WorldWideScience

Sample records for drug administration methodology

  1. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Oral Drug Administration for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarania, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Sushma Kumari; Verma, Sanjay; Kaur, Sukhwinder

    2017-05-01

    To develop standard operational protocol (SOP) on oral drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. In this prospective methodological study, SOPs were developed in five phases. In the first phase, the preliminary draft of SOPs and checklists were prepared based on literature review, assessment of current practices and focus group discussion (FGD) with bedside working nurses. In the second phase, content validity was checked with the help of Delphi technique (12 experts). Total four drafts were prepared in stages and necessary modifications were made as per suggestions after each Delphi round. Fourth Delphi round was performed after conducting a pilot study. In the fourth phase, all bedside nurses were trained as per SOPs and asked to practice accordingly and observation of thirty oral drug administrations in children was done to check reliability of checklists for implementation of SOPs. In Phase-V, 7 FGDs were conducted with bedside nurses to assess the effectiveness of SOPs. The Content Validity Index (CVI) of SOP and checklists was 99.77%. Overall standardized Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 0.94. All the nurses felt that the SOP is useful. Valid and feasible SOP for drug administration to children through oral route along with valid and reliable checklist were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration to children.

  2. Methodology for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's radionuclides in foods program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for the wholesomeness of the nation's food supply. The FDA modified its food monitoring program in January, 1973, to include radioactive isotopes. The methodology used to perform analyses on these food products are taken from the standard setting societies such as the AOAC International, American Society for Testing Materials and American Public Health Association Standard Methods. In addition, methods not tested by these societies are taken from the literature or from Department of Energy manuals such as the Health and Safety Laboratory and also from Environmental Protection Agency, Public Health Service, and Food and Agricultural Organization manuals. These include the methods for long-lived radionuclides such as tritium, strontium-90, cesium-137 and plutonium. Also, the short-lived radionuclides such as iodine-131, radiocesium, radiocerium and radioruthenium. In addition, they include the natural occurring radionuclides such as radium and uranium isotopes. The activity concentrations of gamma-emitters such as radiocesium, iodine-131 and radioruthenium are determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. This is done using intrinsic germanium detectors with the appropriate hardware and software. The alpha and 'pure' beta-emitters are determined by various radiochemical methods and techniques. The radiochemical methodology and equipment used in analyzing these radionuclides are described and discussed. Also, the methodology and equipment for the gamma-emitters are described in more detail in this paper. In addition, the limits of detection for the methods used will be discussed. (author)

  3. A Practical Methodology for Disaggregating the Drivers of Drug Costs Using Administrative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Elena R; Manti, Orlando J; Levine, Mitchell A H; Clark, Douglas A; Potashnik, Tanya M; McKinley, Carol I

    2017-09-01

    Prescription drug expenditures represent a significant component of health care costs in Canada, with estimates of $28.8 billion spent in 2014. Identifying the major cost drivers and the effect they have on prescription drug expenditures allows policy makers and researchers to interpret current cost pressures and anticipate future expenditure levels. To identify the major drivers of prescription drug costs and to develop a methodology to disaggregate the impact of each of the individual drivers. The methodology proposed in this study uses the Laspeyres approach for cost decomposition. This approach isolates the effect of the change in a specific factor (e.g., price) by holding the other factor(s) (e.g., quantity) constant at the base-period value. The Laspeyres approach is expanded to a multi-factorial framework to isolate and quantify several factors that drive prescription drug cost. Three broad categories of effects are considered: volume, price and drug-mix effects. For each category, important sub-effects are quantified. This study presents a new and comprehensive methodology for decomposing the change in prescription drug costs over time including step-by-step demonstrations of how the formulas were derived. This methodology has practical applications for health policy decision makers and can aid researchers in conducting cost driver analyses. The methodology can be adjusted depending on the purpose and analytical depth of the research and data availability. © 2017 Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug Enforcement Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de informacin confidencial --> DEA NEWS The Drug Enforcement Administration and Discovery Education name grand winner of Operation ... JUN 15 (Washington) The United States Drug Enforcement Administration, DEA Educational Foundation and Discovery Education awarded Porter ...

  5. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  6. Methodological Considerations for Comparison of Brand Versus Generic Versus Authorized Generic Adverse Event Reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David C; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), a post-marketing safety database, can be used to differentiate brand versus generic safety signals. To explore the methods for identifying and analyzing brand versus generic adverse event (AE) reports. Public release FAERS data from January 2004 to March 2015 were analyzed using alendronate and carbamazepine as examples. Reports were classified as brand, generic, and authorized generic (AG). Disproportionality analyses compared reporting odds ratios (RORs) of selected known labeled serious adverse events stratifying by brand, generic, and AG. The homogeneity of these RORs was compared using the Breslow-Day test. The AG versus generic was the primary focus since the AG is identical to brand but marketed as a generic, therefore minimizing generic perception bias. Sensitivity analyses explored how methodological approach influenced results. Based on 17,521 US event reports involving alendronate and 3733 US event reports involving carbamazepine (immediate and extended release), no consistently significant differences were observed across RORs for the AGs versus generics. Similar results were obtained when comparing reporting patterns over all time and just after generic entry. The most restrictive approach for classifying AE reports yielded smaller report counts but similar results. Differentiation of FAERS reports as brand versus generic requires careful attention to risk of product misclassification, but the relative stability of findings across varying assumptions supports the utility of these approaches for potential signal detection.

  7. 76 FR 82311 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Food and Drug Administration Report on Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ...] Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Food and Drug Administration Report on Good Guidance Practices: Improving Efficiency and Transparency; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: As part of the Transparency...

  8. Methodological framework to identify possible adverse drug reactions using population-based administrative data [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Sauer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a framework for detecting possible adverse drug reactions (ADRs using the Utah Medicaid administrative data. We examined four classes of ADRs associated with treatment of dementia by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs: known reactions (gastrointestinal, psychological disturbances, potential reactions (respiratory disturbance, novel reactions (hepatic, hematological disturbances, and death. Methods: Our cohort design linked drug utilization data to medical claims from Utah Medicaid recipients. We restricted the analysis to 50 years-old and older beneficiaries diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. We compared patients treated with AChEI to patients untreated with anti-dementia medication therapy. We attempted to remove confounding by establishing propensity-score-matched cohorts for each outcome investigated; we then evaluated the effects of drug treatment by conditional multivariable Cox-proportional-hazard regression. Acute and transient effects were evaluated by a crossover design using conditional logistic regression. Results: Propensity-matched analysis of expected reactions revealed that AChEI treatment was associated with gastrointestinal episodes (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 2.02; 95%CI: 1.28-3.2, but not psychological episodes, respiratory disturbance, or death. Among the unexpected reactions, the risk of hematological episodes was higher (HR: 2.32; 95%CI: 1.47-3.6 in patients exposed to AChEI. AChEI exposure was not associated with an increase in hepatic episodes. We also noted a trend, identified in the case-crossover design, toward increase odds of experiencing acute hematological events during AChEI exposure (Odds Ratio: 3.0; 95% CI: 0.97 - 9.3. Conclusions: We observed an expected association between AChEIs treatment and gastrointestinal disturbances and detected a signal of possible hematological ADR after treatment with AChEIs in this pilot study. Using this analytic framework may raise awareness of potential

  9. 78 FR 69133 - Drug Enforcement Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances..., California 94085, made application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered... Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement Administration. [FR Doc. 2013-27486 Filed 11-15-13; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  10. Development of methodology and direction of practice administrative neuromarketing

    OpenAIRE

    Glushchenko V.; Glushchenko I.

    2018-01-01

    Development of methodology and practical aspects of application of administrative neuromarketing acts as a subject of work, subject of article is administrative neuromarketing in the organization, in article the concept and content of administrative neuromarketing, philosophy, culture, functions, tasks and the principles of administrative neuromarketing are investigated, the technique of the logical analysis of a possibility of application of methods of administrative neuromarketing for incre...

  11. 77 FR 23485 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Input Into Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ...: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a meeting for patients, caregivers..., caregivers, independent patient advocates, and patient advocate groups that seek to: Educate and inform... of patients? (2) What methodological and practical issues should FDA consider as it develops its...

  12. [Innovative therapeutic strategies for intravesical drug administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, C; Salmon, D; Rome, P; Marginean, R; Pivot, C; Colombel, M; Pirot, F

    2013-05-01

    Perspectives for innovative pharmaceutical molecules and intravesical administration of pharmacological agents are presented in the present review carried out from a recent literature. This review of the literature was built by using the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases running 20keywords revealing 34publications between 1983 and 2012. The number of referenced articles on ScienceDirect has increased in recent years, highlighting the interest of scientists for intravesical drug administration and the relevance of innovating drug delivery systems. Different modalities of intravesical administration using physical (e.g., iontophoresis, electroporation) or chemical techniques (e.g., enzyme, solvent, nanoparticles, liposomes, hydrogels) based on novel formulation methods are reported. Finally, the development of biopharmaceuticals (e.g., bacillus Calmette-Guérin, interferon α) and gene therapies is also presented and analyzed in this review. The present review exhibits new development in the pipeline for emerging intravesical drug administration strategies. Knowledge of all these therapies allows practitioners to propose a specific and tailored treatment to each patient with limiting systemic side effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. FDA approves efavirenz. Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highleyman, L

    1998-10-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved DuPont Pharma's new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (Sustiva, DMP-266). Efavirenz has shown promise in trials with over 2000 participants for up to 24 weeks, and early data suggests it may be as effective as protease inhibitors when used in a combination regimen. It is the first anti-HIV drug approved for once-daily dosing. Efavirenz is well tolerated, and the main side effects reported are dizziness, insomnia, abnormal dreams, and skin rash. Efavirenz has been approved for adults and children, but should not be used by pregnant women. Contact information is provided.

  14. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  15. Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Drug Administration in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Mumoli, Laura; Staltari, Orietta; Squillace, Aida; Maida, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; Gratteri, Santo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-01-01

    Drug treatment may be related to the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this paper, we evaluated the ADRs in patients admitted to Catanzaro Hospital. After we obtained the approval by local Ethical Committee, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records from March 01, 2013 to April 30, 2015. The association between drug and ADR or between drug and drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) was evaluated using the Naranjo's probability scale and Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS), respectively. During the study period, we analyzed 2870 clinical records containing a total of 11,138 prescriptions, and we documented the development of 770 ADRs. The time of hospitalization was significantly higher (P<0.05) in women with ADRs (12.6 ± 1.2 days) with respect to men (11.8± 0.83 days). Using the Naranjo score, we documented a probable association in 78% of these reactions, while DIPS revealed that about 22% of ADRs were related to DDIs. Patients with ADRs received 3052 prescriptions on 11,138 (27.4%) having a mean of 6.1±0.29 drugs that was significantly higher (P<0.01) with respect to patients not experiencing ADRs (mean of 3.4±0.13 drugs). About 19% of ADRs were not diagnosed and were treated as new diseases. Our results indicate that drug administration induces the development of ADRs also during the hospitalization, particularly in elderly women. Moreover, we also documented that ADRs in some patients are under-diagnosed, therefore, it is important to motivate healthcare to report the ADRs in order to optimize the patients' safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Administration costs of intravenous biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Soini, Erkki J; Leussu, Miina; Hallinen, Taru

    2013-01-01

    Background Cost-effectiveness studies explicitly reporting infusion times, drug-specific administration costs for infusions or real-payer intravenous drug cost are few in number. Yet, administration costs for infusions are needed in the health economic evaluations assessing intravenously-administered drugs. Objectives To estimate the drug-specific administration and total cost of biologic intravenous rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drugs in the adult population and to compare the obtained costs wit...

  17. 76 FR 6477 - Industry Exchange Workshop on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Industry Exchange Workshop on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  18. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic... and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  19. Administration, Administration of the knowledge and methodological work in the Complex Educational Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Alina Mena-Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today the educational disciplines have evolved to a superior and more complex stadium that has been materialized in that converge in a discipline and relate diverse study modalities, professors' type and teaching matters, that makes more complex the work of the professor when having to prepare metodológicamente the subject in more than an occasion, it is materialized this way the Complex Educational Discipline. The administration and the administration of the knowledge are constituted in essential elements for the realization of the methodological work with the community of professors, starting from a process of methodological preparation centered in the professor.

  20. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0142] Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and Supplier Controls; Public Educational Forum AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public...

  1. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality and...: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral...

  2. 76 FR 25358 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food...

  3. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  4. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ...] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and Industry... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and... written requests for single copies of the guidance document entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and...

  5. Methodological aspects on drug receptor binding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, A.

    1978-01-01

    Although drug receptors occur in relatively low concentrations, they can be visualized by the use of appropriate radioindicators. In most cases the procedure is rapid and can reach a high degree of accuracy. Specificity of the interaction is studied by competition analysis. The necessity of using several radioindicators to define a receptor population is emphasized. It may be possible to define isoreceptors and drugs with selectivity for one isoreceptor. (Author)

  6. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  7. Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ehrenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vera Ehrenstein1, Henrik T Sørensen1, Leiv S Bakketeig1,2, Lars Pedersen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: More than half of all pregnant women take prescription medications, raising concerns about fetal safety. Medical databases routinely collecting data from large populations are potentially valuable resources for cohort studies addressing teratogenicity of drugs. These include electronic medical records, administrative databases, population health registries, and teratogenicity information services. Medical databases allow estimation of prevalences of birth defects with enhanced precision, but systematic error remains a potentially serious problem. In this review, we first provide a brief description of types of North American and European medical databases suitable for studying teratogenicity of drugs and then discuss manifestation of systematic errors in teratogenicity studies based on such databases. Selection bias stems primarily from the inability to ascertain all reproductive outcomes. Information bias (misclassification may be caused by paucity of recorded clinical details or incomplete documentation of medication use. Confounding, particularly confounding by indication, can rarely be ruled out. Bias that either masks teratogenicity or creates false appearance thereof, may have adverse consequences for the health of the child and the mother. Biases should be quantified and their potential impact on the study results should be assessed. Both theory and software are available for such estimation. Provided that methodological problems are understood and effectively handled, computerized medical databases are a valuable source of data for studies of teratogenicity of drugs.Keywords: databases, birth defects, epidemiologic methods, pharmacoepidemiology

  8. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Berdot, Sarah; Sabatier, Brigitte; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds). A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs...

  9. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program management...

  10. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdot Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds. A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs to all patients during the three drug rounds on each of six days per ward. Main outcomes were number, type and clinical importance of errors and associated risk factors. Drug administration error rate was calculated with and without wrong time errors. Relationship between the occurrence of errors and potential risk factors were investigated using logistic regression models with random effects. Results Twenty-eight nurses caring for 108 patients were observed. Among 1501 opportunities for error, 415 administrations (430 errors with one or more errors were detected (27.6%. There were 312 wrong time errors, ten simultaneously with another type of error, resulting in an error rate without wrong time error of 7.5% (113/1501. The most frequently administered drugs were the cardiovascular drugs (425/1501, 28.3%. The highest risks of error in a drug administration were for dermatological drugs. No potentially life-threatening errors were witnessed and 6% of errors were classified as having a serious or significant impact on patients (mainly omission. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of errors was associated with drug administration route, drug classification (ATC and the number of patient under the nurse's care. Conclusion Medication administration errors are frequent. The identification of its determinants helps to undertake designed interventions.

  11. METHODOLOGICAL BASES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrylo Ohdanskyi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An author in the article examines theoretical bases in the question of dynamics of community development. According to classic canons a dynamic process on any of levels of management hierarchy can be presented as a complex of changes of its ecological, economic and social components. For today, national politics in the field of realization of conception of community development does not take into account most theoretical works, which testify that in our country the mechanism of its effective adjusting is not yet created. In connection to this the author of the article accents the attention on the necessity of the use in modern Ukraine realities of the effective approaches to government control of community development. As the subject of research of the article the author chose the analysis of process of community development and methodological bases for the choice of variants for a management by this process. System approach is chosen by author as a research methodology. The aim. Analysis of theoretical bases and developing of the new approaches to the government administration of community development. An author divides the process of community development by constituents: social, economic and ecological components. From the indicated warning it is necessary to take into account the objective necessity of developing of the new conceptual approaches to the elaboration of tool of adjusting of community development. For the decision of this task the author of the article it is suggested to use the category “dynamics”. An author in the article does the analysis of different interpretations of term “dynamics”and offers his own interpretation in the context of community development. Our researches confirm that, mainly, it is methodologically possible to form the blocks of quantitative and quality factors of specific different information of ecological, economic and social character. Author’s researches confirm that it is methodologically

  12. 1 Impact of praziquantel mass drug administration campaign on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    used to collect information on MDA uptake, knowledge of schistosomiasis, sources .... transmission and in which Praziquantel mass drug administration has been ..... MoHSW (2012) Tanzania Mainland Strategic Master Plan for the Neglected ...

  13. Common errors of drug administration in infants: causes and avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B J; Ellis, J F

    1999-01-01

    Drug administration errors are common in infants. Although the infant population has a high exposure to drugs, there are few data concerning pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics, or the influence of paediatric diseases on these processes. Children remain therapeutic orphans. Formulations are often suitable only for adults; in addition, the lack of maturation of drug elimination processes, alteration of body composition and influence of size render the calculation of drug doses complex in infants. The commonest drug administration error in infants is one of dose, and the commonest hospital site for this error is the intensive care unit. Drug errors are a consequence of system error, and preventive strategies are possible through system analysis. The goal of a zero drug error rate should be aggressively sought, with systems in place that aim to eliminate the effects of inevitable human error. This involves review of the entire system from drug manufacture to drug administration. The nuclear industry, telecommunications and air traffic control services all practise error reduction policies with zero error as a clear goal, not by finding fault in the individual, but by identifying faults in the system and building into that system mechanisms for picking up faults before they occur. Such policies could be adapted to medicine using interventions both specific (the production of formulations which are for children only and clearly labelled, regular audit by pharmacists, legible prescriptions, standardised dose tables) and general (paediatric drug trials, education programmes, nonpunitive error reporting) to reduce the number of errors made in giving medication to infants.

  14. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  15. The audit of social administration (AGSC. Methodological proposal for its application in cooperative companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ojeda Mesa

    2014-06-01

    This article explains the bases for a methodology proposal that facilitates the execution of Social Administration Audits (AGS in cooperative companies, with the objective of evaluating the administration that they develop  the same social order.

  16. [Evaluation of administration errors of injectable drugs in neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, A; Sayadi, M; Ben Hmida, H; Ben Ameur, K; Mestiri, K

    2015-11-01

    Use of injectable drugs in newborns represents more than 90% of prescriptions and requires special precautions in order to ensure more safety and efficiency. The aim of this study is to gather errors relating to the administration of injectable drugs and to suggest corrective actions. This descriptive and transversal study has evaluated 300 injectable drug administrations in a neonatology unit. Two hundred and sixty-one administrations have contained an error. Data are collected by direct observations of administrative act. Errors observed are: an inappropriate mixture (2.6% of cases); an incorrect delivery rate (33.7% of cases); incorrect dilutions (26.7% of cases); error in calculation of the dose to be injected (16.7% of cases); error while sampling small volumes (6.3% of cases); error or omission of administration schedule (1% of cases). These data have enabled us to evaluate administration of injectable drugs in neonatology. Different types of errors observed could be a source of therapeutic inefficiency, extended lengths of stay or iatrogenic drug. Following these observations, corrective actions have been undertaken by pharmacists and consist of: organizing training sessions for nursing; developing an explanatory guide for dilution and administration of injectable medicines, which was made available to the clinical service. Collaborative strategies doctor-nurse-pharmacist can help to reduce errors in the medication process especially during his administration. It permits improvement of injectable drugs use, offering more security and better efficiency and contribute to guarantee ideal therapy for patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. 76 FR 61366 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0247] Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to Increase...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. [[Page 61367

  18. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' The draft guidance provides questions and answers... assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration...

  19. 77 FR 5027 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ...] Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to the... entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program to [[Page 5028

  20. Adverse Drug Event Monitoring at the Food and Drug Administration: Your Report Can Make a Difference

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Syed Rizwanuddin

    2003-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible not only for approving drugs but also for monitoring their safety after they reach the market. The complete adverse event profile of a drug is not known at the time of approval because of the small sample size, short duration, and limited generalizability of pre-approval clinical trials. This report describes the FDA's postmarketing surveillance system, to which many clinicians submit reports of adverse drug events encountered while treati...

  1. Food and Drug Administration Drug Approval Process: A History and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher Ty

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the processing of investigational and new drug applications is described and the standard and expedited review processes are examined. The efforts of the US Food and Drug Administration to ensure greater agency transparency and fiscal responsibility and intensify oversight during the drug development and approval process are reviewed. Often attributed to a decrease in the number of uninsured adults, both the increase in prescription drug sales and the high costs associated with bringing a new drug to market highlight the necessity for a streamlined and cost-effective process to deliver these drugs safely and effectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Food and Drug Administration Evaluation and Cigarette Smoking Risk Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Waters, Erika A.; Parascandola, Mark; Augustson, Erik M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between a belief about Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety evaluation of cigarettes and smoking risk perceptions. Methods: A nationally representative, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 1046 adult current cigarette smokers. Results: Smokers reporting that the FDA does not evaluate cigarettes for…

  3. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  4. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  5. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  6. 21 CFR 20.2 - Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... upon an officer or employee of the Food and Drug Administration commanding the production of any record... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.2 Section 20.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  7. [New drug development by innovative drug administration--"change" in pharmaceutical field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T

    1997-11-01

    New drug development can be made by providing products of higher "selectivity for the drug" for medical treatment. There are two ways for the approach to get higher "selectivity of drug": 1) discovery of new compounds with high selectivity of drug; 2) innovation of new drug administration, that is new formulation and/or method with high selectivity of drug by integration and harmonization of various hard/soft technologies. An extensive increase of biological information and advancement of surrounding science and technology may modify the situation as the latter overcomes the former in the 21 century. As the science and technology in the 21 century is said to be formed on "3H", that is, 1. hybrid; 2. hi-quality; 3. husbandry, the new drug development by innovative drug administration is exactly based on the science and technology of 3H. Its characteristic points are interdisciplinary/interfusion, international, of philosophy/ethics, and systems of hard/hard/heart. From these points of view, not only the advance of unit technology but also a revolution in thinking way should be "must" subjects. To organize this type of research well, a total research activity such as ROR (research on research) might take an important and efficient role. Here the key words are the "Optimization technology" and "Change in Pharmaceutical Fields." As some examples of new drug innovation, our trials on several topical mucosal adhesive dosage forms and parenteral administration of peptide drugs such as insulin and erythropoietin will be described.

  8. [Methodology for Identification of Inverse Drug Distribution, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Pérez, M Arantzazu; Muñoz Arias, Mariano; Vázquez Mourelle, Raquel

    2016-04-04

    The phenomenon of reverse drug trafficking in the legal supply chain is an unlawful practice to serious risks to public health. The aims was to identify proactively pharmacies that carry out these illegal activities. An analysis was performed through the crossing billing data to SAS of 52 million packs of medicines for the 496 pharmacies in the province over a period of 29 months with the drug packaging data supplied by the distribution entities of the province with the implementation of specific indicator defined called 'percentage overbought' allows us to detect those pharmacies at high risk of being involved in this illicit trade. It was tested in two pharmacies one rural and other urban a detour of 5.130 medicine containers and an illicit profit obtained from € 9,591.78 for the first and 9.982 packaging and € 26,885.11 for the second; they had gone unnoticed in previous inspections. The methodology implemented to define a profile of infringing pharmacies high risk in these illicit practices, identify new ones that had not been sanctioned, weigh the drugs for illegal trade and to identify new drugs subject to diversion; also added as a challenge, it helps to adjust accurately and effectively calculate the illicit profit obtained.

  9. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  10. Lipid nanoparticles for administration of poorly water soluble neuroactive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Drechsler, Markus; Mariani, Paolo; Carducci, Federica; Servadio, Michela; Melancia, Francesca; Ratano, Patrizia; Campolongo, Patrizia; Trezza, Viviana; Cortesi, Rita; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    This study describes the potential of solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers as nano-formulations to administer to the central nervous system poorly water soluble drugs. Different neuroactive drugs, i.e. dimethylfumarate, retinyl palmitate, progesterone and the endocannabinoid hydrolysis inhibitor URB597 have been studied. Lipid nanoparticles constituted of tristearin or tristearin in association with gliceryl monoolein were produced. The nanoencapsulation strategy allowed to obtain biocompatible and non-toxic vehicles, able to increase the solubility of the considered neuroactive drugs. To improve URB597 targeting to the brain, stealth nanoparticles were produced modifying the SLN surface with polysorbate 80. A behavioural study was conducted in rats to test the ability of SLN containing URB597 given by intranasal administration to alter behaviours relevant to psychiatric disorders. URB597 maintained its activity after nanoencapsulation, suggesting the possibility to propose this kind of vehicle as alternative to unphysiological mixtures usually employed for animal and clinical studies.

  11. Production methodologies of polymeric and hydrogel particles for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana Catarina; Sher, Praveen; Mano, João F

    2012-02-01

    Polymeric particles are ideal vehicles for controlled delivery applications due to their ability to encapsulate a variety of substances, namely low- and high-molecular mass therapeutics, antigens or DNA. Micro and nano scale spherical materials have been developed as carriers for therapies, using appropriated methodologies, in order to achieve a prolonged and controlled drug administration. This paper reviews the methodologies used for the production of polymeric micro/nanoparticles. Emulsions, phase separation, spray drying, ionic gelation, polyelectrolyte complexation and supercritical fluids precipitation are all widely used processes for polymeric micro/nanoencapsulation. This paper also discusses the recent developments and patents reported in this field. Other less conventional methodologies are also described, such as the use of superhydrophobic substrates to produce hydrogel and polymeric particulate biomaterials. Polymeric drug delivery systems have gained increased importance due to the need for improving the efficiency and versatility of existing therapies. This allows the development of innovative concepts that could create more efficient systems, which in turn may address many healthcare needs worldwide. The existing methods to produce polymeric release systems have some critical drawbacks, which compromise the efficiency of these techniques. Improvements and development of new methodologies could be achieved by using multidisciplinary approaches and tools taken from other subjects, including nanotechnologies, biomimetics, tissue engineering, polymer science or microfluidics.

  12. A Methodology for Data Structure Assessment in Higher Education Administration. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Kenneth G.; Hendrix, Vernon L.

    Two recent developments in management information system technology and higher education administration have brought about the need for this study, designed to develop a methodology for revealing a relational model of the data base that administrators are operating from currently or would like to be able to operate from in the future.…

  13. 76 FR 43689 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0530] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  14. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-0168] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling Medical...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  15. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and Drug Administration operates two public reading rooms. The Freedom of Information Staff's Public Reading Room is...

  16. 78 FR 21085 - Establishment of a Public Docket for Administrative Detention Under the Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0365] Establishment of a Public Docket for Administrative Detention Under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Establishment of...

  17. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Administration, Administration of the knowledge and methodological work in the Complex Educational Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Tania Alina Mena-Silva; Ernesto López-Calichs

    2014-01-01

    Today the educational disciplines have evolved to a superior and more complex stadium that has been materialized in that converge in a discipline and relate diverse study modalities, professors' type and teaching matters, that makes more complex the work of the professor when having to prepare metodológicamente the subject in more than an occasion, it is materialized this way the Complex Educational Discipline. The administration and the administration of the knowledge are constituted in esse...

  19. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date; reopening of administrative record. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule; delay of effective date; reopening of administrative record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-03

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is delaying until October 1, 2001, the effective date and reopening the administrative record to receive additional comments regarding certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). The other provisions of the final rule become effective on December 4, 2000. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA) and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). FDA is delaying the effective date for certain requirements relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record. FDA is also delaying the effective date of another requirement that would prohibit blood centers functioning as "health care entities" to act as wholesale distributors of blood derivatives. The agency is taking this action to address numerous concerns about the provisions raised by affected parties.

  20. Acute antidepressant drug administration and autobiographical memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Williams, J Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration of the antidepress...... of reboxetine on emotional memory extends to recall of personally experienced events. Such effects may be relevant to the cognitive improvements found with recovery from depression and with the mechanism of action of contemporary antidepressant drugs.......Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration...... in the processing of positive versus negative memories was reduced following reboxetine compared with placebo in the left frontal lobe (extending into the insula) and the right superior temporal gyrus. This was paired with increased memory speed in volunteers given reboxetine versus placebo. The effect...

  1. Radiopharmaceutical regulation and Food and Drug Administration policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, M; Laven, D; Levine, G

    1996-04-01

    The regulatory policy of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on radiopharmaceuticals flows from a rigid, traditional, drug-like interpretation of the FDC Act on the licensing of radiopharmaceuticals. This contributes to significant delays in the drug-approval process for radiopharmaceuticals, which are very costly to the nuclear medicine community and the American public. It seems that radiopharmaceuticals would be better characterized as molecular devices. Good generic rule-making principles include: use of a risk/benefit/cost analysis; intent based on sound science; performance standards prepared by outside experts; a definite need shown by the regulatory agency; to live with the consequences of any erroneous cost estimates; and design individual credential requirements so that additional training results in enhanced professional responsibility. When these common elements are applied to current FDA policy, it seems that the agency is out of sync with the stated goals for revitalizing federal regulatory policies as deemed necessary by the Clinton administration. Recent FDA rulings on positron-emission tomography, Patient Package inserts, and on medical device service accentuate the degree of such asynchronization. Radiopharmaceutical review and licensing flexibility could be dramatically improved by excluding radiopharmaceuticals from the drug category and reviewing them as separate entities. This new category would take into account their excellent record of safety and their lack of pharmacological action. Additionally, their evaluation of efficacy should be based on their ability to provide useful scintiphotos, data, or responses of the physiological system it portends to image, quantitate, or describe. To accomplish the goal of transforming the FDA's rigid, prescriptive policy into a streamlined flexible performance-based policy, the Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals proposal has been presented. In addition, it is suggested that the United

  2. 76 FR 28046 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Tots Public-Private Partnership AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0005; FDA 225-09-0014] Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the...

  3. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Dependence; Public Hearing; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public hearing; Extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 15 [Docket No...

  4. 78 FR 10107 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing public meeting registration information for two FSMA related... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110...

  5. 75 FR 17143 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0495] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Documents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  6. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0635] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports: Demonstrating Substantial Equivalence for Tobacco Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  7. 75 FR 73107 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ...] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling; Availability AGENCY... announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... single copies of the guidance document entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...

  8. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0514] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling Section 522 Postmarket Surveillance Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  9. 78 FR 14557 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational Device Exemption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0010] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational Device Exemption Guidance for Retinal Prostheses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  10. 75 FR 36425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2007-D-0076] (formerly Docket No. 2007D-0387) Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies--Frequently Asked Questions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  11. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0689] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process... for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process (Evaluation of...

  12. 75 FR 47603 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0395] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket Notifications for Lamotrigine and Zonisamide Assays; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  13. 77 FR 74195 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1161] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  14. 78 FR 5185 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Use Device (HUD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0847] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Use Device (HUD) Designations... public comment ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Humanitarian Use...

  15. 78 FR 30317 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... 24, 2013, from approximately 1 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Location: Food and Drug Administration, White Oak..., Office of the Chief Scientist, Office of the Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration, White Oak Bldg... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001...

  16. Modeling of corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrite, Aniruddha C; Edelhauser, Henry F; Kompella, Uday B

    2008-01-01

    the SD rat corneas. Similar pharmacokinetics models explain drug delivery to the cornea in rat and rabbit animal models. Retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration can be explained with a four-compartment (periocular space, choroid-containing transfer compartment, retina, and distribution compartment) model with elimination from the periocular space, retina, and choroid compartment. Inclusion of a dissolution-release step before the drug is available for absorption or elimination better explains retinal t(max). Good fits were obtained in both the BN (r = 0.99) and SD (r = 0.99) rats for retinal celecoxib using the same model; however, the parameter estimates differed. Corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules after periocular administration can be described by compartment models. The modeling analysis shows that (1) leak-back from the site of administration most likely contributes to the apparent lack of an increase phase in corneal concentrations; (2) elimination via the conjunctival or periocular blood and lymphatic systems contributes significantly to drug clearance after periocular injection; (3) corneal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules can be explained by using similar models in rats and rabbits; and (4) although there are differences in some retinal pharmacokinetics parameters between the pigmented and nonpigmented rats, the physiological basis of these differences has yet to be ascertained.

  17. Transdermal and Topical Drug Administration in the Treatment of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Leppert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive treatment of pain is multidimodal, with pharmacotherapy playing a key role. An effective therapy for pain depends on the intensity and type of pain, the patients’ age, comorbidities, and appropriate choice of analgesic, its dose and route of administration. This review is aimed at presenting current knowledge on analgesics administered by transdermal and topical routes for physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other health care professionals dealing with patients suffering from pain. Analgesics administered transdermally or topically act through different mechanisms. Opioids administered transdermally are absorbed into vessels located in subcutaneous tissue and, subsequently, are conveyed in the blood to opioid receptors localized in the central and peripheral nervous system. Non–steroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs applied topically render analgesia mainly through a high concentration in the structures of the joint and a provision of local anti–inflammatory effects. Topically administered drugs such as lidocaine and capsaicin in patches, capsaicin in cream, EMLA cream, and creams containing antidepressants (i.e., doxepin, amitriptyline act mainly locally in tissues through receptors and/or ion channels. Transdermal and topical routes offer some advantages over systemic analgesic administration. Analgesics administered topically have a much better profile for adverse effects as they relieve local pain with minimal systemic effects. The transdermal route apart from the above-mentioned advantages and provision of long period of analgesia may be more convenient, especially for patients who are unable to take drugs orally. Topically and transdermally administered opioids are characterised by a lower risk of addiction compared to oral and parenteral routes.

  18. Title: Studies on drug switchability showed heterogeneity in methodological approaches: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleudi, Valeria; Trotta, Francesco; Vecchi, Simona; Amato, Laura; Addis, Antonio; Davoli, Marina

    2018-05-16

    Several drugs share the same therapeutic indication, including those undergoing patent expiration. Concerns on the interchangeability are frequent in clinical practice, challenging the evaluation of switchability through observational research. To conduct a scoping review of observational studies on drug switchability to identify methodological strategies adopted to deal with bias and confounding. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science (updated 1/31/2017) to identify studies evaluating switchability in terms of effectiveness/safety outcomes or compliance. Three reviewers independently screened studies extracting all characteristics. Strategies to address confounding, particularly, previous drug use and switching reasons were considered. All findings were summarized in descriptive analyses. Thirty-two studies, published in the last 10 years, met the inclusion criteria. Epilepsy, cardiovascular and rheumatology were the most frequently represented clinical areas. 75% of the studies reported data on effectiveness/safety outcomes. The most frequent study design was cohort (65.6%) followed by case-control (21.9%) and self-controlled (12.5%). Case-control and case-crossover studies showed homogeneous methodological strategies to deal with bias and confounding. Among cohort studies, the confounding associated with previous drug use was addressed introducing variables in multivariate model (47.3%) or selecting only adherent patients (14.3%). Around 30% of cohort studies did not report reasons for switching. In the remaining 70%, clinical parameters or previous occurrence of outcomes were measured to identify switching connected with lack of effectiveness or adverse events. This study represents a starting point for researchers and administrators who are approaching the investigation and assessment of issues related to interchangeability of drugs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. 21 CFR 20.3 - Certification and authentication of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification and authentication of Food and Drug... authentication of Food and Drug Administration records. (a) Upon request, the Food and Drug Administration will... or for authentication of records shall be sent in writing to the Freedom of Information Staff (HFI-35...

  20. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, Bureau of Prisons, Federal... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of...

  1. Cost and Benefit Analysis of an Automated Nursing Administration System: A Methodology*

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Karen A.

    1984-01-01

    In order for a nursing service administration to select the appropriate automated system for its requirements, a systematic process of evaluating alternative approaches must be completed. This paper describes a methodology for evaluating and comparing alternative automated systems based upon an economic analysis which includes two major categories of criteria: costs and benefits.

  2. Drug research methodology. Volume 4, Epidemiology in drugs and highway safety : the study of drug use among drivers and its role in traffic crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop on epidemiology in drugs and highway safety. A cross-disciplinary panel of experts (1) identified methodological issues and constraints present in research to define the nature and magnitude of the drug...

  3. [Professional practice evaluation of injectable drug preparation and administration in neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P; Guillois, B; Gloanec, L; Chatelier, N; Saint-Lorant, G

    2017-09-01

    Adverse drug events are a daily concern in neonatology departments. The aim of this study was to assess the professional practices of preparation and administration of injectable forms of medications in neonatology. A professional practice evaluation with regard to the preparation and administration of various injectable forms of medications in different neonatology units within a given department was conducted by a pharmacy intern based on an assessment grid comprising ten criteria. Following an initial assessment, the results were presented to the care team, which validated the corrective measures put forward by a multiprofessional work group. A second assessment was conducted following the same methodology. Fifty of the department's 76 pediatric nurses were assessed during the first round of the audit and 21 during the second round. Two improvement priorities were identified: taking account of the dead volume of medication in needles and syringe hubs, together with complete identification of syringes used to administer medication. During the second round, these two aspects were improved, progressing from 38% to 100% and from 59% to 89%, respectively. To improve drug administration in neonatology and consequently, to improve patient safety, professional practice evaluation is an essential tool that requires close collaboration between the paramedical team, physicians and pharmacists. Its main value lies in the mobilization of the entire team around the subject in question, hence generating improved understanding and application of corrective measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. 76 FR 61103 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0689] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  5. 75 FR 44267 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0495] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  6. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About... Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Providing Information About Pediatric Uses of...ComplianceRegulatoryInformation/default.htm . To receive ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  7. 75 FR 22412 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Selection Process--the criteria a contract organization should use to consider saying no to a contract... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  8. Zohydro approval by food and drug administration: controversial or frightening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Atluri, Sairam; Candido, Kenneth D; Boswell, Mark V; Simopoulos, Thomas T; Grider, Jay S; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    The actions and regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are crucial to the entire population of the U.S., specifically the public who take a multitude of drugs and providers who prescribe drugs and devices. Further, the FDA is relevant to investors, specifically in regards to biotech and pharmaceutical companies involved in developing new drugs. The FDA has been criticized for a lack of independence on the one hand and excessive regulatory and expanding authority without evidence and consistency of the actions on the other hand. The FDA approved a single-entity, long-acting, hydrocodone product (Zohydro, Zogenix, San Diego, CA) on October 25, 2013, against the recommendation of the FDA's own appointed scientific advisory panel, which voted 11 to 2 against the approval of Zohydro. Subsequent to the approval, multiple consumer safety organizations, health care agencies, addiction treatment providers, professional organizations, and other groups on the frontline of the opioid addiction epidemic have expressed concern. In addition, the US Congress and various state attorneys general raised serious concerns about the approval of Zohydro, which is highly addictive and may enhance the opioid addiction epidemic. Supporters of Zohydro contend that it is necessary and essential to manage chronic pain and improve functional status with no additional risk. Over the past 15 years, prescriptions for opioids have skyrocketed with the United States consuming more than 84% of the global oxycodone and more than 99% of the hydrocodone supply. The sharp increase in opioid prescribing has led to parallel increases in opioid addiction and overdose deaths, surpassing motor vehicle injuries in the U.S. Recent studies assessing the trends of medical use and misuse of opioid analgesics from 2000 to 2011 have concluded that the present trend of the continued increase in the medical use of opioid analgesics appears to contribute to increasing misuse, resulting in multiple health

  9. From theory to practice: the formation of the contemporary administrator stimulated by active methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Jerônimo Soares; Rodrigo Leone Alves; Elma Núbia de Medeiros Araújo Targino

    2017-01-01

    Developing participatory and critical skills are essential to the role of the contemporary manager, so it becomes relevant that such mechanisms focus on the teaching / learning process. The present study sought to identify the effects of the use of active methodologies for the students of a Private Higher Education Institution, as well as the perception and propensity of the students to be favorable or not to the implementation of said didactic innovation in the formation of the administrator...

  10. The U.S. food and drug administration's dosimetry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The U. S. Public Health Service's (PHS) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (part of the PHS) has had a Dosimetry Program at the Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center (WEAC) (formerly the Northeastern Radiological Health Laboratory). This Dosimetry Program has been in place since 1961. In 1967 it was augmented by the construction of a Whole Body Counter at WEAC for measuring internal dose. The FDA's Center for Medical Devices and Radiological Health had been handling these dosimeters since 1961 and in 2000 the WEAC took over total responsibility for this program for the FDA's Office of Regulatory affairs. This program was originally setup for the radiation workers (analysts and support personnel) and later included investigators personnel working in the medical and dental x-ray field. The field laboratories began using radionuclides in 1972 and were also issued radiation dosimeters. Investigators station at border import station alter 2003 were issued as well as radiation pages as a precaution when checking imported food and other FDA regulated products. This paper will discuss the results of radiation exposure received by analyst (including whole body measurements) at WEAC and field laboratories. Also discussed will be exposures to investigators in the medical and dental field. The exposure to the investigators at the import border stations will be included even though they have not been carrying dosimeters for slightly more than a year. In general, the exposures have been well below the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for radiation workers. (author)

  11. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ...] Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug... conference for representatives of Health Professional Organizations. Dr. Margaret Hamburg, Commissioner of... person attending, the name of the organization, address, and telephone number. There is no registration...

  12. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products... educate the rare disease community on the FDA regulatory processes. This educational meeting will consist...

  13. 76 FR 19998 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ...: Linda C. Ulrich, Office of Orphan Products Development, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New... projects through the development process, including product identification, prototype design, device...

  14. 75 FR 70271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0515] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  15. 76 FR 9027 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Best Practices for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0057] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Best Practices for Conducting and...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  16. Accuracy of manual entry of drug administration data into an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Dotan, Koren; Weissman, Charles; Cohen, Matan J; Levin, Phillip D

    2014-11-01

    Data on drug administration are entered manually into anesthesia information management systems (AIMS). This study examined whether these data are accurate regarding drug name, dose administered, and time of administration, and whether the stage of anesthesia influences data accuracy. Real-time observational data on drug administration during elective operations were compared with computerized information on drug administration entered by anesthesiologists. A trained observer (K.D.) performed the observations. Data were collected during 57 operations which included 596 separate occasions of drug administration by 22 anesthesiologists. No AIMS records were found for 90 (15.1%) occasions of drug administration (omissions), while there were 11 (1.8%) AIMS records where drug administration was not observed. The AIMS and observer data matched for drug name on 495 of 596 (83.1%) occasions, for dose on 439 of 495 (92.5%) occasions, and for time on 476 of 495 (96.2%) occasions. Amongst the 90 omitted records, 34 (37.8%) were for vasoactive drugs with 24 (27.7%) for small doses of hypnotics. Omissions occurred mostly during maintenance: 50 of 153 (24.6%), followed by induction: 30 of 325 (9.2%) and emergence: 10 of 57 (17.5%) (P < 0.001). Time and dose inaccuracies occurred mainly during induction, followed by maintenance and emergence; time inaccuracies were 7/325 (8.3%), 10/203 (4.9%), and 0/57 (0%), respectively (P = 0.07), and dose inaccuracies were 15/325 (4.6%), 3/203 (1.5%), and 1/57 (1.7%), respectively (P = 0.11). The range of accuracy varies when anesthesiologists manually enter drug administration data into an AIMS. Charting omissions represent the largest cause of inaccuracy, principally by omissions of records for vasopressors and small doses of hypnotic drugs. Manually entered drug administration data are not without errors. Accuracy of entering drug administration data remains the responsibility of the anesthesiologist.

  17. Modernizing methodology for the WHO assessment of substances for the international drug control conventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danenberg, E; Sorge, L A; Wieniawski, W; Elliott, S; Amato, L; Scholten, W K

    2013-08-01

    The WHO Executive Board revised the guidance that governs the procedures for the WHO review of psychoactive substances for international drug control in 2010. To meet the standards defined in these guidelines, the current evaluation methodology at WHO must be an evidence-based assessment. We describe the history of substance evaluation from 1912 to the present and the development of the evaluation methods over time including a description of the current assessment system, using reports from WHO and its predecessor, the League of Nations. Furthermore, we describe the current review system. We found that some substances under international control were never reviewed; other substances were reviewed decades ago. We argue that assessments do not have unlimited validity, and therefore, substances need to be re-assessed periodically, as already recommended by the Expert Committee on Drug Dependence in 1982. We propose that the evaluation time be shortened; that the influence of the route of administration and/or dosage form of the preparation is considered in the evaluation; and we recommend studying national and regional assessment systems and adopting their best practices. With this article, we make a case for the inclusion of systematic review and other methods of comprehensive analysis of substance evaluation to arrive at a process of equal rigour and quality as already applied by WHO for the development of treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of intravenous drug administration mode on drug distribution in a tumor slab: a finite Fourier transform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, B; Claudius, J S

    1990-03-08

    Cancer therapy using chemotherapeutic drugs frequently involves injection of the drug into the body through some intravenous mode of administration, viz, continuous (drip) infusion or single/multiple bolus injection(s). An understanding of the effect of the various modes of administration upon tumor penetration of drug is essential to rational design of drug therapy. This paper investigates drug penetration into a model tumor of slab geometry (between two capillaries) in which the overall transport rate of drug is limited by intra-tumor transport characterized by an effective diffusion coefficient. Employing the method of Finite Fourier Transforms (FFT), analytical solutions have been obtained for transient drug distribution in both the plasma and the tumor following three modes of administration, viz, continuous infusion, single bolus injection and equally-spaced equal-dose multiple bolus injections, of a given amount of drug. The qualitative trends exhibited by the plasma drug distribution profiles are consistent with reported experimental studies. Two concepts, viz, the dimensionless decay constant and the plasma/tumor drug concentration trajectories, are found to be particularly useful in the rational design of drug therapy. The dimensionless decay constant provides a measure of the rate of drug decay in the plasma relative to the rate of drug diffusion into the tumor and is thus characteristic of the tumor/drug system. The magnitude of this parameter dictates the choice of drug administration mode for minimizing drug decay in the plasma while simultaneously maximizing drug transport into the tumor. The concentration trajectories provide a measure of the plasma drug concentration relative to the tumor drug concentration at various times following injection. When the tumor drug concentration exceeds the plasma drug concentration, the drug will begin to diffuse out of the tumor. Knowledge of the time at which this diffusion reversal occurs is especially useful

  19. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. 17.136 Section 17.136 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. A product is not a medicine, medicinal preparation...

  20. 75 FR 57963 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0459] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance Characteristics of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Helicobacter pylori; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  1. 76 FR 12742 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2008-D-0457] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices Indicated... other electrical continence devices; protective garment for incontinence; surgical mesh; electrosurgical...

  2. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES OF DRUG ADMINISTRATION: ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES (SUBJECT REVIEW OF AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    article editorial

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past 20 years advances in drug formulations and innovative routes of administration have been made. Our understanding of drug transport across tissues has increased. These changes have often resulted in improved patient adherence to the therapeutic regiment and pharmacologic response. The administration of drugs by transdermal or transmucosal routes offers the advantage of being relatively painless. Also, the potential for greater flexibility in a variety of clinical situations exists, often precluding the need to establish intravinus access which is a particular benefit for children. This statement focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of alternative routes of drug administration. Issues of particular importance in the care of pediatric patients especially factors that could lead to drug-relaxed toxicity or adverse responses are emphasized.Key words: drug formulation, pharmacoKINETICS, pharmacodynamics, drug, children.

  3. 28 CFR 16.98 - Exemption of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)-limited access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration (DEA)-limited access. 16.98 Section 16.98 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION... Exemption of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)—limited access. (a) The following systems of records.../Diversion Analysis and Detection System (ARCOS/DADS) (Justice/DEA-003) (2) Controlled Substances Act...

  4. Frequency and determinants of drug administration errors in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Fijn, R; van der Voort, PHJ; Gossen, AA; Egberts, TCG; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Objective., The study aimed to identify both the frequency and the determinants of drug administration errors in the intensive care unit. Design: Administration errors were detected by using the disguised-observation technique (observation of medication administrations by nurses, without revealing

  5. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... inspections, and drive safety and quality throughout the supply chain. Implementation of these authorities... authorities granted to FDA under Title VII and their importance in ensuring drug safety, effectiveness, and.... FDA-2013-N-0683, FDA-2013-N-0684, and FDA-2013-N-0685] Food and Drug Administration Safety and...

  6. A Multi-Criteria Methodology to Support Public Administration Decision Making Concerning Sustainable Energy Action Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Novello

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available For municipalities that have joined the Covenant of Mayors promoted by the European Commission, the Sustainable Energy Action Plan (SEAP represents a strategic tool for achieving the greenhouse gas reductions required by 2020. So far as the energy retrofit actions in their residential building stock are concerned, which in the small-to-medium municipalities are responsible for more than 60% of CO2 emissions, the scenarios for intervening are normally decided on the basis of an economic (cost/performance analysis. This type of analysis, however, does not take into account important aspects for small and medium-sized communities such as social aspects, environmental impacts, local economic development and employment. A more comprehensive and effective tool to support the choices of public administrators is the multi-criteria analysis. This study proposes a methodology that integrates multi-criteria analysis in order to support Public Administration/Local Authorities in programming Sustainable Energy Action Plans with a more targeted approach to sustainability. The methodology, based on the ELECTRE III method, was applied to a medium-size municipality in the Lombardy region of Italy. The results obtained with this approach are discussed in this paper.

  7. From theory to practice: the formation of the contemporary administrator stimulated by active methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Jerônimo Soares

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing participatory and critical skills are essential to the role of the contemporary manager, so it becomes relevant that such mechanisms focus on the teaching / learning process. The present study sought to identify the effects of the use of active methodologies for the students of a Private Higher Education Institution, as well as the perception and propensity of the students to be favorable or not to the implementation of said didactic innovation in the formation of the administrator. The sample consisted of 488 students, of whom 110 began undergraduate studies before the implementation of the methodological innovation in question, and 378 already enrolled in higher education using active teaching strategies. The study is a qualitative-descriptive approach with data collected through a semi-structured questionnaire, which had open, dichotomous questions, rating scales and some based on Likert-type scales. The results show that the students present favorable visions regarding the adoption of active learning systems, denoting that the adopted approach opens space for constructivist perspectives. It is concluded that the effort for higher education in administration to have a greater theoretical-practical connection enhances learning and motivates students. Suggestions for institutional actions are presented at the end of the article, so that andragogic proposals, as emphasized in this work signals and maintains the adherence of a more comprehensive training of managers, accompanying the demands of the labor market through the development of skills practices in the academic environment.

  8. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1056] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  9. 77 FR 48159 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0523] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  10. 77 FR 37058 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA 2012-D-0304] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the...

  11. Wrong drug administration errors amongst anaesthetists in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    stage during their career.1,2,3 Although the majority of wrong drug ... to investigate the incidence, nature and possible causes of wrong ... involved muscle relaxants with suxamethonium chloride administered instead of fentanyl accounting for.

  12. Homeopathic drug discovery: theory update and methodological aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Pathak, Surajit

    2008-08-01

    Homeopathy treats patient on the basis of totality of symptoms and is based on the principle of 'like cures like'. It uses ultra-low doses of highly diluted natural substances as remedies that originate from plants, minerals or animals. The objectives of this review are to discuss concepts, controversies and research related to understanding homeopathy in the light of modern science. Attempts have been made to focus on current views of homeopathy and to delineate its most plausible mechanism(s) of action. Although some areas of concern remain, research carried out so far both in vitro and in vivo validates the effects of highly diluted homeopathic medicines in a wide variety of organisms. The precise mechanism(s) and pathway(s) of action of highly diluted homeopathic drugs are still unknown.

  13. Technology assessment and the Food and Drug Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A. H.; Becker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The statutory standards underlying the activities of the FDA, and the problems the Agency faces in decision making are discussed from a legal point of view. The premarketing clearance of new drugs and of food additives, the two most publicized and criticized areas of FDA activity, are used as illustrations. The importance of statutory standards in technology assessment in a regulatory setting is developed. The difficulties inherent in the formulation of meaningful standards are recognized. For foods, the words of the statute are inadequate, and for drugs, a statutory recognition of the various other objectives would be useful to the regulator and the regulated.

  14. Errors in drug administration by anaesthetists in public hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To investigate errors in administering drugs by anaesthetists working in public hospitals in the Free State province. Methods. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to doctors performing anaesthesia in public hospitals in the Free State, i.e. 188 doctors at 22 public sector hospitals. Outcomes included ...

  15. Drug Administration Errors by South African Anaesthetists – a Survey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    TRAVEL FELLOWSHIP. Objectives. To investigate the incidence, nature of and factors contributing towards “wrong drug administrations” by South African anaesthetists. Design. A confidential, self-reporting survey was sent out to the 720 anaesthetists on the database of the South African Society of. Anaesthesiologists.

  16. Risk of Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic-based Drug-drug Interactions with Drugs Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Between 2013 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Zhou, Zhu; Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica; Levy, Rene H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2018-03-23

    A total of 103 drugs (including 14 combination drugs) were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from 2013 to 2016. Pharmacokinetic-based drug interaction profiles were analyzed using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database and the clinical relevance of these observations was characterized based on information from New Drug Application reviews. CYP3A was identified as a major contributor to clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs), involved in approximately 2/3 of all interactions. Transporters (alone or with enzymes) were found to participate in about half of all interactions, although most of these were weak-to-moderate interactions. When considered as victims, eight new molecular entities (NMEs; cobimetinib, ibrutnib, isavuconazole, ivabradine, naloxegol, paritaprevir, simeprevir, and venetoclax) were identified as sensitive substrates of CYP3A, two NMEs (pirfenidone and tasimelteon) were sensitive substrates of CYP1A2, one NME (dasabuvir) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2C8, one NME (eliglustat) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2D6, and one NME (grazoprevir) was a sensitive substrate of OATP1B1/3 (with changes in exposure greater than 5-fold when co-administered with a strong inhibitor). Interestingly, approximately 75% of identified CYP3A substrates were also substrates of P-gp. As perpetrators, most clinical DDIs involved weak-to-moderate inhibition or induction, with only two drugs (Viekira Pak and idelalisib) showing strong inhibition of CYP3A, and one NME (lumacaftor) considered as a strong CYP3A inducer. Among drugs with large changes in exposure (≥ 5-fold), whether as victim or perpetrator, the most represented therapeutic classes were antivirals and oncology drugs, suggesting a significant risk of clinical DDIs in these patient populations. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H...... intraspinal administration of substances through the spinal loop dialysis probe....

  18. Preventing errors in administration of parenteral drugs: the results of a four-year national patient safety program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C. de; Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the implementation of a four-year national patient safety program concerning the parenteral drug administration process in the Netherlands. Methods: Structuring the preparation and administration process of parenteral drugs reduces the number of medication errors. A

  19. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ..., electronic record requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA), is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's...

  20. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... marketing applications, (2) what is meant by ``due diligence'' in obtaining financial disclosures from...: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

  1. 77 FR 50113 - ASTM International-Food and Drug Administration Workshop on Absorbable Medical Devices: Lessons...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... disability, please contact Cindy Garris, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm... that the implant must withstand and perform. Moreover, the optimal preclinical/bench testing paradigm...

  2. Enhancing food safety: the role of the Food and Drug Administration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Robert B; Oria, Maria

    2010-01-01

    .... Food and Drug Administration's abilities to discover potential threats to food safety and prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness are hampered by impediments to efficient use of its limited resources...

  3. 78 FR 26375 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...] Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship... Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE), is announcing a conference entitled ``Redefining the `C' in CGMP: Creating, Implementing and Sustaining a Culture of Quality'' Pharmaceutical Quality System (ICH...

  4. Role of mass drug administration in elimination of Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a consensus modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Oliver J; Slater, Hannah C; Pemberton-Ross, Peter; Wenger, Edward; Maude, Richard J; Ghani, Azra C; Penny, Melissa A; Gerardin, Jaline; White, Lisa J; Chitnis, Nakul; Aguas, Ricardo; Hay, Simon I; Smith, David L; Stuckey, Erin M; Okiro, Emelda A; Smith, Thomas A; Okell, Lucy C

    2017-07-01

    Mass drug administration for elimination of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is recommended by WHO in some settings. We used consensus modelling to understand how to optimise the effects of mass drug administration in areas with low malaria transmission. We collaborated with researchers doing field trials to establish a standard intervention scenario and standard transmission setting, and we input these parameters into four previously published models. We then varied the number of rounds of mass drug administration, coverage, duration, timing, importation of infection, and pre-administration transmission levels. The outcome of interest was the percentage reduction in annual mean prevalence of P falciparum parasite rate as measured by PCR in the third year after the final round of mass drug administration. The models predicted differing magnitude of the effects of mass drug administration, but consensus answers were reached for several factors. Mass drug administration was predicted to reduce transmission over a longer timescale than accounted for by the prophylactic effect alone. Percentage reduction in transmission was predicted to be higher and last longer at lower baseline transmission levels. Reduction in transmission resulting from mass drug administration was predicted to be temporary, and in the absence of scale-up of other interventions, such as vector control, transmission would return to pre-administration levels. The proportion of the population treated in a year was a key determinant of simulated effectiveness, irrespective of whether people are treated through high coverage in a single round or new individuals are reached by implementation of several rounds. Mass drug administration was predicted to be more effective if continued over 2 years rather than 1 year, and if done at the time of year when transmission is lowest. Mass drug administration has the potential to reduce transmission for a limited time, but is not an effective replacement for existing

  5. Drug research methodology. Volume 2, The identification of drugs of interest in highway safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    This report presents findings of a workshop on the identification of drugs that should be the focus of near-term highway safety research. Drugs of interest are those that have a potential to increase the likelihood of traffic crashes and their attend...

  6. U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval: slow advances in obstetric care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Deborah A; Powers, Barbara; Hickok, Durlin

    2010-04-01

    The process for drug approval in the United States is complex and time-consuming. There are comparatively few drugs with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications for obstetric use in this country at this time; however, several are under development. We review the process for drug approval and recount the approval histories of obstetric drugs reviewed in the recent past. We also outline the current status of two progestational agents that are under development. For a variety of reasons, including a small market compared with others such as cardiology or oncology, and the potential of being drawn into medical-legal litigation, sponsors are disinclined to pursue drug development for obstetric purposes in this country. We compare the procedures for review and approval of drugs in the United States with those in Europe, and note that recent changes within the FDA may result in not only more drugs being approved but also changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Special programs to facilitate drug development and reforms to modernize the process and improve safety are discussed. These may result in changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Obstacles such as funding and liability are also discussed.

  7. 77 FR 70166 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ...; Establishment of a Public Docket AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a public docket for information pertaining to FDA's... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1090...

  8. 75 FR 31450 - Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Administration and the International Anesthesia Research Society for the Safety of Key Inhaled and Intravenous Drugs in Pediatrics Public-Private Partnership AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0004...

  9. 76 FR 20992 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0189] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Low Level Laser System for Aesthetic Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  10. 75 FR 68364 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2008-D-0275] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Full-Field Digital Mammography System; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. [[Page...

  11. 77 FR 16123 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document... Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the...

  12. 76 FR 16425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0028] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  13. 76 FR 6622 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0645] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Contact Cooling System for Aesthetic Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  14. 76 FR 22906 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2006-D-0094] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  15. 78 FR 101 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0524] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for Premarket Approval Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  16. 76 FR 43332 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0500] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Focused Ultrasound Stimulator System for Aesthetic Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...

  17. 76 FR 29251 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls; Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2006-D-0094] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls; Guidance Document... of the guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II...

  18. 77 FR 45357 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0524] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Review for Premarket Approval Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  19. 75 FR 53971 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2007-D-0367] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  20. 77 FR 27461 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Pediatric Information for X...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0384] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Pediatric Information for X-Ray Imaging Device Premarket Notifications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  1. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on In Vitro Companion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0215] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension...

  2. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1056] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  3. 76 FR 77542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Humanitarian Use Device...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0847] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Humanitarian Use Device Designations; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  4. 77 FR 14403 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0167] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Norovirus Serological Reagents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  5. 75 FR 21000 - Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ...] (formerly Docket No. 02D-0049) Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members... and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Public Law No. 110-85), and section 701 (21 U.S.C. 371...

  6. 77 FR 14404 - Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2002-D-0094; (formerly Docket No. 02D-0049)] Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for the public, FDA...

  7. 78 FR 20666 - Food and Drug Administration/National Institutes of Health/National Science Foundation Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0345] Food and Drug Administration/National Institutes of Health/ National Science Foundation Public Workshop... public workshop; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its...

  8. Effects of chronic administration of drugs of abuse on impulsive choice (delay discounting) in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Barry; Mendez, Ian A; Mitchell, Marci R; Simon, Nicholas W

    2009-09-01

    Drug-addicted individuals show high levels of impulsive choice, characterized by preference for small immediate over larger but delayed rewards. Although the causal relationship between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice in humans has been unclear, a small but growing body of literature over the past decade has shown that chronic drug administration in animal models can cause increases in impulsive choice, suggesting that a similar causal relationship may exist in human drug users. This article reviews this literature, with a particular focus on the effects of chronic cocaine administration, which have been most thoroughly characterized. The potential mechanisms of these effects are described in terms of drug-induced neural alterations in ventral striatal and prefrontal cortical brain systems. Some implications of this research for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced increases in impulsive choice are discussed, along with suggestions for future research in this area.

  9. Enhancing topical analgesic administration: review and prospect for transdermal and transbuccal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Roser; Calpena, Ana C; Mallandrich, Mireia; Clares, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Topical administration is an appealing method for drug delivery due to its non-invasiveness, self-controlled application, avoidance of first-pass metabolism in the liver and reduction of systemic side effects compared to other conventional routes such as oral and parenteral. However, topical administration must overcome the permeable barriers that skin and mucosa represent for the drug to achieve its desired therapeutic effect. Penetration of drugs through human skin is mainly impaired by the stratum corneum- the uppermost keratinized skin layer. In contrast, the stratified squamous epithelium (a nonkeratinized tissue) represents the major physical barrier for transbuccal drug administration in humans. Different technologies have been studied to enhance the bioavailability or local effects of drugs administered through skin and buccal mucosa. Those technologies involve the use of physical or chemical enhancers and new dosage forms such as vesicles, cyclodextrins, nanoparticles and other complex systems. Combinations of these technologies may further increase drug delivery in some cases. As analgesia is one of the main therapeutic effects sought through topical administration, this paper focuses on the review of drug delivery systems to improve the topical and transdermal/transbuccal drug delivery of substances with known analgesic action. A discussion of their possibilities and limitations is also included.

  10. 77 FR 10753 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Food and Drug Administration Records Access Authority Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry: Food and Drug Administration Records Access Authority Under the Federal... industry entitled ``FDA Records Access Authority Under Sections 414 and 704 of the Federal Food, Drug...). This updated draft guidance is intended to provide individuals in the human and animal food industries...

  11. 78 FR 54901 - Food and Drug Administration/American Academy of Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    .... Food and beverages will be available for purchase by participants during the workshop breaks. If you....regulations.gov . It may be viewed at the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001...

  12. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  13. Drug administration errors in an institution for individuals with intellectual disability : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, P M L A; Robertz, R; de Jong, A L; van Roon, E N; Leufkens, H G M

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors can result in harm, unless barriers to prevent them are present. Drug administration errors are less likely to be prevented, because they occur in the last stage of the drug distribution process. This is especially the case in non-alert patients, as patients often form

  14. Factors influencing drug uptake during mass drug administration for control of lymphatic filariasis in rural and urban Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kisoka, William J.; Simonsen, Paul Erik; Malecela, Mwelecele N.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission interrupt......BACKGROUND: In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission...

  15. Hepatic transporter drug-drug interactions: an evaluation of approaches and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Beth; Riley, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) continue to account for 5% of hospital admissions and therefore remain a major regulatory concern. Effective, quantitative prediction of DDIs will reduce unexpected clinical findings and encourage projects to frontload DDI investigations rather than concentrating on risk management ('manage the baggage') later in drug development. A key challenge in DDI prediction is the discrepancies between reported models. Areas covered: The current synopsis focuses on four recent influential publications on hepatic drug transporter DDIs using static models that tackle interactions with individual transporters and in combination with other drug transporters and metabolising enzymes. These models vary in their assumptions (including input parameters), transparency, reproducibility and complexity. In this review, these facets are compared and contrasted with recommendations made as to their application. Expert opinion: Over the past decade, static models have evolved from simple [I]/k i models to incorporate victim and perpetrator disposition mechanisms including the absorption rate constant, the fraction of the drug metabolised/eliminated and/or clearance concepts. Nonetheless, models that comprise additional parameters and complexity do not necessarily out-perform simpler models with fewer inputs. Further, consideration of the property space to exploit some drug target classes has also highlighted the fine balance required between frontloading and back-loading studies to design out or 'manage the baggage'.

  16. FDA publishes conflict of interest rules for clinical trials. Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1998-03-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published new rules defining conflict of interests between drug companies and medical researchers and clinicians. Certain financial arrangements will need to be disclosed, although the FDA estimates that only one to ten percent of pharmaceutical companies will need to submit disclosures for one or more of their investigators. The purpose of the new rule is to prevent bias in safety and efficacy studies of drugs and medical devices. The full rule is published in the Federal Register.

  17. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in Europe: a methodological comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.C.H. de; Schuerch, M.; Vries, F. de; Hesse, U.; Oliva, B.; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Gil, M.; Requena, G.; Abajo, F.; Afonso, A.; Souverein, P.C.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; Dijk, L. van; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  18. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in europe: A methodological comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C.H.; Schuerch, Markus; De Vries, Frank; Hesse, Ulrik; Oliva, Belén; Alvarez, Consuelo Huerta; Gil, Miguel; Requena, Gema; Abajo, Francisco; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Schmiedl, Sven; Van Dijk, Liset; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  19. Anti-Obesity Agents and the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Martin F; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing market for obesity care, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved only two new pharmaceutical agents-lorcaserin and combination phentermine/topiramate-for weight reduction since 2000, while removing three agents from the market in the same time period. This article explores the FDA's history and role in the approval of anti-obesity medications within the context of a public health model of obesity. Through the review of obesity literature and FDA approval documents, we identified two major barriers preventing fair evaluation of anti-obesity agents including: (1) methodological pitfalls in clinical trials and (2) misaligned values in the assessment of anti-obesity agents. Specific recommendations include the use of adaptive (Bayesian) design protocols, value-based analyses of risks and benefits, and regulatory guidance based on a comprehensive, multi-platform obesity disease model. Positively addressing barriers in the FDA approval process of anti-obesity agents may have many beneficial effects within an obesity disease model.

  20. Transmission assessment surveys (TAS to define endpoints for lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration: a multicenter evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lymphatic filariasis (LF is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA. Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached a level low enough that it cannot be sustained even in the absence of drug intervention. Guidelines advanced by WHO call for a transmission assessment survey (TAS to determine if MDA can be stopped within an LF evaluation unit (EU after at least five effective rounds of annual treatment. To test the value and practicality of these guidelines, a multicenter operational research trial was undertaken in 11 countries covering various geographic and epidemiological settings. METHODOLOGY: The TAS was conducted twice in each EU with TAS-1 and TAS-2 approximately 24 months apart. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS formed the basis of the TAS survey design but specific EU characteristics defined the survey site (school or community, eligible population (6-7 year olds or 1(st-2(nd graders, survey type (systematic or cluster-sampling, target sample size, and critical cutoff (a statistically powered threshold below which transmission is expected to be no longer sustainable. The primary diagnostic tools were the immunochromatographic (ICT test for W. bancrofti EUs and the BmR1 test (Brugia Rapid or PanLF for Brugia spp. EUs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: In 10 of 11 EUs, the number of TAS-1 positive cases was below the critical cutoff, indicating that MDA could be stopped. The same results were found in the follow-up TAS-2, therefore, confirming the previous decision outcome. Sample sizes were highly sex and age-representative and closely matched the target value after factoring in estimates of non-participation. The TAS was determined to be a practical and effective evaluation tool for stopping MDA although its validity for longer-term post

  1. Estimating preferences for modes of drug administration: The case of US healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ebenezer K; Morris, Steve; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    There are hidden drug administration costs that arise from a mismatch between end-user preferences and how manufacturers choose to formulate their drug products for delivery to patients. The corollary of this is: there are "intangible benefits" from considering end-user preferences in manufacturing patient-friendly medicines. It is important then to have some idea of what pharmaceutical manufacturers should consider in making patient-friendly medicines and of the magnitude of the indirect benefits from doing so. This study aimed to evaluate preferences of healthcare professionals in the US for the non-monetary attributes of different modes of drug administration. It uses these preference orderings to compute a monetary valuation of the indirect benefits from making patient-friendly medicines. A survey collected choice preferences of a sample of 210 healthcare professionals in the US for two unlabelled drug options. These drugs were identical except in the levels of attributes of drug administration. Using the choice data collected, statistical models were estimated to compute gross welfare benefits, measured by the expected compensating variation, from making drugs in a more patient-friendly manner. The monetary value of end-user benefits from developing patient-friendly drug delivery systems is: (1) as large as the annual acquisition costs per full treatment episode for some biologic drugs; and (2) likely to fall in the "high end" of the distribution of the direct monetary costs of drug administration. An examination of end-user preferences should help manufacturers make more effective and efficient use of limited resources for innovations in drug delivery system, or manufacturing research in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Discrete-choice modelling of patient preferences for modes of drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ebenezer Kwabena; Morris, Steve; Titcheneker-Hooker, Nigel

    2017-12-01

    The administration of (biologically-derived) drugs for various disease conditions involves consumption of resources that constitutes a direct monetary cost to healthcare payers and providers. An often ignored cost relates to a mismatch between patients' preferences and the mode of drug administration. The "intangible" benefits of giving patients what they want in terms of the mode of drug delivery is seldom considered. This study aims to evaluate, in monetary terms, end-user preferences for the non-monetary attributes of different modes of drug administration using a discrete-choice experiment. It provides empirical support to the notion that there are significant benefits from developing patient-friendly approaches to drug delivery. The gross benefits per patient per unit administration is in the same order of magnitude as the savings in resource costs of administering drugs. The study argues that, as long as the underlying manufacturing science is capable, a patient-centred approach to producing drug delivery systems should be encouraged and pursued.

  3. Factors influencing drug uptake during mass drug administration for control of lymphatic filariasis in rural and urban Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Kisoka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission interruption within reasonable time. The present study aimed to identify predictors and barriers to individual drug uptake during MDA implementation by the National LF Elimination Programme in Tanzania. METHODS: A questionnaire based cross sectional household survey was carried out in two rural and two urban districts in Lindi and Morogoro regions shortly after the 2011 MDA. 3279 adults (≥15 years were interviewed about personal characteristics, socio-economic status, MDA drug uptake among themselves and their children, reasons for taking/not taking drugs, and participation in previous MDA activities for LF control. FINDINGS: The overall drug uptake rate was 55.1% (range of 44.5-75.6% between districts. There was no overall major difference between children (54.8% and adults (55.2% or between females (54.9% and males (55.8%, but the role of these and other predictors varied to some extent between study sites. Major overall predictors of drug uptake among the interviewed adults were increasing age and history of previous drug uptake. Being absent from home during drug distribution was the main reason for not taking the drugs (50.2% followed by clinical contraindications to treatment (10.8%, missing household visits of drug distributors (10.6%, and households not being informed about the distribution (9.0%. CONCLUSION: Drug uptake relied more on easily modifiable provider-related factors than on individual perceptions and practices in the target population. Limited investments in appropriate timing, dissemination of accurate timing information to recipients and motivation of drug distributors to visit all households (repeatedly when residents are absent are likely

  4. 78 FR 9928 - Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0124... metrics. With that in mind, FDA would like input on the following issues: What metrics do manufacturers... been suggested as a potentially useful approach to expanding manufacturing capacity and preventing...

  5. The Food and Drug Administration and Drug Legalization: A Brief Model of Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kalam, Murad

    2002-01-01

    This paper offers a brief model of FDA regulation of currently illegal narcotics in the United States. Given that nearly three out of four Americans believe that the drug war has failed, recent calls from prominent liberal and conservative thinkers to legalize drugs, and state “compassionate use†ballot initiatives, future drug legalization is at least conceivable in the United States. Yet, how would the FDA regulate NLD’s under its current st...

  6. Systematic review of drug administration costs and implications for biopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ebenezer; Morris, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition costs of biologic drugs are often considered to be relatively high compared with those of nonbiologics. However, the total costs of delivering these drugs also depend on the cost of administration. Ignoring drug administration costs may distort resource allocation decisions because these affect cost effectiveness. The objectives of this systematic review were to develop a framework of drug administration costs that considers both the costs of physical administration and the associated proximal costs; and, as a case example, to use this framework to evaluate administration costs for biologics within the UK National Health Service (NHS). We reviewed literature that reported estimates of administration costs for biologics within the UK NHS to identify how these costs were quantified and to examine how differences in dosage forms and regimens influenced administration costs. The literature reviewed were identified by searching the Centre for Review and Dissemination Databases (DARE, NHS EED and HTA); EMBASE (The Excerpta Medica Database); MEDLINE (using the OVID interface); Econlit (EBSCO); Tufts Medical Center Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry; and Google Scholar. We identified 4,344 potentially relevant studies, of which 43 studies were selected for this systematic review. We extracted estimates of the administration costs of biologics from these studies. We found evidence of variation in the way that administration costs were measured, and that this affected the magnitude of costs reported, which could then influence cost effectiveness. Our findings suggested that manufacturers of biologic medicines should pay attention to formulation issues and their impact on administration costs, because these affect the total costs of healthcare delivery and cost effectiveness.

  7. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer; Sandell, Johan; Farde, Lars; Sovago, Judit; Cselenyi, Zsolt; Vas, Adam; Kiss, Bela; Karpati, Egon

    2002-01-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [ 11 C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [ 11 C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [ 11 C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of orally

  8. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Sóvágó, Judit; Sandell, Johan; Cselényi, Zsolt; Vas, Adám; Kiss, Béla; Kárpáti, Egon; Farde, Lars

    2002-08-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [(11)C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [(11)C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [(11)C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of orally

  9. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyas, Balazs [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Halldin, Christer; Sandell, Johan; Farde, Lars [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Sovago, Judit; Cselenyi, Zsolt [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Vas, Adam; Kiss, Bela; Karpati, Egon [Chemical Works of Gedeon Richter Ltd., Budapest (Hungary)

    2002-08-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and

  10. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest.

  11. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-09-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel" addresses this theme by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general-particularly in Dolliver's article-poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study. The replication study is not based on Dolliver's original dataset, but on a second dataset collected applying the same methodology. We have found that the results produced by Dolliver differ greatly from our replicated study. While a margin of error is to be expected, the inconsistencies we found are too great to attribute to anything other than methodological issues. The analysis and conclusions drawn from studies using these methods are promising and insightful. However, based on the replication of Dolliver's study, we suggest that researchers using these methodologies consider and that datasets be made available for other researchers, and that methodology and dataset metrics (e.g. number of downloaded pages, error logs) are described thoroughly in the context of web-o-metrics and web crawling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This guidance provides questions and answers that address.... 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997...

  13. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cancer Drug Development and US Regulatory Review: Perspectives From Industry, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Geoghegan, Cindy; Coons, Stephen Joel; Gnanasakthy, Ari; Slagle, Ashley F; Papadopoulos, Elektra J; Kluetz, Paul G

    2015-06-01

    Data reported directly by patients about how they feel and function are rarely included in oncology drug labeling in the United States, in contrast to Europe and to nononcology labeling in the United States, where this practice is more common. Multiple barriers exist, including challenges unique to oncology trials, and industry's concerns regarding cost, logistical complexities, and the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) rigorous application of its 2009 guidance on the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. A panel consisting of representatives of industry, FDA, the PRO Consortium, clinicians, and patients was assembled at a 2014 workshop cosponsored by FDA to identify practical recommendations for overcoming these barriers. Key recommendations included increasing proactive encouragement by FDA to clinical trial sponsors for including PROs in drug development programs; provision of comprehensive PRO plans by sponsors to FDA early in drug development; promotion of an oncology-specific PRO research agenda; development of an approach to existing ("legacy") PRO measures, when appropriate (focused initially on symptoms and functional status); and increased FDA and industry training in PRO methodology. FDA has begun implementing several of these recommendations.

  14. Local drug delivery - the early Berlin experience: single drug administration versus sustained release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Ulrich; Scheller, Bruno; Rutsch, Wolfgang; Laule, Michael; Stangl, Verena

    2011-05-01

    Our initial investigations into restenosis inhibition by local drug delivery were prompted by reports on an improved outcome of coronary interventions, including a lower rate of target lesion revascularisation, when the intervention was performed with an ionic instead of non-ionic contrast medium. Although this was not confirmed in an animal study, the short exposure of the vessel wall to paclitaxel dissolved in contrast agent or coated on balloons proved to be efficacious. A study comparing three methods of local drug delivery to the coronary artery in pigs indicated the following order of efficacy in inhibiting neointimal proliferation: paclitaxel-coated balloons > sirolimus-eluting stents, sustained drug release > paclitaxel in contrast medium. Cell culture experiments confirmed that cell proliferation can be inhibited by very short exposure to the drug. Shorter exposure times require higher drug concentrations. Effective paclitaxel concentrations in porcine arteries are achieved when the drug is dissolved in contrast medium or coated on balloons. Paclitaxel is an exceptional drug in that it stays in the treated tissue for a long time. This may explain the long-lasting efficacy of paclitaxel-coated balloons, but does not disprove the hypothesis that the agent blocks a process initiating long-lasting excessive neointimal proliferation, which occurs early after vessel injury.

  15. Prescription Drug Promotion from 2001-2014: Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen W Sullivan

    Full Text Available The volume of prescription drug promotion over time is often measured by assessing changes in ad spending. However, this method obscures the fact that some types of advertising are more expensive than others. Another way to measure the changes in prescription drug promotion over time is to assess the number of promotional pieces submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Form FDA 2253 collects information such as the date submitted and the type of material submitted. We analyzed data from Forms FDA 2253 received from 2001-2014. We examined the frequency of submissions by audience (consumer and healthcare professional and type of promotional material. There was a noted increase in prescription drug promotion submissions across all media in the early 2000s. Although non-Internet promotion submissions have since plateaued, Internet promotion continued to increase. These results can help public health advocates and regulators focus attention and resources.

  16. Quantum Dots Applied to Methodology on Detection of Pesticide and Veterinary Drug Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Wei; Zou, Xue-Mei; Song, Shang-Hong; Chen, Guan-Hua

    2018-02-14

    The pesticide and veterinary drug residues brought by large-scale agricultural production have become one of the issues in the fields of food safety and environmental ecological security. It is necessary to develop the rapid, sensitive, qualitative and quantitative methodology for the detection of pesticide and veterinary drug residues. As one of the achievements of nanoscience, quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in the detection of pesticide and veterinary drug residues. In these methodology studies, the used QD-signal styles include fluorescence, chemiluminescence, electrochemical luminescence, photoelectrochemistry, etc. QDs can also be assembled into sensors with different materials, such as QD-enzyme, QD-antibody, QD-aptamer, and QD-molecularly imprinted polymer sensors, etc. Plenty of study achievements in the field of detection of pesticide and veterinary drug residues have been obtained from the different combinations among these signals and sensors. They are summarized in this paper to provide a reference for the QD application in the detection of pesticide and veterinary drug residues.

  17. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob Johan; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-01-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article “Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel” addresses this theme...... by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general—particularly in Dolliver's article—poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study...

  18. 77 FR 47078 - 2012 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Regulatory Conference...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... foundations, emerging technologies and innovations in regulatory science, as well as the current quality and... of today's leading pharmaceutical companies present case studies on how they employ global strategies... Contract Manufacturing Organizations Contract Agreements Drug Safety Emerging Active Pharmaceutical...

  19. 78 FR 20325 - 2013 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Regulatory Conference...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... foundations, emerging technologies and innovations in regulatory science, as well as the current quality and... strategies, while industry professionals from some of today's leading pharmaceutical companies present case.... Drug Safety. Emerging Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) Regulations. Investigations. Emerging API...

  20. 78 FR 48691 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Demystifying Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... 240-316-3200 ext. 207. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please specify those... impact the drug development and review paradigm. Though several programs exist that facilitate patient...

  1. Sex differences in the self-administration of cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2009-12-01

    Many studies have provided evidence for important sex-dependent differences in the origins, outcomes and treatment of drug abuse and dependence. Preclinical studies typically have employed animal models of addiction, such as oral or intravenous self-administration, to untangle the environmental, neurobiological and genetic factors that contribute to the shift from occasional, recreational use to compulsive, uncontrolled intake of drugs. Craving and relapse of drug seeking in abstinent individuals have also been found to differ between men and women. Identification of the neurobiological basis of craving and drug dependence continues to pose a challenge to addiction research. Significant sex differences are emerging in substance-abuse-related behavior, which has increased the demand for research on how drug consumption may have different causes, progression and consequences in men and women. In keeping with epidemiological data in humans, differences between the two sexes in drug seeking and intake have been well-documented in animal studies, with most recent findings related to abuse of cannabinoids. Clinical and preclinical findings indicate that sex and gonadal hormones may account for individual differences in susceptibility to the reinforcing effects of addictive substances, and that differences in vulnerability to drug abuse may be mediated by the same biological mechanisms. This review focuses on the differences between males and females in relation to drug self-administration and how such behavior may be affected by hormonal status.

  2. Investigation of the mechanisms of action behind Electromotive Drug Administration (EMDA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kos, Bor; Vasquez, Juan Luis; Miklavčič, D

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Bladder cancer is a cause of considerable morbidity worldwide. Electromotive Drug Administration is a method that combines intravesical chemotherapy with local electric field application. Electroporation has been suggested among other mechanisms as having a possible role in the therapy......, so the goal of the present study was to investigate the electric fields present in the bladder wall during the treatment to determine which mechanisms might be involved. Material and Methods. Electromotive Drug Administration involves applying intravesical mitomycin C with direct current of 20 m...

  3. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0281] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; ```Harmful and Potentially Harmful... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance provides written guidance to industry and FDA staff...

  4. 76 FR 81511 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Center for Devices and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0893] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Center for Devices and Radiological... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  5. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for... the Internet. To receive ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User... and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  6. 76 FR 43690 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2007-D-0149] (Formerly 2007D-0309) Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Electrocardiograph Electrodes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  7. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and research...

  8. 75 FR 69089 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0514] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance...

  9. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ...] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and... ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information...

  10. Pharmaceutical assistance in the enteral administration of drugs: choosing the appropriate pharmaceutical formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele de Lima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study solid medications for oral delivery on the formulary of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE, investigating the  possibility of using these drugs through enteral feeding tubes, and recommending appropriate administration. Methods: Study carried out through survey of solid medications for oral delivery included on the formulary of HIAE, literature review, and analysis of medication monographs, manufacturer information and pharmacotechnical data of active ingredients and excipients. It was observed the factors that might hinder or complicate the administration of these drugs though enteral tubes, and was drawn an information chart with recommendations about drug administration in this context. Rresults: The study evaluated 234 medications; and the main problems of administering these drugs through enteral feeding tubes were as follows: changes in drug pharmacokinetics (38; gastrointestinal damage (9; risk of obstruction (40, drug-nutrient interactions (7; biological hazards (5 and no information (33. Cconclusions: Compiling this information helps the healthcare team to choose the appropriate pharmaceutical formulation for medications administered through enteral tubes, and may help identify adverse events related to this technique.

  11. Errors in preparation and administration of parenteral drugs in neonatology: evaluation and corrective actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Nesrine; Ben Hamida, Emira; Ben Jeddou, Khouloud; Ben Hamida, Sarra; Ayadi, Imene; Ouahchi, Zeineb; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2016-12-01

    The medication iatrogenic risk is quite unevaluated in neonatology Objective: Assessment of errors that occurred during the preparation and administration of injectable medicines in a neonatal unit in order to implement corrective actions to reduce the occurrence of these errors. A prospective, observational study was performed in a neonatal unit over a period of one month. The practice of preparing and administering injectable medications were identified through a standardized data collection form. These practices were compared with summaries of the characteristics of each product (RCP) and the bibliography. One hundred preparations were observed of 13 different drugs. 85 errors during preparations and administration steps were detected. These errors were divided into preparation errors in 59% of cases such as changing the dilution protocol (32%), the use of bad solvent (11%) and administration errors in 41% of cases as errors timing of administration (18%) or omission of administration (9%). This study showed a high rate of errors during stages of preparation and administration of injectable drugs. In order to optimize the care of newborns and reduce the risk of medication errors, corrective actions have been implemented through the establishment of a quality assurance system which consisted of the development of injectable drugs preparation procedures, the introduction of a labeling system and staff training.

  12. 78 FR 13072 - Seventh Annual Drug Information Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum-2013...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... establish an ongoing dialogue regarding FDA's ``Critical Path'' initiative--emphasizing the regulatory and... application of statistical methodologies and thinking to the development of new therapeutic biologics and... improving the communication between industry statisticians and FDA reviewers. A description of the planned...

  13. 5-FU Metabolism in Cancer and Orally-Administrable 5-FU Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Sasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a key anticancer drug that for its broad antitumor activity, as well as for its synergism with other anticancer drugs, has been used to treat various types of malignancies. In chemotherapeutic regimens, 5-FU has been combined with oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other drugs as a continuous intravenous infusion. Recent clinical chemotherapy studies have shown that several of the regimens with oral 5-FU drugs are not inferior compared to those involving continuous 5-FU infusion chemotherapy, and it is probable that in some regimens continuous 5-FU infusion can be replaced by oral 5-FU drugs. Historically, both the pharmaceutical industry and academia in Japan have been involved in the development of oral 5-FU drugs, and this review will focus on the current knowledge of 5-FU anabolism and catabolism, and the available information about the various orally-administrable 5-FU drugs, including UFT, S-1 and capecitabine. Clinical studies comparing the efficacy and adverse events of S-1 and capecitabine have been reported, and the accumulated results should be utilized to optimize the treatment of cancer patients. On the other hand, it is essential to elucidate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of each of the newly-developed drugs, to correctly select the drugs for each patient in the clinical setting, and to further develop optimized drug derivatives.

  14. Quantification of drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in rabbit liver and tumor after in vivo administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Rainer; Jurgons, Roland; Lyer, Stefan; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Richter, Heike; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: C.Alexiou@web.de

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is imminent in medical research, especially for treating cancer and vascular diseases. We used drug-labeled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were attracted to an experimental tumor in rabbits with an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting, MDT). Aim of this study was to detect and quantify the biodistribution of the magnetic nanoparticles by magnetorelaxometry. The study shows higher amount of nanoparticles in the tumor after intraarterial application and MDT compared to intravenous administration.

  15. Drug overprescription in nursing homes: an empirical evaluation of administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Magdalena A

    2016-04-01

    A widely discussed shortcoming of long-term care in nursing homes for the elderly is the inappropriate or suboptimal drug utilization, particularly of psychotropic drugs. Using administrative data from the largest sickness fund in Germany, this study was designed to estimate the effect of institutionalization on the drug intake of the frail elderly. Difference-in-differences propensity score matching techniques were used to compare drug prescriptions for the frail elderly who entered a nursing home with those who remained in the outpatient care system; findings suggest that nursing home residents receive more doses of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and analgesics. The potential overprescription correlates with estimated drug costs of about €87 million per year.

  16. In vitro dissolution methodology, mini-Gastrointestinal Simulator (mGIS), predicts better in vivo dissolution of a weak base drug, dasatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Susumu; Matsui, Kazuki; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-08-30

    USP apparatus I and II are gold standard methodologies for determining the in vitro dissolution profiles of test drugs. However, it is difficult to use in vitro dissolution results to predict in vivo dissolution, particularly the pH-dependent solubility of weak acid and base drugs, because the USP apparatus contains one vessel with a fixed pH for the test drug, limiting insight into in vivo drug dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs. This discrepancy underscores the need to develop new in vitro dissolution methodology that better predicts in vivo response to assure the therapeutic efficacy and safety of oral drug products. Thus, the development of the in vivo predictive dissolution (IPD) methodology is necessitated. The major goals of in vitro dissolution are to ensure the performance of oral drug products and the support of drug formulation design, including bioequivalence (BE). Orally administered anticancer drugs, such as dasatinib and erlotinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), are used to treat various types of cancer. These drugs are weak bases that exhibit pH-dependent and high solubility in the acidic stomach and low solubility in the small intestine (>pH 6.0). Therefore, these drugs supersaturate and/or precipitate when they move from the stomach to the small intestine. Also of importance, gastric acidity for cancer patients may be altered with aging (reduction of gastric fluid secretion) and/or co-administration of acid-reducing agents. These may result in changes to the dissolution profiles of weak base and the reduction of drug absorption and efficacy. In vitro dissolution methodologies that assess the impact of these physiological changes in the GI condition are expected to better predict in vivo dissolution of oral medications for patients and, hence, better assess efficacy, toxicity and safety concerns. The objective of this present study is to determine the initial conditions for a mini-Gastrointestinal Simulator (mGIS) to assess in vivo

  17. Methodology to Forecast Volume and Cost of Cancer Drugs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehoda M. Martei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, frequent outages of the stock of cancer drugs undermine cancer care delivery and are potentially fatal for patients with cancer. The aim of this study is to describe a methodologic approach to forecast chemotherapy volume and estimate cost that can be readily updated and applied in most LMICs. Methods: Prerequisite data for forecasting are population-based incidence data and cost estimates per unit of drug to be ordered. We used the supplementary guidelines from the WHO list of essential medicines for cancer to predict treatment plans and ordering patterns. We used de-identified aggregate data from the Botswana National Cancer Registry to estimate incident cases. The WHO Management Sciences for Health International Price Indicator was used to estimate unit costs per drug. Results: Chemotherapy volume required for incident cancer cases was estimated as the product of the standardized dose required to complete a full treatment regimen per patient, with a given cancer diagnosis and stage, multiplied by the total number of incident cancer cases with the respective diagnosis. The estimated chemotherapy costs to treat the 10 most common cancers in the public health care sector of Botswana is approximately 2.3 million US dollars. An estimated 66% of the budget is allocated to costs of rituximab and trastuzumab alone, which are used by approximately 10% of the cancer population. Conclusion: This method provides a reproducible approach to forecast chemotherapy volume and cost in LMICs. The chemotherapy volume and cost outputs of this methodology provide key stakeholders with valuable information that can guide budget estimation, resource allocation, and drug-price negotiations for cancer treatment. Ultimately, this will minimize drug shortages or outages and reduce potential loss of lives that result from an erratic drug supply.

  18. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Program Administrator's Handbook. Strategies for Preventing Alcohol and Other Drug Problems. The College Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook is for administrators of programs in higher education settings which deal with alcohol and other drug (AOD) related problems. Chapter 1, "Defining the Problem, Issues, and Trends" examines the problem from various perspectives and presents the latest statistics on the extent of AOD use on campuses, specific problems affecting…

  20. 75 FR 4407 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001... subcommittee reviewing research at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. The Science Board will... person on or before Monday, February 15, 2010. Oral presentations from the public will be scheduled...

  1. Prospects for the control of neglected tropical diseases by mass drug administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Henk L.

    2009-01-01

    The prospects for the control of neglected tropical diseases, including soil-transmitted helminthiasis, shistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and trachoma, through mass drug administration, are exemplified by the elimination of the trachoma as a public-health problem in Morocco. In

  2. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA Expects in a...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...-sponsorship with the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The...

  3. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Society of Clinical Research Associates, Inc. (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA...

  4. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ..., electronic record requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial...

  5. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... requirements, and investigator initiated research. Topics for discussion include the following: (1) What FDA...] Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical... Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) is announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical...

  6. 78 FR 76842 - Food and Drug Administration/American Academy of Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... 866-561-8558 (toll free). Food and beverages will be available for purchase by participants during the... accessible at http://www.regulations.gov . It may be viewed at the Division of Dockets Management, Food and... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001...

  7. 77 FR 39498 - Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...] Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied... Clinical Performance Assessment: Considerations for Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied to... guidance, entitled ``Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied to Radiology Images and Radiology Device...

  8. DILEMMAS OF COMMUNITY-DIRECTED MASS DRUG ADMINISTRATION FOR LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS CONTROL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kisoka, William; Mushi, Declare; Meyrowitsch, Dan W.

    2017-01-01

    There has in recent years been a growing interest in the social significance of global health policy and associated interventions. This paper is concerned with neglected tropical disease control, which prescribes annual mass drug administration to interrupt transmission of, among others, lymphati...

  9. 77 FR 47652 - Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001... include an update on the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (Pub. L. 112-144) and an overview of FDA's Network... liaison between FDA Centers and the public on matters that involve medical product safety and also acts as...

  10. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ...-mail: [email protected] . Grants Management Contact Gladys Melendez-Bohler, Office of..., MD 20857, Tele.: 301-827-7175; e-mail: Gladys[email protected] . For more information on...: Gladys Melendez-Bohler, Office of Acquisition and Grant Services (OAGS), Food and Drug Administration...

  11. 75 FR 74063 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration's Convener of Active Medical Product...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... the program expansion including the availability of appropriate staff and sufficient funding. 4. The...] Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration's Convener of Active Medical Product Surveillance... expansion of its Conference Cooperative Agreement Program (U13), awarded to the Engelberg Center for Health...

  12. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... FDA intends to apply its regulatory oversight to only those mobile apps that are medical devices and...] Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability...) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Mobile Medical Applications.'' The FDA is...

  13. 78 FR 34392 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Technical Considerations for Pen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... adhesive label to assist the office in processing your requests. The guidance may also be obtained by mail... and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... June 2013. FDA is providing this final guidance document to assist industry in developing technical and...

  14. Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) to define endpoints for lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Brian K.; Deming, Michael; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA). Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached...

  15. Best practice strategies to safeguard drug prescribing and drug administration: an anthology of expert views and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Allenet, Benoît; Bedouch, Pierrick; Bonnabry, Pascal; Coleman, Jamie J; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Lovis, Christian; Rei, Maria Jose; Störzinger, Dominic; Taylor, Lenka A; Pontefract, Sarah K; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; van der Sijs, Heleen; Haefeli, Walter E

    2016-04-01

    While evidence on implementation of medication safety strategies is increasing, reasons for selecting and relinquishing distinct strategies and details on implementation are typically not shared in published literature. We aimed to collect and structure expert information resulting from implementing medication safety strategies to provide advice for decision-makers. Medication safety experts with clinical expertise from thirteen hospitals throughout twelve European and North American countries shared their experience in workshop meetings, on-site-visits and remote structured interviews. We performed an expert-based, in-depth assessment of implementation of best-practice strategies to improve drug prescribing and drug administration. Workflow, variability and recommended medication safety strategies in drug prescribing and drug administration processes. According to the experts, institutions chose strategies that targeted process steps known to be particularly error-prone in the respective setting. Often, the selection was channeled by local constraints such as the e-health equipment and critically modulated by national context factors. In our study, the experts favored electronic prescribing with clinical decision support and medication reconciliation as most promising interventions. They agreed that self-assessment and introduction of medication safety boards were crucial to satisfy the setting-specific differences and foster successful implementation. While general evidence for implementation of strategies to improve medication safety exists, successful selection and adaptation of a distinct strategy requires a thorough knowledge of the institute-specific constraints and an ongoing monitoring and adjustment of the implemented measures.

  16. Development of an opioid self-administration assay to study drug seeking in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Gabriel D; Peterson, Randall T

    2017-09-29

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an excellent tool to study mental health disorders, due to its physiological and genetic similarity to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, and feasibility of small molecule screening. Zebrafish have been shown to exhibit characteristics of addiction to drugs of abuse in non-contingent assays, including conditioned place preference, but contingent assays have been limited to a single assay for alcohol consumption. Using inexpensive electronic, mechanical, and optical components, we developed an automated opioid self-administration assay for zebrafish, enabling us to measure drug seeking and gain insight into the underlying biological pathways. Zebrafish trained in the assay for five days exhibited robust self-administration, which was dependent on the function of the μ-opioid receptor. In addition, a progressive ratio protocol was used to test conditioned animals for motivation. Furthermore, conditioned fish continued to seek the drug despite an adverse consequence and showed signs of stress and anxiety upon withdrawal of the drug. Finally, we validated our assay by confirming that self-administration in zebrafish is dependent on several of the same molecular pathways as in other animal models. Given the ease and throughput of this assay, it will enable identification of important biological pathways regulating drug seeking and could lead to the development of new therapeutic molecules to treat addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prohibited or regulated? LSD psychotherapy and the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Over the 1950s and early 1960s, the use of the hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to facilitate psychotherapy was a promising field of psychiatric research in the USA. However, during the 1960s, research began to decline, before coming to a complete halt in the mid-1970s. This has commonly been explained through the increase in prohibitive federal regulations during the 1960s that aimed to curb the growing recreational use of the drug. However, closely examining the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of LSD research in the 1960s will reveal that not only was LSD research never prohibited, but that the administration supported research to a greater degree than has been recognized. Instead, the decline in research reflected more complex changes in the regulation of pharmaceutical research and development. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Moving Synergistically Acting Drug Combinations to the Clinic by Comparing Sequential versus Simultaneous Drug Administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinavahi, Saketh S; Noory, Mohammad A; Gowda, Raghavendra; Drabick, Joseph J; Berg, Arthur; Neves, Rogerio I; Robertson, Gavin P

    2018-03-01

    Drug combinations acting synergistically to kill cancer cells have become increasingly important in melanoma as an approach to manage the recurrent resistant disease. Protein kinase B (AKT) is a major target in this disease but its inhibitors are not effective clinically, which is a major concern. Targeting AKT in combination with WEE1 (mitotic inhibitor kinase) seems to have potential to make AKT-based therapeutics effective clinically. Since agents targeting AKT and WEE1 have been tested individually in the clinic, the quickest way to move the drug combination to patients would be to combine these agents sequentially, enabling the use of existing phase I clinical trial toxicity data. Therefore, a rapid preclinical approach is needed to evaluate whether simultaneous or sequential drug treatment has maximal therapeutic efficacy, which is based on a mechanistic rationale. To develop this approach, melanoma cell lines were treated with AKT inhibitor AZD5363 [4-amino- N -[(1 S )-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl]-1-(7 H -pyrrolo[2,3- d ]pyrimidin-4-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide] and WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 [2-allyl-1-(6-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-((4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl)amino)-1 H -pyrazolo[3,4- d ]pyrimidin-3(2 H )-one] using simultaneous and sequential dosing schedules. Simultaneous treatment synergistically reduced melanoma cell survival and tumor growth. In contrast, sequential treatment was antagonistic and had a minimal tumor inhibitory effect compared with individual agents. Mechanistically, simultaneous targeting of AKT and WEE1 enhanced deregulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair pathways by modulating transcription factors p53 and forkhead box M1, which was not observed with sequential treatment. Thus, this study identifies a rapid approach to assess the drug combinations with a mechanistic basis for selection, which suggests that combining AKT and WEE1 inhibitors is needed for maximal efficacy. Copyright © 2018 by The American

  19. [PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT IN PALLIATIVE CARE. DRUG ADMINISTRATION ROUTE, CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INFUSION, ADVERSE SIDE EFFECTS, SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez Álvarez, Rocío; Calderón Carrasco, Justo; García Colchero, Francisco; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    To achieve well-being in patients in Palliative Care is required to know which are the most common symptoms, which are the drugs used for relief, which are the routes of administration of drugs that are suitable, how effective the drugs are and what incompatibilities, interactions and adverse effects occur. The aim of this article is to review the relevant issues in the management of the drugs commonly used by nursing in Palliative Care and presenting recommendations to clinical practice. Management interventions drugs for nurses in Palliative Care recommended by the scientific literature after a search of Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, UpToDate and Google Scholar are selected. The oral route is the choice for patients in palliative situation and subcutaneous route when the first is not available. The symptoms, complex, intense and moody, should be systematically reevaluated by the nurse, to predict when a possible decompensation of it needing extra dose of medication. Nurses must be able to recognize the imbalance of well-being and act quickly and effectively, to get relief to some unpleasant situations for the patient as the pain symptoms, dyspnea or delirium. For the proper administration of rescue medication, the nurse should know the methods of symptomatic evaluation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the time intervals to elapse between different rescues and nccocc rocnnnco t thocm

  20. [Drug administration to pediatric patients: Evaluation of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménétré, S; Weber, M; Socha, M; Le Tacon, S; May, I; Schweitzer, C; Demoré, B

    2018-04-01

    In hospitals, the nursing staff is often confronted with the problem of the preparation and administration of drugs for their pediatric patients because of the lack of indication, pediatric dosage, and appropriate galenic form. The goal of this study was to give an overview of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units and highlight their daily problems. This single-center prospective study was conducted through an observation of the nursing staff during the drug preparation process in medicine, surgery and intensive care units. We included 91 patients (55 boys and 36 girls), with an average age of 6.3 years (youngest child, 10 days old; oldest child, 18 years old). We observed a mean 2.16 drug preparations per patient [1-5]. We collected 197 observation reports regarding 66 injectable drugs and 131 oral drugs (71 liquid forms and 60 solid forms). The majority of these reports concerned central nervous system drugs (63/197), metabolism and digestive system drugs (50/197), and anti-infective drugs (46/197). The study highlights the nurses' difficulties: modification of the solid galenic forms, lack of knowledge on oral liquid form preservation or reconstitution methods, withdrawal of small volumes, and vague and noncompliant labeling. This study led to the creation of a specific working group for pediatrics. This multidisciplinary team meets on a regular basis to work toward improving the current habits to both simplify and secure drug administration to hospitalized children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of generic drug prices in seven European countries: a methodological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J; Kanavos, Panos G

    2017-03-31

    Policymakers and researchers frequently compare the prices of medicines between countries. Such comparisons often serve as barometers of how pricing and reimbursement policies are performing. The aim of this study was to examine methodological challenges to comparing generic drug prices. We calculated all commonly used price indices based on 2013 IMS Health data on sales of 3156 generic drugs in seven European countries. There were large differences in generic drug prices between countries. However, the results varied depending on the choice of index, base country, unit of volume, method of currency conversion, and therapeutic category. The results also differed depending on whether one looked at the prices charged by manufacturers or those charged by pharmacists. Price indices are a useful statistical approach for comparing drug prices across countries, but researchers and policymakers should interpret price indices with caution given their limitations. Price-index results are highly sensitive to the choice of method and sample. More research is needed to determine the drivers of price differences between countries. The data suggest that some governments should aim to reduce distribution costs for generic drugs.

  2. METHODOLOGY OF DOMESTIC STUDIES OF MEDICINAL DRUGS NEED AND THEIR CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Dryomova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the current development stage of Russian healthcare rational use of limited financial resources for the fullest satisfaction of population's need in medicinal drugs acquires a special importance. Therefore, the issue about knowledge of experts in determination of need in drugs and evaluation of the consumption, as well as methods applied for these scientific and practical tasks resolution has a critical character. The purpose of our work is to characterize the development of research methodology of medicinal drugs need and their consumption in Russia. We have revealed the dynamics and tendencies of analyzed scientific direction development, leading scientists, principal methods, and study objects using scientometric methods of content-analysis and scientific works calculation (dissertations autoab-stracts. We have established the fact of significant change of methodology beginning with 2000 comparing with a period 1970-1980s. According to authors' opinion this was conditioned by objective need in problem solving connected with pharmaceutical support in the frameworks of state guarantees.

  3. Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-06-01

    Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

  4. Assessment of knowledge of pediatric nurses related with drug administration and preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Ali; Kunt, Ayşe; Selalmaz, Melek; Sözeri, Şehrinaz; Uslu, Sinan; Nuhoğlu, Asiye

    2014-12-01

    Aim of this study is to determine the levels of knowledge related with drug administration and drug administration errors of nurses who care for pediatric patients. The study data were obtained from the nurses who were working in the departments of pediatrics in two education and research hospitals in the province of İstanbul and who accepted to participate in the study. The questionnaire form of the study was established by the investigators in accordance with the experiences and literature information. A total of 31 questions related with drug preparation, calculation and administration together with the general working properties of the individual were filled out by face to face interview. The data were evaluated using percent and chi-square tests. The study was initiated after ethics committee approval was obtained from Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Education and Research Hospital (365/2013). The study was conducted with 98 nurses who accepted the questionnaire. The education levels of the participants were as follows: undergraduate (48%), high school (32.7%), associate degree (12.2%), master's degree (6.1%) and postgraduate (1%). It was found that 88.8% of the participants worked in a patient-centered fashion and 11.2% worked in a work-centered fashion. The frequency of interruption/distraction during preparation of treatment was found to be 92.9%. It was found that the frequency of checking by two people during preparation or administration of high risk drugs was 64.3% and the conditions under which drugs should be kept were found to known correctly with a rate of 76.5%. It was found that undergraduate healthcare workers were more successful in converting units (p= 0.000). It was found that powder weight of drugs was considered with a rate of 85.7% in calculation. Conclusively, it was found that nurses who worked in pediatric wards did not receive a standard education in terms of drug administration and preparation. It was found that undergraduate nurses were more

  5. Towards a Computable Data Corpus of Temporal Correlations between Drug Administration and Lab Value Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Newe

    Full Text Available The analysis of electronic health records for an automated detection of adverse drug reactions is an approach to solve the problems that arise from traditional methods like spontaneous reporting or manual chart review. Algorithms addressing this task should be modeled on the criteria for a standardized case causality assessment defined by the World Health Organization. One of these criteria is the temporal relationship between drug intake and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. Appropriate data that would allow for developing or validating related algorithms is not publicly available, though.In order to provide such data, retrospective routine data of drug administrations and temporally corresponding laboratory observations from a university clinic were extracted, transformed and evaluated by experts in terms of a reasonable time relationship between drug administration and lab value alteration.The result is a data corpus of 400 episodes of normalized laboratory parameter values in temporal context with drug administrations. Each episode has been manually classified whether it contains data that might indicate a temporal correlation between the drug administration and the change of the lab value course, whether such a change is not observable or whether a decision between those two options is not possible due to the data. In addition, each episode has been assigned a concordance value which indicates how difficult it is to assess. This is the first open data corpus of a computable ground truth of temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations.The main purpose of this data corpus is the provision of data for further research and the provision of a ground truth which allows for comparing the outcome of other assessments of this data with the outcome of assessments made by human experts. It can serve as a contribution towards systematic, computerized ADR detection in retrospective data. With

  6. The 2015 US Food and Drug Administration Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Mary C; King, Tekoa L

    2017-05-01

    As of 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) discontinued the pregnancy risk categories (ABCDX) that had been used to denote the putative safety of drugs for use among pregnant women. The ABCDX system has been replaced by the FDA Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR) that requires narrative text to describe risk information, clinical considerations, and background data for the drug. The new rule includes 3 overarching categories: 1) pregnancy, which includes labor and birth; 2) lactation; and 3) females and males of reproductive potential. This article reviews the key components of the PLLR and clinical implications, and provides resources for clinicians who prescribe drugs for women of reproductive age. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  7. The Food and Drug Administration reports provided more data but were more difficult to use than the European Medicines Agency reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Abdel-Sattar, Maher; Bero, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the accessibility, comprehensiveness, and usefulness of data available from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug reports. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. All new molecular drugs approved between January...... 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 from the FDA and EMA Web sites were eligible. RESULTS: We included 27 drug reports. Most were searchable, but the FDA table of contents did not match the file's page numbers. Several FDA documents must be searched compared with a single EMA document, but the FDA reports...... contain more summary data on harms. Detailed information about harms was reported for 93% of the FDA reports (25 of 27 reports) and 26% of the EMA reports (7 of 27 reports). The reports contained information about trial methodology but did not include trial registry IDs or investigator names. All reports...

  8. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Newe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available.

  9. Evaluating the administration costs of biologic drugs: development of a cost algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ebenezer K; Morris, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Biologic drugs, as with all other medical technologies, are subject to a number of regulatory, marketing, reimbursement (financing) and other demand-restricting hurdles applied by healthcare payers. One example is the routine use of cost-effectiveness analyses or health technology assessments to determine which medical technologies offer value-for-money. The manner in which these assessments are conducted suggests that, holding all else equal, the economic value of biologic drugs may be determined by how much is spent on administering these drugs or trade-offs between drug acquisition and administration costs. Yet, on the supply-side, it seems very little attention is given to how manufacturing and formulation choices affect healthcare delivery costs. This paper evaluates variations in the administration costs of biologic drugs, taking care to ensure consistent inclusion of all relevant cost resources. From this, it develops a regression-based algorithm with which manufacturers could possibly predict, during process development, how their manufacturing and formulation choices may impact on the healthcare delivery costs of their products.

  10. Impact of repeated intravenous cocaine administration on incentive motivation depends on mode of drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Kimberly H; Maidment, Nigel T; Ostlund, Sean B

    2014-11-01

    The incentive sensitization theory of addiction posits that repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, like cocaine, can lead to long-term adaptations in the neural circuits that support motivated behavior, providing an account of pathological drug-seeking behavior. Although pre-clinical findings provide strong support for this theory, much remains unknown about the conditions that support incentive sensitization. The current study examined whether the mode of cocaine administration is an important factor governing that drug's long-term impact on behavior. Separate groups of rats were allowed either to self-administer intravenous cocaine or were given an equivalent number and distribution of unsignaled cocaine or saline infusions. During the subsequent test of incentive motivation (Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer), we found that rats with a history of cocaine self-administration showed strong cue-evoked food seeking, in contrast to rats given unsignaled cocaine or saline. This finding indicates that the manner in which cocaine is administered can determine its lasting behavioral effects, suggesting that subjective experiences during drug use play a critical role in the addiction process. Our findings may therefore have important implications for the study and treatment of compulsive drug seeking. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. A Methodological Review of US Budget-Impact Models for New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskopf, Josephine; Earnshaw, Stephanie

    2016-11-01

    A budget-impact analysis is required by many jurisdictions when adding a new drug to the formulary. However, previous reviews have indicated that adherence to methodological guidelines is variable. In this methodological review, we assess the extent to which US budget-impact analyses for new drugs use recommended practices. We describe recommended practice for seven key elements in the design of a budget-impact analysis. Targeted literature searches for US studies reporting estimates of the budget impact of a new drug were performed and we prepared a summary of how each study addressed the seven key elements. The primary finding from this review is that recommended practice is not followed in many budget-impact analyses. For example, we found that growth in the treated population size and/or changes in disease-related costs expected during the model time horizon for more effective treatments was not included in several analyses for chronic conditions. In addition, all drug-related costs were not captured in the majority of the models. Finally, for most studies, one-way sensitivity and scenario analyses were very limited, and the ranges used in one-way sensitivity analyses were frequently arbitrary percentages rather than being data driven. The conclusions from our review are that changes in population size, disease severity mix, and/or disease-related costs should be properly accounted for to avoid over- or underestimating the budget impact. Since each budget holder might have different perspectives and different values for many of the input parameters, it is also critical for published budget-impact analyses to include extensive sensitivity and scenario analyses based on realistic input values.

  12. Structured Observation of School Administrator Work Activities: Methodological Limitations and Recommendations for Research, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitner, Nancy J.; Russell, James S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically reviews administrator work activity studies which follow the research of Henry Mintzberg. It discusses directions for future research using qualitative and quantitative methods and discourages research that relies solely on Mintzberg's structure. (Author/JAZ)

  13. [Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma complicated with drug-induced vasculitis during administration of pegfilgrastim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuta; Noda, Kentaro; Aiba, Keisuke; Yano, Shingo; Fujii, Tsunehiro

    A 59-year-old female with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) regimen. In addition, we administered pegfilgrastim for treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. She complained of fever and neck and chest pain a few days after pegfilgrastim administration during the third and fourth courses of R-CHOP. Radiological imaging revealed an inflammation of large vessels, which led to the diagnosis of drug-associated vasculitis. We confirmed that vasculitis observed in this case was caused by pegfilgrastim administration because similar symptoms appeared with both injections of pegfilgrastim.

  14. Model-based drug administration : current status of target-controlled infusion and closed-loop control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuizenga, Merel H.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Purpose of review Drug administration might be optimized by incorporating pharmacokinetic-dynamic (PK/PD) principles and control engineering theories. This review gives an update of the actual status of target-controlled infusion (TCI) and closed-loop computer-controlled drug administration and the

  15. 76 FR 28688 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0102] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus Species Detection AGENCY: Food and...

  16. 76 FR 48870 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... selection inclusion and exclusion criteria section. The revisions define and differentiate the required... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0428] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document...

  17. 75 FR 59726 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... method comparison section and the sample selection inclusion and exclusion criteria section. The... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0428] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

  18. 78 FR 9701 - Draft Joint Food and Drug Administration/Health Canada Quantitative Assessment of the Risk of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... on the sources of L. monocytogenes contamination, the effects of individual manufacturing and/or... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1182] Draft Joint Food and Drug Administration/Health Canada Quantitative Assessment of the Risk of...

  19. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... annually from approximately 25 application holders. FDA professionals familiar with Dear Health Care... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0319] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters...

  20. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0529] Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business... amounts on small business, as set forth in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). In particular...

  1. 76 FR 45818 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0529] Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business... burden of fee amounts on small business, as set forth in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA...

  2. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  3. Methodologies Related to Computational models in View of Developing Anti-Alzheimer Drugs: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheti, Kirtee; Kale, Mayura Ajay

    2018-04-17

    carried out on various heterocyclic scaffolds that can serve as lead compounds to design Anti-Alzheimer's drugs in future. The molecular modeling methods can thus become a better alternative for discovery of newer Anti-Alzheimer agents. This methodology is extremely useful to design drugs in minimum time, with enhanced activity keeping balanced ethical considerations. Thus, the researchers are opting for this improved process over the conventional methods hoping to achieve a sure shot way out for the sufferings of people affected by Alzheimer besides other diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Nanotechnology-based polymeric bio(muco)adhesive platforms for controlling drug delivery - properties, methodologies and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Flavia Chiva; Chorilli, Marlus; Gremiao, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2014-01-01

    Studies using bio(muco)adhesive drug delivery systems have recently gained great interest, which can promote drug targeting and more specific contact of the drug delivery system with the various absorptive membranes of the body. This technological platform associated with nanotechnology offers potential for controlling drug delivery; therefore, they are excellent strategies to increase the bioavailability of drugs. The objective of this work was to study nanotechnology-based polymeric bio(muco)adhesive platforms for controlling drug delivery, highlighting their properties, how the bio(muco)adhesion can be measured and their potential applications for different routes of administration. (author)

  5. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Jessica L; Fixen, Danielle R; Saseen, Joseph J; Saba, Laura M; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) per night in women. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zo...

  6. Concurrent administration of anticancer chemotherapy drug and herbal medicine on the perspective of pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Yi Cheng; Chen-Hsi Hsieh; Tung-Hu Tsai

    2018-01-01

    With an increasing number of cancer patients seeking an improved quality of life, complementary and alternative therapies are becoming more common ways to achieve such improvements. The potential risks of concurrent administration are serious and must be addressed. However, comprehensive evidence for the risks and benefits of combining anticancer drugs with traditional herbs is rare. Pharmacokinetic investigations are an efficient way to understand the influence of concomitant remedies. There...

  7. Identifying priorities in methodological research using ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 administrative data: report from an international consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health administrative data are frequently used for health services and population health research. Comparative research using these data has been facilitated by the use of a standard system for coding diagnoses, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD. Research using the data must deal with data quality and validity limitations which arise because the data are not created for research purposes. This paper presents a list of high-priority methodological areas for researchers using health administrative data. Methods A group of researchers and users of health administrative data from Canada, the United States, Switzerland, Australia, China and the United Kingdom came together in June 2005 in Banff, Canada to discuss and identify high-priority methodological research areas. The generation of ideas for research focussed not only on matters relating to the use of administrative data in health services and population health research, but also on the challenges created in transitioning from ICD-9 to ICD-10. After the brain-storming session, voting took place to rank-order the suggested projects. Participants were asked to rate the importance of each project from 1 (low priority to 10 (high priority. Average ranks were computed to prioritise the projects. Results Thirteen potential areas of research were identified, some of which represented preparatory work rather than research per se. The three most highly ranked priorities were the documentation of data fields in each country's hospital administrative data (average score 8.4, the translation of patient safety indicators from ICD-9 to ICD-10 (average score 8.0, and the development and validation of algorithms to verify the logic and internal consistency of coding in hospital abstract data (average score 7.0. Conclusion The group discussions resulted in a list of expert views on critical international priorities for future methodological research relating to health

  8. Alcohol- and Drug-Involved Driving in the United States: Methodology for the 2007 National Roadside Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, John H.; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Voas, Robert B.; Romano, Eduardo; Furr-Holden, C. Debra; Torres, Pedro; Berning, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the methodology used in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey to estimate the prevalence of alcohol- and drug-impaired driving and alcohol- and drug-involved driving. This study involved randomly stopping drivers at 300 locations across the 48 continental U.S. states at sites selected through a stratified random sampling…

  9. Profile of drug administration errors in anesthesia among anesthesiologists from Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rolf Erdmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anesthesiology is the only medical specialty that prescribes, dilutes, and administers drugs without conferral by another professional. Adding to the high frequency of drug administration, a propitious scenario to errors is created. OBJECTIVE: Access the prevalence of drug administration errors during anesthesia among anesthesiologists from Santa Catarina, the circumstances in which they occurred, and possible associated factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to all anesthesiologists from Sociedade de Anestesiologia do Estado de Santa Catarina, with direct or multiple choice questions on responder demographics and anesthesia practice profile; prevalence of errors, type and consequence of error; and factors that may have contributed to the errors. RESULTS: Of the respondents, 91.8% reported they had committed administration errors, adding the total error of 274 and mean of 4.7 (6.9 errors per respondent. The most common error was replacement (68.4%, followed by dose error (49.1%, and omission (35%. Only 7% of respondents reported neuraxial administration error. Regarding circumstances of errors, they mainly occurred in the morning (32.7%, in anesthesia maintenance (49%, with 47.8% without harm to the patient and 1.75% with the highest morbidity and irreversible damage, and 87.3% of cases with immediate identification. As for possible contributing factors, the most frequent were distraction and fatigue (64.9% and misreading of labels, ampoules, or syringes (54.4%. CONCLUSION: Most respondents committed more than one error in anesthesia administration, mainly justified as a distraction or fatigue, and of low gravity.

  10. Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om den praksis, vi kalder administration. Vi er i den offentlige sektor i Danmark hos kontorfolkene med deres sagsmapper, computere, telefoner,, lovsamlinger,, retningslinier og regneark. I bogen udfoldes en mangfoldighed af konkrete historier om det administrative arbejde fra...... forskellige områder i den offentlige sektor. Hensigten er at forstå den praksis og faglighed der knytter sig til det administrative arbejde...

  11. Chiron Vision files FDA application to market intraocular implant for CMV retinitis. Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Chiron Corporation and Hoffman-LaRoche announced a filing of a New Drug Application with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Vitrasert, its intraocular implant which delivers ganciclovir directly to the eye for treatment of CMV retinitis. Clinical trials show that Vitrasert offers a clinical improvement versus intravenous ganciclovir in further delaying progression of CMV retinitis in the treated eye. One study reported that the median time to progression of CMV retinitis was 186 days for eyes receiving Vitrasert compared to 72 days for eyes receiving intravenous ganciclovir therapy. Chiron's intraocular implant contains ganciclovir embedded in a polymer-based system that slowly releases the drug into the eye for up to eight months. Two additional trials are underway. For further information contact the Professional Services Group at Chiron Corporation at (800) 244-7668, select 2.

  12. Combined Transcriptomics and Metabolomics in a Rhesus Macaque Drug Administration Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Whole blood and bone marrow RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven time-points before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modelling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modelling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the bone marrow with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance following each round of drug exposure is observed. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine’s predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system.

  13. 77 FR 51698 - Authorization To Seize Property Involved in Drug Offenses for Administrative Forfeiture (2012R-9P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... obtained. In recognition of the link between drug trafficking and many criminal organizations, the Attorney... to combat firearm-related violent crime. The nexus between drug trafficking and firearm violence is... Involved in Drug Offenses for Administrative Forfeiture (2012R-9P) AGENCY: Department of Justice. ACTION...

  14. Accuracy of Coverage Survey Recall following an Integrated Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis, Schistosomiasis, and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Philip J.; Sognikin, Edmond; Akosa, Amanda; Mathieu, Els M.; Deming, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Achieving target coverage levels for mass drug administration (MDA) is essential to elimination and control efforts for several neglected tropical diseases (NTD). To ensure program goals are met, coverage reported by drug distributors may be validated through household coverage surveys that rely on respondent recall. This is the first study to assess accuracy in such surveys. Methodology/Principal Findings Recall accuracy was tested in a series of coverage surveys conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after an integrated MDA in Togo during which three drugs (albendazole, ivermectin, and praziquantel) were distributed. Drug distribution was observed during the MDA to ensure accurate recording of persons treated during the MDA. Information was obtained for 506, 1131, and 947 persons surveyed at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Coverage (defined as the percentage of persons taking at least one of the MDA medications) within these groups was respectively 88.3%, 87.4%, and 80.0%, according to the treatment registers; it was 87.9%, 91.4% and 89.4%, according to survey responses. Concordance between respondents and registers on swallowing at least one pill was >95% at 1 month and >86% at 12 months; the lower concordance at 12 months was more likely due to difficulty matching survey respondents with the year-old treatment register rather than inaccurate responses. Respondents generally distinguished between pills similar in appearance; concordance for recall of which pills were taken was over 80% in each survey. Significance In this population, coverage surveys provided remarkably consistent coverage estimates for up to one year following an integrated MDA. It is not clear if similar consistency will be seen in other settings, however, these data suggest that in some settings coverage surveys might be conducted as much as one year following an MDA without compromising results. This might enable integration of post-MDA coverage measurement into large, multipurpose

  15. Structured Observation of School Administrator Work Activities: Methodological Limitations and Recommendations for Research, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitner, Nancy J.; Russell, James S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically reviews studies of administrator work activities which follow the work of Henry Mintzberg (1973), concentrating on these shortcomings of the method: (1) procedural difficulties in coding; (2) design limitations of classifying activities; (3) inadequate testing of Mintzberg's hypotheses; and (4) failure to explore antecedents…

  16. New screening methodology for selection of polymeric materials for transdermal drug delivery devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Roberto P.

    As medical advances extend the human lifespan, the level of chronic illnesses will increase and thus straining the needs of the health care system that, as a result, governments will need to balance expenses without upsetting national budgets. Therefore, the selection of a precise and affordable drug delivery technology is seen as the most practical solution for governments, health care professionals, and consumers. Transdermal drug delivery patches (TDDP) are one of the best economical technologies that are favored by pharmaceutical companies and physicians alike because it offers fewer complications when compared to other delivery technologies. TDDP provides increased efficiency, safety and convenience for the patient. The TDDP segment within the US and Global drug delivery markets were valued at 5.6 and 12.7 billion respectively in 2009. TDDP is forecasted to reach $31.5 billion in 2015. The present TDDP technology involves the fabrication of a patch that consists of a drug embedded in a polymeric matrix. The diffusion coefficient is determined from the slope of the cumulative drug release versus time. It is a trial and error method that is time and labor consuming. With all the advantages that TDDPs can offer, the methodology used to achieve the so-called optimum design has resulted in several incidents where the safety and design have been put to question in recent times (e.g. Fentanyl). A more logical screening methodology is needed. This work shows the use of a modified Duda Zielinsky equation (DZE). Experimental release curves from commercial are evaluated. The experimental and theoretical Diffusion Coefficient values are found to be within the limits specified in the patent literature. One interesting finding is that the accuracy of the DZE is closer to experimental values when the type of Molecular Shape and Radius are used. This work shows that the modified DZE could be used as an excellent screening tool to determine the optimal polymeric matrices that

  17. 78 FR 100 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0523] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  18. Enrichment Strategies in Pediatric Drug Development: An Analysis of Trials Submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dionna J; Liu, Xiaomei I; Hua, Tianyi; Burnham, Janelle M; Schuck, Robert; Pacanowski, Michael; Yao, Lynne; McCune, Susan K; Burckart, Gilbert J; Zineh, Issam

    2017-12-08

    Clinical trial enrichment involves prospectively incorporating trial design elements that increase the probability of detecting a treatment effect. The use of enrichment strategies in pediatric drug development has not been systematically assessed. We analyzed the use of enrichment strategies in pediatric trials submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration from 2012-2016. In all, 112 efficacy studies associated with 76 drug development programs were assessed and their overall success rates were 78% and 75%, respectively. Eighty-eight trials (76.8%) employed at least one enrichment strategy; of these, 66.3% employed multiple enrichment strategies. The highest trial success rates were achieved when all three enrichment strategies (practical, predictive, and prognostic) were used together within a single trial (87.5%), while the lowest success rate was observed when no enrichment strategy was used (65.4%). The use of enrichment strategies in pediatric trials was found to be associated with trial and program success in our analysis. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Design of a RESTful web information system for drug prescription and administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo; Paganelli, Federica; Pettenati, Maria Chiara; Turchi, Stefano; Ciofi, Lucia; Iadanza, Ernesto; Giuli, Dino

    2014-05-01

    Drug prescription and administration processes strongly impact on the occurrence of risks in medical settings for they can be sources of adverse drug events (ADEs). A properly engineered use of information and communication technologies has proven to be a promising approach to reduce these risks. In this study, we propose PHARMA, a web information system which supports healthcare staff in the secure cooperative execution of drug prescription, transcription and registration tasks. PHARMA allows the easy sharing and management of documents containing drug-related information (i.e., drug prescriptions, medical reports, screening), which is often inconsistent and scattered across different information systems and heterogeneous organization domains (e.g., departments, other hospital facilities). PHARMA enables users to access such information in a consistent and secure way, through the adoption of REST and web-oriented design paradigms and protocols. We describe the implementation of the PHARMA prototype, and we discuss the results of the usability evaluation that we carried out with the staff of a hospital in Florence, Italy.

  20. Equity, land register and government of the territory. A methodological proposal to support the Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Curto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research project submitted to the MIUR (Ministry of Education, University and Research, in response to the Notice of PRIN (Scientific Research Programmes of Relevant National Interest for the year 2012. The "Fairness, Land register and territory government" project addresses the core of property taxation and, in particular, how such fairness can be guaranteed in Italy only through a process of revision of the land register estimates. In Italy, in fact, land register values have been completely disconnected from the real market values of the assets and, therefore, from their characteristics and quality. The project aims to define the most appropriate methodology for the revision of land register values of the entire national heritage, which satisfy the requirements of scientific rigour and which are also applicable. It considers the timing of the estimate of the values as a specific step in a broader methodology, which includes the node of technological infrastructures and databases. In fact it conceives the land register, with its databases, as the heart of Lis (Land Information System and also considers the process of reviewing the estimates from the perspective of providing the basis for more modern property taxation, able to recognise and delimit territorially the dynamics of values and, in particular, those that manifest themselves in the form of exogenous monetary factors produced by public interventions, whether they are large projects and/or infrastructure developments.

  1. A systematic review of adverse drug events associated with administration of common asthma medications in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Leung

    Full Text Available To systematically review the literature and determine frequencies of adverse drug events (ADE associated with pediatric asthma medications.Following PRISMA guidelines, we systematically searched six bibliographic databases between January 1991 and January 2017. Study eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment were independently completed and verified by two reviewers. We included randomized control trials (RCT, case-control, cohort, or quasi-experimental studies where the primary objective was identifying ADE in children 1 month- 18 years old exposed to commercial asthma medications. The primary outcome was ADE frequency.Our search identified 14,540 citations. 46 studies were included: 24 RCT, 15 cohort, 4 RCT pooled analyses, 1 case-control, 1 open-label trial and 1 quasi-experimental study. Studies examined the following drug classes: inhaled corticosteroids (ICS (n = 24, short-acting beta-agonists (n = 10, long-acting beta-agonists (LABA (n = 3, ICS + LABA (n = 3, Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists (n = 3 and others (n = 3. 29 studies occurred in North America, and 29 were industry funded. We report a detailed index of 406 ADE descriptions and frequencies organized by drug class. The majority of data focuses on ICS, with 174 ADE affecting 13 organ systems including adrenal and growth suppression. We observed serious ADE, although they were rare, with frequency ranging between 0.9-6% per drug. There were no confirmed deaths, except for 13 potential deaths in a LABA study including combined adult and pediatric participants. We identified substantial methodological concerns, particularly with identifying ADE and determining severity. No studies utilized available standardized causality, severity or preventability assessments.The majority of studies focus on ICS, with adrenal and growth suppression described. Serious ADE are relatively uncommon, with no confirmed pediatric deaths. We identify substantial methodological concerns

  2. Derived Intervention Levels for Tritium Based on Food and Drug Administration Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1998-01-01

    In 1998, the FDA released it recommendations for age-dependent derived intervention levels for several radionuclides involved in nuclear accidents. One radionuclide that is not included in that document is tritium

  3. The history and contemporary challenges of the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Andrea T; Hagie, Frank; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 marks the 100th anniversary of the regulatory agency now known as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the first consumer protection agency of the federal government and arguably the most influential regulatory agency in the world. The FDA thus plays an integral role in the use of pharmaceuticals, not only in the United States but worldwide. The goal of this review was to present an overview of the FDA and place its current role in the perspectives of history and contemporary needs. Relevant materials for this review were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE (through 2006) using the main search terms United States Food and Drug Administration, FDA, history of the FDA, drug approvals, drug legislation, and FDA legislation. Results from the initial searches were then explored further. The statute that created the bureau which later became the FDA established this agency to prohibit interstate commerce of adulterated foods, drinks, and drugs. The Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that replaced it in 1938, and subsequent food and drug laws and amendments, expanded the FDA's responsibilities to cosmetics, medical devices, biological products, and radiation-emitting products. These amendments have also established the FDA as a mainly preventive regulatory agency that relies chiefly on pre-market control. As such, the FDA has played an important role in shaping the modern pharmaceutical industry by making the scientific approach and the clinical trial process the standard for establishing safety and efficacy and by making rigorous scientific analysis the predominant component of the process for pharmaceutical regulation. As shown in this review, the evolution of the FDA can be described as a series of "crisis-legislation-adaptation" cycles: a public health crisis promoted the passage of congressional legislation, which was then followed by implementation of the law by the FDA. However, the crises the FDA faces

  4. Multiple model predictive control for optimal drug administration of mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, N; Ozgoli, S; Ramezani, A

    2017-06-01

    Mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours is one of the most efficient ways to improve cancer treatment strategies. However, it is important to 'design' an effective treatment programme which can optimize the ways of combining immunotherapy and chemotherapy to diminish their imminent side effects. Control engineering techniques could be used for this. The method of multiple model predictive controller (MMPC) is applied to the modified Stepanova model to induce the best combination of drugs scheduling under a better health criteria profile. The proposed MMPC is a feedback scheme that can perform global optimization for both tumour volume and immune competent cell density by performing multiple constraints. Although current studies usually assume that immunotherapy has no side effect, this paper presents a new method of mixed drug administration by employing MMPC, which implements several constraints for chemotherapy and immunotherapy by considering both drug toxicity and autoimmune. With designed controller we need maximum 57% and 28% of full dosage of drugs for chemotherapy and immunotherapy in some instances, respectively. Therefore, through the proposed controller less dosage of drugs are needed, which contribute to suitable results with a perceptible reduction in medicine side effects. It is observed that in the presence of MMPC, the amount of required drugs is minimized, while the tumour volume is reduced. The efficiency of the presented method has been illustrated through simulations, as the system from an initial condition in the malignant region of the state space (macroscopic tumour volume) transfers into the benign region (microscopic tumour volume) in which the immune system can control tumour growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Will mass drug administration eliminate lymphatic filariasis? Evidence from northern coastal Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa; Allen, Tim

    2013-07-01

    This article documents understandings and responses to mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment and prevention of lymphatic filariasis among adults and children in northern coastal Tanzania from 2004 to 2011. Assessment of village-level distribution registers, combined with self-reported drug uptake surveys of adults, participant observation and interviews, revealed that at study sites in Pangani and Muheza districts the uptake of drugs was persistently low. The majority of people living at these highly endemic locations either did not receive or actively rejected free treatment. A combination of social, economic and political reasons explain the low uptake of drugs. These include a fear of treatment (attributable, in part, to a lack of trust in international aid and a questioning of the motives behind the distribution); divergence between biomedical and local understandings of lymphatic filariasis; and limited and ineffective communication about the rationale for mass treatment. Other contributory factors are the reliance upon volunteers for distribution within villages and, in some locations, strained relationships between different groups of people within villages as well as between local leaders and government officials. The article also highlights a disjuncture between self-reported uptake of drugs by adults at a village level and the higher uptake of drugs recorded in official reports. The latter informs claims that elimination will be a possibility by 2020. This gives voice to a broader problem: there is considerable pressure for those implementing MDA to report positive results. The very real challenges of making MDA work are pushed to one side - adding to a rhetoric of success at the expense of engaging with local realities. It is vital to address the kind of issues raised in this article if current attempts to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in mainland coastal Tanzania are to achieve their goal.

  6. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havens Jennifer R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101 and a major metropolitan area (n = 111 in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use.

  7. A European study on alcohol and drug use among young drivers: the TEND by Night study design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliquini Roberta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young individuals are the age group with the highest risk of car accidents. One of main explanations relies on the use of psychoactive substances (alcohol, illegal and medicinal drugs, which are known to be major risk factors of road accidents, and whose consumption is almost universally more common among younger drivers. Although the correlation between psychoactive substances use and decrease in driving performance has been established in controlled experimental or laboratory settings, few studies were conducted in naturalistic circumstances. The TEND by Night project has been designed to evaluate the relationship between driving performance and psychoactive substances assumption in young drivers enrolled at typical places of consumption. Methods/Design The TEND by Night project, endorsed by the European Commission, is a multidisciplinary, multi-centric, cross-sectional study conducted in six European countries (Italy, Belgium/Netherlands, Bulgaria, Spain, Poland and Latvia. The study population consists of 5000 young drivers aged 16-34 years, attending recreational sites during weekend nights. The intervention is based on the portal survey technique and includes several steps at the entrance and exit of selected sites, including the administration of semi-structured questionnaires, breath alcohol test, several drug assumption test, and measurement of the reaction time using a driving simulator. The main outcome is the difference in reaction time between the entrance and exit of the recreation site, and its correlation with psychoactive substances use. As a secondary outcome it will be explored the relationship between reaction time difference and the amount of consumption of each substance. All analyses will be multivariate. Discussion The project methodology should provide some relevant advantages over traditional survey systems. The main strengths of the study include the large and multicentric sample, the objective

  8. Regulatory aspects of teratology: role of the Food and Drug Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, F.O.

    1982-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is a scientific regulatory agency whose consumer protection activities cover a wide range of products including foods and additives, and pesticide residues on foods; drugs; cosmetics; medical devices; and radiation-emitting electronic products. Amongst its concerns is the possible teratogen effects of regulated products to which the pregnant woman is exposed. The policies and programs of the agency directed toward reducing such risks to the unborn are reviewed. These measures include guidelines for animal reproduction studies and for clinical trials involving women to childbearing potential; labeling of products to disclose known or possible harm to the fetus or embryo; surveillance procedures designed to detect previously unsuspected adverse effects of marketed products; research activities designed to develop better understanding of developmental toxicology and improved techniques for detecting embryocidal and embryotoxic effects; and educational efforts directed both to professionals and the public regarding hazards to the unborn of agency-regulated products

  9. Concurrent administration of anticancer chemotherapy drug and herbal medicine on the perspective of pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Yi Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing number of cancer patients seeking an improved quality of life, complementary and alternative therapies are becoming more common ways to achieve such improvements. The potential risks of concurrent administration are serious and must be addressed. However, comprehensive evidence for the risks and benefits of combining anticancer drugs with traditional herbs is rare. Pharmacokinetic investigations are an efficient way to understand the influence of concomitant remedies. Therefore, this study aimed to collect the results of pharmacokinetic studies relating to the concurrent use of cancer chemotherapy and complementary and alternative therapies. According to the National Health Insurance (NHI database in Taiwan and several publications, the three most commonly prescribed formulations for cancer patients are Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang, Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San and Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. The three most commonly prescribed single herbs for cancer patients are Hedyotis diffusa, Scutellaria barbata, and Astragalus membranaceus. Few studies have discussed herb–drug interactions involving these herbs from a pharmacokinetics perspective. Here, we reviewed Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San, Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang, Curcuma longa and milk thistle to provide information based on pharmacokinetic evidence for healthcare professionals to use in educating patients about the risks of the concomitant use of various remedies. Keywords: Traditional Chinese medicine, Chemotherapy drug, Pharmacokinetics, Herb–drug interaction

  10. Nuclear methods for food analysis at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Cunningham, W.C.; Capar, S.G.; Baratta, E.J.; Mackill, P.

    2001-01-01

    An overview radioanalytical techniques used in support of research, monitoring programs, and field assignments directed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) is presented. The Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center annually determines radionuclide concentrations in 260 Total Diet Study foods, approximately 80 imported foods, and a selection of domestic foods collected near U.S. nuclear power plants. Radioanalytical techniques used at CFSAN's neutron analysis laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology are discussed along with applications for research, quality control, and special projects. (author)

  11. Microbiological Contamination of Drugs during Their Administration for Anesthesia in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Derryn A; Mitchell, Simon J; Sheridan, Janie; Short, Timothy G; Swift, Simon; Torrie, Jane; Webster, Craig S; Merry, Alan F

    2016-04-01

    The aseptic techniques of anesthesiologists in the preparation and administration of injected medications have not been extensively investigated, but emerging data demonstrate that inadvertent lapses in aseptic technique may be an important contributor to surgical site and other postoperative infections. A prospective, open, microbiological audit of 303 cases in which anesthesiologists were asked to inject all bolus drugs, except propofol and antibiotics, through a 0.2-µm filter was performed. The authors cultured microorganisms, if present, from the 0.2-µm filter unit and from the residual contents of the syringes used for drawing up or administering drugs. Participating anesthesiologists rated ease of use of the filters after each case. Twenty-three anesthesiologists each anesthetized up to 25 adult patients. The authors isolated microorganisms from filter units in 19 (6.3%) of 300 cases (3 cases were excluded), including Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus warneri, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Micrococcus luteus/lylae, Corynebacterium, and Bacillus species. The authors collected used syringes at the end of each case and grew microorganisms from residual drug in 55 of these 2,318 (2.4%) syringes including all the aforementioned microorganisms and also Kocuria kristinae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus hominus. Participants' average rating of ease of use of the filter units was 3.5 out of 10 (0 being very easy and 10 being very difficult). Microorganisms with the potential to cause infection are being injected (presumably inadvertently) into some patients during the administration of intravenous drugs by bolus during anesthesia. The relevance of this finding to postoperative infections warrants further investigation.

  12. Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Alan F; Webster, Craig S; Hannam, Jacqueline; Mitchell, Simon J; Henderson, Robert; Reid, Papaarangi; Edwards, Kylie-Ellen; Jardim, Anisoara; Pak, Nick; Cooper, Jeremy; Hopley, Lara; Frampton, Chris; Short, Timothy G

    2011-09-22

    To clinically evaluate a new patented multimodal system (SAFERSleep) designed to reduce errors in the recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia. Prospective randomised open label clinical trial. Five designated operating theatres in a major tertiary referral hospital. Eighty nine consenting anaesthetists managing 1075 cases in which there were 10,764 drug administrations. Use of the new system (which includes customised drug trays and purpose designed drug trolley drawers to promote a well organised anaesthetic workspace and aseptic technique; pre-filled syringes for commonly used anaesthetic drugs; large legible colour coded drug labels; a barcode reader linked to a computer, speakers, and touch screen to provide automatic auditory and visual verification of selected drugs immediately before each administration; automatic compilation of an anaesthetic record; an on-screen and audible warning if an antibiotic has not been administered within 15 minutes of the start of anaesthesia; and certain procedural rules-notably, scanning the label before each drug administration) versus conventional practice in drug administration with a manually compiled anaesthetic record. Primary: composite of errors in the recording and administration of intravenous drugs detected by direct observation and by detailed reconciliation of the contents of used drug vials against recorded administrations; and lapses in responding to an intermittent visual stimulus (vigilance latency task). Secondary: outcomes in patients; analyses of anaesthetists' tasks and assessments of workload; evaluation of the legibility of anaesthetic records; evaluation of compliance with the procedural rules of the new system; and questionnaire based ratings of the respective systems by participants. The overall mean rate of drug errors per 100 administrations was 9.1 (95% confidence interval 6.9 to 11.4) with the new system (one in 11 administrations) and 11.6 (9.3 to 13.9) with conventional methods (one

  13. A stochastic model for the probability of malaria extinction by mass drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton-Ross, Peter; Chitnis, Nakul; Pothin, Emilie; Smith, Thomas A

    2017-09-18

    Mass drug administration (MDA) has been proposed as an intervention to achieve local extinction of malaria. Although its effect on the reproduction number is short lived, extinction may subsequently occur in a small population due to stochastic fluctuations. This paper examines how the probability of stochastic extinction depends on population size, MDA coverage and the reproduction number under control, R c . A simple compartmental model is developed which is used to compute the probability of extinction using probability generating functions. The expected time to extinction in small populations after MDA for various scenarios in this model is calculated analytically. The results indicate that mass drug administration (Firstly, R c must be sustained at R c  95% to have a non-negligible probability of successful elimination. Stochastic fluctuations only significantly affect the probability of extinction in populations of about 1000 individuals or less. The expected time to extinction via stochastic fluctuation is less than 10 years only in populations less than about 150 individuals. Clustering of secondary infections and of MDA distribution both contribute positively to the potential probability of success, indicating that MDA would most effectively be administered at the household level. There are very limited circumstances in which MDA will lead to local malaria elimination with a substantial probability.

  14. Investigation of the mechanisms of action behind Electromotive Drug Administration (EMDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Bor; Vásquez, Juan Luis; Miklavčič, Damijan; Hermann, Gregers G G; Gehl, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a cause of considerable morbidity worldwide. Electromotive Drug Administration is a method that combines intravesical chemotherapy with local electric field application. Electroporation has been suggested among other mechanisms as having a possible role in the therapy, so the goal of the present study was to investigate the electric fields present in the bladder wall during the treatment to determine which mechanisms might be involved. Electromotive Drug Administration involves applying intravesical mitomycin C with direct current of 20 mA delivered through a catheter electrode for 30 min. For numerical electric field computation we built a 3-D nonhomogeneous patient specific model based on CT images and used finite element method simulations to determine the electric fields in the whole body. Results indicate that highest electric field in the bladder wall was 37.7 V/m. The mean electric field magnitude in the bladder wall was 3.03 V/m. The mean magnitude of the current density in the bladder wall was 0.61 A/m(2). The present study shows that electroporation is not the mechanism of action in EMDA. A more likely explanation of the mechanism of action is iontophoretic forces increasing the mitomycin C concentration in the bladder wall.

  15. A novel method to calculate the extent and amount of drug transported into CSF after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenqi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2005-01-31

    The aim of this paper is to establish a novel method to calculate the extent and amount of drug transported to brain after administration. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was chosen as the target region. The intranasal administration of meptazinol hydrochloride (MEP) was chosen as the model administration and intravenous administration was selected as reference. According to formula transform, the extent was measured by the equation of X(A)CSF, infinity/X0 = Cl(CSF) AUC(0-->infinity)CSF/X0 and the drug amount was calculated by multiplying the dose with the extent. The drug clearance in CSF (Cl(CSF)) was calculated by a method, in which a certain volume of MEP solution was injected directly into rat cistern magna and then clearance was assessed as the reciprocal of the zeroth moment of a CSF level-time curve normalized for dose. In order to testify the accurateness of the method, 14C-sucrose was chosen as reference because of its impermeable characteristic across blood-brain barrier (BBB). It was found out that the MEP concentrations in plasma and CSF after intranasal administration did not show significant difference with those after intravenous administration. However, the extent and amount of MEP transported to CSF was significantly lower compared with those to plasma after these two administrations. In conclusion, the method can be applied to measure the extent and amount of drug transported to CSF, which would be useful to evaluate brain-targeting drug delivery.

  16. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco... guidance for industry entitled ``Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked... civil money penalties for violations of regulations issued under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  17. 78 FR 72900 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ...] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers... the guidance entitled ``Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked... issuance of civil money penalties for violations of regulations issued under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  18. Peer influences on drug self-administration: an econometric analysis in socially housed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Geoffrey W; Strickland, Justin C; Pitts, Elizabeth G; Foley, Mark; Tonidandel, Scott; Smith, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Social-learning theories of substance use propose that members of peer groups influence the drug use of other members by selectively modeling, reinforcing, and punishing either abstinence-related or drug-related behaviors. The objective of the present study was to examine the social influences on cocaine self-administration in isolated and socially housed rats, under conditions where the socially housed rats were tested simultaneously with their partner in the same chamber. To this end, male rats were obtained at weaning and housed in isolated or pair-housed conditions for 6 weeks. Rats were then implanted with intravenous catheters and cocaine self-administration was examined in custom-built operant conditioning chambers that allowed two rats to be tested simultaneously. For some socially housed subjects, both rats had simultaneous access to cocaine; for others, only one rat of the pair had access to cocaine. An econometric analysis was applied to the data, and the reinforcing strength of cocaine was measured by examining consumption (i.e. quantity demanded) and elasticity of demand as a function of price, which was manipulated by varying the dose and ratio requirements on a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine consumption decreased as a function of price in all groups. Elasticity of demand did not vary across groups, but consumption was significantly lower in socially housed rats paired with a rat without access to cocaine. These data suggest that the presence of an abstaining peer decreases the reinforcing strength of cocaine, thus supporting the development of social interventions in drug abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  19. Quantifying The Food And Drug Administration's rulemaking delays highlights the need for transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Thomas J; Avorn, Jerry; Carpenter, Daniel; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) frequently uses its rulemaking process to establish or modify the way it regulates drugs, medical devices, and other medical products. The federal agency's rulemaking is controversial because of its perceived complexity, lack of transparency, and lengthy duration. To shed light on the FDA's rulemaking process, we examined the evolution of significant rules that the agency published during 2000-12 for drugs, devices, and other medical products. We found that the rules' median time to finalization was 7.3 years, with the pre-rule phase and postreview deliberation within the FDA accounting for the majority of that time. Rules that involved mandatory cost-benefit analyses were associated with an additional delay of approximately two years. We also found that longer review times were significantly associated with a reduction in the stringency of final rules, compared to the originally proposed versions. We recommend improving FDA's rulemaking by allocating additional resources to increase efficiency and by embarking on initiatives to promote transparency by the FDA and other parts of the executive branch.

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding lymphatic filariasis: study on systematic noncompliance with mass drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cabral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics, antigenic profile, perceptions, attitudes and practices of individuals who have been systematically non-compliant in mass drug administration (MDA campaigns targeting lymphatic filariasis, in the municipality of Olinda, State of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. A pretested questionnaire was used to obtain information on socioenvironmental demographics, perceptions of lymphatic filariasis and MDA, and reasons for systematic noncompliance with treatment. A rapid immunochromatographic test (ICT was performed during the survey to screen for filariasis. It was found that the survey subjects knew about filariasis and MDA. Filariasis was identified as a disease (86.2% and 74.4% associated it with the presence of swelling in the legs. About 80% knew about MDA, and the main source of information was healthcare workers (68.3%. For men the main reasons for systematic noncompliance with MDA were that “the individual had not received the medication” (p=0.03 and for women “the individual either feared experiencing adverse reactions”. According to the ICT, the prevalence of lymphatic filariasis was 2%. The most important causes of systematic noncompliance were not receiving the drug and fear of side-effects. For successful implementation of MDA programs, good planning, educational campaigns promoting the benefits of MDA, adoption of measures to minimize the impact of adverse effects and improvement of drug distribution logistics are needed.

  1. Accelerated approval of oncology products: the food and drug administration experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, John R; Ning, Yang-Min; Farrell, Ann; Justice, Robert; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2011-04-20

    We reviewed the regulatory history of the accelerated approval process and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) experience with accelerated approval of oncology products from its initiation in December 11, 1992, to July 1, 2010. The accelerated approval regulations allowed accelerated approval of products to treat serious or life-threatening diseases based on surrogate endpoints that are reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. Failure to complete postapproval trials to confirm clinical benefit with due diligence could result in removal of the accelerated approval indication from the market. From December 11, 1992, to July 1, 2010, the FDA granted accelerated approval to 35 oncology products for 47 new indications. Clinical benefit was confirmed in postapproval trials for 26 of the 47 new indications, resulting in conversion to regular approval. The median time between accelerated approval and regular approval of oncology products was 3.9 years (range = 0.8-12.6 years) and the mean time was 4.7 years, representing a substantial time savings in terms of earlier availability of drugs to cancer patients. Three new indications did not show clinical benefit when confirmatory postapproval trials were completed and were subsequently removed from the market or had restricted distribution plans implemented. Confirmatory trials were not completed for 14 new indications. The five longest intervals from receipt of accelerated approval to July 1, 2010, without completion of trials to confirm clinical benefit were 10.5, 6.4, 5.5, 5.5, and 4.7 years. The five longest intervals between accelerated approval and successful conversion to regular approval were 12.6, 9.7, 8.1, 7.5, and 7.4 years. Trials to confirm clinical benefit should be part of the drug development plan and should be in progress at the time of an application seeking accelerated approval to prevent an ineffective drug from remaining on the market for an unacceptable time.

  2. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  3. Uptake of mass drug administration programme for schistosomiasis control in Koome Islands, Central Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Tuhebwe

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is one of the neglected tropical diseases targeted for elimination in Uganda through the Mass Drug Administration (MDA programme. Praziquantel has been distributed using community resource persons in fixed sites and house-to-house visits; however the uptake is still below target coverage. In 2011/2012 MDA exercise, uptake stood at 50% yet WHO target coverage is 75% at community level. We assessed the uptake of MDA and the associated factors in Koome Islands, Central Uganda.In March 2013, we conducted a mixed methods cross sectional study in 15 randomly selected villages. We interviewed a total of 615 respondents aged 18 years and above using semi structured questionnaires and five key informants were also purposively selected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was done. MDA uptake was defined as self reported swallowing of praziquantel during the last (2012 MDA campaign. We conducted key informant interviews with Ministry of Health, district health personnel and community health workers.Self reported uptake of praziquantel was 44.7% (275/615, 95% confidence interval (CI 40.8-48.7%. Of the 275 community members who said they had swallowed praziquantel, 142 (51.6% reported that they had developed side effects. Uptake of MDA was more likely if the respondent was knowledgeable about schistosomiasis transmission and prevention (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.85, 95% CI 1.22-2.81 and reported to have received health education from the health personnel (AOR 5.95, 95% CI 3.67-9.65. Service delivery challenges such as drug shortages and community health worker attrition also influenced MDA in Koome Islands.Uptake of MDA for schistosomiasis control in Koome was sub optimal. Lack of knowledge about schistosomiasis transmission and prevention, inadequate health education and drug shortages are some of the major factors associated with low uptake. These could be addressed through routine health education and systematic drug supply for the

  4. Vegetable Oil-Loaded Nanocapsules: Innovative Alternative for Incorporating Drugs for Parenteral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturinil, C G; Bruinsmann, A; Oliveira, C P; Contri, R V; Pohlmann, A R; Guterres, S S

    2016-02-01

    An innovative nanocapsule formulation for parenteral administration using selected vegetable oils (mango, jojoba, pequi, oat, annatto, calendula, and chamomile) was developed that has the potential to encapsulate various drugs. The vegetable oil-loaded nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition and compared with capric/caprylic triglyceride-loaded lipid core nanocapsules. The major objective was to investigate the effect of vegetable oils on particle size distribution and physical stability and to determine the hemolytic potential of the nanocapsules, considering their applicability for intravenous administration. Taking into account the importance of accurately determining particle size for the selected route of administration, different size characterization techniques were employed, such as Laser Diffraction, Dynamic Light Scattering, Multiple Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and Transmission Electronic Microscopy. Laser diffraction studies indicated that the mean particle size of all nanocapsules was below 300 nm. For smaller particles, the laser diffraction and multiple light scattering data were in agreement (D[3,2]-130 nm). Dynamic light scattering and nanoparticle tracking analysis, two powerful techniques that complement each other, exhibited size values between 180 and 259 nm for all nanoparticles. Stability studies demonstrated a tendency of particle creaming for jojoba-nanocapsules and sedimentation for the other nanoparticles; however, no size variation occurred over 30 days. The hemolysis test proved the hemocompatibility of all nanosystems, irrespective of the type of oil. Although all developed nanocapsules presented the potential for parenteral administration, jojoba oil-loaded nanocapsules were selected as the most promising nanoformulation due to their low average size and high particle size homogeneity.

  5. Quantum-Mechanics Methodologies in Drug Discovery: Applications of Docking and Scoring in Lead Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Lim, Victoria T

    2017-01-01

    The development and application of quantum mechanics (QM) methodologies in computer- aided drug design have flourished in the last 10 years. Despite the natural advantage of QM methods to predict binding affinities with a higher level of theory than those methods based on molecular mechanics (MM), there are only a few examples where diverse sets of protein-ligand targets have been evaluated simultaneously. In this work, we review recent advances in QM docking and scoring for those cases in which a systematic analysis has been performed. In addition, we introduce and validate a simplified QM/MM expression to compute protein-ligand binding energies. Overall, QMbased scoring functions are generally better to predict ligand affinities than those based on classical mechanics. However, the agreement between experimental activities and calculated binding energies is highly dependent on the specific chemical series considered. The advantage of more accurate QM methods is evident in cases where charge transfer and polarization effects are important, for example when metals are involved in the binding process or when dispersion forces play a significant role as in the case of hydrophobic or stacking interactions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Modulation of lipoprotein metabolism by antisense technology: preclinical drug discovery methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are a new class of specific therapeutic agents that alter the intermediary metabolism of mRNA, resulting in the suppression of disease-associated gene products. ASOs exert their pharmacological effects after hybridizing, via Watson-Crick base pairing, to a specific target RNA. If appropriately designed, this event results in the recruitment of RNase H, the degradation of targeted mRNA or pre-mRNA, and subsequent inhibition of the synthesis of a specific protein. A key advantage of the technology is the ability to selectively inhibit targets that cannot be modulated by traditional therapeutics such as structural proteins, transcription factors, and, of topical interest, lipoproteins. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of antisense technology, then more specifically describe the status of lipoprotein-related genes that have been studied using the antisense platform, and finally, outline the general methodology required to design and evaluate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of those drugs.

  7. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jessica L; Fixen, Danielle R; Saseen, Joseph J; Saba, Laura M; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2017-01-01

    Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) per night in women. The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zolpidem labeling change. A secondary objective was to evaluate serious adverse events potentially related to zolpidem. Electronic medical records of adults receiving care through the University of Colorado Health system were accessed for study inclusion if patients were provided a first-time prescription for zolpidem either prior to or after the Food and Drug Administration labeling change. Patients were randomly chosen from eight strata based on age, gender, and date of zolpidem initiation (before/after the labeling change). Demographic and zolpidem prescribing data were collected. Low-dose zolpidem was considered 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) daily or less. Documentation of potentially related serious adverse events within the patients' records was also evaluated. A total of 400 patients were included in the study. The overall percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased from 44% to 58% after the labeling change (p = 0.0020). In a pre-specified subgroup analysis, the percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased in all groups, including young men (38%-50%, p = 0.23), elderly men (34%-40%, p = 0.53), and elderly women (60%-74%, p = 0.14), but the change was only significant in young women (42%-70%, p = 0.0045). After Food and Drug Administration-mandated labeling changes for zolpidem in 2013, the percentage of overall patients in our health system, and specifically young women, with initial prescriptions for low

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs after Multiple Administrations in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Oh, Jaeseong; Jang, Kyungho; Yoon, Jangsoo; Moon, Seol Ju; Park, Jong Sun; Lee, Jae Ho; Song, Junghan; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Chung, Jae-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of second-line antituberculosis drugs would allow for optimal individualized dosage adjustments and improve drug safety and therapeutic outcomes. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of clinically relevant, multidrug treatment regimens and to improve the feasibility of TDM, we conducted an open-label, multiple-dosing study with 16 healthy subjects who were divided into two groups. Cycloserine (250 mg), p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) (5.28 g), and prothionamide (250 mg) twice daily and pyrazinamide (1,500 mg) once daily were administered to both groups. Additionally, levofloxacin (750 mg) and streptomycin (1 g) once daily were administered to group 1 and moxifloxacin (400 mg) and kanamycin (1 g) once daily were administered to group 2. Blood samples for PK analysis were collected up to 24 h following the 5 days of drug administration. The PK parameters, including the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve during a dosing interval at steady state (AUCτ), were evaluated. The correlations between the PK parameters and the concentrations at each time point were analyzed. The mean Cmax and AUCτ, respectively, for each drug were as follows: cycloserine, 24.9 mg/liter and 242.3 mg · h/liter; PAS, 65.9 mg/liter and 326.5 mg · h/liter; prothionamide, 5.3 mg/liter and 22.1 mg · h/liter; levofloxacin, 6.6 mg/liter and 64.4 mg · h/liter; moxifloxacin, 4.7 mg/liter and 54.2 mg · h/liter; streptomycin, 42.0 mg/liter and 196.7 mg · h/liter; kanamycin, 34.5 mg/liter and 153.5 mg · h/liter. The results indicated that sampling at 1, 2.5, and 6 h postdosing is needed for TDM when all seven drugs are administered concomitantly. This study indicates that PK characteristics must be considered when prescribing optimal treatments for patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02128308.). Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  9. Inspector Perceptions of the Food and Drug Administration's Newest Recommended Food Facility Inspection Format: Training Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Kim, Jooho; Almanza, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration publishes the Food Code to guide restaurant inspections. The most recent version proposes a three-tier system categorizing violations as priority, priority foundation, and core. This study used a scenario-based questionnaire to examine inspector perceptions and preferences for inspection formats. Results suggest that inspectors would be able to maintain consistent evaluations when changing to the three-tier system, although the classifying terms under the three-tier system were confusing. Additionally, inspectors were not very positive about the new system; they were concerned that the new system would not be easy to understand and use, inspections would take a longer time, it would not accurately reflect the amount of risk associated with violations, and it would not be easy for consumers and managers to understand and use. The results suggest the need for additional training for inspectors before adoption, especially on the rationale and benefits of changing to a three-tier system.

  10. Mass drug administration for trachoma: how long is not long enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Blinding trachoma is targeted for elimination by 2020 using the SAFE strategy (Surgery, Antibiotics, Facial cleanliness, and Environmental improvements. Annual mass drug administration (MDA with azithromycin is a cornerstone of this strategy. If baseline prevalence of clinical signs of trachomatous inflammation - follicular among 1-9 year-olds (TF1-9 is ≥ 10% but 30%, 7 or more annual MDAs may be required to achieve the target. There are five years left before the 2020 deadline to eliminate blinding trachoma. Low endemic settings are poised to succeed in their elimination goals. However, newly-identified high prevalence districts warrant immediate inclusion in the global program. Intensified application of the SAFE strategy is needed in order to guarantee blinding trachoma elimination by 2020.

  11. Kombucha brewing under the Food and Drug Administration model Food Code: risk analysis and processing guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Brian A

    2013-11-01

    Kombucha is a fermented beverage made from brewed tea and sugar. The taste is slightly sweet and acidic and it may have residual carbon dioxide. Kombucha is consumed in many countries as a health beverage and it is gaining in popularity in the U.S. Consequently, many retailers and food service operators are seeking to brew this beverage on site. As a fermented beverage, kombucha would be categorized in the Food and Drug Administration model Food Code as a specialized process and would require a variance with submission of a food safety plan. This special report was created to assist both operators and regulators in preparing or reviewing a kombucha food safety plan.

  12. Clinical trials for vaccine development in registry of Korea Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seog-Youn

    2013-01-01

    Based on the action plan "Ensuring a stable supply of National Immunization Program vaccines and sovereignty of biopharmaceutical products," Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) has made efforts to develop vaccines in the context of self reliance and to protect public health. Along with the recognized infrastructures for clinical trials, clinical trials for vaccines have also gradually been conducted at multinational sites as well as at local sites. KFDA will support to expand six to eleven kinds of vaccines by 2017. In accordance with integrated regulatory system, KFDA has promoted clinical trials, established national lot release procedure, and strengthened good manufacturing practices inspection and post marketing surveillance. Against this backdrop, KFDA will support the vaccine development and promote excellent public health protection.

  13. Effect of propranolol in head tremor: quantitative study following single-dose and sustained drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetti, S; Sasso, E; Negrotti, A; Baratti, M; Fava, R

    1992-12-01

    The effect of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol has been investigated in nine patients suffering from isolated (six patients) or prominent (three patients) essential tremor of the head. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the tremorolytic efficacy of propranolol has been assessed by a quantitative accelerometric method after a single oral dose (120 mg) and following 2 weeks of sustained treatment with two different dosage regimens of the drug (120 and 240 mg daily). As compared with placebo, a significant reduction in tremor magnitude was found following a single oral dose but not on sustained administration of the beta-blocker at either dosage. The results suggest that the efficacy of sustained propranolol on isolated or prominent essential head tremor is less predictable and satisfactory than expected on the basis of the single-dose response, as compared with hand tremor.

  14. Short time administration of antirheumatic drugs - Methotrexate as a strong inhibitor of osteoblast's proliferation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annussek Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Due to increasing use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs as first line therapy in rheumatic diseases, dental and maxillofacial practitioner should be aware of drug related adverse events. Especially effects on bone-metabolism and its cells are discussed controversially. Therefore we investigate the in vitro effect of short time administration of low dose methotrexate (MTX on osteoblasts as essential part of bone remodelling cells. Methods Primary bovine osteoblasts (OBs were incubated with various concentrations of MTX, related to tissue concentrations, over a period of fourteen days by using a previously established standard protocol. The effect on cell proliferation as well as mitochondrial activity was assessed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl 2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, imaging and counting of living cells. Additionally, immunostaining of extracellular matrix proteins was used to survey osteogenic differentiation. Results All methods indicate a strong inhibition of osteoblast`s proliferation by short time administration of low dose MTX within therapeutically relevant concentrations of 1 to 1000nM, without affecting cell differentiation of middle-stage differentiated OBs in general. More over a significant decrease of cell numbers and mitochondrial activity was found at these MTX concentrations. The most sensitive method seems to be the MTT-assay. MTX-concentration of 0,01nM and concentrations below had no inhibitory effects anymore. Conclusion Even low dose methotrexate acts as a potent inhibitor of osteoblast’s proliferation and mitochondrial metabolism in vitro, without affecting main differentiation of pre-differentiated osteoblasts. These results suggest possible negative effects of DMARDs concerning bone healing and for example osseointegration of dental implants. Especially the specifics of the jaw bone with its high vascularisation and physiological high tissue metabolism

  15. Social Media Impact of the Food and Drug Administration's Drug Safety Communication Messaging About Zolpidem: Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Michael S; Freifeld, Clark C; Brownstein, John S; Donneyong, Macarius M; Rausch, Paula; Lappin, Brian M; Zhou, Esther H; Dal Pan, Gerald J; Pawar, Ajinkya M; Hwang, Thomas J; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2018-01-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues drug safety communications (DSCs) to health care professionals, patients, and the public when safety issues emerge related to FDA-approved drug products. These safety messages are disseminated through social media to ensure broad uptake. The objective of this study was to assess the social media dissemination of 2 DSCs released in 2013 for the sleep aid zolpidem. We used the MedWatcher Social program and the DataSift historic query tool to aggregate Twitter and Facebook posts from October 1, 2012 through August 31, 2013, a period beginning approximately 3 months before the first DSC and ending 3 months after the second. Posts were categorized as (1) junk, (2) mention, and (3) adverse event (AE) based on a score between -0.2 (completely unrelated) to 1 (perfectly related). We also looked at Google Trends data and Wikipedia edits for the same time period. Google Trends search volume is scaled on a range of 0 to 100 and includes "Related queries" during the relevant time periods. An interrupted time series (ITS) analysis assessed the impact of DSCs on the counts of posts with specific mention of zolpidem-containing products. Chow tests for known structural breaks were conducted on data from Twitter, Facebook, and Google Trends. Finally, Wikipedia edits were pulled from the website's editorial history, which lists all revisions to a given page and the editor's identity. In total, 174,286 Twitter posts and 59,641 Facebook posts met entry criteria. Of those, 16.63% (28,989/174,286) of Twitter posts and 25.91% (15,453/59,641) of Facebook posts were labeled as junk and excluded. AEs and mentions represented 9.21% (16,051/174,286) and 74.16% (129,246/174,286) of Twitter posts and 5.11% (3,050/59,641) and 68.98% (41,138/59,641) of Facebook posts, respectively. Total daily counts of posts about zolpidem-containing products increased on Twitter and Facebook on the day of the first DSC; Google searches increased on the week of the

  16. Prevention of Intraabdominal Adhesions by Local and Systemic Administration of Immunosuppressive Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kemal; Inal, Abdullah; Sayar, Ilyas; Sahin, Murat; Gullu, Huriye; Inal, Duriye Gul; Isik, Arda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraperitoneal adhesion formation is a serious postsurgical issue. Adhesions develop after damage to the peritoneum by surgery, irradiation, infection or trauma. Objectives: Using a rat model, we compared the effectiveness of systemic and intraperitoneally administered common immunosuppressive drugs for prevention of postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions. Materials and Methods: Peritoneal adhesions were induced in 98 female Wistar-Albino rats by cecal abrasion and peritoneal excision. Rats were randomly separated into seven groups, each containing fourteen rats, and the standard experimental model was applied to all of rats. 14 days later, rats were euthanized, intraperitoneal adhesions were scored and tissues were examined histologically using hematoxylin/eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. Results: Throughout the investigation, no animal died during or after surgery. In all of experimental groups, decrease in fibrosis was statistically significant. Decrease in fibrosis was most prominently in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000), and decrease was least in intraperitoneal cyclosporine group (P = 0.022). Vascular proliferation was significantly decreased in all experimental groups (P < 0.05) except for systemic tacrolimus group (P = 0.139). Most prominent reduction in vascular proliferation was in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Administration of immunosuppressive drugs is effective for prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions. PMID:24693396

  17. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to 1989 99 Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the 99 Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem 99 Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce 99 Mo. Although Cintichem produced 99 Mo and 99m Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of 99 Mo to US pharmaceutical companies

  18. Concurrent administration effect of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs on the immunotoxicity of bacterial endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amir, Azza M; Tanious, Dalia G; Mansour, Hanaa A

    2017-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a gram-negative bacterium that causes a variety of diseases in compromised hosts. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the major outer surface membrane components that are present in almost all gram-negative bacteria and act as extremely strong stimulators of innate immunity and inflammation of the airway. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of combined administration of Gentamicin (GENT) as an antibiotic and Dexamethasone (DEXA) as an anti-inflammatory drug on some immunological and histological parameters. After determination of LD 50 of P. aeruginosa, mice groups were injected with DEXA, GENT and lipopolysaccharide alone or in combination. Lipopolysaccharide single injection caused a significant increase of total leukocyte count, lymphocytes, neutrophils and levels of IgM and IgG. DEXA induced an increase of neutrophilia and lymphopenia. Immunological examination demonstrated that combined treatment has a significant effect of decreasing lymphocytes and IgG levels than single treatment does. Histological examination demonstrated that the inflammation of thymus, spleen, lymph node and liver decreases in mice that received combined treatment than those that received individual treatment. Concurrent administration of DEXA and GENT has a great effect on protecting organs against damage in case of endotoxemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug research methodology. Volume 3, The detection and quantitation of drugs of interest in body fluids from drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop on the chemical analysis of human body fluids for drugs of interest in highway safety. A cross-disciplinary panel of experts reviewed the list of drugs of interest developed in a previous workshop and d...

  20. A System for Anesthesia Drug Administration Using Barcode Technology: The Codonics Safe Label System and Smart Anesthesia Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelacic, Srdjan; Bowdle, Andrew; Nair, Bala G; Kusulos, Dolly; Bower, Lynnette; Togashi, Kei

    2015-08-01

    Many anesthetic drug errors result from vial or syringe swaps. Scanning the barcodes on vials before drug preparation, creating syringe labels that include barcodes, and scanning the syringe label barcodes before drug administration may help to prevent errors. In contrast, making syringe labels by hand that comply with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies is tedious and time consuming. A computerized system that uses vial barcodes and generates barcoded syringe labels could address both safety issues and labeling recommendations. We measured compliance of syringe labels in multiple operating rooms (ORs) with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies before and after the introduction of the Codonics Safe Label System (SLS). The Codonics SLS was then combined with Smart Anesthesia Manager software to create an anesthesia barcode drug administration system, which allowed us to measure the rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration in 2 cardiothoracic ORs before and after introducing a coffee card incentive. Twelve attending cardiothoracic anesthesiologists and the OR satellite pharmacy participated. The use of the Codonics SLS drug labeling system resulted in >75% compliant syringe labels (95% confidence interval, 75%-98%). All syringe labels made using the Codonics SLS system were compliant. The average rate of scanning barcodes on syringe labels using Smart Anesthesia Manager was 25% (730 of 2976) over 13 weeks but increased to 58% (956 of 1645) over 8 weeks after introduction of a simple (coffee card) incentive (P < 0.001). An anesthesia barcode drug administration system resulted in a moderate rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration. Further, adaptation of the system will be required to achieve a higher utilization rate.

  1. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Norman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release or 6.25 mg (controlled release per night in women. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zolpidem labeling change. A secondary objective was to evaluate serious adverse events potentially related to zolpidem. Methods: Electronic medical records of adults receiving care through the University of Colorado Health system were accessed for study inclusion if patients were provided a first-time prescription for zolpidem either prior to or after the Food and Drug Administration labeling change. Patients were randomly chosen from eight strata based on age, gender, and date of zolpidem initiation (before/after the labeling change. Demographic and zolpidem prescribing data were collected. Low-dose zolpidem was considered 5 mg (immediate release or 6.25 mg (controlled release daily or less. Documentation of potentially related serious adverse events within the patients’ records was also evaluated. Results: A total of 400 patients were included in the study. The overall percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased from 44% to 58% after the labeling change (p = 0.0020. In a pre-specified subgroup analysis, the percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased in all groups, including young men (38%–50%, p = 0.23, elderly men (34%–40%, p = 0.53, and elderly women (60%–74%, p = 0.14, but the change was only significant in young women (42%–70%, p = 0.0045. Conclusion: After Food and Drug Administration–mandated labeling changes for zolpidem in 2013, the percentage of overall patients in our health

  2. Maximizing Health or Sufficient Capability in Economic Evaluation? A Methodological Experiment of Treatment for Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goranitis, Ilias; Coast, Joanna; Day, Ed; Copello, Alex; Freemantle, Nick; Frew, Emma

    2017-07-01

    Conventional practice within the United Kingdom and beyond is to conduct economic evaluations with "health" as evaluative space and "health maximization" as the decision-making rule. However, there is increasing recognition that this evaluative framework may not always be appropriate, and this is particularly the case within public health and social care contexts. This article presents a methodological case study designed to explore the impact of changing the evaluative space within an economic evaluation from health to capability well-being and the decision-making rule from health maximization to the maximization of sufficient capability. Capability well-being is an evaluative space grounded on Amartya Sen's capability approach and assesses well-being based on individuals' ability to do and be the things they value in life. Sufficient capability is an egalitarian approach to decision making that aims to ensure everyone in society achieves a normatively sufficient level of capability well-being. The case study is treatment for drug addiction, and the cost-effectiveness of 2 psychological interventions relative to usual care is assessed using data from a pilot trial. Analyses are undertaken from a health care and a government perspective. For the purpose of the study, quality-adjusted life years (measured using the EQ-5D-5L) and years of full capability equivalent and years of sufficient capability equivalent (both measured using the ICECAP-A [ICEpop CAPability measure for Adults]) are estimated. The study concludes that different evaluative spaces and decision-making rules have the potential to offer opposing treatment recommendations. The implications for policy makers are discussed.

  3. Methodological characteristics of academic clinical drug trials--a retrospective cohort study of applications to the Danish Medicines Agency 1993-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Louise; Håkansson, Cecilia; Bach, Karin F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal trends in characteristics of academic clinical drug trials. We here report characteristics on trial methodology.......The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal trends in characteristics of academic clinical drug trials. We here report characteristics on trial methodology....

  4. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Methodology, Applications, and Limitations with a Focus on Its Role in Pediatric Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was introduced years ago, but it has not been practiced significantly. However, interest in and implementation of this modeling technique have grown, as evidenced by the increased number of publications in this field. This paper demonstrates briefly the methodology, applications, and limitations of PBPK modeling with special attention given to discuss the use of PBPK models in pediatric drug development and some examples described in detail. Although PBPK models do have some limitations, the potential benefit from PBPK modeling technique is huge. PBPK models can be applied to investigate drug pharmacokinetics under different physiological and pathological conditions or in different age groups, to support decision-making during drug discovery, to provide, perhaps most important, data that can save time and resources, especially in early drug development phases and in pediatric clinical trials, and potentially to help clinical trials become more “confirmatory” rather than “exploratory”.

  5. The US Food and Drug Administration's tentative approval process and the global fight against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Harinder Singh; Murray, Jeffrey S; Shimer, Martin; Capella, Peter; Presto, Ryan; Valdez, Mary Lou; Lurie, Peter G

    2017-12-01

    In 2004, the US government began to utilize the Food and Drug Administration's (USFDA) tentative approval process (tFDA) as a basis to determine which HIV drugs are appropriate to be purchased and used in resource-constrained settings. This process permits products that are not approved for marketing in the US, including medicines with active patents or marketing restrictions in the US, to be purchased and distributed in resource-constrained settings. Although the tFDA was originally intended to support the United States' President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the USFDA list has become a cornerstone of international HIV programmes that support procurement of ARVs, such as the World Health Organization and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Our objective in this article is to help the global HIV policy makers and implementers of HIV programmes better understand the benefits and limitations of the tFDA by providing an in-depth review of the relevant legal and regulatory processes. USFDA's dedicated tFDA process for ARVs used by the PEPFAR programme has a wide impact globally; however, the implementation and the regulatory processes governing the programme have not been thoroughly described in the medical literature. This paper seeks to help stakeholders better understand the legal and regulatory aspects associated with review of ARVs under the tFDA by describing the following: (1) the tFDA and its importance to global ARV procurement; (2) the regulatory pathways for applications under tFDA for the PEPFAR programme, including modifications to applications, review timelines and costs; (3) the role of US patents, US marketing exclusivity rights, and the Medicines Patents Pool in tFDA; and (4) an overview of how applications for PEPFAR programme are processed through the USFDA. We also provide a case study of a new ARV, tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF), not yet reviewed by USFDA for PEPFAR use. In this paper, we describe the

  6. Methodological challenges to control for immortal time bias in addressing drug effects in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xi-Lin; Huo, Xiao-Xu; Chan, Juliana CN

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple biases in using observational studies to examine treatment effects such as those from prevalent drug users, immortal time and drug indications. We used renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and statins as reference drugs with proven efficacies in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and examined their effectiveness in the prospective Hong Kong Diabetes Registry using adjustment methods proposed in the literature. Using time-dependent exposures to drug treatments yielded gr...

  7. Pressure ulcers induced by drug administration: A new concept and report of four cases in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Hasegawa, Keiko; Hattori, Hideyuki; Nishihara, Keiji; Endo, Hidetoshi; Furuta, Katsunori; Isogai, Zenzo

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced akinesia is a potential cause of pressure ulcers. However, pressure ulcers that are caused by drug-induced akinesia are not considered an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We propose that drug-induced pressure ulcers (DIPU) are pressure ulcers that are caused by an external force that is experienced after drug administration, and we considered resolution of these ulcers after drug discontinuation to be a supportive finding. In this report, we reviewed the medical records of pressure ulcer cases from a 300-bed hospital. Among 148 patients, four patients with pressure ulcers met the criterion for DIPU. In these cases, the suspected DIPU were related to treatment with olanzapine, fluvoxamine, valproic acid, clotiazepam, triazolam and rilmazafone. These drugs were administrated to manage the patients' behavioral and psychological symptoms that accompanied dementia. The DIPU in these patients were categorized as stage IV according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel criteria. Discontinuation of the causal drugs led to significant improvements or complete healing of the pressure ulcers, and the patients subsequently recovered their mobility. Therefore, we propose that DIPU are potential ADR that have been overlooked in clinical practice. Thus, recognition of DIPU as an ADR may be important in preventing and appropriately managing pressure ulcers among elderly patients. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Two cases of corneal perforation after oral administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: oral NSAID-induced corneal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ikuya; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Kazuo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To report 2 cases of corneal perforation associated with the use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In a 62-year-old woman and a 79-year-old woman, corneal perforation occurred after 7 days and 5 months of oral NSAIDs administration, respectively. After NSAIDs were discontinued, the cornea epithelialized and the anterior chamber formed within 14 and 10 days, respectively. It is well known that topical NSAIDs cause corneal perforation. Observations in the present cases suggest that the oral administration of NSAIDs may also cause corneal damage, and hence, medical professionals should consider the risk of damage to the cornea when administering these drugs orally.

  9. A new minimal-stress freely-moving rat model for preclinical studies on intranasal administration of CNS drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jasper; Suidgeest, Ernst; van der Graaf, Piet Hein; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2009-08-01

    To develop a new minimal-stress model for intranasal administration in freely moving rats and to evaluate in this model the brain distribution of acetaminophen following intranasal versus intravenous administration. Male Wistar rats received one intranasal cannula, an intra-cerebral microdialysis probe, and two blood cannulas for drug administration and serial blood sampling respectively. To evaluate this novel model, the following experiments were conducted. 1) Evans Blue was administered to verify the selectivity of intranasal exposure. 2) During a 1 min infusion 10, 20, or 40 microl saline was administered intranasally or 250 microl intravenously. Corticosterone plasma concentrations over time were compared as biomarkers for stress. 3) 200 microg of the model drug acetaminophen was given in identical setup and plasma, and brain pharmacokinetics were determined. In 96% of the rats, only the targeted nasal cavity was deeply colored. Corticosterone plasma concentrations were not influenced, neither by route nor volume of administration. Pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen were identical after intravenous and intranasal administration, although the Cmax in microdialysates was reached a little earlier following intravenous administration. A new minimal-stress model for intranasal administration in freely moving rats has been successfully developed and allows direct comparison with intravenous administration.

  10. Food and Drug Administration warning on anesthesia and brain development: implications for obstetric and fetal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olutoye, Olutoyin A; Baker, Byron Wycke; Belfort, Michael A; Olutoye, Oluyinka O

    2018-01-01

    There has been growing concern about the detrimental effects of certain anesthetic agents on the developing brain. Preclinical studies in small animal models as well as nonhuman primates suggested loss or death of brain cells and consequent impaired neurocognitive function following anesthetic exposure in neonates and late gestation fetuses. Human studies in this area are limited and currently inconclusive. On Dec. 14, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning regarding impaired brain development in children following exposure to certain anesthetic agents used for general anesthesia, namely the inhalational anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, and the intravenous agents propofol and midazolam, in the third trimester of pregnancy. Furthermore, this warning recommends that health care professionals should balance the benefits of appropriate anesthesia in young children and pregnant women against potential risks, especially for procedures that may last >3 hours or if multiple procedures are required in children surgery in the second and third trimester; this exposure is typically longer than that for cesarean delivery. Very few studies address the effect of anesthetic exposure on the fetus in the second trimester when most nonobstetric and fetal surgical procedures are performed. It is also unclear how the plasticity of the fetal brain at this stage of development will modulate the consequences of anesthetic exposure. Strategies that may circumvent possible untoward long-term neurologic effects of anesthesia in the baby include: (1) use of nonimplicated (nongamma-aminobutyric acid agonist) agents for sedation such as opioids (remifentanil, fentanyl) or the alpha-2 agonist, dexmedetomidine, when appropriate; (2) minimizing the duration of exposure to inhalational anesthetics for fetal, obstetric, and nonobstetric procedures in the pregnant patient, as much as possible within safe limits; and (3) commencing surgery promptly and limiting

  11. Bioadhesive drug delivery system using glyceryl monooleate for the intravesical administration of paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Ju; Kim, Sae Woong; Chung, Hesson; Park, Yeong Taek; Choi, Young Wook; Cho, Yong-Hyun; Yoon, Moon Soo

    2005-10-01

    Many reports have shown that the efficacy of intravesical therapy for bladder cancer is in part limited by the poor penetration of drugs into the urothelium. The present study evaluated the effect of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) on the absorption of intravesically administered paclitaxel in a rabbit model of bladder cancer. Urine, plasma, and tissue pharmacokinetics were determined in rabbits treated for 120 min with paclitaxel (500 microg/20 ml) by intravesical instillation. Two formulations of GMO/paclitaxel were evaluated using different proportions of water, 15 and 30%, and Taxol was used as a control. Animals were observed for clinical signs of toxicity and necropsy was performed. 120 min after instillation, the bladder was emptied and excised. In the urine, paclitaxel concentration was decreased by 39.6 and 41.2% in the two experimental groups and by 25.2% in the control group. The paclitaxel concentrations in the urothelium were 53 and 56% of the urine concentration in both experimental groups, but 11% in the control group. The concentration then declined exponentially in the underlying capillary-perfused tissues, reaching equilibrium at a depth of 1,400-1,700 microm. The plasma concentrations were extremely low compared with concentrations in urine and bladder tissues and were not associated with clinical toxicity. We conclude that GMO has a significantly increased bioadhesiveness to bladder mucosa. Therefore, intravesical administration of GMO/paclitaxel/water provides a significant advantage for drugs targeting the bladder tissue, and paclitaxel represents a viable option for intravesical bladder cancer therapy. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Modeling the impact and costs of semiannual mass drug administration for accelerated elimination of lymphatic filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma A Stolk

    Full Text Available The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020.

  13. Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) to define endpoints for lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration: a multicenter evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian K; Deming, Michael; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Bougma, Windtaré R; Dorkenoo, Améyo M; El-Setouhy, Maged; Fischer, Peter U; Gass, Katherine; Gonzalez de Peña, Manuel; Mercado-Hernandez, Leda; Kyelem, Dominique; Lammie, Patrick J; Flueckiger, Rebecca M; Mwingira, Upendo J; Noordin, Rahmah; Offei Owusu, Irene; Ottesen, Eric A; Pavluck, Alexandre; Pilotte, Nils; Rao, Ramakrishna U; Samarasekera, Dilhani; Schmaedick, Mark A; Settinayake, Sunil; Simonsen, Paul E; Supali, Taniawati; Taleo, Fasihah; Torres, Melissa; Weil, Gary J; Won, Kimberly Y

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA). Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached a level low enough that it cannot be sustained even in the absence of drug intervention. Guidelines advanced by WHO call for a transmission assessment survey (TAS) to determine if MDA can be stopped within an LF evaluation unit (EU) after at least five effective rounds of annual treatment. To test the value and practicality of these guidelines, a multicenter operational research trial was undertaken in 11 countries covering various geographic and epidemiological settings. The TAS was conducted twice in each EU with TAS-1 and TAS-2 approximately 24 months apart. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) formed the basis of the TAS survey design but specific EU characteristics defined the survey site (school or community), eligible population (6-7 year olds or 1(st)-2(nd) graders), survey type (systematic or cluster-sampling), target sample size, and critical cutoff (a statistically powered threshold below which transmission is expected to be no longer sustainable). The primary diagnostic tools were the immunochromatographic (ICT) test for W. bancrofti EUs and the BmR1 test (Brugia Rapid or PanLF) for Brugia spp. EUs. In 10 of 11 EUs, the number of TAS-1 positive cases was below the critical cutoff, indicating that MDA could be stopped. The same results were found in the follow-up TAS-2, therefore, confirming the previous decision outcome. Sample sizes were highly sex and age-representative and closely matched the target value after factoring in estimates of non-participation. The TAS was determined to be a practical and effective evaluation tool for stopping MDA although its validity for longer-term post-MDA surveillance requires further investigation.

  14. Measuring and modelling the effects of systematic non-adherence to mass drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Dyson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well understood that the success or failure of a mass drug administration campaign critically depends on the level of coverage achieved. To that end coverage levels are often closely scrutinised during campaigns and the response to underperforming campaigns is to attempt to improve coverage. Modelling work has indicated, however, that the quality of the coverage achieved may also have a significant impact on the outcome. If the coverage achieved is likely to miss similar people every round then this can have a serious detrimental effect on the campaign outcome. We begin by reviewing the current modelling descriptions of this effect and introduce a new modelling framework that can be used to simulate a given level of systematic non-adherence. We formalise the likelihood that people may miss several rounds of treatment using the correlation in the attendance of different rounds. Using two very simplified models of the infection of helminths and non-helminths, respectively, we demonstrate that the modelling description used and the correlation included between treatment rounds can have a profound effect on the time to elimination of disease in a population. It is therefore clear that more detailed coverage data is required to accurately predict the time to disease elimination. We review published coverage data in which individuals are asked how many previous rounds they have attended, and show how this information may be used to assess the level of systematic non-adherence. We note that while the coverages in the data found range from 40.5% to 95.5%, still the correlations found lie in a fairly narrow range (between 0.2806 and 0.5351. This indicates that the level of systematic non-adherence may be similar even in data from different years, countries, diseases and administered drugs.

  15. Non-linear mixed effects modeling - from methodology and software development to driving implementation in drug development science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Goonaseelan Colin; Mentré, France; Steimer, Jean-Louis

    2005-04-01

    Few scientific contributions have made significant impact unless there was a champion who had the vision to see the potential for its use in seemingly disparate areas-and who then drove active implementation. In this paper, we present a historical summary of the development of non-linear mixed effects (NLME) modeling up to the more recent extensions of this statistical methodology. The paper places strong emphasis on the pivotal role played by Lewis B. Sheiner (1940-2004), who used this statistical methodology to elucidate solutions to real problems identified in clinical practice and in medical research and on how he drove implementation of the proposed solutions. A succinct overview of the evolution of the NLME modeling methodology is presented as well as ideas on how its expansion helped to provide guidance for a more scientific view of (model-based) drug development that reduces empiricism in favor of critical quantitative thinking and decision making.

  16. Drug research methodology. Volume 5, Experimentation in drugs and highway safety : the study of drug effects on skills related to driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop on experimental research in the area of drugs and highway safety. Complementing studies of drug use in different driving populations, experimentation here refers to studies performed under controlled co...

  17. Life cycle of medical product rules issued by the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Thomas J; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-08-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses rulemaking as one of its primary tools to protect the public health and implement laws enacted by Congress and the president. Because of the many effects that these rules have on social welfare and the economy, the FDA and other executive agencies receive input from the executive branch, the public, and in some cases, the courts, during the process of rulemaking. In this article, we examine the life cycle of FDA regulations concerning medical products and review notable features of the rulemaking process. The current system grants substantial opportunities for diverse stakeholders to participate in and influence how rules are written and implemented. However, the duration, complexity, and adversarial qualities of the rulemaking process can hinder the FDA's ability to achieve its policy and public health goals. There is considerable variation in the level of transparency at different stages in the process, ranging from freely accessible public comments to undisclosed internal agency deliberations. In addition, significant medical product rules are associated with lengthy times to finalization, in some cases for unclear reasons. We conclude by identifying potential areas for reform on the basis of transparency and efficiency. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  18. Office bladder distention with Electromotive Drug Administration (EMDA is equivalent to distention under General Anesthesia (GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Kathryn J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder distention is commonly used in diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC. Traditionally performed in the operating room under general or spinal anesthesia (GA, it is expensive and associated with short term morbidity. Office bladder distention using electromotive drug administration (EMDA has been suggested as an alternative that is well tolerated by patients. We report the first comparative findings of patients undergoing both office distention with EMDA and distention in the operating room (OR with GA. Methods This retrospective chart review identified 11 patients participating in two protocols of EMDA bladder distention who also underwent bladder distention under GA either prior to or after the EMDA procedure. Results The median absolute difference in bladder capacity between GA and EMDA was only 25 cc; the median percent difference was 5%. Cystoscopic findings, while not prospectively compiled, appear to have been similar. Conclusion This study represents the first comparison between distention with EMDA versus GA and confirms the technical feasibility of performing bladder distention in an office setting. The distention capacity achieved in the office was nearly identical to that in the OR and the cystoscopic findings very similar. Further investigation into the comparative morbidity, cost, and other outcome measures is warranted to define the ultimate role of EMDA bladder distention in the clinical evaluation and care of patients with IC.

  19. Persistent 'hotspots' of lymphatic filariasis microfilaraemia despite 14 years of mass drug administration in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Yikpotey, Paul; Marfo, Benjamin K; Odoom, Samuel; Mensah, Ernest O; Asiedu, Odame; Alomatu, Bright; Hervie, Edward T; Yeboah, Abednego; Ade, Serge; Hinderaker, Sven G; Reid, Anthony; Takarinda, Kudakwashe C; Koudou, Benjamin; Koroma, Joseph B

    2016-12-01

    Among the 216 districts in Ghana, 98 were declared endemic for lymphatic filariasis in 1999 after mapping. Pursuing the goal of elimination, WHO recommends annual treatment using mass drugs administration (MDA) for at least 5 years. MDA was started in the country in 2001 and reached national coverage in 2006. By 2014, 69 districts had 'stopped-MDA' (after passing the transmission assessment survey) while 29 others remained with persistent microfilaraemia (mf) prevalence (≥1%) despite more than 11 years of MDA and were classified as 'hotspots'. An ecological study was carried out to compare baseline mf prevalence and anti-microfilaria interventions between hotspot and stopped-MDA districts. Baseline mf prevalence was significantly higher in hotspots than stopped-MDA districts (photspot districts, but it was still higher than in stopped-MDA districts. The number of MDA rounds was slightly higher in hotspot districts (photspots and stopped-MDA districts was a high baseline mf prevalence. This finding indicates that the recommended 5-6 rounds annual treatment may not achieve interruption of transmission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Pluripotent stem cells in translation: a Food and Drug Administration-National Institutes of Health collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Naomi; Rao, Mahendra S; Owens, David F

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the stem cell research community have collaborated on a series of workshops that address moving pluripotent stem cell therapies into the clinic. The first two workshops in the series focused on preclinical science, and a third, future workshop will focus on clinical trials. This summary addresses major points from both of the recent preclinically focused meetings. When entering into a therapeutics developmental program based on pluripotent cells, investigators must make decisions at the very early stages that will have major ramifications during later phases of development. Presentations and discussions from both invited participants and FDA staff described the need to characterize and document the quality, variability, and suitability of the cells and commercial reagents used at every translational stage. This requires consideration of future regulatory requirements, ranging from donor eligibility of the original source material to the late-stage manufacturing protocols. Federal, industrial, and academic participants agreed that planning backward is the best way to anticipate what evidence will be needed to justify human testing of novel therapeutics and to eliminate wasted efforts.

  1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration's dioxin monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, P.; S. Kathleen Egan; Troxell, T.; P. Michael Bolger [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, College Park (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are a group of environmental contaminants whose primary route of human exposure occurs via the consumption of fatty foods of animal origin. Recent safety risk assessments conducted by national and international organizations broadly agree that risk management actions should be developed to decrease DLC exposure. Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has tested specific foods with the goal of describing and reducing DLC exposure. In 2001, FDA developed a strategy for DLCs (http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/{proportional_to}lrd/dioxstra.html) and substantially expanded its dioxin monitoring program to obtain more comprehensive data on background levels of DLCs in specific food and feed samples as well as to identify and reduce pathways of DLC contamination. FDA's dioxin monitoring program analyzes food collected under its Total Diet Study (TDS) and food and feed from targeted sampling. The TDS is FDA's ongoing market basket survey of approximately 280 core foods in the U.S. food supply. FDA targeted sampling collects and analyzes foods suspected of having both higher DLC levels and more variability in those levels than other foods. The contribution of dietary DLCs to overall exposure and the possible introduction of DLCs in animalbased food via the use of particular feed components was recently identified by the National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply and confirmed FDA's approach articulated in its dioxin strategy.

  2. Food and Drug Administration upscheduling of hydrocodone and the effects on nurse practitioner pain management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Rachel

    2018-06-01

    In 2013, the Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration determined hydrocodone combination medications (HCMs) needed tighter regulation due to high abuse potential; they recommended upscheduling HCMs from Schedule III to II. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of upscheduling of HCMs on pain management practices of advanced practiced registered nurses (APRNs) in Oklahoma. In this qualitative study, 25 participants described their primary care experiences after the upscheduling. A thematic analysis was used to understand the effects on APRN pain management practices. The upscheduling of HCMs has greatly affected the pain management practices of APRNs in a state where Schedule II narcotic prescribing is forbidden. Findings will assist APRNs with improving patient access to care, implementing practice regulations, and exploring options for alternative pain therapies in primary care. Upscheduling of HCMs has had a severe impact on APRNs, affecting their prescribing practices and leading to increased referrals. They noted limited treatment options, increased health care costs, and decreased access to care. The APRNs understand the problem of prescription opioid abuse, diversion, and misuse. A consensus model could standardize the regulatory process for APRNs, increase interstate mobility for practice, and increase access to APRN care nationwide.

  3. Optimization of self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for poorly water-soluble drug using response surface methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Shan; Mu, Huiling; Alchaer, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    impact of excipients on the performance of formulations as well as the fate of drug. The aim of this study was to rationalize the SNEDDS development procedure and to get a better understanding on the role of excipients on the SNEDDS. The formulations consist of soybean oil or rapeseed oil, Cremophor...

  4. 77 FR 56650 - Food and Drug Administration/American Glaucoma Society Workshop on the Validity, Reliability, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ...] Food and Drug Administration/American Glaucoma Society Workshop on the Validity, Reliability, and... entitled ``FDA/American Glaucoma Society (AGS) Workshop on the Validity, Reliability, and Usability of... research. The purpose of this public workshop is to provide a forum for discussing the validity...

  5. 78 FR 47712 - Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997: Modifications to the List of Recognized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2004-N-0451... should review the supplementary information sheet for the standard to understand fully the extent to... incorporating medical devices--Part 2-2: Guidance 2012-07 for the disclosure and communication of medical device...

  6. 77 FR 44256 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Safety Considerations for 510...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Safety Considerations for 510(k... serious and sometimes fatal consequences to patients. This guidance provides recommendations to 510(k... unintended connections between enteral and nonenteral devices. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in...

  7. 76 FR 5387 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “`Harmful and Potentially Harmful...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville... harmful constituents, including smoke constituents, to health in each tobacco product by brand and by quantity in each brand and subbrand.'' The guidance discusses the meaning of the term ``harmful and...

  8. 77 FR 16036 - Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0226...) audit report provides FDA a degree of assurance of compliance with basic and fundamental quality management system requirements for medical devices. \\1\\ The GHTF founding members auditing systems include...

  9. 76 FR 22905 - Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...] Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties and No... entitled ``Civil Money Penalties and No- Tobacco-Sale Orders for Tobacco Retailers.'' This guidance document describes FDA's current policies with respect to civil money penalties and no-tobacco-sale orders...

  10. 75 FR 53316 - Draft Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ...] Draft Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties and... guidance entitled ``Civil Money Penalties and No-Tobacco-Sale Orders for Tobacco Retailers.'' This guidance document is intended to describe FDA's current policies with respect to civil money penalties and no...

  11. 75 FR 60767 - Office of the Commissioner; Request for Comments on the Food and Drug Administration Fiscal Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Science and Innovation, (2) Strengthen the Safety and Integrity of the Global Supply Chain, (3) Strengthen... comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane... strengthen the strategic management structure currently in place. For comparison purposes, the current FDA...

  12. The multi-copy simultaneous search methodology: a fundamental tool for structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian R; Stultz, Collin M

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based ligand design approaches, such as the multi-copy simultaneous search (MCSS) methodology, have proven to be useful tools in the search for novel therapeutic compounds that bind pre-specified targets of known structure. MCSS offers a variety of advantages over more traditional high-throughput screening methods, and has been applied successfully to challenging targets. The methodology is quite general and can be used to construct functionality maps for proteins, DNA, and RNA. In this review, we describe the main aspects of the MCSS method and outline the general use of the methodology as a fundamental tool to guide the design of de novo lead compounds. We focus our discussion on the evaluation of MCSS results and the incorporation of protein flexibility into the methodology. In addition, we demonstrate on several specific examples how the information arising from the MCSS functionality maps has been successfully used to predict ligand binding to protein targets and RNA.

  13. Valuation of Drug Abuse: A Review of Current Methodologies and Implications for Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schori, Maayan

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the use of several valuation methods as they relate to drug abuse and places them within the context of U.S. policy. First, cost-of-illness (COI) studies are reviewed and their limitations discussed. Second, three additional economic methods of valuing drug abuse are reviewed, including cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA),…

  14. The US Food and Drug Administration's perspective on the new antidepressant vortioxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mathis, Mitchell V; Sellers, Jenn W; Kordzakhia, George; Jackson, Andre J; Dow, Antonia; Yang, Peiling; Fossom, Linda; Zhu, Hao; Patel, Hiren; Unger, Ellis F; Temple, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) review of the New Drug Application for vortioxetine, especially the clinical efficacy and safety data. It emphasizes the issues that were important to the FDA's approval decision, particularly the difference in the effective dose in domestic and foreign studies, and notes several new labeling features, specifically, description of time course of treatment response and detailed sexual dysfunction evaluation. The data sources were the original raw data sets for all clinical trials included in the development program for vortioxetine, as well as the sponsor's original analyses of these data. Data were available from 51 human trials involving vortioxetine, and included a total of 7,666 healthy volunteers and patients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) or generalized anxiety disorder who were exposed to at least 1 dose of vortioxetine for a total of 2,743 patient-years. Vortioxetine was effective in treating MDD in the United States at a dose of 20 mg/d. The recommended starting dose is 10 mg once daily without regard to food, with increase to 20 mg/d if the 10 mg/d dose is tolerated. For patients who do not tolerate 20 mg/d, 10 mg/d can be used and 5-mg/d dose can be considered. Vortioxetine can be discontinued abruptly, but it is recommended that doses of 15 mg/d or 20 mg/d be reduced to 10 mg/d for 1 week prior to full discontinuation to avoid potential withdrawal symptoms. Although the non-US maintenance study showed that maintenance doses of 5 to 10 mg/d were effective, a clinical judgment needs to be made to decide the maintenance dose in the United States. The applicant has agreed to conduct a US maintenance dose-response study covering the US-approved dose range. Vortioxetine's adverse event profile is similar to that of other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Nausea is the most common adverse event and is dose dependent. No dose adjustment is needed based on

  15. Effect of administration method, animal weight and age on the intranasal delivery of drugs to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Arun, Peethambaran; Chembukave, Bhadra; Appu, Abhilash P; Vijayakumar, Nivetha; Moffett, John R; Puthillathu, Narayanan; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2017-07-15

    The intranasal route of administration has proven to be an effective method for bypassing the blood brain barrier and avoiding first pass hepatic metabolism when targeting drugs to the brain. Most small molecules gain rapid access to CNS parenchyma when administered intranasally. However, bioavailability is affected by various factors ranging from the molecular weight of the drug to the mode of intranasal delivery. We examined the effects of animal posture, intranasal application method and animal weight and age on the delivery of radiolabeled pralidoxime ( 3 H-2-PAM) to the brain of rats. We found that using upright vs. supine posture did not significantly affect 3 H-2-PAM concentrations in different brain regions. Older animals with higher weights required increased doses to achieve the same drug concentration throughout the brain when compared to young animals with lower body weights. The use of an intranasal aerosol propelled delivery device mainly increased bioavailability in the olfactory bulbs, but did not reliably increase delivery of the drug to various other brain regions, and in some regions of the brain delivered less of the drug than simple pipette administration. In view of the emerging interest in the use of intranasal delivery of drugs to combat cognitive decline in old age, we tested effectiveness in very old rats and found the method to be as effective in the older rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. METHODOLOGY OF THE DRUGS MARKET VOLUME MODELING ON THE EXAMPLE OF HEMOPHILIA A

    OpenAIRE

    N. B. Molchanova

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a serious genetic disease, which may lead to disability of a patient even in early ages without a required therapy. The only one therapeutic approach is a replacement therapy with drugs of bloodcoagulation factor VIII (FVIII). The modeling of coagulation drugs market volume will allow evaluation of the level of patients’ provision with a necessary therapy. Modeling of a “perfect” market of drugs and its comparison with the real one was the purpose of the study. During the mode...

  17. Regulation and Device Development: Tips for Optimizing Your Experience With the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven S

    2017-06-01

    Physician-inventors are in a unique position to identify unserved patient needs, and innovate solutions to clinical problems. These solutions may also have associated commercial opportunities. The logistics of developing these medical products, however, can seem a daunting task. One of the primary barriers in the United States is the regulatory process of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this article, we will explore the risk-based approach used by the FDA which forms a framework to consider the regulatory pathway and the process to gain regulatory clearance or approval for medical devices. Inherent device properties and the procedural risk of the devices will determine the rigor with which they are scrutinized by FDA, and the evidentiary requirements to legally market them. Data and evidentiary development will vary depending on risk and regulatory precedent and may or may not require clinical data This regulatory paradigm will determine into which risk-based device class they fit, and whether they are regulated under the 510(k) or premarket approval application pathways. The FDA, although gatekeeper of the US market and tasked with determining which products are safe and effective, can be a powerful ally for product development. They have significant scientific and medical expertise, and mechanisms to both provide guidance, and also to consider novel approaches to product development and evidence development. Early interaction for routine and novel products alike can result in expedited and efficient development. This collaborative approach can be best practice to most expeditiously develop the next generation of products, getting them into the hands of US doctors and into the treatment of US patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Optimising strategies for Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination in Cambodia: primaquine, mass drug administration and artemisinin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Maude

    Full Text Available Malaria elimination requires a variety of approaches individually optimized for different transmission settings. A recent field study in an area of low seasonal transmission in South West Cambodia demonstrated dramatic reductions in malaria parasite prevalence following both mass drug administration (MDA and high treatment coverage of symptomatic patients with artemisinin-piperaquine plus primaquine. This study employed multiple combined strategies and it was unclear what contribution each made to the reductions in malaria.A mathematical model fitted to the trial results was used to assess the effects of the various components of these interventions, design optimal elimination strategies, and explore their interactions with artemisinin resistance, which has recently been discovered in Western Cambodia. The modelling indicated that most of the initial reduction of P. falciparum malaria resulted from MDA with artemisinin-piperaquine. The subsequent continued decline and near elimination resulted mainly from high coverage with artemisinin-piperaquine treatment. Both these strategies were more effective with the addition of primaquine. MDA with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT increased the proportion of artemisinin resistant infections, although much less than treatment of symptomatic cases with ACT, and this increase was slowed by adding primaquine. Artemisinin resistance reduced the effectiveness of interventions using ACT when the prevalence of resistance was very high. The main results were robust to assumptions about primaquine action, and immunity.The key messages of these modelling results for policy makers were: high coverage with ACT treatment can produce a long-term reduction in malaria whereas the impact of MDA is generally only short-term; primaquine enhances the effect of ACT in eliminating malaria and reduces the increase in proportion of artemisinin resistant infections; parasite prevalence is a better surveillance measure for

  19. STABILITY AND COMPATIBILITY OF TAXOL WITH VARIOUS DRUGS DURING SIMULATED Y-SITE ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN PIL BURM

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the compatibility and stability of Taxol with ondansetron, ranitidine, vancomycin and cephalosporins in 5% dextrose injection and 0.9% sodium chloride injection during simulated Y-site administration. Two stock solutions of Taxol 0.3 and 1.2 mg/mL and each stock solutions of ondansetron 0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/mL, ranitidine 0.5 and 2 mg/mL, vancomycin 1, 5 and 10 mg/mL and cephalosporins 20 mg/mL were prepared in glass bottles. Two mL of Taxol stock solution was mixed with 2 mL of each stock solution. Samples were removed at room temperature at time zero, one, two, four and 12 hours for immediate assay. Taxol concentrations were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. All solutions were prepared in triplicate, and each drug was assayed in duplicate. At the time of sampling assay and before any dilution, each sample was visually inspected for clarity, color and precipitation. The pH was also determined. Taxol in concentrations of 0.3 and 1.2 mg/mL was stable when mixed with either ondansetron (0.03, 0.1 or 0.3 mg/mL, as the hydrochloride salt, ranitidine (0.5 or 2.0 mg/mL, as the hydrochloride salt, vancomycin (1, 5 or 10 mg/mL, as the hydrochloride salt or cephalosporins 20 mg/mL and stored in glass containers for 12 hours. No precipitates, color changes, or haziness was seen. The changes in pH were minor.

  20. 75 FR 48179 - Comprehensive List of Guidance Documents at the Food and Drug Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... Products (PDF - 57KB) 11/1994 Preparation of Investigational New Drug Products (Human and Animal) (PDF... Form FDA 356h ``Application to Market a New Drug, Biologic or an Antibiotic Drug for Human Use'' 5/10... Description Information for Human Plasma-Derived Biological Products, Animal Plasma or Serum-Derived Products...

  1. 76 FR 36133 - Draft Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Classification of Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Action'' in the Definition of Device Under Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act... the Term 'Chemical Action' in the Definition of Device Under Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug... statutory definitions for these terms set forth in sections 201(g) and 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  2. Lipid-based formulations for oral administration of poorly water-soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems have shown great potentials in oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, primarily for lipophilic drugs, with several successfully marketed products. Pre-dissolving drugs in lipids, surfactants, or mixtures of lipids and surfactants omits the dissolving....../dissolution step, which is a potential rate limiting factor for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipids not only vary in structures and physiochemical properties, but also in their digestibility and absorption pathway; therefore selection of lipid excipients and dosage form has a pronounced effect...

  3. DRUG EVALUATION AND DECISION MAKING IN CATALONIA: DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK BASED ON MULTI-CRITERIA DECISION ANALYSIS (MCDA) FOR ORPHAN DRUGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Perramon, Antoni; Torrent-Farnell, Josep; Catalan, Arancha; Prat, Alba; Fontanet, Manel; Puig-Peiró, Ruth; Merino-Montero, Sandra; Khoury, Hanane; Goetghebeur, Mireille M; Badia, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to adapt and assess the value of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) framework (EVIDEM) for the evaluation of Orphan drugs in Catalonia (Catalan Health Service). The standard evaluation and decision-making procedures of CatSalut were compared with the EVIDEM methodology and contents. The EVIDEM framework was adapted to the Catalan context, focusing on the evaluation of Orphan drugs (PASFTAC program), during a Workshop with sixteen PASFTAC members. The criteria weighting was done using two different techniques (nonhierarchical and hierarchical). Reliability was assessed by re-test. The EVIDEM framework and methodology was found useful and feasible for Orphan drugs evaluation and decision making in Catalonia. All the criteria considered for the development of the CatSalut Technical Reports and decision making were considered in the framework. Nevertheless, the framework could improve the reporting of some of these criteria (i.e., "unmet needs" or "nonmedical costs"). Some Contextual criteria were removed (i.e., "Mandate and scope of healthcare system", "Environmental impact") or adapted ("population priorities and access") for CatSalut purposes. Independently of the weighting technique considered, the most important evaluation criteria identified for orphan drugs were: "disease severity", "unmet needs" and "comparative effectiveness", while the "size of the population" had the lowest relevance for decision making. Test-retest analysis showed weight consistency among techniques, supporting reliability overtime. MCDA (EVIDEM framework) could be a useful tool to complement the current evaluation methods of CatSalut, contributing to standardization and pragmatism, providing a method to tackle ethical dilemmas and facilitating discussions related to decision making.

  4. METHODOLOGY OF THE DRUGS MARKET VOLUME MODELING ON THE EXAMPLE OF HEMOPHILIA A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Molchanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a serious genetic disease, which may lead to disability of a patient even in early ages without a required therapy. The only one therapeutic approach is a replacement therapy with drugs of bloodcoagulation factor VIII (FVIII. The modeling of coagulation drugs market volume will allow evaluation of the level of patients’ provision with a necessary therapy. Modeling of a “perfect” market of drugs and its comparison with the real one was the purpose of the study. During the modeling of market volume we have used the data about the number of hamophilia A patients on the basis of the federal registry, Russian and international morbidity indices, and the data of a real practice about average consumption of drugs of bloodcoagulation factors and data about the drugs prescription according to the standards and protocols of assistance rendering. According to the standards of care delivery, average annual volume of FVIII drugs consumption amounted to 406 325 244 IU for children and 964 578 678 IU for adults, i.e. an average volume of a “perfect” market is equal to 1 370 903 922 IU for all patients. The market volume is 1.8 times bigger than a real volume of FVIII drugs which, according to the data of IMS marketing agency, amounted to 765 000 000 IU in 2013. The modeling conducted has shown that despite a relatively high patients’ coverage there is a potential for almost double growth.

  5. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... benefit and risk considerations that make up a regulatory decision will help to facilitate balanced and... and the role of those factors in the regulatory decision-making process for human drug and biological... communication of its decisions by making clear the important considerations in the Agency's decision-making...

  7. A critical review about methodologies for the analysis of mucoadhesive properties of drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi da Silva, Jéssica; Ferreira, Sabrina Barbosa de Souza; de Freitas, Osvaldo; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2017-07-01

    Mucoadhesion is a useful strategy for drug delivery systems, such as tablets, patches, gels, liposomes, micro/nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, microemulsions and colloidal dispersions. Moreover, it has contributed to many benefits like increased residence time at application sites, drug protection, increased drug permeation and improved drug availability. In this context, investigation into the mucoadhesive properties of pharmaceutical dosage forms is fundamental, in order to characterize, understand and simulate the in vivo interaction between the formulation and the biological substrate, contributing to the development of new mucoadhesive systems with effectiveness, safety and quality. There are a lot of in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo methods for the evaluation of the mucoadhesive properties of drug delivery systems. However, there also is a lack of standardization of these techniques, which makes comparison between the results difficult. Therefore, this work aims to show an overview of the most commonly employed methods for mucoadhesion evaluation, relating them to different proposed systems and using artificial or natural mucosa from humans and animals.

  8. Alcohol- and Drug-Involved Driving in the United States: Methodology for the 2007 National Roadside Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, John H.; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Voas, Robert B.; Romano, Eduardo; Furr-Holden, C. Debra; Torres, Pedro; Berning, Amy

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the methodology used in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey to estimate the prevalence of alcohol- and drug-impaired driving and alcohol- and drug-involved driving. This study involved randomly stopping drivers at 300 locations across the 48 continental U.S. states at sites selected through a stratified random sampling procedure. Data were collected during a 2-hour Friday daytime session at 60 locations and during 2-hour nighttime weekend periods at 240 locations. Both self-report and biological measures were taken. Biological measures included breath alcohol measurements from 9,413 respondents, oral fluid samples from 7,719 respondents, and blood samples from 3,276 respondents. PMID:21997324

  9. Is mass drug administration against lymphatic filariasis required in urban settings? The experience in Kano, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pam, Dung D; de Souza, Dziedzom K; D'Souza, Susan; Opoku, Millicent; Sanda, Safiya; Nazaradden, Ibrahim; Anagbogu, Ifeoma N; Okoronkwo, Chukwu; Davies, Emmanuel; Elhassan, Elisabeth; Molyneux, David H; Bockarie, Moses J; Koudou, Benjamin G

    2017-10-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF), launched in 2000, has the target of eliminating the disease as a public health problem by the year 2020. The strategy adopted is mass drug administration (MDA) to all eligible individuals in endemic communities and the implementation of measures to reduce the morbidity of those suffering from chronic disease. Success has been recorded in many rural endemic communities in which elimination efforts have centered. However, implementation has been challenging in several urban African cities. The large cities of West Africa, exemplified in Nigeria in Kano are challenging for LF elimination program because reaching 65% therapeutic coverage during MDA is difficult. There is therefore a need to define a strategy which could complement MDA. Thus, in Kano State, Nigeria, while LF MDA had reached 33 of the 44 Local Government Areas (LGAs) there remained eleven 'urban' LGAs which had not been covered by MDA. Given the challenges of achieving at least 65% coverage during MDA implementation over several years in order to achieve elimination, it may be challenging to eliminate LF in such settings. In order to plan the LF control activities, this study was undertaken to confirm the LF infection prevalence in the human and mosquito populations in three urban LGAs. The prevalence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) of Wuchereria bancrofti was assessed by an immuno-chromatography test (ICT) in 981 people in three urban LGAs of Kano state, Nigeria. Mosquitoes were collected over a period of 4 months from May to August 2015 using exit traps, gravid traps and pyrethrum knock-down spray sheet collections (PSC) in different households. A proportion of mosquitoes were analyzed for W. bancrofti, using dissection, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that none of the 981 subjects (constituted of West Africa may not be of significant importance

  10. Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese M Kearns

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35-60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10-42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus.We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818 at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%, falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297 to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157 at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any self-reported clinical

  11. Maintaining effective mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis through in-process monitoring in Sierra Leone

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    Hodges Mary H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2007 Sierra Leone has conducted mass drug administration (MDA for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF implemented by unpaid community health volunteers (CHVs. Other health campaigns such as Mother and Child Health Weeks (MCHW pay for services to be implemented at community level and these persons are then known as community health workers (CHWs. In 2010, the LF MDA in the 12 districts of the Southern, Northern and Eastern Provinces un-expectantly coincided with universal distribution of Long Lasting Insecticide Treated Nets (LLITNs during the MCHW. In-process monitoring of LF MDA was performed to ensure effective coverage was attained in hard to reach sites (HTR in both urban and rural locations where vulnerable populations reside. Methods Independent monitors interviewed individuals eligible for LF MDA and tallied those who recalled having taken ivermectin and albendazole, calculated program coverage and reported results daily by phone. Monitoring of coverage in HTR sites in the 4 most rapidly urbanizing towns was performed after 4 weeks of LF MDA and again after 8 weeks throughout all 12 districts. End process monitoring was performed in randomly selected HTR sites not previously sampled throughout all 12 districts and compared to coverage calculated from the pre-MDA census and reported treatments. Results Only one town had reached effective program coverage (≥80% after 4 weeks following which CHWs were recruited for LF MDA in all district headquarter towns. After 8 weeks only 4 of 12 districts had reached effective coverage so LF MDA was extended for a further month in all districts. By 12 weeks effective program coverage had been reached in all districts except Port Loko and there was no significant difference between those interviewed in communities versus households or by sex. Effective epidemiological coverage (≥65% was reported in all districts and overall was significantly higher in males versus

  12. Toward Omics-Based, Systems Biomedicine, and Path and Drug Discovery Methodologies for Depression-Inflammation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Nowak, Gabriel; Caso, Javier R; Leza, Juan Carlos; Song, Cai; Kubera, Marta; Klein, Hans; Galecki, Piotr; Noto, Cristiano; Glaab, Enrico; Balling, Rudi; Berk, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Meta-analyses confirm that depression is accompanied by signs of inflammation including increased levels of acute phase proteins, e.g., C-reactive protein, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interleukin-6. Supporting the translational significance of this, a meta-analysis showed that anti-inflammatory drugs may have antidepressant effects. Here, we argue that inflammation and depression research needs to get onto a new track. Firstly, the choice of inflammatory biomarkers in depression research was often too selective and did not consider the broader pathways. Secondly, although mild inflammatory responses are present in depression, other immune-related pathways cannot be disregarded as new drug targets, e.g., activation of cell-mediated immunity, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) pathways, autoimmune responses, bacterial translocation, and activation of the toll-like receptor and neuroprogressive pathways. Thirdly, anti-inflammatory treatments are sometimes used without full understanding of their effects on the broader pathways underpinning depression. Since many of the activated immune-inflammatory pathways in depression actually confer protection against an overzealous inflammatory response, targeting these pathways may result in unpredictable and unwanted results. Furthermore, this paper discusses the required improvements in research strategy, i.e., path and drug discovery processes, omics-based techniques, and systems biomedicine methodologies. Firstly, novel methods should be employed to examine the intracellular networks that control and modulate the immune, O&NS and neuroprogressive pathways using omics-based assays, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, epigenomics, immunoproteomics and metagenomics. Secondly, systems biomedicine analyses are essential to unravel the complex interactions between these cellular networks, pathways, and the multifactorial trigger factors and to delineate new drug targets in the cellular

  13. A systematic review of factors that shape implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silumbwe, Adam; Zulu, Joseph Mumba; Halwindi, Hikabasa; Jacobs, Choolwe; Zgambo, Jessy; Dambe, Rosalia; Chola, Mumbi; Chongwe, Gershom; Michelo, Charles

    2017-05-22

    Understanding factors surrounding the implementation process of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (MDA for LF) elimination programmes is critical for successful implementation of similar interventions. The sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region records the second highest prevalence of the disease and subsequently several countries have initiated and implemented MDA for LF. Systematic reviews have largely focused on factors that affect coverage and compliance, with less attention on the implementation of MDA for LF activities. This review therefore seeks to document facilitators and barriers to implementation of MDA for LF in sub-Saharan Africa. A systematic search of databases PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar was conducted. English peer-reviewed publications focusing on implementation of MDA for LF from 2000 to 2016 were considered for analysis. Using thematic analysis, we synthesized the final 18 articles to identify key facilitators and barriers to MDA for LF programme implementation. The main factors facilitating implementation of MDA for LF programmes were awareness creation through innovative community health education programmes, creation of partnerships and collaborations, integration with existing programmes, creation of morbidity management programmes, motivation of community drug distributors (CDDs) through incentives and training, and management of adverse effects. Barriers to implementation included the lack of geographical demarcations and unregistered migrations into rapidly urbanizing areas, major disease outbreaks like the Ebola virus disease in West Africa, delayed drug deliveries at both country and community levels, inappropriate drug delivery strategies, limited number of drug distributors and the large number of households allocated for drug distribution. Mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination programmes should design their implementation strategies differently based on specific contextual factors to

  14. A systematic review of factors that shape implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Silumbwe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding factors surrounding the implementation process of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (MDA for LF elimination programmes is critical for successful implementation of similar interventions. The sub-Saharan Africa (SSA region records the second highest prevalence of the disease and subsequently several countries have initiated and implemented MDA for LF. Systematic reviews have largely focused on factors that affect coverage and compliance, with less attention on the implementation of MDA for LF activities. This review therefore seeks to document facilitators and barriers to implementation of MDA for LF in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A systematic search of databases PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar was conducted. English peer-reviewed publications focusing on implementation of MDA for LF from 2000 to 2016 were considered for analysis. Using thematic analysis, we synthesized the final 18 articles to identify key facilitators and barriers to MDA for LF programme implementation. Results The main factors facilitating implementation of MDA for LF programmes were awareness creation through innovative community health education programmes, creation of partnerships and collaborations, integration with existing programmes, creation of morbidity management programmes, motivation of community drug distributors (CDDs through incentives and training, and management of adverse effects. Barriers to implementation included the lack of geographical demarcations and unregistered migrations into rapidly urbanizing areas, major disease outbreaks like the Ebola virus disease in West Africa, delayed drug deliveries at both country and community levels, inappropriate drug delivery strategies, limited number of drug distributors and the large number of households allocated for drug distribution. Conclusion Mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination programmes should design their implementation

  15. Characteristics of Clinical Studies Used for US Food and Drug Administration Approval of High-Risk Medical Device Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sarah Y; Dhruva, Sanket S; Redberg, Rita F

    2017-08-15

    High-risk medical devices often undergo modifications, which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through various kinds of premarket approval (PMA) supplements. There have been multiple high-profile recalls of devices approved as PMA supplements. To characterize the quality of the clinical studies and data (strength of evidence) used to support FDA approval of panel-track supplements (a type of PMA supplement pathway that is used for significant changes in a device or indication for use and always requires clinical data). Descriptive study of clinical studies supporting panel-track supplements approved by the FDA between April 19, 2006, and October 9, 2015. Panel-track supplement approval. Methodological quality of studies including randomization, blinding, type of controls, clinical vs surrogate primary end points, use of post hoc analyses, and reporting of age and sex. Eighty-three clinical studies supported the approval of 78 panel-track supplements, with 71 panel-track supplements (91%) supported by a single study. Of the 83 studies, 37 (45%) were randomized clinical trials and 25 (30%) were blinded. The median number of patients per study was 185 (interquartile range, 75-305), and the median follow-up duration was 180 days (interquartile range, 84-270 days). There were a total of 150 primary end points (mean [SD], 1.8 [1.2] per study), and 57 primary end points (38%) were compared with controls. Of primary end points with controls, 6 (11%) were retrospective controls and 51 (89%) were active controls. One hundred twenty-one primary end points (81%) were surrogate end points. Thirty-three studies (40%) did not report age and 25 (30%) did not report sex for all enrolled patients. The FDA required postapproval studies for 29 of 78 (37%) panel-track supplements. Among clinical studies used to support FDA approval of high-risk medical device modifications, fewer than half were randomized, blinded, or controlled, and most primary outcomes were

  16. Relevance of methodological design for the interpretation of efficacy of drug treatment of premature ejaculation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, M. D.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Schweitzer, D. H.; Olivier, B.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate whether the design and methodology of drug-treatment studies of premature ejaculation affect the efficacy outcome differently. Therefore, methodological, design and efficacy data from 79 studies ( 3034 males), published between 1943

  17. Cartel Next: How Army Design Methodology Offers Holistic and Dissimilar Approaches to the Mexican Drug Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    which the source is limited to South American regions that grow abundant quantities of the cocoa plant, this cycle manifests in many forms based upon...coffee, bananas, or other legal commodities. In other words, American apathy towards cultural drug consumption often verges on the comical; we

  18. Integrated cardiac safety: assessment methodologies for noncardiac drugs in discovery, development, and postmarketing surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, J. Rick; Durham, Todd A

    2009-01-01

    ... PROTEOMICS AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS 2.8 GENE EXPRESSION 2.9 PROTEINS 2.10 CELLS 2.11 CELL MEMBRANES 2.12 PROTEINS IN CELL MEMBRANES 2.13 ION CHANNELS 2.14 RECEPTORS ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS MELANOGASTER 25 ...

  19. Individual and contextual determinants of regional variation in prescription drug use: an analysis of administrative data from British Columbia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Morgan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention is being paid to variations in the use of prescription drugs because their role in health care has grown to the point where their use can be considered a proxy for health system performance. Studies have shown that prescription drug use varies across regions in the US, UK, and Canada by more than would be predicted based on age and health status alone. In this paper, we explore the determinants of variations in the use of prescription drugs, drawing on health services theories of access to care.We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using population-based administrative health care data for British Columbia (BC, Canada. We used logistic and hierarchical regressions to analyze the effects of individual- and area-level determinants of use of prescriptions overall and rates of purchase of prescriptions from five therapeutic categories representing a range of indications: antihypertensives, statins, acid reducing drugs, opioid drugs, and antidepressants. To indicate the relative scale of regional variations and the importance of individual- and area-level variables in explaining them, we computed standardized rates of utilization for 49 local health areas in BC.We found that characteristics of individuals and the areas in which they live affect likelihood of prescription drug purchase. Individual-level factors influenced prescription drug purchases in ways generally consistent with behavioral models of health services use. Contextual variables exerted influences that differed by type of drug studied. Population health, education levels, and ethnic composition of local areas were associated with significant differences in the likelihood of purchasing medications. Relatively modest regional variations remained after both individual-level and area-level determinants were taken into account.The results of this study suggest that individual- and area-level factors should be considered when studying variations in the use of

  20. Individual and contextual determinants of regional variation in prescription drug use: an analysis of administrative data from British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Steven G; Cunningham, Colleen M; Hanley, Gillian E

    2010-12-29

    Increasing attention is being paid to variations in the use of prescription drugs because their role in health care has grown to the point where their use can be considered a proxy for health system performance. Studies have shown that prescription drug use varies across regions in the US, UK, and Canada by more than would be predicted based on age and health status alone. In this paper, we explore the determinants of variations in the use of prescription drugs, drawing on health services theories of access to care. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using population-based administrative health care data for British Columbia (BC), Canada. We used logistic and hierarchical regressions to analyze the effects of individual- and area-level determinants of use of prescriptions overall and rates of purchase of prescriptions from five therapeutic categories representing a range of indications: antihypertensives, statins, acid reducing drugs, opioid drugs, and antidepressants. To indicate the relative scale of regional variations and the importance of individual- and area-level variables in explaining them, we computed standardized rates of utilization for 49 local health areas in BC. We found that characteristics of individuals and the areas in which they live affect likelihood of prescription drug purchase. Individual-level factors influenced prescription drug purchases in ways generally consistent with behavioral models of health services use. Contextual variables exerted influences that differed by type of drug studied. Population health, education levels, and ethnic composition of local areas were associated with significant differences in the likelihood of purchasing medications. Relatively modest regional variations remained after both individual-level and area-level determinants were taken into account. The results of this study suggest that individual- and area-level factors should be considered when studying variations in the use of prescription drugs. Some

  1. [Treatment of Chemotherapy Related Leukocytopenia by Oral Administration of Multiple Leucogenic Drugs Combined with G-CSF: an Experimental Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Hong-jian; Zou, De-hong; He, Xiang-ming; Yu, Xing-fei; Li, Yong-feng

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate efficacies of three commonly used oral drugs including Berbamine Hydrochloride Tablet (B), Qijiao Shengbai Capsule (Q), and Leucogen Tablet (L) (by single drug, two drugs or three drugs) combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for treat ment of chemotherapy related leukocytopenia in mice. Totally 156 Kunming male mice were divided into the normal control group (A, n=24), the model group (B, n=24), the G-CSF group (C, n =24), the G-CSF+Q group (D, n=12), G-CSF+ B (E, n=12), the G-CSF+L group (F, n=12), the G-CSF + Q + B group (G, n=12), the G-CSF + Q + L group (H, n=12), the G-CSF + L + B group (I, n=12), and the G-CSF + L + Q + B (J, n=12). Mouse models of chemotherapy related leukocytopenia were established by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (CTX). A G-CSF group was set up as a positive control. Mice were treated by a single oral drug, a single oral drug combined with G-CSF, and two or three drugs combined with G-CSF respectively, and the death rate calculated. Hemocytes [such as white blood cells (WBC) and its classification, red blood cells (RBC), platelet (PLT), hemoglobin (Hb)] were calculated by hematology analyzer. Mice were anatomized and important organs weighed. Organ indices were calculated. There was no statistical difference in the mortality rate among all groups (P > 0.05). Compared with Group B, WBC was elevated in all other groups (P drug B and L (P chemotherapy related leukopenia or decreased three blood series was to administrate three commonly oral drugs combined with G-CSF. Authors speculated that G-CSF and Q might have a certain effect on CTX induced immune inhibition.

  2. The pneumatic syringe: a simple apparatus for self-administration of drugs by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J R

    1977-12-01

    Drug solution is delivered by a syringe operated by a pneumatic cylinder. Recommended delivery volumes are from 10 to 200 microliter. A solid-state control unit is described which can operate two syringes (drug injection and flush), has outputs for recording responses and injections, and can be programmed to provide several schedules of reinforcement. All components are readily commercially available.

  3. Levofloxacin-Induced QTc Prolongation Depends on the Time of Drug Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kervezee, L; Gotta, V; Stevens, J; Birkhoff, W; Kamerling, Imc; Danhof, M; Meijer, J H; Burggraaf, J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing a drug's potential to prolong the QTc interval on an electrocardiogram is essential for the correct evaluation of its safety profile. To explore the effect of dosing time on drug-induced QTc prolongation, a randomized, crossover, clinical trial was conducted in

  4. 75 FR 4982 - Redelegation of Functions; Delegation of Authority to Drug Enforcement Administration Official

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... other things, the CMEA amended the CSA to change the regulations for selling nonprescription products... redelegation will empower the Deputy Assistant Administrator, among other things, to exercise signing authority... Administration. The redelegation of signature authority for the regulations in part 1314 is consistent with the...

  5. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-treatment with grapefruit juice inhibits while chronic administration activates intestinal P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchagnula, R; Bansal, T; Varma, M V S; Kaul, C L

    2005-12-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated efflux is recognized as a significant biochemical barrier affecting oral absorption for a number of drugs. Various conflicting reports have been published regarding the effects of grapefruit juice (GFJ) on P-gp-mediated drug efflux, in which GFJ has been shown both to inhibit and activate it. Hence, the present study adopted a two-way approach, involving both co-treatment and chronic administration. Bi-directional transport of paclitaxel (PCL) was carried out in the absence and presence of GFJ extract, in rat everted ileum sac. Further, the effect of chronic administration of GFJ to rats was characterized by permeability studies with indinavir (INDI). Co-treatment of GFJ extract at 100% concentration reduced the asymmetric transport of PCL (efflux ratio = 20.8) by increasing absorptive (A --> B) transport by 921% and reducing secretory (B --> A) transport by 41%. Further, GFJ showed a concentration dependent effect on PCL permeability. Imipramine, a passive permeability marker with absorptive permeability of 15.33 +/- 4.26 x 10(-6) cm/s showed no asymmetric transport and also no significant (P extract inhibited P-gp-mediated efflux in co-treatment, whereas chronic administration led to increased levels of P-gp expression, thus having a profound effect on intestinal absorption and GFJ-drug interactions in vivo.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DISEASE MODIFYING DRUGS ADMINISTRATION FREGUENCY AND CAUSES OF THEIR WITHDRAWAL IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Pavlova

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of studdy: To assess the frequency of practical application of different basic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: Tlxe study was conducted basing of questionner of pts and analysis of ycases by randomized sampling among 103 consequent pts (M:F= 13:90 with reliable RA (ARA, 1987 in rheumatologic department of Clinical Hospital Nol in Ekaterinburg. 74% of pts under study demonstrated systemic manifestations: anemia (in 47 pts, lymphadenopathy (in 34, rheumatoid nodules (in 15, Sjogren s syndrome (in 4, nephropathy (in 4, vascular disturbances including Raynaud s phenomenon, capillarites (by 1 pt. Results: In the course of disease basic therapy was prescribed to 88 out of103 (85.4% pts and one and the same patient could take different basic drugs. Aminochinoline drugs prevailed, after them more frequent were immunodepressants and gold preparations. More rarely pts had sulfasalazin, cuprenil and wobenzym. In general, in 133 out of 184 cases of prescribing basic drugs they were canceled. The reason for cancellation were: prevalently absence of the drug in the pharmaceutical stores (in 48 cases averagely in 8 months of taking the drug; then they insufficient efficacy (44 cases averagely in 1.3 year. In 18 cases pts themselves stopped treatment averagely in 3.5 months of drug taking. Conclusion: In the majority of cases of basic drugs cancellation in RA the cause is their absence in sail especially on free of charge prescription. Cases ofself-cancellation of the drug demonstrate the need of explaining to pts the necessity> of long-term taking disease-modifying drugs.

  8. The impact of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act on the recruitment of children for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharav, Vera Hassner

    2003-01-01

    This article argues that contrary to the claims made by research stakeholders in industry, academia and government, the shift in public policy since the enactment of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) of 1997 and its financial incentives to industry to test drugs on children, has had a deleterious impact on children's dignity, health and welfare. Those lucrative incentives offered an opportunity to accelerate the pace of FDA approval for pediatric drug marketing. FDAMA resulted in a radical shift in federal policy to accommodate an expansion of pediatric trials. Children who are precluded from exercising a human adult's right to informed consent to research are increasingly sought as test subjects even when the trials offer no potential benefit for them. Prior to FDAMA children were protected under federal regulations that prohibited their recruitment for experiments that were not in their best interest. This article discusses eight cases and controversies demonstrating that children have been subjected to experiments that exposed them to pain, discomfort, and serious risks of harm. Babies have died testing a lethal heartburn drug; children have been subjected to "forced dose titration" in antidepressant drug trials that resulted in several suicide attempts. Toddlers are currently being subjected to methylphenidate dose tolerance tests without evidence of any pathological condition. Healthy teenagers are being exposed to antipsychotic drugs known to induce severe pathological side effects in speculative "schizophrenia prevention" experiments.

  9. Controlling prescription drug costs: regulation and the role of interest groups in Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakt, Austin B; Pizer, Steven D; Hendricks, Ann M

    2008-12-01

    Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration (VA) both finance large outpatient prescription drug programs, though in very different ways. In the ongoing debate on how to control Medicare spending, some suggest that Medicare should negotiate directly with drug manufacturers, as the VA does. In this article we relate the role of interest groups to policy differences between Medicare and the VA and, in doing so, explain why such a large change to the Medicare drug program is unlikely. We argue that key policy differences are attributable to stable differences in interest group involvement. While this stability makes major changes in Medicare unlikely, it suggests the possibility of leveraging VA drug purchasing to achieve savings in Medicare. This could be done through a VA-administered drug-only benefit for Medicare-enrolled veterans. Such a partnership could incorporate key elements of both programs: capacity to accept large numbers of enrollees (like Medicare) and leverage to negotiate prescription drug prices (like the VA). Moreover, it could be implemented at no cost to the VA while achieving savings for Medicare and beneficiaries.

  10. Methodology for geometric modelling. Presentation and administration of site descriptive models; Metodik foer geometrisk modellering. Presentation och administration av platsbeskrivande modeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This report presents a methodology to construct, visualise and present geoscientific descriptive models based on data from the site investigations, which the SKB currently performs, to build an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. It is designed for interaction with SICADA (SKB:s site characterisation database) and RVS (SKB:s Rock Visualisation System). However, the concepts of the methodology are general and can be used with other tools capable of handling 3D geometries and parameters. The descriptive model is intended to be an instrument where site investigation data from all disciplines are put together to form a comprehensive visual interpretation of the studied rock mass. The methodology has four main components: 1. Construction of a geometrical model of the interpreted main structures at the site. 2. Description of the geoscientific characteristics of the structures. 3. Description and geometrical implementation of the geometric uncertainties in the interpreted model structures. 4. Quality system for the handling of the geometrical model, its associated database and some aspects of the technical auditing. The geometrical model forms a basis for understanding the main elements and structures of the investigated site. Once the interpreted geometries are in place in the model, the system allows for adding descriptive and quantitative data to each modelled object through a system of intuitive menus. The associated database allows each geometrical object a complete quantitative description of all geoscientific disciplines, variabilities, uncertainties in interpretation and full version history. The complete geometrical model and its associated database of object descriptions are to be recorded in a central quality system. Official, new and old versions of the model are administered centrally in order to have complete quality assurance of each step in the interpretation process. The descriptive model is a cornerstone in the understanding of the

  11. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and class labeling of gadolinium-based contrast agents by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lucie; Krefting, Ira; Gorovets, Alex; Marzella, Louis; Kaiser, James; Boucher, Robert; Rieves, Dwaine

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers of all approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), drugs widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, use nearly identical text in their product labeling to describe the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Accumulating information about NSF risks led to revision of the labeling text for all of these drugs in 2010. The present report summarizes the basis and purpose of this class-labeling approach and describes some of the related challenges, given the evolutionary nature of the NSF risk evidence. The class-labeling approach for presentation of product risk is designed to decrease the occurrence of NSF and to enhance the safe use of GBCAs in radiologic practice. © RSNA, 2012.

  12. Correct titration of non-drugs and some other methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, M; Rasmus, W; Rød, I S; Fritze, J

    1994-01-01

    Doctors' prescription and dosing behaviour was investigated using data from 9 clinical trials in 550 patients treated with psychotropics. 7 trials were conducted under double- and 2 under single-blind conditions. In 3 of these trials, oral and i.m. preparations were used demanding a double-dummy design. All patients were evaluated on a weekly or 2-week basis using psychopathological rating scales (i.e. Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Hamilton Depression Scale, Clinical Global Impressions, Simpson and Angus EPS). It was found that (a) oral-medication titration was 3- to 4-fold more broad-ranging than i.m. medication titration, (b) oral placebo was titrated to the same extent as the oral investigational drugs, and (c) the titration schedule did not follow protocol requirements. Moreover, the average doses in all drug and placebo groups were the same. Concomitant medication like sleep inducers was found to be more closely related to doctors' habits than to actual medical need. Independent of trial and investigational drug, 10-33% of all patients received additional sleep inducers.

  13. Administración de medicamentos por vía oral: Interacciones medicamento - alimento Oral drug administration: drug-food interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélida Barrueco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la vía oral de administración de medicamentos es la vía más cómoda, segura y económica. Sin embargo, pueden existir interacciones con otros fármacos o con alimentos que alteren la eficacia y seguridad de los mismos. Objetivo: desarrollar un programa de información dirigido a enfermeros y enfermeras sobre la administración de medicamentos por vía oral. Método: se seleccionan los medicamentos más utilizados en el área de cardiología pediátrica, revisándose para cada principio activo la administración en relación con alimentos o productos medicinales y otros aspectos relacionados con la administración por vía oral. Resultados: se elabora una tabla informativa sobre un total de 28 principios activos. Discusión: Los farmacéuticos de hospital se han integrado recientemente en los equipos multidisciplinares y desde esta posición tienen la oportunidad de desarrollar diferentes programas de atención farmacéutica, educación sanitaria e información encaminadas a prevenir problemas relacionados con los medicamentos, aumentar su uso seguro y disminuir los riesgos asociados a cualquier tratamiento farmacológico. Las prescripciones médicas generalmente no indican el horario y la forma de administración de los medicamentos, dejando a enfermeros y enfermeras la responsabilidad de su organización. Por esto deben estar informados de cómo y cuándo se deben administrar los medicamentos, lo que permite garantizar su uso seguro y disminuir los riesgos asociados al tratamiento.Background: The easiest, safest and cheapest way to administrate drugs is by mouth (PO. Nevertheless, there may be interactions, either with other drugs or with food, which can modify efficacy and security of the drug itself. Objective: the development of a nursing information program about the administration of drugs PO. Method: we selected the most used drugs corresponding to the pediatric cardiology area, looking for the best administration

  14. 78 FR 42381 - Administrative Detention of Drugs Intended for Human or Animal Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... to all interested persons in a timely fashion. The 30-day public docket closed on May 9, 2013. FDA... detained drug, may be incurred if FDA revokes the detention order on appeal. Given the history of...

  15. Is mass drug administration against lymphatic filariasis required in urban settings? The experience in Kano, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung D Pam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF, launched in 2000, has the target of eliminating the disease as a public health problem by the year 2020. The strategy adopted is mass drug administration (MDA to all eligible individuals in endemic communities and the implementation of measures to reduce the morbidity of those suffering from chronic disease. Success has been recorded in many rural endemic communities in which elimination efforts have centered. However, implementation has been challenging in several urban African cities. The large cities of West Africa, exemplified in Nigeria in Kano are challenging for LF elimination program because reaching 65% therapeutic coverage during MDA is difficult. There is therefore a need to define a strategy which could complement MDA. Thus, in Kano State, Nigeria, while LF MDA had reached 33 of the 44 Local Government Areas (LGAs there remained eleven 'urban' LGAs which had not been covered by MDA. Given the challenges of achieving at least 65% coverage during MDA implementation over several years in order to achieve elimination, it may be challenging to eliminate LF in such settings. In order to plan the LF control activities, this study was undertaken to confirm the LF infection prevalence in the human and mosquito populations in three urban LGAs.The prevalence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA of Wuchereria bancrofti was assessed by an immuno-chromatography test (ICT in 981 people in three urban LGAs of Kano state, Nigeria. Mosquitoes were collected over a period of 4 months from May to August 2015 using exit traps, gravid traps and pyrethrum knock-down spray sheet collections (PSC in different households. A proportion of mosquitoes were analyzed for W. bancrofti, using dissection, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR.The results showed that none of the 981 subjects (constituted of <21% of children 5-10 years old tested

  16. The integrity of the social hierarchy in mice following administration of psychotropic drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Poshivalov, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    1 Mice in small groups develop a despotic type of social hierarchy, a feature of which is to resist alteration through the medium of psychotropic drugs. This makes a rapid pharmacologically induced change in the social hierarchy impossible. 2 Patrolling the territory and a certain level of social interaction are both critical factors in maintaining the phenomenon of inertia in the social hierarchy. Psychotropic drugs (diazepam, droperidol and mescaline) altered both these factors to a varying...

  17. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine-loaded carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles for drug delivery to the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is considered as a common and diverse set of chronic neurological disorders and its symptoms can be controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. The presence of p-glycoprotein and multi-drug resistance transporters in the blood-brain barrier could prevent the entry of AEDs into the brain, causing drug resistant epilepsy. To overcome this problem, we propose using carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles as a carrier to deliver carbamazepine (CBZ intra-nasally with the purpose to bypass the blood-brain barrier thus to enhance the brain drug concentration and the treatment efficacy. Results so far indicate that the developed CBZ-NPs have small particle size (218.76 ± 2.41 nm with high drug loading (around 35% and high entrapment efficiency (around 80%. The in vitro release profiles of CBZ from the NPs are in accordance with the Korsmeyer-peppas model. The in vivo results show that both encapsulation of CBZ in nanoparticles and the nasal route determined the enhancement of the drug bioavailability and brain targeting characteristics.

  18. Applying the methodology of Design of Experiments to stability studies: a Partial Least Squares approach for evaluation of drug stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nika; Zakrajšek, Jure; Bohanec, Simona; Roškar, Robert; Grabnar, Iztok

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present research is to show that the methodology of Design of Experiments can be applied to stability data evaluation, as they can be seen as multi-factor and multi-level experimental designs. Linear regression analysis is usually an approach for analyzing stability data, but multivariate statistical methods could also be used to assess drug stability during the development phase. Data from a stability study for a pharmaceutical product with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) as an unstable drug substance was used as a case example in this paper. The design space of the stability study was modeled using Umetrics MODDE 10.1 software. We showed that a Partial Least Squares model could be used for a multi-dimensional presentation of all data generated in a stability study and for determination of the relationship among factors that influence drug stability. It might also be used for stability predictions and potentially for the optimization of the extent of stability testing needed to determine shelf life and storage conditions, which would be time and cost-effective for the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. The neuropharmacology of relapse to food seeking: methodology, main findings, and comparison with relapse to drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunila G; Adams-Deutsch, Tristan; Epstein, David H; Shaham, Yavin

    2009-09-01

    Relapse to old, unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatments. The mechanisms underlying this relapse are unknown. Surprisingly, until recently this clinical problem has not been systematically studied in animal models. Here, we review results from recent studies in which a reinstatement model (commonly used to study relapse to abused drugs) was employed to characterize the effect of pharmacological agents on relapse to food seeking induced by either food priming (non-contingent exposure to small amounts of food), cues previously associated with food, or injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. We also address methodological issues related to the use of the reinstatement model to study relapse to food seeking, similarities and differences in mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking versus drug seeking, and the degree to which the reinstatement procedure provides a suitable model for studying relapse in humans. We conclude by discussing implications for medication development and future research. We offer three tentative conclusions: (1)The neuronal mechanisms of food-priming- and cue-induced reinstatement are likely different from those of reinstatement induced by the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. (2)The neuronal mechanisms of reinstatement of food seeking are possibly different from those of ongoing food-reinforced operant responding. (3)The neuronal mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking overlap to some degree with those of reinstatement of drug seeking.

  20. Topical administration of Tetrasodium-Mesotetraphenyl-Porphinesulfonate (TPPS): correlations between drug penetration and depth of necrosis in skin of nude mice following red light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, R.; Melloni, E.; Fava, G.

    1987-01-01

    The main side effect in photodynamic therapy is photosensitization of the patient's skin following systemic administration of the photosensitizing agent. In the case of superficial lesions, this problem can be avoided by topically applying the drug: in this way a local treatment can be performed. The photosensitizing properties of a 2% solution of TPPS (Tetrasodium-Tetraphenylpophinesulfonate) in a vehicle containing a penetration enhancer, Azone, on skin of nude mice has been tested. An aliquot of 0.1 ml/cm 2 of the solution was painted on the skin overlying an s.c. implanted NMU-1 tumor. Subsequently, animals were sacrificed at different times after applications. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that TPPS penetration depth was related to time elapsed after application and to painting modalities. Solution penetration was enhanced by wiping with ether immediately before painting. Irradiation at 80 mW/cm 2 for 20 min with a dye laser emitting at 640 nm, 4 h after TPPS applications, produced necrosis of the upper skin layers, up to 0.2 mm in depth. These findings suggest that topical TPPS administration, followed by laser irradiation, may be a suitable treatment modality for skin lesions involving epithelial layers, even though several aspects of this methodology need further investigation

  1. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  2. [Systematic review on methodology of randomized controlled trials of post-marketing Chinese patent drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-xin; Wang, Yu-yi; Li, Xin-xue; Liu, Jian-ping

    2012-03-01

    Randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered as the gold standard for the efficacy assessment of medicines. With the increasing number of Chinese patent drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes, the methodology of post-marketing RCTs evaluating the efficacy and specific effect has become more important. To investigate post-marketing Chinese patent drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes, as well as the methodological quality of post-marketing RCTs. Literature was searched from the books of Newly Compiled Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine and Chinese Pharmacopeia, the websites of the State Food and Drug Administration and the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security of the People's Republic of China, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, Chinese Biomedical Database (SinoMed) and Wanfang Data. The time period for searching ran from the commencement of each database to August 2011. RCTs of post-marketing Chinese patent drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes with intervention course no less than 3 months. Two authors independently evaluated the research quality of the RCTs by the checklist of risk bias assessment and the data collection forms based on the CONSORT Statement. Independent double data-extraction was performed. The authors identified a total of 149 Chinese patent drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes. According to different indicative syndromes, the Chinese patent drugs can be divided into the following types, namely, yin deficiency and interior heat (n=48, 32%), dual deficiency of qi and yin (n=58, 39%) and dual deficiency of qi and yin combined with blood stasis (n=22, 15%). A total of 41 RCTs meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Neither multicenter RCTs nor endpoint outcome reports were found. Risk bias analysis showed that 81% of the included studies reported randomization for grouping without sequence generation, 98% of these studies did not report

  3. Qualitative and quantitative methodology in the studies in administration and organizations: lessons of the history of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Carvalho De Benedicto

    2011-08-01

    organizational research granting a greater legitimacy to the different manners of approaching the theme. The debates about which is the best approach remain, in spite of a greater dialogue between these two chains of methodological thought being happening in the latest decades.

  4. Visual compatibility of defibrotide with selected drugs during simulated Y-site administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correard, Florian; Savry, Amandine; Gauthier-Villano, Laurence; Pisano, Pascale; Pourroy, Bertrand

    2014-08-01

    The visual compatibility of a solution of defibrotide (the only drug recommended for treatment and prophylaxis of hepatic venoocclusive disease) with solutions of various drugs commonly administered in bone marrow transplant procedures was studied. Solutions of 43 drug products in concentrations typically used in clinical practice were evaluated in 1:1 mixtures with defibrotide solution in glass tubes kept at room temperature. The evaluated products included antiinfectious, corticoid, sedative, analgesic, and cardiovascular agents widely used for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and other marrow transplant procedures; in most cases, test solutions were prepared via dilution in or reconstitution with sterile water, 0.9% sodium chloride injection, or 5% dextrose injection. The mixtures were visually observed immediately after manual mixing and at specified time points (60, 150, and 240 minutes). Visual compatibility was defined as the absence of color change, haze, fibers, particles, gas generation, and precipitate formation. The effect of mixing order on visual compatibility was ascertained. Of the 43 tested drug solutions, 36 were found to be visually compatible with the defibrotide solution over the entire four-hour study period. Solutions of 7 drugs (amikacin, furosemide, midazolam, mycophenolate mofetil, nicardipine, tobramycin, and vancomycin) were visually incompatible with defibrotide solution. In some cases, evidence of incompatibility was observed intermittently or was dependent on mixing order. Defibrotide solution was found to be visually compatible with solutions of 36 i.v. products that are likely to be coadministered with the drug in a bone marrow transplant unit. Seven drug solutions were visually incompatible with defibrotide solution. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-training amphetamine administration enhances memory consolidation in appetitive Pavlovian conditioning: Implications for drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicholas W; Setlow, Barry

    2006-11-01

    It has been suggested that some of the addictive potential of psychostimulant drugs of abuse such as amphetamine may result from their ability to enhance memory for drug-related experiences through actions on memory consolidation. This experiment examined whether amphetamine can specifically enhance consolidation of memory for a Pavlovian association between a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS-a light) and a rewarding unconditioned stimulus (US-food), as Pavlovian conditioning of this sort plays a major role in drug addiction. Male Long-Evans rats were given six training sessions consisting of 8 CS presentations followed by delivery of the food into a recessed food cup. After the 1st, 3rd, and 5th session, rats received subcutaneous injections of amphetamine (1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg) or saline vehicle immediately following training. Conditioned responding was assessed using the percentage of time rats spent in the food cup during the CS relative to a pre-CS baseline period. Both amphetamine-treated groups showed significantly more selective conditioned responding than saline controls. In a control experiment, there were no differences among groups given saline, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg amphetamine 2 h post-training, suggesting that immediate post-training amphetamine enhanced performance specifically through actions on memory consolidation rather than through non-mnemonic processes. This procedure modeled Pavlovian learning involved in drug addiction, in which the emotional valence of a drug reward is transferred to neutral drug-predictive stimuli such as drug paraphernalia. These data suggest that amphetamine may contribute to its addictive potential through actions specifically on memory consolidation.

  6. Comparison of brand versus generic antiepileptic drug adverse event reporting rates in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Plotkina, Annya V; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the cost saving role of generic anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), debate exists as to whether generic substitution of branded AEDs may lead to therapeutic failure and increased toxicity. This study compared adverse event (AE) reporting rates for brand vs. authorized generic (AG) vs. generic AEDs. Since AGs are pharmaceutically identical to brand but perceived as generics, the generic vs. AG comparison minimized potential bias against generics. Events reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System between January 2004 to March 2015 with lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine listed as primary or secondary suspect were classified as brand, generic, or AG based on the manufacturer. Disproportionality analyses using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) assessed the relative rate of reporting of labeled AEs compared to reporting these events with all other drugs. The Breslow-Day statistic compared RORs across brand, AG, and other generics using a Bonferroni-corrected Pbrand and generics for all three drugs of interest (Breslow-Day Pbrands and generics have similar reporting rates after accounting for generic perception biases. Disproportional suicide reporting was observed for generics compared with AGs and brand, although this finding needs further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Healthcare professionals and pharmacovigilance of pediatric adverse drug reactions: a 5-year analysis of Adverse Events Reporting System database of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Caterina; Tuccori, Marco; Bocci, Guido

    2017-02-17

    To analyze the Adverse Events Reporting System (AERS) database of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), investigating the characteristics of pediatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and describing the effective participation of healthcare professionals in the reporting activity. Reports of ADRs were obtained from the FDA website. Only ADRs in pediatric subjects (divided by age, by country and by professional category) were included into the analysis. The drugs suspected as primary cause of the ADRs in pediatric subjects and their principal anatomic group according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system were considered. To classify the ADRs, the Medical Dictionary for Regularity Activities terminology was adopted. Between 2008 and 2012, FDA collected 113,077 ADRs in pediatric patients. Of the total pediatric ADR reports, those performed by medical doctors were 32%, followed by consumers (26%) and healthcare professionals (25%). Most of the ADR reports were related to the adolescent group (39%). Healthcare professionals resulted the category with the highest rate of ADR reports in neonates and infants. Drugs acting on nervous system and antineoplastic/immunomodulating agents were the most involved the pediatric ADR reports. Pyrexia, convulsion, vomiting and accidental overdose were the reactions more reported both from healthcare professionals and medical doctors. The present study describes the pediatric ADR reports of the FDA database through healthcare professional's perspective, describing the various aspects of pediatric pharmacovigilance.

  8. Stimulated reporting: the impact of US food and drug administration-issued alerts on the adverse event reporting system (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Keith B; Demakas, Andrea R; Dimbil, Mo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Erdman, Colin B

    2014-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses the Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to support post-marketing safety surveillance programs. Currently, almost one million case reports are submitted to FAERS each year, making it a vast repository of drug safety information. Sometimes cited as a limitation of FAERS, however, is the assumption that "stimulated reporting" of adverse events (AEs) occurs in response to warnings, alerts, and label changes that are issued by the FDA. To determine the extent of "stimulated reporting" in the modern-day FAERS database. One hundred drugs approved by the FDA between 2001 and 2010 were included in this analysis. FDA alerts were obtained by a comprehensive search of the FDA's MedWatch and main websites. Publicly available FAERS data were used to assess the "primary suspect" AE reporting pattern for up to four quarters before, and after, the issuance of an FDA alert. A few drugs did demonstrate "stimulated reporting" trends. A majority of the drugs, however, showed little evidence for significant reporting changes associated with the issuance of alerts. When we compared the percentage changes in reporting after an FDA alert with those after a sham "control alert", the overall reporting trends appeared to be quite similar. Of 100 drugs analyzed for short-term reporting trends, 21 real alerts and 25 sham alerts demonstrated an increase (greater than or equal to 1 %) in reporting. The long-term analysis of 91 drugs showed that 24 real alerts and 28 sham alerts demonstrated a greater than or equal to 1 % increase. Our results suggest that most of modern day FAERS reporting is not significantly affected by the issuance of FDA alerts.

  9. Methodology for the evaluation of decontaminant drugs at in vitro systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez de Giorgi, Cristina; Dubner, Diana; Gomez Parada, Ines

    1987-01-01

    An experimental system was developed in order to facilitate hte study of the action of decontaminant drugs in hepatic tissue. Three stages are distinguished: 1) The isolation and the hepatocytes culture in the presence of a chelant agent. 2) The obtainment of the soluble cytoplasmic fraction and its chromatographyc analysis. 3) The comparison of the behaviour of the chelant agent in in vivo and in vitro of the mentioned fraction. 144 CeCl was employed as a radionuclide and DTPA CaNa 3 as a decontaminant agent. The preliminary results of the mechanism of action of the decontaminant obtained by chromatography shows a different distribution of the radionuclide between compounds of high and low molecular weight, in the hepatocytes incubated in the presence of the chelant concerning the controls. (M.E.L.) [es

  10. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  11. Physical compatibility of binary and ternary mixtures of morphine and methadone with other drugs for parenteral administration in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, Massimo; Ottolini, Luca; Vicentini, Lorenza; Boschetti, Silvia

    2012-10-01

    The parenteral administration of combinations of drugs is often necessary in palliative medicine, particularly in the terminal stage of life, when patients are no longer able to take medication orally. The use of infusers to administer continuous subcutaneous infusions is a well-established practice in the palliative care setting and enables several drugs to be given simultaneously, avoiding the need for repeated administrations and the effects of peaks and troughs in the doses of medication. The method is also appreciated by patients and caregivers in the home care setting because the devices and infusion sites are easy to manage. Despite their frequent use, however, the mixtures of drugs adopted in clinical practice are sometimes not supported by reliable data concerning their chemical and physical compatibility. The present study investigates the chemical compatibility of binary mixtures (morphine with ketorolac) and the physical compatibility of binary (morphine or methadone with ketorolac) or ternary mixtures (morphine with ketorolac and/or haloperidol, and/or dexamethasone, and/or metoclopramide, and/or hyoscine butylbromide) with a view to reducing the aleatory nature of the empirical use of such combinations, thereby increasing their safety and clinical appropriateness.

  12. Levofloxacin?Induced QTc Prolongation Depends on the Time of Drug Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Kervezee, L; Gotta, V; Stevens, J; Birkhoff, W; Kamerling, IMC; Danhof, M; Meijer, JH; Burggraaf, J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing a drug's potential to prolong the QTc interval on an electrocardiogram is essential for the correct evaluation of its safety profile. To explore the effect of dosing time on drug-induced QTc prolongation, a randomized, crossover, clinical trial was conducted in which 12 healthy male subjects received levofloxacin at 02:00, 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Using a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling approach to account for variations in ...

  13. Factors associated with the acceptance of mass drug administration for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis in Agusan del Sur, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sison Stephanie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass drug administration (MDA has been one of the strategies endorsed by the World Health Assembly for lymphatic filariasis (LF elimination. Many factors, however, affect the acceptability of the MDA in the Philippines with acceptability defined as the ingestion of drugs -diethylcarbamazine and albendazole during MDA. These drugs were mainly distributed in fixed sites and mopping up activities were conducted through house-to-house visits to increase treatment coverage. The aim of conducting the study was to determine the MDA acceptance rate among a population endemic for LF, and the factors associated with MDA acceptance. Methods In April 2005, a stratified cluster survey involving 437 respondents aged 18 years old and above in Agusan del Sur, Philippines was conducted. Key informant interviews and focused group discussions were performed among community leaders and health service providers. Descriptive statistics and coverage estimates were calculated with appropriate sampling weights applied to all analyses. Factors assessed for association with receipt of antifilarial drugs and MDA acceptance were respondents' socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and perceptions on LF. Pearson chi-squared test was used to determine factors associated with MDA acceptance. Results Results showed that 63.3% of the sampled population received the antifilarial drugs; of these, 94.5% ingested the drugs, yielding an acceptance rate of 60%. Half of the sampled population received the drugs from a fixed site, while only 13% was mopped up. A majority of the sampled population were aware of LF and MDA. Knowledge on LF prevention, cause, treatment and diagnosis and adverse events was low to moderate. Knowledge on LF and perceived benefits of antifilarial drugs were found to be associated with MDA acceptance (p = 0.08. Health workers remain the front liners in the MDA implementation. Local government units were aware of LF

  14. Assessing the comparative effectiveness of newly marketed medications: methodological challenges and implications for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, S; Gagne, J J; Glynn, R J; Ruhl, M; Rassen, J A

    2011-12-01

    Comparative-effectiveness research (CER) aims to produce actionable evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of medical products and interventions as they are used outside of controlled research settings. Although CER evidence regarding medications is particularly needed shortly after market approval, key methodological challenges include (i) potential bias due to channeling of patients to the newly marketed medication because of various patient-, physician-, and system-related factors; (ii) rapid changes in the characteristics of the user population during the early phase of marketing; and (iii) lack of timely data and the often small number of users in the first few months of marketing. We propose a mix of approaches to generate comparative-effectiveness data in the early marketing period, including sequential cohort monitoring with secondary health-care data and propensity score (PS) balancing, as well as extended follow-up of phase III and phase IV trials, indirect comparisons of placebo-controlled trials, and modeling and simulation of virtual trials.

  15. 75 FR 22819 - Considerations Regarding Food and Drug Administration Review and Regulation of Articles for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... subsequent amendments to) the Orphan Drug Act (ODA), the high development cost for therapies targeting few... received FDA marketing approval. More modest advances have been made in medical devices for people with... non-clinical studies and clinical trials, and makes decisions about marketing authorization and...

  16. 77 FR 40069 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... being manufactured and distributed. In 2009, the Agency sent warning letters to companies manufacturing... opportunity to assess the adequacy of their chemistry, manufacturing, and controls specifications before...), have the potential to be highly addictive, and are extremely popular drugs of abuse. The particular...

  17. 77 FR 26768 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Cosponsorship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... ISPE room block is filled). If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please contact ISPE.... Topics for discussion include the following: (1) The Business Case For Change; (2) Quality Risk... Network; (4) IT Strategies--Cloud Computing, RFID, and Beyond; (5) The Future of Drug Manufacturing. To...

  18. 77 FR 5171 - Further Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration to Incorporate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Advertising Act (FCLAA) (15 U.S.C. 1333) as amended by the Tobacco Control Act, and under section 3 of the... that provide for a part 16 hearing. IV. Analysis of Impacts A. Introduction and Summary FDA has... introduction into interstate commerce. Section 911(j) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act relating to...

  19. Commentary on: ?Levofloxacin?Induced QTc Prolongation Depends on the Time of Drug Administration?

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, C; Johannesen, L

    2016-01-01

    Circadian variations in the corrected QT (QTc) interval have been documented in clinical trials. Animal models show circadian variations in expression of the cardiac ion channels that are necessary to maintain the heart's electrophysiological properties. Can these diurnal rhythms in QTc affect the ability of a drug to delay cardiac repolarization?

  20. School-Based Administration of ADHD Drugs Decline, along with Diversion, Theft, and Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Robert L.; Bucher, Richard H.; Wilford, Bonnie B.; Coleman, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000 researchers have reported a decline in the administration of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications given by school nurses, although no decline has been noted in the incidence of ADHD in school-age populations. Government data for the same period show reduced levels of methylphenidate abuse as measured by its…

  1. Antitussive pharmaceutical drugs administration in complex therapy of acute respiratory infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    Lokshina, E.; Zajtseva, O.

    2009-01-01

    There is considered the problem of treatment of cough in children with acute respiratory infections in article. In particular, the data on an effective administration of the domestic combined medication framed on basis of medicinal grasses with codeine in complex therapy of acute respiratory infections is presented.

  2. 75 FR 57233 - 340B Drug Pricing Program Administrative Dispute Resolution Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... administrative procedures associated with alternative dispute resolution. Systems must be put in place that... that the alternative dispute resolution process would involve some type of hearing. The hearing could... available to HRSA, such as audits and alternative dispute resolution, the Affordable Care Act provides HRSA...

  3. Assessing cancer drugs for reimbursement: methodology, relationship between effect size and medical need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sahb-Berkovitch, Rima; Woronoff-Lemsi, Marie-Christine; Molimard, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Reimbursement is assessed by the Transparency Commission from the Health Authority (HAS) using a medical benefit (SMR) score that gives access to reimbursement, an "improvement of medical service rendered" (ASMR) that determines the added therapeutic value, and the target population. Assessing cancer drugs for reimbursement raises the same issues as other therapeutic classes, with some key differences. Overall survival (OS) is considered by the Transparency Commission as the endpoint for assessing clinical benefit, and yet it is not an applicable primary endpoint in all types of cancer. Later lines of treatment, particularly during the development process, may make it difficult to interpret OS as the primary endpoint. Therefore, progression-free survival (PFS) for metastatic situations and disease-free survival (DFS) in adjuvant situations are wholly relevant endpoints for decisions on the reimbursement of a new cancer drug. Effect size is assessed using actuarial survival curves of the product versus the comparator, and it is difficult to summarise them into one single parameter. Results are generally interpreted based on median survival, which is fragmented because it only measures one point of the curve. The hazard ratio measures the effect of treatment throughout the duration of survival and is therefore more comprehensive in quantifying clinical benefit. Determining an effect size threshold for granting reimbursement is difficult given the diversity of cancer settings and the level of medical need, which influences assessment of the clinical relevance of the observed difference. Rapid progress in comparators (700 molecules in development) and the identification of predictive factors of efficacy (biomarkers, histology, etc.) during development may lead to different ASMR scores per population, or to the restriction of the target population to a subgroup of the marketing authorisation (MA) population in which the expected effect size is greater. To address these

  4. The cost of antibiotic mass drug administration for trachoma control in a remote area of South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaczinski, Jan H; Robinson, Emily; Finn, Timothy P

    2011-10-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) of antibiotics is a key component of the so-called "SAFE" strategy for trachoma control, while MDA of anthelminthics provides the cornerstone for control of a number of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Simultaneous delivery of two or more of these drugs, renowned as "integrated NTD control," is being promoted to reduce costs and expand intervention coverage. A cost analysis was conducted alongside an MDA campaign in a remote trachoma endemic area, to inform budgeting for NTD control in South Sudan. A first round of antibiotic MDA was conducted in the highly trachoma endemic county of Mayom, Unity state, from June to August 2010. A core team of seven staff delivered the intervention, including recruitment and training of 44 supervisors and 542 community drug distributors. Using an ingredients approach, financial and economic costs were captured from the provider perspective in a detailed costing database. Overall, 123,760 individuals were treated for trachoma, resulting in an estimated treatment coverage of 94%. The economic cost per person treated was USD 1.53, excluding the cost of the antibiotic azithromycin. Ninety four per cent of the delivery costs were recurrent costs, with personnel and travel/transport costs taking up the largest share. In a remote setting and for the initial round, MDA of antibiotics was considerably more expensive than USD 0.5 per person treated, an estimate frequently quoted to advocate for integrated NTD control. Drug delivery costs in South Sudan are unlikely to decrease substantially during subsequent MDA rounds, as the major cost drivers were recurrent costs. MDA campaigns for delivery of one or more drugs in South Sudan should thus be budgeted at around USD 1.5 per person treated, at least until further costing data for delivery of other NTD drugs, singly or in combination, are available.

  5. The cost of antibiotic mass drug administration for trachoma control in a remote area of South Sudan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H Kolaczinski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA of antibiotics is a key component of the so-called "SAFE" strategy for trachoma control, while MDA of anthelminthics provides the cornerstone for control of a number of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. Simultaneous delivery of two or more of these drugs, renowned as "integrated NTD control," is being promoted to reduce costs and expand intervention coverage. A cost analysis was conducted alongside an MDA campaign in a remote trachoma endemic area, to inform budgeting for NTD control in South Sudan. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A first round of antibiotic MDA was conducted in the highly trachoma endemic county of Mayom, Unity state, from June to August 2010. A core team of seven staff delivered the intervention, including recruitment and training of 44 supervisors and 542 community drug distributors. Using an ingredients approach, financial and economic costs were captured from the provider perspective in a detailed costing database. Overall, 123,760 individuals were treated for trachoma, resulting in an estimated treatment coverage of 94%. The economic cost per person treated was USD 1.53, excluding the cost of the antibiotic azithromycin. Ninety four per cent of the delivery costs were recurrent costs, with personnel and travel/transport costs taking up the largest share. CONCLUSIONS: In a remote setting and for the initial round, MDA of antibiotics was considerably more expensive than USD 0.5 per person treated, an estimate frequently quoted to advocate for integrated NTD control. Drug delivery costs in South Sudan are unlikely to decrease substantially during subsequent MDA rounds, as the major cost drivers were recurrent costs. MDA campaigns for delivery of one or more drugs in South Sudan should thus be budgeted at around USD 1.5 per person treated, at least until further costing data for delivery of other NTD drugs, singly or in combination, are available.

  6. The reduction of radiation damage to the spinal cord by post-irradiation administration of vasoactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornsey, S.; Myers, R.; Jenkinson, T.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation induced white matter necrosis in the rat spinal cord is preceded by changes in permeability of the blood brain-barrier, reduced blood flow, and infarction so that the necrosis is an ischemic necrosis. Attempts have been made to modify this developing pathology by the administration of drugs post-irradiation but just prior to the changes in vascular permeability. Verapamyl, a calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the development of ataxia. Dipyridamole, a drug which increases blood flow and reduces thrombosis, delayed and reduced the onset of ataxia. A low iron diet and desferrioxamine which reduces reperfusion injury also delayed and reduced ataxia. These results support the thesis that vascular changes are an important pathway in the development of radiation necrosis and that reperfusion injury is an important factor in the development and exacerbation of radiation damage to the spinal cord

  7. Effect of NAD on binding and liberation of 14C-GABA in administration of the convulsion producing drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, A.I.; Stepanenko, S.P.; Parkhomets, P.K.; Donchenko, G.V.

    1993-01-01

    Administration of corazole into animals led to a decrease in content of NAD and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brain. Under these conditions, binding of 14 C-GABA was increased and its liberation was inhibited in the synaptosomes of the brain cortex. Additional administration of incotinamide, accompanied by considerable increase in content of NAD and GABA, caused a decrease in accumulation of exogenous GABA in the synaptosomes and removed the effects produced by the convulsant agent. Kinetics of 14 C-GABA binding in the presence of NAD demonstrated that the more effective inhibition of the binding occurred in the animals treated with the convulsant drug. NAD appears to affect the GABA-ergic transmission at the postsynaptic level

  8. Stress modulation of drug self-administration: implications for addiction comorbidity with post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logrip, Marian L.; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Drug abuse and dependence present significant health burdens for our society, affecting roughly 10% of the population. Stress likely contributes to the development and persistence of drug use; for example, rates of substance dependence are elevated among individuals diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Thus, understanding the interaction between stress and drug use, and associated neuroadaptations, is key for developing therapies to combat substance use disorders. For this purpose, many rodent models of the effects of stress exposure on substance use have been developed; the models can be classified according to three categories of stress exposure: developmental, adult nonsocial, and adult social. The present review addresses preclinical findings on the effect of each type of trauma on responses to and self-administration of drugs of abuse by focusing on a key exemplar for each category. In addition, the potential efficacy of targeting neuropeptide systems that have been implicated in stress responses and stress system neuroadaptation in order to treat comorbid PTSD and substance abuse will be discussed. PMID:21782834

  9. Attitudes and Usage of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Among Gastroenterology Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Allison; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used for postmarketing pharmacovigilance. Our study sought to assess attitudes and usage of the FAERS among gastroenterology nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). A survey was administered at the August 2012 Principles of Gastroenterology for the Nurse Practitioner and Physician Assistant course, held in Chicago, IL. Of the 128 respondents, 123 (96%) reported a specialty in gastroenterology or hepatology and were included in analysis. Eighty-nine participants were NPs and 32 PAs, whereas 2 did not report their profession. Although 119 (98%) agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that accurately reporting adverse drug reactions is an important process to optimize patient safety, the majority of participants (54% NPs and 81% PAs) were unfamiliar with the FAERS. In addition, only 20% of NPs and 9% of PAs reported learning about the FAERS in NP or PA schooling. Our study shows enthusiasm among gastroenterology NPs and PAs for the reporting of adverse drug reactions, coupled with a lack of familiarity with the FAERS. This presents an opportunity for enhanced education about reporting of adverse drug reactions for gastroenterology NPs and PAs.

  10. Automatically Recognizing Medication and Adverse Event Information From Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System Narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Belknap, Steven M; Li, Zuofeng; Frid, Nadya; West, Dennis P; Yu, Hong

    2014-06-27

    The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is a repository of spontaneously-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) for FDA-approved prescription drugs. FAERS reports include both structured reports and unstructured narratives. The narratives often include essential information for evaluation of the severity, causality, and description of ADEs that are not present in the structured data. The timely identification of unknown toxicities of prescription drugs is an important, unsolved problem. The objective of this study was to develop an annotated corpus of FAERS narratives and biomedical named entity tagger to automatically identify ADE related information in the FAERS narratives. We developed an annotation guideline and annotate medication information and adverse event related entities on 122 FAERS narratives comprising approximately 23,000 word tokens. A named entity tagger using supervised machine learning approaches was built for detecting medication information and adverse event entities using various categories of features. The annotated corpus had an agreement of over .9 Cohen's kappa for medication and adverse event entities. The best performing tagger achieves an overall performance of 0.73 F1 score for detection of medication, adverse event and other named entities. In this study, we developed an annotated corpus of FAERS narratives and machine learning based models for automatically extracting medication and adverse event information from the FAERS narratives. Our study is an important step towards enriching the FAERS data for postmarketing pharmacovigilance.

  11. Implications of the new Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on human factors engineering for diabetes device manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Stephen B; Drucker, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the implications of the new Food and Drug Administration's draft guidance on human factors and usability engineering for the development of diabetes-related devices. Important considerations include the challenge of identifying users, when the user population is so dramatically broad, and the challenge of identifying use environments when the same can be said for use environments. Another important consideration is that diabetes-related devices, unlike many other medical devices, are used constantly as part of the user's lifestyle--adding complexity to the focus on human factors and ease of use emphasized by the draft guidance. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. Science, law, and politics in the Food and Drug Administration's genetically engineered foods policy: FDA's 1992 policy statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, David L

    2005-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) 1992 policy statement was developed in the context of critical gaps in scientific knowledge concerning the compositional effects of genetic transformation and severe limitations in methods for safety testing. FDA acknowledged that pleiotropy and insertional mutagenesis may cause unintended changes, but it was unknown whether this happens to a greater extent in genetic engineering compared with traditional breeding. Moreover, the agency was not able to identify methods by which producers could screen for unintended allergens and toxicants. Despite these uncertainties, FDA granted genetically engineered foods the presumption of GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and recommended that producers use voluntary consultations before marketing them.

  13. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 88). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  14. Long-lasting insecticidal nets are synergistic with mass drug administration for interruption of lymphatic filariasis transmission in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Eigege

    Full Text Available In central Nigeria Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF. The strategy used for interrupting LF transmission in this area is annual mass drug administration (MDA with albendazole and ivermectin, but after 8 years of MDA, entomological evaluations in sentinel villages showed continued low-grade mosquito infection rates of 0.32%. After long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN distribution by the national malaria program in late 2010, however, we were no longer able to detect infected vectors over a 24-month period. This is evidence that LLINs are synergistic with MDA in interrupting LF transmission.

  15. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  16. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  17. Alendronate-Loaded Modified Drug Delivery Lipid Particles Intended for Improved Oral and Topical Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacramioara Ochiuz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on solid lipid particles (SLPs, described in the literature as the most effective lipid drug delivery systems that have been introduced in the last decades, as they actually combine the advantages of polymeric particles, hydrophilic/lipophilic emulsions and liposomes. In the current study, we present our most recent advances in the preparation of alendronate (AL-loaded SLPs prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication using various ratios of a self-emulsifying lipidic mixture of Compritol 888, Gelucire 44/14, and Cremophor A 25. The prepared AL-loaded SLPs were investigated for their physicochemical, morphological and structural characteristics by dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Entrapment efficacy and actual drug content were assessed by a validated HPLC method. In vitro dissolution tests performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids and phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 revealed a prolonged release of AL of 70 h. Additionally, release kinetics analysis showed that both in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and in phosphate buffer solution, AL is released from SLPs based on equal ratios of lipid excipients following zero-order kinetics, which characterizes prolonged-release drug systems.

  18. Hyaluronan-decorated liposomes as drug delivery systems for cutaneous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzé, Silvia; Marengo, Alessandro; Stella, Barbara; Minghetti, Paola; Arpicco, Silvia; Cilurzo, Francesco

    2018-01-15

    The work aimed to evaluate the feasibility to design hyaluronic acid (HA) decorated flexible liposomes to enhance the skin penetration of nifedipine. Egg phosphatidylcholine (e-PC) based transfersomes (Tween 80) and transethosomes (ethanol) were prepared. HA was reacted with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (HA-DPPE) and two molar ratios (0.5 and 3%) of conjugate with respect to e-PC were tested. The presence of HA significantly increased the packing order of the bilayer (as verified by differential scanning calorimetry), reducing both the encapsulation efficiency and the flexibility of the decorated liposomes in a dose-dependent manner. In fact, at the highest HA content the constant of deformability (K, N/mm) increased and the carriers remained on the skin surface after topical application. The stiffening effect of HA was counterbalanced by the addition of ethanol as fluidizing agent that allowed to maintain the highest HA concentration, meanwhile reducing the K value of the vesicles. HA-transethosomes allowed a suitable nifedipine permeation (J ∼ 30 ng/cm 2 /h) and significantly improved the drug penetration, favouring the formation of a drug depot in the epidermis. These data suggest the potentialities of HA-transethosomes as drug delivery systems intended for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies and underline the importance of studying the effect of surface functionalization on carrier deformability to rationalize the design of such systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Profiling Nonrecipients of Mass Drug Administration for Schistosomiasis and Hookworm Infections : A Comprehensive Analysis of Praziquantel and Albendazole Coverage in Community-Directed Treatment in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, Goylette F.; Kontoleon, Andreas A.; Bulte, Erwin; Fenwick, Alan; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Dunne, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repeated mass drug administration (MDA) with preventive chemotherapies is the mainstay of morbidity control for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, yet the World Health Organization recently reported that less than one-third of individuals who required preventive

  20. The role of personal opinions and experiences in compliance with mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njomo, Doris W; Amuyunzu-Nyamongo, Mary; Magambo, Japheth K; Njenga, Sammy M

    2012-01-01

    The main strategy adopted for Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) elimination globally is annual mass drug administration (MDA) for 4 to 6 rounds. At least 65% of the population at risk should be treated in each round for LF elimination to occur. In Kenya, MDA using diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) and albendazole data shows declining compliance (proportion of eligible populations who receive and swallow the drugs) levels (85%-62.8%). The present study's aim was to determine the role of personal opinions and experiences in compliance with MDA. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted between January and September 2009 in two districts based on December 2008 MDA round. In each district, one location with high and one with low compliance was selected. Through systematic sampling, nine villages were selected and interviewer-based questionnaires administered to 965 household heads or adult representatives also systematically sampled. The qualitative data were generated from opinion leaders, LF patients with clinical signs and community drug distributors (CDDs) all purposively selected and interviewed. Sixteen focus group discussions (FGDs) were also conducted with single-sex adult and youth male and female groups. Chi square test was used to assess the statistical significance of differences in compliance with treatment based on the records reviewed. The house-to-house method of drug distribution influenced compliance. Over one-quarter (27%) in low compared to 15% in high compliance villages disliked this method. Problems related to size, number and taste of the drugs were more common in low (16.4%) than in high (14.4%) compliance villages. Reasons for failure to take the drugs were associated with compliance (pcompliance villages. Experience of side effects influenced compliance (Pcompliance in both types of villages (p>0.05). Community sensitization on treatment, drugs used, their regimen and distribution method involving all leaders should be strengthened by

  1. The role of personal opinions and experiences in compliance with mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris W Njomo

    Full Text Available The main strategy adopted for Lymphatic Filariasis (LF elimination globally is annual mass drug administration (MDA for 4 to 6 rounds. At least 65% of the population at risk should be treated in each round for LF elimination to occur. In Kenya, MDA using diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC and albendazole data shows declining compliance (proportion of eligible populations who receive and swallow the drugs levels (85%-62.8%. The present study's aim was to determine the role of personal opinions and experiences in compliance with MDA.This was a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted between January and September 2009 in two districts based on December 2008 MDA round. In each district, one location with high and one with low compliance was selected. Through systematic sampling, nine villages were selected and interviewer-based questionnaires administered to 965 household heads or adult representatives also systematically sampled. The qualitative data were generated from opinion leaders, LF patients with clinical signs and community drug distributors (CDDs all purposively selected and interviewed. Sixteen focus group discussions (FGDs were also conducted with single-sex adult and youth male and female groups. Chi square test was used to assess the statistical significance of differences in compliance with treatment based on the records reviewed. The house-to-house method of drug distribution influenced compliance. Over one-quarter (27% in low compared to 15% in high compliance villages disliked this method. Problems related to size, number and taste of the drugs were more common in low (16.4% than in high (14.4% compliance villages. Reasons for failure to take the drugs were associated with compliance (p0.05.Community sensitization on treatment, drugs used, their regimen and distribution method involving all leaders should be strengthened by the Programme Implementers. The communities need to be made aware of the potential side effects of the

  2. Predicting the effect of cytochrome P450 inhibitors on substrate drugs: analysis of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Pan, Yuzhuo; Hsu, Vicky; Grillo, Joseph A; Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S; Sinha, Vikram; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has seen a recent increase in the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling towards assessing the potential of drug-drug interactions (DDI) in clinically relevant scenarios. To continue our assessment of such approaches, we evaluated the predictive performance of PBPK modeling in predicting cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated DDI. This evaluation was based on 15 substrate PBPK models submitted by nine sponsors between 2009 and 2013. For these 15 models, a total of 26 DDI studies (cases) with various CYP inhibitors were available. Sponsors developed the PBPK models, reportedly without considering clinical DDI data. Inhibitor models were either developed by sponsors or provided by PBPK software developers and applied with minimal or no modification. The metric for assessing predictive performance of the sponsors' PBPK approach was the R predicted/observed value (R predicted/observed = [predicted mean exposure ratio]/[observed mean exposure ratio], with the exposure ratio defined as [C max (maximum plasma concentration) or AUC (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) in the presence of CYP inhibition]/[C max or AUC in the absence of CYP inhibition]). In 81 % (21/26) and 77 % (20/26) of cases, respectively, the R predicted/observed values for AUC and C max ratios were within a pre-defined threshold of 1.25-fold of the observed data. For all cases, the R predicted/observed values for AUC and C max were within a 2-fold range. These results suggest that, based on the submissions to the FDA to date, there is a high degree of concordance between PBPK-predicted and observed effects of CYP inhibition, especially CYP3A-based, on the exposure of drug substrates.

  3. Food and Drug Administration criteria for the diagnosis of drug-induced valvular heart disease in patients previously exposed to benfluorex: a prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Rusinaru, Dan; Jobic, Yannick; Ederhy, Stéphane; Donal, Erwan; Réant, Patricia; Arnalsteen, Elise; Boulanger, Jacques; Garban, Thierry; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Jeu, Antoine; Szymanski, Catherine; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria for diagnosis of drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) are only based on the observation of aortic regurgitation ≥ mild and/or mitral regurgitation ≥ moderate. We sought to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDA criteria in a cohort of control patients and in a cohort of patients exposed to a drug (benfluorex) known to induce VHD. This prospective, multicentre study included 376 diabetic control patients not exposed to valvulopathic drugs and 1000 subjects previously exposed to benfluorex. Diagnosis of mitral or aortic DIVHD was based on a combined functional and morphological echocardiographic analysis of cardiac valves. Patients were classified according to the FDA criteria [mitral or aortic-FDA(+) and mitral or aortic-FDA(-)]. Among the 376 control patients, 2 were wrongly classified as mitral-FDA(+) and 17 as aortic-FDA(+) (0.53 and 4.5% of false positives, respectively). Of those exposed to benfluorex, 48 of 58 with a diagnosis of mitral DIVHD (83%) were classified as mitral-FDA(-), and 901 of the 910 patients (99%) without a diagnosis of the mitral DIVHD group were classified as mitral-FDA(-). All 40 patients with a diagnosis of aortic DIVHD were classified as aortic-FDA(+), and 105 of the 910 patients without a diagnosis of aortic DIVHD (12%) were classified aortic-FDA(+). Older age and lower BMI were independent predictors of disagreement between FDA criteria and the diagnosis of DIVHD in patients exposed to benfluorex (both P ≤ 0.001). FDA criteria solely based on the Doppler detection of cardiac valve regurgitation underestimate for the mitral valve and overestimate for the aortic valve the frequency of DIVHD. Therefore, the diagnosis of DIVHD must be based on a combined echocardiographic and Doppler morphological and functional analysis of cardiac valves. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Combining two technologies: multifunctional polymers and self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for oral insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakloetsakun, Duangkamon; Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Barthelmes, Jan; Perera, Glen; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) based on thiolated chitosan for oral insulin administration. The preparations were characterized by particle size, entrapment efficiency, stability and drug release. Serum insulin concentrations were determined after oral administration of all formulations. Insulin SNEDDS formulation was served as control. The optimized SNEDDS consists of 65% (w/w) miglyol 840, 25% (w/w) cremophor EL, 10% (w/w) co-solvents (a mixture of DMSO and glycerol). The formulations in the presence or absence of insulin (5mg/mL) were spherical with the size range between 80 and 160 nm. Entrapment efficiency of insulin increased significantly when the thiolated chitosan was employed (95.14±2.96%), in comparison to the insulin SNEDDS (80.38±1.22%). After 30 min, the in vitro release profile of insulin from the nanoemulsions was markedly increased compared to the control. In vivo results showed that insulin/thiolated chitosan SNEDDS displayed a significant increase in serum insulin (p-value=0.02) compared to oral insulin solution. A new strategy to combine SNEDDS and thiolated chitosan described in the study would therefore be a promising and innovative approach to improve oral bioavailability of insulin. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicted Impact of the Food and Drug Administration's Menu-Labeling Regulations on Restaurants in 4 New Jersey Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Jessie; DeWeese, Robin S; Lorts, Cori; Yedidia, Michael J; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2018-02-01

    To determine the proportion of restaurants that will be required to post calorie information under the Food and Drug Administration's menu-labeling regulations in 4 New Jersey cities. We classified geocoded 2014 data on 1753 restaurant outlets in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines, which will require restaurants with 20 or more locations nationwide to post calorie information. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the association between menu-labeling requirements and census tract characteristics. Only 17.6% of restaurants will be affected by menu labeling; restaurants in higher-income tracts have higher odds than do restaurants in lower-income tracts (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55; P = .02). Restaurants in non-Hispanic Black (OR = 1.62; P = .02) and mixed race/ethnicity (OR = 1.44; P = .05) tracts have higher odds than do restaurants in non-Hispanic White tracts of being affected. Additional strategies are needed to help consumers make healthy choices at restaurants not affected by the menu-labeling law. These findings have implications for designing implementation strategies for the law and for evaluating its impact.

  6. Photobiomodulation therapy for androgenetic alopecia: A clinician's guide to home-use devices cleared by the Federal Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Erin M; Winter, Margo A; Hordinsky, Maria K; Sadick, Neil S; Farah, Ronda S

    2018-06-01

    The market for home-use photobiomodulation devices to treat androgenetic alopecia has rapidly expanded, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently cleared many devices for this purpose. Patients increasingly seek the advice of dermatologists regarding the safety and efficacy of these hair loss treatments. The purpose of this guide was threefold: (1) to identify all home-use photobiomodulation therapy devices with FDA-clearance for treatment of androgenetic alopecia; (2) to review device design, features and existing clinical evidence; and (3) to discuss practical considerations of photobiomodulation therapy, including patient suitability, treatment goals, safety, and device selection. A search of the FDA 510(k) Premarket Notification database was conducted using product code "OAP" to identify all home-use devices that are FDA-cleared to treat androgenetic alopecia. Thirteen commercially available devices were identified and compared. Devices varied in shape, wavelength, light sources, technical features, price, and level of clinical evidence. To date, there are no head-to-head studies comparing the efficacy of these devices. Photobiomodulation therapy devices have an excellent safety profile and mounting evidence supporting their efficacy. However, long-term, high quality studies comparing these devices in diverse populations are lacking. As these devices become increasingly popular, dermatologists should be familiar with this treatment modality to add to their therapeutic armamentarium. AGA, androgenetic alopecia; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IEC, International Electrotechnical Commission; LED, light-emitting diode; PBMT, photobiomodulation therapy.

  7. Inhibition of the development of myringosclerosis by local administration of fenspiride, an anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, C; Hellström, S

    1997-01-01

    Earlier studies have revealed a relationship between the development of myringosclerosis and oxygen-derived free radicals. The latter can be blocked by the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride. The present study was undertaken to test the ability of fenspiride to prevent myringosclerosis from developing during healing of the tympanic membrane. Myringotomized rats were treated with either topical applications or intraperitoneal injections of fenspiride for 12 days, after which the tympanic membranes were examined by otomicroscopy and studied histologically by light microscopy. Topically applied fenspiride was found to inhibit the development of sclerotic lesions, whereas intraperitoneal injections were ineffective.

  8. Moving Clinical Deliberations on Administrative Discharge in Drug Addiction Treatment Beyond Moral Rhetoric to Empirical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Izaak L

    2016-01-01

    Patients' admission to modern substance use disorder treatment comes with the attendant risk of being discharged from treatment-a widespread practice. This article describes the three mainstream theories of addiction that operate as a reference point for clinicians in reasoning about a decision to discharge a patient from treatment. The extant literature is reviewed to highlight the pathways that patients follow after administrative discharge. Little scientific research has been done to investigate claims and hypotheses about the therapeutic function of AD, which points to the need for empirical ethics to inform clinical addictions practice. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  9. The COUNTDOWN Study Protocol for Expansion of Mass Drug Administration Strategies against Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzy J. Campbell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Current international policy for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH control emphasises mass administration of deworming drugs in school-based programmes. However, this approach is insufficient to control the transmission of these diseases, and their burden in non-school cohorts is recognised, albeit under-researched. This research will investigate the feasibility and acceptability of expanding access to praziquantel (PZQ against schistosomiasis, and albendazole (ALB against STH, to communities in selected transmission settings in Ghana. (2 Methods: A three-site longitudinal study will be implemented to investigate the effectiveness of expanding treatment strategies for PZQ and ALB to community members. In the context of community mass drug administration (to preschool children, school non-attending children, and adults, including pregnant women, the intervention will be assessed in a random sample of community members, at baseline with follow-up at 6, 12, and 18 months. In each community, 658 participants will be enrolled, and 314 followed up at each time point. The primary outcome measure is the prevalence of infection of Schistosoma haematobium and/or S. mansoni at study endpoint, as assessed by longitudinal surveys. Secondary outcomes are to quantify the infection of schistosomiasis and STH infections in non-treated cohorts, reductions in prevalence of STH, and intensity of schistosomiasis and STH, and treatment coverage. Nested within this study will be qualitative, cost-benefit, and cost-effectiveness evaluations that will explore accessibility, feasibility, and economic impact of expanded treatment from different complementary perspectives. (3 Discussion: Using a multidisciplinary approach, this study will generate evidence for improved availability, acceptability, affordability, and accessibility to deworming drugs against schistosomiasis and STH to individuals and communities in Ghana. This is likely

  10. Acetaldehyde as a drug of abuse: insight into AM281 administration on operant-conflict paradigm in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio ePlescia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence focuses on acetaldehyde (ACD as the mediator of the rewarding and motivational properties of ethanol. Indeed, ACD stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and it is self-administered under different conditions. Besides the dopaminergic transmission, the endocannabinoid system has been reported to play an important role in ethanol central effects, modulating primary alcohol rewarding effect, drug-seeking and relapse behaviour. Drug motivational properties are highlighted in operant paradigms which include response-contingent punishment, a behavioural equivalent of compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences.The aim of this study was thus to characterize ACD motivational and rewarding properties employing an operant-conflict paradigm in which rats, trained to lever press in order to get ACD solution (0.9%, undergo extinction, reinstatement and conflict sessions, according to a modified Geller-Seifter procedur. Furthermore the role played by CB1 receptor system in modulating ACD-induced effects were investigated through the administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM281 (1 mg/kg, i.p. during the extinction-, relapse- and conflict experiments.Our results indicate that ACD is able to induce and maintain an operant behaviour, a high number of responses during extinction, an increase in the lever presses during the reinstatement phase, and a higher emission of punished responses during the conflict experiments, when compared to controls.The administration of AM281 is able to decrease ACD-seeking behaviour during extinction, the number of lever presses during reinstatement and to strongly decrease the punished responses for ACD. Our data strengthen the idea that ACD may be responsible for the central effects of ethanol, and pinpoint at the CB1 system as one of the neural substrates underlying its addictive properties.

  11. Effects of intrathecal or intracerebroventricular administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a C-fiber reflex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, D; Paeile, C; Willer, J C; Le Bars, D

    1997-06-01

    A C-fiber reflex elicited by electrical stimulation within the territory of the sural nerve was recorded from the ipsilateral biceps femoris muscle in anesthetized rats. The temporal evolution of the response was studied using a constant stimulus intensity (3 times threshold), and recruitment curves were built by varying the stimulus intensity from 0 to 7 times threshold. The intrathecal (i.t.) but not i.c.v. administration of aspirin, indomethacin, ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate resulted in dose-dependent depressions of the C-fiber reflex. In contrast, saline was ineffective. Regardless of the route of administration, the drugs never produced disturbances in heart rate and/or acid-base equilibrium. When a constant level of stimulation was used, 500 microg of aspirin i.t. induced a blockade of the reflex immediately after the injection, followed by a partial recovery. Indomethacin produced a stable depression, which reached 80 to 90% with an i.t. dose of 500 microg. Ketoprofen and lysine clonixinate produced a more stable effect; the highest doses (500 microg) produced a steady-state depression of approximately 50% for approximately 30 min. When the recruitment curves were built with a range of nociceptive stimulus intensities, all of the drugs except for indomethacin produced a dose-dependent decrease in the slopes and the areas under the recruitment curves without major modifications in the thresholds; indomethacin also induced a significant dose-related increase in the threshold. The orders of potency for both stimulation paradigms with the i.t. route were the same, namely aspirin > indomethacin > lysine clonixinate > or = ketoprofen. It is concluded that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs elicit significant antinociceptive effects at a spinal level, which do not depend on the existence of a hyperalgesic or inflammatory state. Such effects were not seen after injections within the lateral ventricle.

  12. Developing an in situ nanosuspension: a novel approach towards the efficient administration of poorly soluble drugs at the anterior eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschmann, Christoph; Tessmar, Joerg; Schoeberl, Simon; Strauss, Olaf; Framme, Carsten; Luschmann, Karl; Goepferich, Achim

    2013-11-20

    With about 50-60 million cases in the US alone, dry eye disease represents a severe health care problem. Cyclosporin A (CsA) would be a potent candidate for a causal therapy. However, CsA is not sufficiently water soluble to be administrated via simple eye drops. We developed an in situ nanosuspension (INS) as a novel approach towards the administration of CsA to the cornea. It precipitates upon contact with the tear fluid and creates CsA nanoparticles that enter the cornea and release the drug by dissolution. We selected two liquid poly(ethylene glycols) (PEG) that dissolve CsA and create nanoparticles by precipitation of CsA upon water contact. Aqueous solutions of PEG and Solutol, a non-ionic surfactant, were well tolerated by primary human epithelial cells in vitro. To determine the critical water content needed for a precipitation, the solubility of CsA was investigated in quaternary systems of drug, solvent, surfactant and water. The best INS formulation showed a particle size of 505 ± 5 nm, a polydispersity index (PdI) of 0.23 ± 0.03 and a neutral zeta potential of -0.07 ± 0.05 mV. After single administration to porcine eyes in vitro, 3165 ± 597 ng(CsA)/g(cornea) were detected in corneal tissue, while the levels of Restasis a commercial formulation were, with 545 ± 137 ng(CsA)/g(cornea), significantly lower (P<0.01). These results demonstrate that an INS is a promising, novel approach towards the causal treatment of inflammatory diseases at the anterior eye. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Establishment of a drug-induced rhabdomyolysis mouse model by co-administration of ciprofloxacin and atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Akiko; Oda, Shingo; Akai, Sho; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is one of the serious side effects of ciprofloxacin (CPFX), a widely used antibacterial drug; and occasionally, acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs. Often, rhabdomyolysis has occurred in patients taking CPFX co-administered with statins. The purpose of this study is to establish a mouse model of drug-induced rhabdomyolysis by co-administration of CPFX and atorvastatin (ATV) and to clarify the mechanisms of its pathogenesis. C57BL/6J mice treated with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, were orally administered with CPFX and ATV for 4 days. Plasma levels of creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly increased in the CPFX and ATV-co-administered group. Histopathological examination of skeletal muscle observed degeneration in gastrocnemius muscle and an increased number of the satellite cells. Expressions of skeletal muscle-specific microRNA and mRNA in plasma and skeletal muscle, respectively, were significantly increased. The area under the curve (AUC) of plasma CPFX was significantly increased in the CPFX and ATV-co-administered group. Furthermore, cytoplasmic vacuolization and a positively myoglobin-stained region in kidney tissue and high content of myoglobin in urine were observed. These results indicated that AKI was induced by myoglobin that leaked from skeletal muscle. The established mouse model in the present study would be useful for predicting potential rhabdomyolysis risks in preclinical drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Methodological approach and tools for systems thinking in health systems research: technical assistants' support of health administration reform in the Democratic Republic of Congo as an application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribesse, Nathalie; Bossyns, Paul; Marchal, Bruno; Karemere, Hermes; Burman, Christopher J; Macq, Jean

    2017-03-01

    In the field of development cooperation, interest in systems thinking and complex systems theories as a methodological approach is increasingly recognised. And so it is in health systems research, which informs health development aid interventions. However, practical applications remain scarce to date. The objective of this article is to contribute to the body of knowledge by presenting the tools inspired by systems thinking and complexity theories and methodological lessons learned from their application. These tools were used in a case study. Detailed results of this study are in process for publication in additional articles. Applying a complexity 'lens', the subject of the case study is the role of long-term international technical assistance in supporting health administration reform at the provincial level in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Methods section presents the guiding principles of systems thinking and complex systems, their relevance and implication for the subject under study, and the existing tools associated with those theories which inspired us in the design of the data collection and analysis process. The tools and their application processes are presented in the results section, and followed in the discussion section by the critical analysis of their innovative potential and emergent challenges. The overall methodology provides a coherent whole, each tool bringing a different and complementary perspective on the system.

  15. Serotonergic systems associated with arousal and vigilance behaviors following administration of anxiogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, J K; Johnson, P L; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Serotonergic systems play important roles in modulating behavioral arousal, including behavioral arousal and vigilance associated with anxiety states. To further our understanding of the neural systems associated with increases in anxiety states, we investigated the effects of multiple anxiogenic...... and vigilance behaviors consistent with an increase in anxiety state. In addition, these anxiogenic drugs, excluding yohimbine, had convergent actions on an anatomically-defined subset of serotonergic neurons within the middle and caudal, dorsal subdivision of the DR. High resolution topographical analysis...... nucleus, a forebrain structure important for emotional appraisal and modulation of anxiety-related physiological and behavioral responses. Together these findings support the hypothesis that there is a functional topographical organization in the DR and are consistent with the hypothesis that anxiogenic...

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Repeated Melatonin Drug Administrations Prior to and After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Kloster; Mielke, Louise Vennegaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical studies have documented the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and anxiolytic effects of exogenous melatonin. The pharmacokinetic properties of melatonin have primarily been investigated in experimental studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate...... the pharmacokinetics of melatonin in patients undergoing surgery and general anesthesia. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective, two-phase cohort study. Patients were candidates for subpectoral breast augmentation surgery, and surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon. The perioperative...... treatment protocol was standardized between patients. During the study, each patient received two separate oral administrations of melatonin 10 mg. Melatonin was administered 60 min before surgery, and at 9:00 p.m. the evening after surgery. The pharmacokinetic variables absorption half-life (t ½ absorption...

  17. First intramuscular administration in the U.S. space program. [of motion sickness drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagian, James P.

    1991-01-01

    In the past, the only kind of medicines used for symptomatic treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) in space had been oral, transdermal, or suppositories. This paper describes the effect of the first intramuscular (IM) administration of Phenergan (50-mg in single dose) on SMS in one subject who exhibited grade-3 symptoms and signs which persisted unabated throughout the first and the second flight days aboard the Space Shuttle. Thirty minutes after the injection, the subject had completely recovered. His symptoms were gone, his appetite was back, and he had no recurrences for the remainder of the flight. Since that experiment, intramuscular injections have been given nine more times on subsequent flights, with similar results.

  18. Administration of phospholipide hepatoprotective drug Phosphogliv in patients with psoriatic arthritis (preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering membrane-reparative properties of a new phospholipid hepatoprotector Phosphogliv (FG its therapeutic efficacy was assessed in 9 pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA accompanied by prominent disturbances of blood rheology. FG was given 0,6 g a day during 3 months. Significant decrease of erythrocyte aggregation resulting in increase of erythrocyte aggregation formation time and diminishment of their hydrodynamic resistance without changes of whole blood general caisson viscosity was achieved. Significant improvement of Richie index, tender joint count and pt assessment was noted. The results prove availability of PG administration in PA therapy and possibility of enlargement PG application area owing to membrane-reparative properties of contained in it polyunsaturated phosphatidilcholin in combination with immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory action of glycyrrhizinic acid.

  19. [Autonomy attitudes in the treatment compliance of a cohort of subjects with continuous psychotropic drug administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, M; Trincard, M

    2002-01-01

    Prescriptions for psychotropic drugs are part of a general practitioner's daily routine. As with all drugs, they need to be controlled by a phenomenon of observance. Respecting prescriptions is in fact a major public health concern. Our problematic is centred on the analysis of the association between observance and autonomy in order to gain a better understanding of the links between the drug, how it is to be taken, and how the patients adapt and control it. Identifying and comparing autonomous practices psychotrope users associated with attitudes put into play by those who claim to observe or not to observe their treatment is the aim of this project. The qualitative analysis of the speech is based on the categorial analysis of the contents of 46 transcriptions of 23 women et 23 men continuous (regular monthly intake for at least 5 years), aged between 50 and 65. The majority live in couples, have professional activities, and are executives. The psychotropes with the largest consumption are: anxiolytics and antidepressors. The average duration of their consumption is more than 17 years. Two types of attitude can be distinguished through the qualitative analyse. The attitudes of non-observers towards the psychotropic drug and dependence show controlled, autonomous acts. Autonomy is an influencing factor in their observation of the prescribed treatment, it is a major component of their non-observance regarding psychotropes; thus our hypothesis is confirmed. The strategy adopted around the medication arises from autonomy of action. Organising the treatment is seen as a sign of autonomy, as taking an initiative in relation to the medical prescription, and not as rebellious, or carefree behaviour, or as a sign of inconsistency. Non-observers seem more to be involved in a step towards self-regulation. Active taking verbs such as stop, diminish, increase , and success verbs succeed the I is greatly used, reinforced in some cases by myself ; this vocabulary situates the

  20. Accuracy of Coverage Survey Recall following an Integrated Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis, Schistosomiasis, and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Philip J; Sognikin, Edmond; Akosa, Amanda; Mathieu, Els M; Deming, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Achieving target coverage levels for mass drug administration (MDA) is essential to elimination and control efforts for several neglected tropical diseases (NTD). To ensure program goals are met, coverage reported by drug distributors may be validated through household coverage surveys that rely on respondent recall. This is the first study to assess accuracy in such surveys. Recall accuracy was tested in a series of coverage surveys conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after an integrated MDA in Togo during which three drugs (albendazole, ivermectin, and praziquantel) were distributed. Drug distribution was observed during the MDA to ensure accurate recording of persons treated during the MDA. Information was obtained for 506, 1131, and 947 persons surveyed at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Coverage (defined as the percentage of persons taking at least one of the MDA medications) within these groups was respectively 88.3%, 87.4%, and 80.0%, according to the treatment registers; it was 87.9%, 91.4% and 89.4%, according to survey responses. Concordance between respondents and registers on swallowing at least one pill was >95% at 1 month and >86% at 12 months; the lower concordance at 12 months was more likely due to difficulty matching survey respondents with the year-old treatment register rather than inaccurate responses. Respondents generally distinguished between pills similar in appearance; concordance for recall of which pills were taken was over 80% in each survey. In this population, coverage surveys provided remarkably consistent coverage estimates for up to one year following an integrated MDA. It is not clear if similar consistency will be seen in other settings, however, these data suggest that in some settings coverage surveys might be conducted as much as one year following an MDA without compromising results. This might enable integration of post-MDA coverage measurement into large, multipurpose, periodic surveys, thereby conserving resources.

  1. Accuracy of Coverage Survey Recall following an Integrated Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis, Schistosomiasis, and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Budge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving target coverage levels for mass drug administration (MDA is essential to elimination and control efforts for several neglected tropical diseases (NTD. To ensure program goals are met, coverage reported by drug distributors may be validated through household coverage surveys that rely on respondent recall. This is the first study to assess accuracy in such surveys.Recall accuracy was tested in a series of coverage surveys conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after an integrated MDA in Togo during which three drugs (albendazole, ivermectin, and praziquantel were distributed. Drug distribution was observed during the MDA to ensure accurate recording of persons treated during the MDA. Information was obtained for 506, 1131, and 947 persons surveyed at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Coverage (defined as the percentage of persons taking at least one of the MDA medications within these groups was respectively 88.3%, 87.4%, and 80.0%, according to the treatment registers; it was 87.9%, 91.4% and 89.4%, according to survey responses. Concordance between respondents and registers on swallowing at least one pill was >95% at 1 month and >86% at 12 months; the lower concordance at 12 months was more likely due to difficulty matching survey respondents with the year-old treatment register rather than inaccurate responses. Respondents generally distinguished between pills similar in appearance; concordance for recall of which pills were taken was over 80% in each survey.In this population, coverage surveys provided remarkably consistent coverage estimates for up to one year following an integrated MDA. It is not clear if similar consistency will be seen in other settings, however, these data suggest that in some settings coverage surveys might be conducted as much as one year following an MDA without compromising results. This might enable integration of post-MDA coverage measurement into large, multipurpose, periodic surveys, thereby conserving

  2. Gemfibrozil, food and drug administration-approved lipid-lowering drug, increases longevity in mouse model of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Rangasamy, Suresh Babu; Modi, Khushbu K; Pahan, Kalipada

    2017-05-01

    Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL) is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the Cln2 gene that leads to deficiency or loss of function of the tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) enzyme. TPP1 deficiency is known to cause the accumulation of autofluoroscent lipid-protein pigments in brain. Similar to other neurodegenerative disorders, LINCL is also associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal damage. Despite investigations, no effective therapy is currently available for LINCL. Therefore, we administered gemfibrozil (gem), an food and drug administration (FDA)-approved lipid-lowering drug, which has been shown to stimulate lysosomal biogenesis and induce anti-inflammation, orally, at a dose of 7.5 mg/kg body wt/day to Cln2 (-/-) mice. We observed that gem-fed Cln2 (-/-) mice lived longer by more than 10 weeks and had better motor activity compared to vehicle (0.1% Methyl cellulose) treatment. Gem treatment lowered the burden of storage materials, increased anti-inflammatory factors like SOCS3 and IL-1Ra, up-regulated anti-apoptotic molecule like phospho-Bad, and reduced neuronal apoptosis in the brain of Cln2 (-/-) mice. Collectively, this study reinforces a neuroprotective role of gem that may be of therapeutic interest in improving the quality of life in LINCL patients. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Prevalence of trachoma in the Kayes region of Mali eight years after stopping mass drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, Lamine; Dembele, Benoit; Keita, Modibo; Reid, Steven D; Dembéle, Mahamadou; Mariko, Bréhima; Coulibaly, Famolo; Goldman, Whitney; Traoré, Dramane; Coulibaly, Daouda; Guindo, Boubacar; Amon, Joseph J; Knieriemen, Marily; Zhang, Yaobi

    2018-02-01

    In 2009, three years after stopping mass treatment with azithromycin, a trachoma impact survey in four health districts in the Kayes region of Mali found a prevalence of trachomatous inflammation-follicular (TF) among children aged 1 to 9 years of >5% and a trachomatous trichiasis (TT) prevalence within the general population (≥1-year-old) of <1%. As a result, the government's national trachoma program expanded trichiasis surgery and related activities required to achieve trachoma elimination. In 2015, to assess progress towards elimination, a follow-up impact survey was conducted in the Kayes, Kéniéba, Nioro and Yélimané health districts. The survey used district level two-stage cluster random sampling methodology with 20 clusters of 30 households in each evaluation unit. Subjects were eligible for examination if they were ≥1 year. TF and TT cases were identified and confirmed by experienced ophthalmologists. In total 14,159 people were enumerated and 11,620 (82%) were examined. TF prevalence (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 0.5% (0.3-1%) in Kayes, 0.8% (0.4-1.7%) in Kéniéba, 0.2% (0-0.9%) in Nioro and 0.3% (0.1-1%) in Yélimané. TT prevalence (95% CI) was 0.04% (0-0.25%) in Kayes, 0.29% (0.11-0.6%) in Kéniéba, 0.04% (0-0.25%) in Nioro and 0.07% (0-0.27%) in Yélimané. Eight years after stopping MDA and intensifying trichiasis surgery outreach campaigns, all four districts reached the TF elimination threshold of <5% and three of four districts reached the TT elimination threshold of <0.1%.

  4. Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepak, Maryjoy R; Bochenek, Samantha H; Bush, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    To present the case of a severe anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reaction to Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) in a patient bitten by a copperhead snake. A 68-year-old man presented with progressive envenomation after receiving a copperhead snakebite on each hand. Crotalinae Fab antivenom was administered. While the initial and only dose was partially infusing, the patient developed an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of urticaria and hypotension, which resolved with cessation of the infusion, recurred with resumption of the infusion, and ultimately was completed with supportive care. An additional episode of hypotension, urticaria, and angioedema occurred shortly after antivenom therapy completion. Epinephrine was administered, resolving the reaction with complete patient recovery. The event received a Naranjo score of 10, indicating a definite ADR. Treating copperhead snakebites with antivenom is a matter of debate. Concern over adverse events and cost induce some physicians to manage copperhead bites without antivenom because they are generally milder in severity. As demonstrated in this case, severe ADR can occur with Crotalinae Fab antivenom, and its efficacy for copperhead envenoming needs to be better established via placebo-controlled, randomized trials. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Methotrexate: Revisited efficiency and safety of drug administration in psoriasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Bakulev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the current data of the literature on methotrexate, which is now one of the most commonly used preparation for the systemic treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. The following problems are under consideration: estimation by specialists of response to systemic psoriasis therapy and possible therapeutic strategies; selecting initial doses of methotrexate for the treatment of patients with psoriasis; the possibilities of combined use with genetically engineered biological agents and monitoring of therapy. The data from randomized clinical trials on the long-term continuous treatment with methotrexate (efficacy, safety; methods of its administration to patients and time and criteria for long-term effecasy are reported. There are presented the data on the mechanisms of methotrexate action and the new data about the impact on the adenosine metabolism and the ability of the preparation to modulate the inflammatory response in the skin of patients by inhibiting the cellular components of the inflammatory infiltrate in the skin (dendritic antigen-producing cells and T-lymphocytes, as well as the suppression of expression of some proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-y and IL17A.

  6. Year 2000 (Y2K) computer compliance guide; guidance for FDA personnel. Food and Drug Administration. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a new compliance policy guide (CPG) entitled "Year 2000 (Y2K) Computer Compliance" (section 160-800). This guidance document represents the agency's current thinking on the manufacturing and distribution of domestic and imported products regulated by FDA using computer systems that may not perform properly before, or during, the transition to the year 2000 (Y2K). The text of the CPG is included in this notice. This compliance guidance document is an update to the Compliance Policy Guides Manual (August 1996 edition). It is a new CPG, and it will be included in the next printing of the Compliance Policy Guides Manual. This CPG is intended for FDA personnel, and it is available electronically to the public.

  7. A brave new beef: The US Food and Drug Administration's review of the safety of cloned animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Louis M; Noll, Rebekka C; Mordkoff, David S; Murphy, Patrick; Rolerson, Marcy

    2009-09-01

    To meet its public mandate, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collected studies on the potential health hazards of eating or drinking cloned food products. Based on an earlier National Academy of Sciences study that, on closer analysis, was not nearly as sanguine, the FDA's report found no evidence of a health risk from the public's ingestion of cloned food products. This article analyzes the risks the FDA considered, and concludes that there is a disconnect between the risks the FDA assessed in these studies and the risks that might arise from cloned food products. The FDA should consider instituting effective tracking mechanisms and other diagnostics that would permit scientists and the public to answer the question of health risks posed by cloned food products.

  8. Fabrication of 50-mg 252Cf neutron sources for the FDA [Food and Drug Administration] activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, J.E.; Cagle, E.B.; Knauer, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Transuranium Processing Plant (TPP) at ORNL has been requested by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to furnish 200 mg of 252 Cf for use in their new activation analysis facility. This paper discusses the procedure to be employed in fabricating the californium into four neutron sources, each containing a nominal 50-mg of 252 Cf. The ORNL Model LSD (Large, Stainless steel, Doubly encapsulated) neutron source consists of a 6.33-mm-diam aluminum pellet doubly encapsulated in Type 304L stainless steel. The pellet is comprised of an aluminum tube holding Cf 2 O 2 SO 4 microspheres confined by pressed aluminum powder. The microspheres are prepared in a separate vessel and then transferred into the specially designed aluminum tube prior to pressing

  9. Data reporting constraints for the lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration activities in two districts in Ghana: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Baaba da-Costa Vroom

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Timely and accurate health data are important for objective decision making and policy formulation. However, little evidence exists to explain why poor quality routine health data persist. This study examined the constraints to data reporting for the lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration programme in two districts in Ghana. This qualitative study focused on timeliness and accuracy of mass drug administration reports submitted by community health volunteers. Methods: The study is nested within a larger study focusing on the feasibility of mobile phone technology for the lymphatic filariasis programme. Using an exploratory study design, data were obtained through in-depth interviews (n = 7 with programme supervisors and focus group discussions (n = 4 with community health volunteers. Results were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: Reasons for delays in reporting were attributed to poor numeracy skills among community health volunteers, difficult physical access to communities, high supervisor workload, poor adherence reporting deadlines, difficulty in reaching communities within allocated time and untimely release of programme funds. Poor accuracy of data was mainly attributed to inadequate motivation for community health volunteers and difficulty calculating summaries. Conclusion: This study has shown that there are relevant issues that need to be addressed in order to improve the quality of lymphatic filariasis treatment coverage reports. Some of the factors identified are problems within the health system; others are specific to the community health volunteers and the lymphatic filariasis programme. Steps such as training on data reporting should be intensified for community health volunteers, allowances for community health volunteers should be re-evaluated and other non-monetary incentives should be provided for community health volunteers.

  10. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael J.; Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ"2 test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance, improved

  11. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ{sup 2} test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance

  12. Repeated attempted homicide by administration of drugs documented by hair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillif-Couniou, Valérie; Bartoli, Christophe; Sastre, Caroline; Chèze, Marjorie; Deveaux, Marc; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2018-02-01

    Attempted murder by repeated poisoning is quite rare. The authors describe the case of a 62-year-old man who was admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) for neurological disturbances complicated by inhalation pneumopathy. He presented a loss of consciousness while his wife was visiting him at the ICU (H0). Forty-eight hours later (H48), police officers apprehended the patient's wife pouring a liquid into his fruit salad at the hospital. Toxicological analyses of a blood sample and the infusion equipment (H0), as well as the fruit salad and its container (H48), confirmed the attempted poisoning with cyamemazine (H0) and hydrochloric acid (H48). In order to evaluate the anteriority of poisonings, hair analysis was requested and the medical records of the 6 previous months were also examined. Two 6-cm brown hair strands were sampled and the victim's medical record was seized in order to determine the treatments he had been given during the previous six months. Segmental hair testing on two 6-cm brown hair was conducted by GC-MS, LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS (0-2/2-4/4-6 cm; pg/mg). Haloperidol (9200/1391/227), amitriptyline (7450/1850/3260), venlafaxine (332/560/260), that had never been part of the victim's treatment were detected, as well as some benzodiazepines (alprazolam, bromazepam, nordazepam); cyamemazine was also detected in all the segments (9960/1610/2367) though only a single dose administration was reported in the medical records. The toxicological analyses performed at H0 and H48 confirmed the homicide attempts in the ICU. In addition, comparison of the results in hair analysis with the medical records confirmed repeated poisoning attempts over the previous six months, and thus explain the origin of the disorders presented by the victim. This case serves to remind us that repeated attempted murder can be difficult to diagnose and that hair analysis can be an effective way to detect such attempts. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Protein kinase C isozymes as regulators of sensitivity to and self-administration of drugs of abuse-studies with genetically modified mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Michael Foster; Newton, Philip M

    2010-09-01

    Studies using targeted gene deletion in mice have revealed distinct roles for individual isozymes of the protein kinase C (PKC) family of enzymes in regulating sensitivity to various drugs of abuse. These changes in drug sensitivity are associated with altered patterns of drug self-administration. The purpose of this review is to summarize behavioral studies conducted on mice carrying targeted deletions of genes encoding specific PKC isozymes (namely the beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon isozymes), and to critically evaluate the possibility of using pharmacological inhibitors of specific PKC isozymes as modulators of the sensitivity to various drugs of abuse, as well as potential aids in the treatment of substance use disorders.

  14. Ketamine alters behavior and decreases BDNF levels in the rat brain as a function of time after drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane B. Fraga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate behavioral changes and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in rats subjected to ketamine administration (25 mg/kg for 7 days. Method: Behavioral evaluation was undertaken at 1 and 6 hours after the last injection. Results: We observed hyperlocomotion 1 hour after the last injection and a decrease in locomotion after 6 hours. Immobility time was decreased and climbing time was increased 6 hours after the last injection. BDNF levels were decreased in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala when rats were killed 6 hours after the last injection, compared to the saline group and to rats killed 1 hour after the last injection. BDNF levels in the striatum were decreased in rats killed 6 hours after the last ketamine injection, and BDNF levels in the hippocampus were decreased in the groups that were killed 1 and 6 hours after the last injection. Conclusion: These results suggest that the effects of ketamine on behavior and BDNF levels are related to the time at which they were evaluated after administration of the drug.

  15. Radioprotective efficacy of dipyridamole and AMP combination in fractionated radiation regimen, and its dependence on the time of administration of the drugs prior to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated that a combined administration of dipyridamole and adenosine monophosphate to mice induces radioprotective effects in terms of postirradiation hematopoietic recovery in animals irradiated with a single dose. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the radioprotective ability of the drug combination under conditions of fractionated radiation. It was shown that administration of the drugs either 15 or 60 min before each of the five daily 3-Gy doses of gamma radiation enhances hematopoietic recovery and survival of mice exposed to an additional 'top-up' dose of 3.5 Gy. Furthermore, it was ascertained that administration of the drugs 60 min prior to irradiation is more effective than administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation. Due to the evidence that administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation protects the organism mainly via mechanisms of systemic hypoxia while the pretreatment 60 min before irradiation avoids the role of hypoxia and mainly induces cell proliferation effects, the present results suggest a more protective role of mechanisms stimulating hematopoiesis under conditions of fractionated radiation. The data may provide a basis for more rational use of radioprotection in fractionated radiation techniques. (author) 1 tab., 1 fig., 25 refs

  16. Mass drug administration and the sustainable control of schistosomiasis: Community health workers are vital for global elimination efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inobaya, Marianette T; Chau, Thao N; Ng, Shu-Kay; MacDougall, Colin; Olveda, Remigio M; Tallo, Veronica L; Landicho, Jhoys M; Malacad, Carol M; Aligato, Mila F; Guevarra, Jerric R; Ross, Allen G

    2018-01-01

    Schistosomiasis control is centred on preventive chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA). However, endemic countries continue to struggle to attain target coverage rates and patient compliance. In the Philippines, barangay health workers (BHWs) play a vital role in the coordination of MDA, acting as advocates, implementers, and educators. The aim of this study was to determine whether BHW knowledge and attitudes towards schistosomiasis and MDA is sufficient and correlated with resident knowledge and drug compliance. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2015 among 2186 residents and 224 BHWs in the province of Northern Samar, the Philippines using a structured survey questionnaire. BHWs showed good familiarity on how schistosomiasis is acquired and diagnosed. Nevertheless, both BHWs and residents had poor awareness of the signs and symptoms of schistosomiasis, disease prevention, and treatment options. There was no correlation between the knowledge scores of the BHWs and the residents (r=0.080, p=0.722). Kruskal-Wallis analysis revealed significant differences in BHW knowledge scores between the low (3.29, 95% confidence interval 3.16-3.36), moderate (3.61, 95% confidence interval 3.49-3.69), and high (4.05, 95% confidence interval 3.77-4.13) compliance village groups (p=0.002), with the high compliance areas having the highest mean knowledge scores. This study highlights the importance of community health workers in obtaining the World Health Organization drug coverage rate of 75% and improving compliance with MDA in the community. Investing in the education of community health workers with appropriate disease-specific training is crucial if disease elimination is ultimately to be achieved. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Yoshinori

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desmoid tumours or fibromatoses are rare entities characterized by the benign proliferation of fibroblasts, which can be life-threatening due to their locally aggressive properties. Surgery is widely accepted as the first line of treatment for extra-abdominal desmoids; however, it is not recommended for intra-abdominal desmoids because of the high-risk of recurrence and difficulties with the operation. Here, we report on a patient with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours, who showed partial response following the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Case presentation A 73-year-old man presented with swelling and pain of the right leg. Computed tomography showed an abnormal multilocular soft-tissue mass (95 × 70 mm in the right pelvis, which was revealed by biopsy to be a desmoid tumour. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumour cells expressed vimentin, but not smooth-muscle actin, CD34, or desmin. Very few Ki-67-positive cells were found. Non-cytotoxic treatment with etodolac (200 mg/day was chosen because of the patient's age, lack of bowel obstruction, and the likelihood of prostate cancer. Two years after the commencement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, computed tomography showed a decrease in tumour size (63 × 49 mm, and the disappearance of intratumoural septa. Conclusion Our case report suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment should be taken into consideration for use as first-line treatment in patients with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours.

  18. Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keita; Yoshikawa, Reigetsu; Yanagi, Hidenori; Gega, Makoto; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Hirota, Syozo; Tsujimura, Tohru; Tomita, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumours or fibromatoses are rare entities characterized by the benign proliferation of fibroblasts, which can be life-threatening due to their locally aggressive properties. Surgery is widely accepted as the first line of treatment for extra-abdominal desmoids; however, it is not recommended for intra-abdominal desmoids because of the high-risk of recurrence and difficulties with the operation. Here, we report on a patient with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours, who showed partial response following the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Case presentation A 73-year-old man presented with swelling and pain of the right leg. Computed tomography showed an abnormal multilocular soft-tissue mass (95 × 70 mm) in the right pelvis, which was revealed by biopsy to be a desmoid tumour. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumour cells expressed vimentin, but not smooth-muscle actin, CD34, or desmin. Very few Ki-67-positive cells were found. Non-cytotoxic treatment with etodolac (200 mg/day) was chosen because of the patient's age, lack of bowel obstruction, and the likelihood of prostate cancer. Two years after the commencement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, computed tomography showed a decrease in tumour size (63 × 49 mm), and the disappearance of intratumoural septa. Conclusion Our case report suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment should be taken into consideration for use as first-line treatment in patients with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours. PMID:18257933

  19. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence

  20. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddoris, Michael P; Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A; Carelli, Regina M

    2016-01-06

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence, particularly its role in

  1. Comparison of self-administration behavior and responsiveness to drug-paired cues in rats running an alley for intravenous heroin and cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Baird, Rebeccah; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2011-04-01

    Evidence suggests that responsiveness to a drug-paired cue is predicted by the reinforcing magnitude of the drug during prior self-administration. It remains unclear, however, if this principle holds true when comparisons are made across drug reinforcers. The current study was therefore devised to test the hypothesis that differences in the animals' responsiveness to a cocaine- or heroin-paired cue presented during extinction would reflect differences in the patterns of prior cocaine and heroin runway self-administration. Rats ran a straight alley for single intravenous injections of either heroin (0.1 mg/kg/inj) or cocaine (1.0 mg/kg/inj) each paired with a distinct olfactory cue. Animals experienced 15 trials with each drug reinforcer in a counterbalanced manner. Start latencies, run times, and retreat behaviors (a form of approach-avoidance conflict) provided behavioral indices of the subjects' motivation to seek the reinforcer on each trial. Responsiveness to each drug-paired cue was assessed after 7, 14, or 21 days of non-reinforced extinction trials. Other animals underwent conditioned place preference (CPP) testing to ensure that the two drug reinforcers were capable of producing drug-cue associations. While both drugs produced comparable CPPs, heroin served as a stronger incentive stimulus in the runway as evidenced by faster start and run times and fewer retreats. In contrast, cocaine- but not heroin-paired cues produced increases in drug-seeking behavior during subsequent extinction trials. The subjects' responsiveness to drug-paired cues during extinction was not predicted by differences in the motivation to seek heroin versus cocaine during prior drug self-administration.

  2. Is law enforcement of drug-impaired driving cost-efficient? An explorative study of a methodology for cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veisten, Knut; Houwing, Sjoerd; Mathijssen, M P M René; Akhtar, Juned

    2013-03-01

    Road users driving under the influence of psychoactive substances may be at much higher relative risk (RR) in road traffic than the average driver. Legislation banning blood alcohol concentrations above certain threshold levels combined with roadside breath-testing of alcohol have been in lieu for decades in many countries, but new legislation and testing of drivers for drug use have recently been implemented in some countries. In this article we present a methodology for cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of increased law enforcement of roadside drug screening. This is an analysis of the profitability for society, where costs of control are weighed against the reduction in injuries expected from fewer drugged drivers on the roads. We specify assumptions regarding costs and the effect of the specificity of the drug screening device, and quantify a deterrence effect related to sensitivity of the device yielding the benefit estimates. Three European countries with different current enforcement levels were studied, yielding benefit-cost ratios in the approximate range of 0.5-5 for a tripling of current levels of enforcement, with costs of about 4000 EUR per convicted and in the range of 1.5 and 13 million EUR per prevented fatality. The applied methodology for CBA has involved a simplistic behavioural response to enforcement increase and control efficiency. Although this methodology should be developed further, it is clearly indicated that the cost-efficiency of increased law enforcement of drug driving offences is dependent on the baseline situation of drug-use in traffic and on the current level of enforcement, as well as the RR and prevalence of drugs in road traffic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the US Food and Drug Administration sentinel analysis tools in confirming previously observed drug-outcome associations: The case of clindamycin and Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Ryan M; Kuntz, Jennifer L; Wang, Shirley V; Fuller, Candace; Gagne, Joshua J; Leonard, Charles E; Hennessy, Sean; Meyer, Tamra; Archdeacon, Patrick; Chen, Chih-Ying; Panozzo, Catherine A; Toh, Sengwee; Katcoff, Hannah; Woodworth, Tiffany; Iyer, Aarthi; Axtman, Sophia; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-13

    The Food and Drug Administration's Sentinel System developed parameterized, reusable analytic programs for evaluation of medical product safety. Research on outpatient antibiotic exposures, and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with non-user reference groups led us to expect a higher rate of CDI among outpatient clindamycin users vs penicillin users. We evaluated the ability of the Cohort Identification and Descriptive Analysis and Propensity Score Matching tools to identify a higher rate of CDI among clindamycin users. We matched new users of outpatient dispensings of oral clindamycin or penicillin from 13 Data Partners 1:1 on propensity score and followed them for up to 60 days for development of CDI. We used Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by Data Partner and matched pair to compare CDI incidence. Propensity score models at 3 Data Partners had convergence warnings and a limited range of predicted values. We excluded these Data Partners despite adequate covariate balance after matching. From the 10 Data Partners where these models converged without warnings, we identified 807 919 new clindamycin users and 8 815 441 new penicillin users eligible for the analysis. The stratified analysis of 807 769 matched pairs included 840 events among clindamycin users and 290 among penicillin users (hazard ratio 2.90, 95% confidence interval 2.53, 3.31). This evaluation produced an expected result and identified several potential enhancements to the Propensity Score Matching tool. This study has important limitations. CDI risk may have been related to factors other than the inherent properties of the drugs, such as duration of use or subsequent exposures. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Towards a better prediction of peak concentration, volume of distribution and half-life after oral drug administration in man, using allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vikash K; Vaarties, Karin; De Buck, Stefan S; Fenu, Luca A; Nijsen, Marjoleen; Gilissen, Ron A H J; Sanderson, Wendy; Van Uytsel, Kelly; Hoeben, Eva; Van Peer, Achiel; Mackie, Claire E; Smit, Johan W

    2011-05-01

    It is imperative that new drugs demonstrate adequate pharmacokinetic properties, allowing an optimal safety margin and convenient dosing regimens in clinical practice, which then lead to better patient compliance. Such pharmacokinetic properties include suitable peak (maximum) plasma drug concentration (C(max)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and a suitable half-life (t(½)). The C(max) and t(½) following oral drug administration are functions of the oral clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution during the terminal phase by the oral route (V(z)/F), each of which may be predicted and combined to estimate C(max) and t(½). Allometric scaling is a widely used methodology in the pharmaceutical industry to predict human pharmacokinetic parameters such as clearance and volume of distribution. In our previous published work, we have evaluated the use of allometry for prediction of CL/F and AUC. In this paper we describe the evaluation of different allometric scaling approaches for the prediction of C(max), V(z)/F and t(½) after oral drug administration in man. Twenty-nine compounds developed at Janssen Research and Development (a division of Janssen Pharmaceutica NV), covering a wide range of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, were selected. The C(max) following oral dosing of a compound was predicted using (i) simple allometry alone; (ii) simple allometry along with correction factors such as plasma protein binding (PPB), maximum life-span potential or brain weight (reverse rule of exponents, unbound C(max) approach); and (iii) an indirect approach using allometrically predicted CL/F and V(z)/F and absorption rate constant (k(a)). The k(a) was estimated from (i) in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments in preclinical species; and (ii) predicted effective permeability in man (P(eff)), using a Caco-2 permeability assay. The V(z)/F was predicted using allometric scaling with or without PPB correction. The t(½) was estimated from

  5. Frequency and Severity of Neutropenia Associated with Food and Drug Administration Approved and Compounded Formulations of Lomustine in Dogs with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, J.H.; Stanley, S.D.; Knych, H.K.; Rodriguez, C.O.; Skorupski, K.A.; Rebhun, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Compounded lomustine is used commonly in veterinary patients. However, the potential variability in these formulations is unknown and concern exists that compounded formulations of drugs may differ in potency from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?approved products. Hypothesis/Objectives The initial objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and severity of neutropenia in dogs treated with compounded or FDA?approved formulations of lomustine. Subsequent analyses aimed t...

  6. A cloud on the horizon-a survey into the use of electronic vaping devices for recreational drug and new psychoactive substance (NPS) administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, M; Dargan, P; Wood, D

    2018-01-01

    There is limited published scientific data on vaping recreational drugs other than cannabis. A recent review suggested that 15% of people vaping cannabis have also vaped a synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist (SCRA) and identified over 300 Internet reports of e-liquid manufacture of recreational drugs and/or new psychoactive substances (NPS). To determine the prevalence of use of electronic vaping devices for recreational drug and NPS delivery in the UK. A voluntary online survey using a convenience sample of UK adult participants (aged 16 years old and over) identified by a market research company. Data was collected regarding demographics, smoking history, electronic vaping device history and recreational drug/NPS use and route of administration. There were 2501 respondents. The mean (±SD) age was 46.2 ± 16.8 years old. The commonest lifetime recreational drug used was Cannabis (818, 32.7%). The majority of respondents had smoked (1545, 61.8%) with 731 (29.2%) being current smokers. The most commonly used SCRA product was 'Spice Gold' (173, 6.9%) and SCRA compound was ADB-CHMICA (48, 1.9%). 861 (34.4%) had used an electronic vaping device; 340 (13.6%) having used them for recreational drug administration; 236 (9.4%) reporting current use. The commonest lifetime recreational drug to be vaped was cannabis (155, 65.7%), with electronic cigarettes (230, 48.2%) being the commonest reported route of SCRA compound administration. 9.4% of respondents currently use electronic vaping devices for recreational drug administration with 6.2% reporting lifetime cannabis vaping use. Further larger scale studies are required to help inform the appropriate treatment and primary prevention strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Re-inventing Nigeria's Public Sector: A Review of National Agency for Food, Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyeaka Justine Igbokwe-Ibeto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Public  Over the years, the efficiency and effectiveness of Nigeria’s public sector has been a subject of debate. However, in recent time, the organizational performance and service delivery of National Agency for Food, Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC have been a success story. Within the framework of New Public Management (NPM theory, the study investigates the secrete behind the degree of success achieved by NAFDAC with the aim of recommending such to other public sector organizations in Nigeria which has over the year’s demonstrated lack of zeal for service delivery. The study relied heavily on primary and secondary data. Yamani’s formula for sample size determination was used to select a sample of 133 employees from NAFDAC Lagos office out of a total of 200. Weighted mean and chi-square statistical tools was used to determine the independence or otherwise of the variables under investigation. It is the position of the study that NPM has enhanced NAFDAC’s performance and service delivery. It concludes that since the traditional public administration theories has failed to deliver the much needed public goods and services, it is therefore imperative to reinvent Nigeria’s public sector in line with (NPM international best practices so as to reposition the Nigerian public sector for the challenges of a modern and rapidly changing world. However, while change is desirable, we feel there is need to exercise caution on account of the peculiar nature and character of the Nigerian state and society. Reinventing the country’s public sector should progress slowly and wisely.

  8. A comprehensive assessment of lymphatic filariasis in Sri Lanka six years after cessation of mass drug administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna U Rao

    Full Text Available The Sri Lankan Anti-Filariasis Campaign conducted 5 rounds of mass drug administration (MDA with diethycarbamazine plus albendazole between 2002 and 2006. We now report results of a comprehensive surveillance program that assessed the lymphatic filariasis (LF situation in Sri Lanka 6 years after cessation of MDA.Transmission assessment surveys (TAS were performed per WHO guidelines in primary school children in 11 evaluation units (EUs in all 8 formerly endemic districts. All EUs easily satisfied WHO criteria for stopping MDA. Comprehensive surveillance was performed in 19 Public Health Inspector (PHI areas (subdistrict health administrative units. The surveillance package included cross-sectional community surveys for microfilaremia (Mf and circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA, school surveys for CFA and anti-filarial antibodies, and collection of Culex mosquitoes with gravid traps for detection of filarial DNA (molecular xenomonitoring, MX. Provisional target rates for interruption of LF transmission were community CFA <2%, antibody in school children <2%, and filarial DNA in mosquitoes <0.25%. Community Mf and CFA prevalence rates ranged from 0-0.9% and 0-3.4%, respectively. Infection rates were significantly higher in males and lower in people who denied prior treatment. Antibody rates in school children exceeded 2% in 10 study sites; the area that had the highest community and school CFA rates also had the highest school antibody rate (6.9%. Filarial DNA rates in mosquitoes exceeded 0.25% in 10 PHI areas.Comprehensive surveillance is feasible for some national filariasis elimination programs. Low-level persistence of LF was present in all study sites; several sites failed to meet provisional endpoint criteria for LF elimination, and follow-up testing will be needed in these areas. TAS was not sensitive for detecting low-level persistence of filariasis in Sri Lanka. We recommend use of antibody and MX testing as tools to complement TAS for

  9. The effect of site (deltoid or gluteus muscle of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Hess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of site of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta. Twenty macaque monkeys were given medetomidine (25 µg·kg-1 and ketamine (3 mg·kg-1 intramuscularly to the deltoid (n = 10 animals or gluteus (n = 10 animals muscles. Behavioural changes, loss of aggressiveness, immobilisation time and cardiorespiratory changes were recorded. The effect of drugs was reversed after 20 min by i.m. administration of atipamezole at the dose of 250 µg·kg-1. Highly significant differences (P < 0.001 were found between groups with gluteal or deltoid administration of drugs on the onset of immobilisation effect (71.3 s and 108.3 s, respectively, and immobilisation time (152.7 s and 254.4 s, respectively. In the gluteus muscle group, the grasp reflex was still present at the beginning of immobilisation and slowly wore off in 15–45 s. The same was valid for muscle tone. There were no differences in cardiorespiratory parameters in any of the groups. Animals of both groups recovered in 3–6 min after atipamezole administration. Administration of drugs to the deltoid muscle resulted in a more rapid onset and increased effect of immobilisation than administration to the gluteus muscle. Both in veterinary and human medicine, injection to the deltoid muscle may be more convenient in all cases, when rapid and more prominent effect is desirable as in premedication before surgery or in emergency medicine. The study is the first to compare the effect of administering drugs to different muscles and the results may improve the practice of intramuscular injections in animals and in humans.

  10. Coverage and Compliance of Mass Drug Administration in Lymphatic Filariasis: A Comparative Analysis in a District of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay Kanti Panja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite several rounds of Mass Drug Administration (MDA as an elimination strategy of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF from India, still the coverage is far behind the required level of 85%.Objectives: The present study was carried out with the objectives to assess the coverage and compliance of MDA and their possible determinants. Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted in Paschim Midnapur district of West Bengal, India for consecutive two years following MDA. Study participants were chosen by 30-cluster sampling technique. Data was collected by using pre-tested semi-structured proforma to assess the coverage and compliance of MDA along with possible determinants for non-attaining the expected coverage. Results: In the year 2009, coverage, compliance, coverage compliance gap (CCG and effective coverage was seen to be 84.1%, 70.5%, 29.5% and 59.3% respectively. In 2010, the results further deteriorated to 78.5%, 66.9%, 33.3% and 57% respectively. The poor coverage and compliance were attributed to improper training of service providers and lack of community awareness regarding MDA.Conclusion: The study emphasized supervised consumption, retraining of service providers before MDA activities, strengthening behaviour change communication strategy for community awareness. Advocacy by the program managers and policy makers towards prioritization of MDA program will make the story of filaria elimination a success.

  11. Information to Improve Public Perceptions of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA’s Tobacco Regulatory Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Osman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA has had regulatory authority over tobacco products since 2009, public awareness of this authority remains limited. This research examines several broad types of information about FDA tobacco regulatory mission that may improve the perceptions of FDA as a tobacco regulator. Using Amazon Mechanical Turk, 1766 adults, smokers and non-smokers, were randomly assigned to view a statement about FDA regulatory authority that varied three information types in a 2 × 2 × 2 between subjects experimental design: (1 FDA’s roles in regulating tobacco (yes/no; (2 The scientific basis of regulations (yes/no; and (3 A potential protective function of regulations (yes/no. Using factorial ANOVA, we estimated the main and interactive effects of all three types of information and of smoking status on the perceptions of FDA. Participants that were exposed to information on FDA roles reported higher FDA credibility and a greater perceived knowledge of FDA than those who did not. Exposure to information about the scientific basis of regulations led to more negative views of the tobacco industry. Participants who learned of the FDA’s commitment to protecting the public reported higher FDA credibility and more positive attitudes toward regulations than those who did not learn of this commitment. We observed no significant interaction effects. The findings suggest that providing information about the regulatory roles and protective characterization of the FDA’s tobacco regulatory mission positively influence public perceptions of FDA and tobacco regulations.

  12. Assessing transmission of lymphatic filariasis using parasitologic, serologic, and entomologic tools after mass drug administration in American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladonicky, Janice M; King, Jonathan D; Liang, Jennifer L; Chambers, Eric; Pa'au, Molisamoa; Schmaedick, Mark A; Burkot, Thomas R; Bradley, Mark; Lammie, Patrick J

    2009-05-01

    Assessing the interruption of lymphatic filariasis transmission after annual mass drug administration (MDA) requires a better understanding of how to interpret results obtained with the available diagnostic tools. We conducted parasitologic, serologic, and entomologic surveys in three villages in American Samoa after sentinel site surveys suggested filarial antigen prevalence was < 1% after five annual MDAs with diethylcarbamazine and albendazole. Antigen and antifilarial antibody prevalence ranged from 3.7% to 4.6% and from 12.5% to 14.9%, respectively, by village. Only one person was microfilaria positive. Although no children less than 10 years of age were antigen positive, antifilarial antibody prevalence in this age group was 5.1% and antibody-positive children were detected in all three villages. Wuchereria bancrofti-infected mosquitoes were also detected in all three villages. Thus, monitoring of infections in mosquitoes and antifilarial antibody levels in children may serve as indicators of local transmission and be useful for making decisions about program endpoints.

  13. Coverage of, and compliance with, mass drug administration under the programme to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in India: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Bontha V; Babu, Gopalan R

    2014-09-01

    India's mass drug administration (MDA) programme to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (PELF) covers all 250 endemic districts, but compliance with treatment is not adequate for the programme to succeed in eradicating this neglected tropical disease. The objective of our study was to systematically review published studies on the coverage of and compliance with MDA under the PELF in India. We searched several databases-PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, CINAHL/EBSCO, Web of Knowledge (including Web of Science) and OVID-and by applying selection criteria identified a total of 36 papers to include in the review. Overall MDA coverage rates varied between 48.8% and 98.8%, while compliance rates ranged from 20.8% to 93.7%. The coverage-compliance gap is large in many MDA programmes. The effective level of compliance, ≥65%, was reported in only 10 of a total of 31 MDAs (5 of 20 MDAs in rural areas and 2 of 12 MDAs in urban areas). The review has identified a gap between coverage and compliance, and potentially correctable causes of this gap. These causes need to be addressed if the Indian programme is to advance towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Mass Drug Administration and beyond: how can we strengthen health systems to deliver complex interventions to eliminate neglected tropical diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Eleanor E; Adams, Emily R; Bockarie, Moses J; Hollingsworth, T Deirdre; Kelly-Hope, Louise A; Lehane, Mike; Kovacic, Vanja; Harrison, Robert A; Paine, Mark Ji; Reimer, Lisa J; Torr, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Achieving the 2020 goals for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) requires scale-up of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) which will require long-term commitment of national and global financing partners, strengthening national capacity and, at the community level, systems to monitor and evaluate activities and impact. For some settings and diseases, MDA is not appropriate and alternative interventions are required. Operational research is necessary to identify how existing MDA networks can deliver this more complex range of interventions equitably. The final stages of the different global programmes to eliminate NTDs require eliminating foci of transmission which are likely to persist in complex and remote rural settings. Operational research is required to identify how current tools and practices might be adapted to locate and eliminate these hard-to-reach foci. Chronic disabilities caused by NTDs will persist after transmission of pathogens ceases. Development and delivery of sustainable services to reduce the NTD-related disability is an urgent public health priority. LSTM and its partners are world leaders in developing and delivering interventions to control vector-borne NTDs and malaria, particularly in hard-to-reach settings in Africa. Our experience, partnerships and research capacity allows us to serve as a hub for developing, supporting, monitoring and evaluating global programmes to eliminate NTDs.

  15. Citizen's Petition to Food and Drug Administration to ban cornstarch powder on medical gloves: Maltese cross birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Rodeheaver, George T; Thacker, John G; Borel, Lise; Chase, Margot E; Cross, Catherine L; Fisher, Allyson L; Lin, Kant Y; Cox, Mary J; Zura, Robert B

    2009-02-01

    During the last 25 years, scientific experimental and clinical studies have documented the dangers of cornstarch powder on examination and surgical gloves because the cornstarch promotes wound infection, causes serious peritoneal adhesions and granulomatous peritonitis, and is a well-documented vector of the latex allergy epidemic in the world. Realizing the dangers of cornstarch on examination and surgical gloves, Germany's regulations of personal protective equipment banned the use of surgical glove powder cornstarch in 1997. In 2000, the Purchasing and Supply agency for the United Kingdom ceased to purchase any gloves lubricated with cornstarch. Realizing the dangers of cornstarch-powdered gloves, many hospitals and clinics in the United States have banned the use of cornstarch-powdered examination and surgical gloves. Hospitals that have banned cornstarch in their examination and surgical gloves have noted a marked reduction in the latex allergy epidemic in their facilities. Realizing the dangers of cornstarch-powdered examination and surgical gloves, Dr Sheila A. Murphey, branch chief, Infection Control Devices Branch, Division of Anesthesiology, General Hospital, Infection Control, and Dental Devices Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), recommended that a Citizen's Petition be filed to the FDA to ban cornstarch on surgical and examination gloves. The 12 authors of this report have attached the enclosed petition to the FDA to ban the use of cornstarch on all synthetic and latex examination and surgical gloves used in the United States.

  16. Proposed Food and Drug Administration protective action guides for human food and animal feed: methods and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.D.; Shleien, B.; Chiacchierini, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration's proposed recommendations to State and local agencies provide guidance on appropriate planning actions necessary for evaluating and preventing radioactive contamination of foods and animal feeds and the control and use of such products should they become contaminated. This presentation will cover the recommendations on implementation of the Preventive and Emergency PAG's. These recommendations include (1) the use of 'Dietary Factors' to obtain PAG's for specific food items from the general guidance, (2) procedures to be used for radionuclide mixtures and other radionuclides, (3) field and laboratory methods for the measurement of the level of contamination in the event of an incident and, (4) protective actions to be implemented by State and local agencies to limit the radiation dose to the public. Specific protective actions which should be considered for implementation when the projected dose exceeds the Preventive PAG are given for application to pasture, milk, fruits and vegetables, and grains. At the Emergency PAG level, the protective action decision is whether condemnation or other disposition is appropriate. (author)

  17. Patient-centered communication of community treatment assistants in Tanzania predicts coverage of future mass drug administration for trachoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Alexander; Roter, Debra L; Mkocha, Harran; Munoz, Beatriz; West, Sheila

    2018-06-01

    Prevention of Trachoma, the leading cause of infectious blindness, requires community treatment assistants (CTAs) to perform mass drug administration (MDA) of azithromycin. Previous research has shown that female CTAs have higher MDA coverage, but no studies have focused on the content of conversation. We hypothesize that female CTAs had more patient-centered communication and higher MDA coverage. In 2011, CTAs from 23 distribution sites undergoing MDA as part of the Partnership for Rapid Elimination of Trachoma were selected. CTA - villager interactions were audio recorded. Audio was analyzed using an adaptation of the Roter Interaction Analysis System. The outcome of interest was the proportion of adults receiving MDA in 2011 who returned in 2012. 58 CTAs and 3122 interactions were included. Sites with female CTAs had significantly higher patient-centeredness ratio (0.548 vs 0.400) when compared to sites with male CTAs. Sites with more patient-centered interactions had higher proportion of patients return (p = 0.009). Female CTAs had higher proportion of patient-centered communication. Patient centered communication was associated with higher rates of return for MDA. Greater patient-centered connection with health care providers affects participation in public health efforts, even when those providers are lay health workers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proposed food and drug administration protection action guides for human food and animal feed: Rationale and limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shleien, B.; Schmidt, G.D.; Chiacchierini, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is proposing Protective Action Guides (PAG's) to be used in the event that a radiological incident results in the radioactive contamination of human food and animal feed. PAG's are proposed for two levels of response: (1) PREVENTIVE PAG - establishes a level at which responsible officials should take protective action to prevent or reduce the concentration of radioactivity in food or animal feed. (2) EMERGENCY PAG - establishes a level at which responsible officials should isolate food containing radioactivity to prevent its introduction into commerce and determine whether condemnation or another disposition is appropriate. Derived response levels, which are defined as the concentration of radioactivity in food or animal feed corresponding to the above PAG's, are proposed for radionuclides of most significance. The presentation will discuss the supporting rationale as well as the numerical limits for the PAG's. This rationale is based on the process of risk assessment and cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis. The risk assessment compares the risk of radiation exposure to the risk from prevalent hazards accepted by society and from variability of the natural radiation environment. The cost-benefit analysis is limited to protective actions efficacious in the reduction of iodine-131 dose to the thyroid via the milk pathway (condemnation and use of stored feed). In addition, the metabolic and agricultural transfer models that were used to calculate derived response levels will be described briefly. (author)

  19. Proposed food and drug administration protection action guides for human food and animal feed: Rationale and limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shleien, B; Schmidt, G D; Chiacchierini, R P [Food and Drug Administration, Bureau of Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1978-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is proposing Protective Action Guides (PAG's) to be used in the event that a radiological incident results in the radioactive contamination of human food and animal feed. PAG's are proposed for two levels of response: (1) PREVENTIVE PAG - establishes a level at which responsible officials should take protective action to prevent or reduce the concentration of radioactivity in food or animal feed. (2) EMERGENCY PAG - establishes a level at which responsible officials should isolate food containing radioactivity to prevent its introduction into commerce and determine whether condemnation or another disposition is appropriate. Derived response levels, which are defined as the concentration of radioactivity in food or animal feed corresponding to the above PAG's, are proposed for radionuclides of most significance. The presentation will discuss the supporting rationale as well as the numerical limits for the PAG's. This rationale is based on the process of risk assessment and cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis. The risk assessment compares the risk of radiation exposure to the risk from prevalent hazards accepted by society and from variability of the natural radiation environment. The cost-benefit analysis is limited to protective actions efficacious in the reduction of iodine-131 dose to the thyroid via the milk pathway (condemnation and use of stored feed). In addition, the metabolic and agricultural transfer models that were used to calculate derived response levels will be described briefly. (author)

  20. Successfull Treatment of Ventriculitis Caused by Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR Acinetobacter Baumannii with Intraventriculer Colistin Administration: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Karaahmetoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumanni is an important nosocomial infection pathogen has emerged worldwide and can causes life-threatening hospital acquired infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICU. After post neurosurgical operations or procedures, this pathogen consists with central nervous system (CNS infections, also. Resistance mechanism of these pathogens against broad-spectrum antimicrobials is the challenging problem and limited penetration of antibiotics to achieve therapeutic concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been still controversial issue. Here we report two cases who had ventriculitis after external ventricular drainage (EVD placement procedures. Both of CSF of two cases yielded XDR (Extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanni. Traditional intravenous treatment did not eradicate pathogen exactly, at first. Adjunctive colistimetat sodium every 12 h (10 mg/kg/day by the route of intraventriculer (IVT was admitted and CSF sterilization was achieved thereafter. The option of IVT colistin administration must be considered with IV antibiotherapy to provide satisfactory treatment of those complicated CNS infections. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 65-69

  1. Medical Device Recalls in Radiation Oncology: Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 2002-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael J; Tringale, Kathryn; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marshall, Deborah C; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Brown, Derek; Mundt, Arno J; Pawlicki, Todd; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A

    2017-06-01

    To analyze all recalls involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s recall database, comparing these with non-radiation oncology device recalls to identify discipline-specific trends that may inform improvements in device safety. Recall data on RODs from 2002 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems). Outcomes included determined cause of recall, recall class (severity), quantity in commerce, time until recall termination (date FDA determines recall is complete), and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by Pearson χ 2 test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. There were 502 ROD recalls and 9534 other class II device recalls during 2002 to 2015. Most recalls were for external beam devices (66.7%) and planning systems (22.9%), and recall events peaked in 2011. Radiation oncology devices differed significantly from other devices in all recall outcomes (P≤.04). Recall cause was commonly software related (49% vs 10% for other devices). Recall severity was more often moderate among RODs (97.6% vs 87.2%) instead of severe (0.2% vs 4.4%; Panalysis of recall data can identify areas for device improvement, such as better system design among RODs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The organizational structure and governing principles of the Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrow, Susan; Campion, Daniel M; Herrinton, Lisa J; Nair, Vinit P; Robb, Melissa A; Wilson, Marcus; Platt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel pilot program is developing an organizational structure as well as principles and policies to govern its operations. These will inform the structure and function of the eventual Sentinel System. Mini-Sentinel is a collaboration that includes 25 participating institutions. We describe the program's current organizational structure and its major principles and policies. The organization includes a coordinating center with program leadership provided by a principal investigator; a planning board and subcommittees; an operations center; and data, methods, and protocol cores. Ad hoc workgroups are created as needed. A privacy panel advises about protection of individual health information. Principles and policies are intended to ensure that Mini-Sentinel conforms to the principles of fair information practices, protects the privacy of individual health information, maintains the security and integrity of data, assures the confidentiality of proprietary information, provides accurate and timely communications, prevents or manages conflicts of interest, and preserves respect for intellectual property rights. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A mathematical model for long-term effect of diethylcarbamazine-albendazole mass drug administration on lymphatic filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasman, H.; Supali, T.; Supriatna, A. K.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss a mathematical model for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis disease. The human population is divided into susceptible, latent, acute and chronic subpopulations. Treatment is carried out within the scheme of mass drug administration (MDA) by giving the diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and albendazole (ALB) to all individuals. In the model, we assume that the treatments have direct killing effect to microfilariae, increase of immune-mediated effect. The treated individuals are assumed to remain susceptible to the disease. This is due to the fact that the treatment is only partially effective against macrofilaria. Simulations of the model reveals that DEC-ALB treatment does give significant reduction of acute and chronic compartments at the end of the treatment period and slow down the growth after the treatment before eventually tend to the endemic state. It showed that repeated treatment during MDA is effective to decrease the transmission. This suggests that terminating MDA program after a long period of its application may still effective in controlling the disease.

  4. Interlaboratory validation of an improved U.S. Food and Drug Administration method for detection of Cyclospora cayetanensis in produce using TaqMan real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative validation study was performed to evaluate the performance of a new U.S. Food and Drug Administration method developed for detection of the protozoan parasite, Cyclospora cayetanensis, on cilantro and raspberries. The method includes a sample preparation step in which oocysts are re...

  5. Evaluating the Impact of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Proposed Nutrition Facts Label Changes on Young Adults' Visual Attention and Purchase Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Dan J.; Roberto, Christina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed modifying the Nutrition Facts Label (NFL) on food packages to increase consumer attention to this resource and to promote healthier dietary choices. Aims: The present study sought to determine whether the proposed NFL changes will affect consumer attention to the NFL or purchase…

  6. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Evaluation of the Safety of Animal Clones: A Failure to Recognize the Normativity of Risk Assessment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghani, Zahra; de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced recently that food products derived from some animal clones and their offspring are safe for human consumption. In response to criticism that it had failed to engage with ethical, social, and economic concerns raised by livestock cloning, the FDA argued that addressing normative issues prior to…

  7. Adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration from 2004 to 2016 for cosmetics and personal care products marketed to newborns and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Erika; Kwa, Michael; Paller, Amy S; Xu, Shuai

    2018-03-01

    Despite their ubiquitous use and several recent health controversies involving cosmetics and personal care products for children, the Food and Drug Administration has little oversight of these products and relies on consumer-submitted adverse event reports. We assessed the recently released Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System database for adverse event reports submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for baby personal care products and to determine whether useful insights can be derived. We extracted the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System data file from 2004 to 2016 and examined the subset classified according to the Food and Drug Administration-designated product class as a baby product. Events were manually categorized into product type and symptom type to assess for trends. Only 166 total adverse events were reported to the Food and Drug Administration for baby products from 2004 to 2016. The majority of reports indicated rash or other skin reaction; 46% of reported events led to a health care visit. Pediatric dermatologists should consider submitting cosmetics and personal care product adverse event reports and encouraging consumers to do so likewise in situations in which a product adversely affects a child's health. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Community-directed mass drug administration is undermined by status seeking in friendship networks and inadequate trust in health advice networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, Goylette F.; Kontoleon, Andreas A.; Bulte, Erwin; Fenwick, Alan; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Dunne, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Over 1.9 billion individuals require preventive chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA). Community-directed MDA relies on volunteer community medicine distributors (CMDs) and their achievement of high coverage and compliance. Yet, it is unknown if village social networks influence

  9. Community-directed mass drug administration is undermined by status seeking in friendship networks and inadequate trust in health advice networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, Goylette F.; Kontoleon, Andreas A.; Bulte, Erwin; Fenwick, Alan; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Dunne, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Over 1.9 billion individuals require preventive chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA). Community-directed MDA relies on volunteer community medicine distributors (CMDs) and their achievement of high coverage and compliance. Yet, it is unknown if village social networks influence

  10. Profiling Nonrecipients of Mass Drug Administration for Schistosomiasis and Hookworm Infections: A Comprehensive Analysis of Praziquantel and Albendazole Coverage in Community-Directed Treatment in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, G.; Kontoleon, Andreas A.; Bulte, E.H.; Fenwick, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repeated mass drug administration (MDA) with preventive chemotherapies is the mainstay of morbidity control for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, yet the World Health Organization recently reported that less than one-third of individuals who required preventive

  11. Polymer adhesion predictions for oral dosage forms to enhance drug administration safety. Part 3: Review of in vitro and in vivo methods used to predict esophageal adhesion and transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Nélio; Stegemann, Sven

    2018-05-01

    The oral cavity is frequently used to administer pharmaceutical drug products. This route of administration is seen as the most accessible for the majority of patients and supports an independent therapy management. For current oral dosage forms under development, the prediction of their unintended mucoadhesive properties and esophageal transit profiles would contribute for future administration safety, as concerns regarding unintended adhesion of solid oral dosage forms (SODF) during oro-esophageal transit still remain. Different in vitro methods that access mucoadhesion of polymers and pharmaceutical preparations have been proposed over the years. The same methods might be used to test non-adhesive systems and contribute for developing safe-to-swallow technologies. Previous works have already investigated the suitability of non-animal derived in vitro methods to assess such properties. The aim of this work was to review the in vitro methodology available in the scientific literature that used animal esophageal tissue to evaluate mucoadhesion and esophageal transit of pharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, in vivo methodology is also discussed. Since none of the in vitro methods developed are able to mimic the complex swallowing process and oro-esophageal transit, in vivo studies in humans remain as the gold standard. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Formulation and optimization of a novel oral fast dissolving film containing drug nanoparticles by Box-Behnken design-response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengying; Shen, Baode; Xu, He; Bai, Jinxia; Dai, Ling; Lv, Qingyuan; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hailong

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and optimize a novel drug nanoparticles-loaded oral fast dissolving film (NP-OFDF) using Box-Behnken design-response surface methodology. Drug nanosuspensions produced from high pressure homogenization were transformed into oral fast dissolving film containing drug nanoparticles by casting methods. Herpetrione (HPE), a novel and potent antiviral agent with poor water solubility that was extracted from Herpetospermum caudigerum, was studied as the model drug. The formulations of oral fast dissolving film containing HPE nanoparticles (HPE-NP-OFDF) were optimized by employing Box-Behnken design-response surface methodology and then systematically characterized. The optimized HPE-NP-OFDF was disintegrated in water within 20 s with reconstituted nanosuspensions particle size of 299.31 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that well-dispersed HPE nanoparticles with slight adhesion to each other were exposed on the surface of film or embedded in film. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD) analysis suggested that HPE in the HPE-NP-OFDF was in the amorphous state. In-vitro release study, approximate 77.23% of HPE was released from the HPE-NP-OFDF within 5 min, which was more than eight times compared with that of HPE raw materials (9.57%). The optimized HPE-NP-OFDF exhibits much faster drug release rates compared to HPE raw material, which indicated that this novel NP-OFDF may provide a potential opportunity for oral delivery of drugs with poor water solubility.

  13. Influence of route of administration/drug formulation and other factors on adherence to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (pain related) and dyslipidemia (non-pain related).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrel, Bruno; Balsa, Alejandro; Van Riel, Piet; Casillas, Marta; Capron, Jean-Philippe; Cueille, Carine; de la Torre, Inmaculada

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive review was performed to investigate the effect of route of administration on medication adherence and persistence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to compare adherence/persistence with oral medications between RA and a non-painful disease (dyslipidemia). Comprehensive database searches were performed to identify studies investigating medication adherence and/or persistence in adults with RA receiving conventional synthetic or biologic agents. Similar searches were performed for studies of patients with dyslipidemia receiving statins. Studies had to be published after 1998 in English and involve ≥6 months' follow up. Adherence and persistence were compared between the different routes of drug administration in RA, and between the two diseases for oral medications. A total of 35 and 28 papers underwent data extraction for RA and dyslipidemia, respectively. Within the constraints of the analysis, adherence and persistence rates appeared broadly similar for the different routes of drug administration in RA. Adherence to oral medications was also broadly similar across the two diseases, but persistence was lower in dyslipidemia. Poor adherence has clinical consequences in both diseases: greater disease activity and risk of flare in RA, and increased serum cholesterol levels and risk of heart and cerebrovascular disease in dyslipidemia. Over 1-3 years, poor adherence to biologic RA medications led to increased resource use and medical costs but lower total direct costs due to reduced biologic drug costs. Conversely, poor adherence to dyslipidemia medications resulted in increased total direct costs. In both diseases, adherence improved with patient education/support. The route of drug administration and the symptomatic (pain) nature of the disease do not appear to be dominant factors for drug adherence or persistence in RA. The wide range of adherence and persistence values and definitions across studies made comparisons between drug formulations and

  14. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  15. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  16. Central site monitoring: results from a test of accuracy in identifying trials and sites failing Food and Drug Administration inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Anne S; Manukyan, Zorayr; Purohit-Sheth, Tejashri; Gensler, Gary; Okwesili, Paul; Meeker-O'Connell, Ann; Ball, Leslie; Marler, John R

    2014-04-01

    Site monitoring and source document verification account for 15%-30% of clinical trial costs. An alternative is to streamline site monitoring to focus on correcting trial-specific risks identified by central data monitoring. This risk-based approach could preserve or even improve the quality of clinical trial data and human subject protection compared to site monitoring focused primarily on source document verification. To determine whether a central review by statisticians using data submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by clinical trial sponsors can identify problem sites and trials that failed FDA site inspections. An independent Analysis Center (AC) analyzed data from four anonymous new drug applications (NDAs) where FDA had performed site inspections overseen by FDA's Office of Scientific Investigations (OSI). FDA team members in the OSI chose the four NDAs from among all NDAs with data in Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) format. Two of the NDAs had data that OSI had deemed unreliable in support of the application after FDA site inspections identified serious data integrity problems. The other two NDAs had clinical data that OSI deemed reliable after site inspections. At the outset, the AC knew only that the experimental design specified two NDAs with significant problems. FDA gave the AC no information about which NDAs had problems, how many sites were inspected, or how many were found to have problems until after the AC analysis was complete. The AC evaluated randomization balance, enrollment patterns, study visit scheduling, variability of reported data, and last digit reference. The AC classified sites as 'High Concern', 'Moderate Concern', 'Mild Concern', or 'No Concern'. The AC correctly identified the two NDAs with data deemed unreliable by OSI. In addition, central data analysis correctly identified 5 of 6 (83%) sites for which FDA recommended rejection of data and 13 of 15 sites (87%) for which any regulatory deviations were

  17. Long-term gene expression in the nucleus accumbens following heroin administration is subregion-specific and depends on the nature of drug administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, E.H.; Smit, A.B.; de Vries, T.J.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Repeated exposure to addictive drugs results in long-lasting neuroadaptations in the brain, especially in the mesocorticolimbic system. Within this system, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays a major integrative role. As such, the NAc has been shown to be a target of short- and long-lasting

  18. Validation of key behaviourally based mental health diagnoses in administrative data: suicide attempt, alcohol abuse, illicit drug abuse and tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Smith, Eric G; Stano, Claire M; Ganoczy, Dara; Zivin, Kara; Walters, Heather; Valenstein, Marcia

    2012-01-23

    Observational research frequently uses administrative codes for mental health or substance use diagnoses and for important behaviours such as suicide attempts. We sought to validate codes (International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, clinical modification diagnostic and E-codes) entered in Veterans Health Administration administrative data for patients with depression versus a gold standard of electronic medical record text ("chart notation"). Three random samples of patients were selected, each stratified by geographic region, gender, and year of cohort entry, from a VHA depression treatment cohort from April 1, 1999 to September 30, 2004. The first sample was selected from patients who died by suicide, the second from patients who remained alive on the date of death of suicide cases, and the third from patients with a new start of a commonly used antidepressant medication. Four variables were assessed using administrative codes in the year prior to the index date: suicide attempt, alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence and tobacco use. Specificity was high (≥ 90%) for all four administrative codes, regardless of the sample. Sensitivity was ≤75% and was particularly low for suicide attempt (≤ 17%). Positive predictive values for alcohol dependence/abuse and tobacco use were high, but barely better than flipping a coin for illicit drug abuse/dependence. Sensitivity differed across the three samples, but was highest in the suicide death sample. Administrative data-based diagnoses among VHA records have high specificity, but low sensitivity. The accuracy level varies by different diagnosis and by different patient subgroup.

  19. Increasing compliance with mass drug administration programs for lymphatic filariasis in India through education and lymphedema management programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Cantey

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 45% of people living at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF worldwide live in India. India has faced challenges obtaining the needed levels of compliance with its mass drug administration (MDA program to interrupt LF transmission, which utilizes diethylcarbamazine (DEC or DEC plus albendazole. Previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with the MDA program were used to refine a pre-MDA educational campaign. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of these refinements and of a lymphedema morbidity management program on MDA compliance.A randomized, 30-cluster survey was performed in each of 3 areas: the community-based pre-MDA education plus community-based lymphedema management education (Com-MDA+LM area, the community-based pre-MDA education (Com-MDA area, and the Indian standard pre-MDA education (MDA-only area. Compliance with the MDA program was 90.2% in Com-MDA+LM, 75.0% in Com-MDA, and 52.9% in the MDA-only areas (p<0.0001. Identified barriers to adherence included: 1 fear of side effects and 2 lack of recognition of one's personal benefit from adherence. Multivariable predictors of adherence amenable to educational intervention were: 1 knowing about the MDA in advance of its occurrence, 2 knowing everyone is at risk for LF, 3 knowing that the MDA was for LF, and 4 knowing at least one component of the lymphedema management techniques taught in the lymphedema management program.This study confirmed previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with India's MDA program for LF. More importantly, it showed that targeting these predictors and barriers in a timely and clear pre-MDA educational campaign can increase compliance with MDA programs, and it demonstrated, for the first time, that lymphedema management programs may also increase compliance with MDA programs.

  20. Modeling the economic and epidemiologic impact of hookworm vaccine and mass drug administration (MDA) in Brazil, a high transmission setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Sarah M; Hotez, Peter J; Hertenstein, Daniel L; Diemert, David J; Zapf, Kristina M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Brown, Shawn T; Lee, Bruce Y

    2016-04-27

    Although mass drug administration (MDA) has helped reduce morbidity attributed to soil-transmitted helminth infections in children, its limitations for hookworm infection have motivated the development of a human hookworm vaccine to both improve morbidity control and ultimately help block hookworm transmission leading to elimination. However, the potential economic and epidemiologic impact of a preventive vaccine has not been fully evaluated. We developed a dynamic compartment model coupled to a clinical and economics outcomes model representing both the human and hookworm populations in a high transmission region of Brazil. Experiments simulated different implementation scenarios of MDA and vaccination under varying circumstances. Considering only intervention costs, both annual MDA and vaccination were highly cost-effective (ICERs ≤ $790/DALY averted) compared to no intervention, with vaccination resulting in lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs ≤ $444/DALY averted). From the societal perspective, vaccination was economically dominant (i.e., less costly and more effective) versus annual MDA in all tested scenarios, except when vaccination was less efficacious (20% efficacy, 5 year duration) and MDA coverage was 75%. Increasing the vaccine's duration of protection and efficacy, and including a booster injection in adulthood all increased the benefits of vaccination (i.e., resulted in lower hookworm prevalence, averted more disability-adjusted life years, and saved more costs). Assuming its target product profile, a pediatric hookworm vaccine drastically decreased hookworm prevalence in children to 14.6% after 20 years, compared to 57.2% with no intervention and 54.1% with MDA. The addition of a booster in adulthood further reduced the overall prevalence from 68.0% to 36.0% and nearly eliminated hookworm infection in children. Using a human hookworm vaccine would be cost-effective and in many cases economically dominant, providing both health