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Sample records for drosophila vesicular monoamine

  1. A glial variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter is required to store histamine in the Drosophila visual system.

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    Rafael Romero-Calderón

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other monoamine neurotransmitters, the mechanism by which the brain's histamine content is regulated remains unclear. In mammals, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs are expressed exclusively in neurons and mediate the storage of histamine and other monoamines. We have studied the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster in which histamine is the primary neurotransmitter released from photoreceptor cells. We report here that a novel mRNA splice variant of Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT-B is expressed not in neurons but rather in a small subset of glia in the lamina of the fly's optic lobe. Histamine contents are reduced by mutation of dVMAT, but can be partially restored by specifically expressing DVMAT-B in glia. Our results suggest a novel role for a monoamine transporter in glia that may be relevant to histamine homeostasis in other systems.

  2. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

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    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  3. Hyperforin inhibits vesicular uptake of monoamines by dissipating pH gradient across synaptic vesicle membrane.

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    Roz, Netta; Rehavi, Moshe

    2003-06-13

    Extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) have antidepressant properties in depressed patients and exert antidepressant-like action in laboratory animals. The phloroglucinol derivative hyperforin has become a topic of interest, as this Hypericum component is a potent inhibitor of monoamines reuptake. The molecular mechanism by which hyperforin inhibits monoamines uptake is yet unclear. In the present study we try to clarify the mechanism by which hyperforin inhibits the synaptic vesicle transport of monoamines. The pH gradient across the synaptic vesicle membrane, induced by vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase, is the major driving force for vesicular monoamines uptake and storage. We suggest that hyperforin, like the protonophore FCCP, dissipates an existing Delta pH generated by an efflux of inwardly pumped protons. Proton transport was measured by acridine orange fluorescence quenching. Adding Mg-ATP to a medium containing 130 mM KCl and synaptic vesicles caused an immediate decrease in fluorescence of acridine orange and the addition of 1 microM FCCP abolished this effect. H(+)-ATPase dependent proton pumping was inhibited by hyperforin in a dose dependent manner (IC(50) = 1.9 x 10(-7) M). Hyperforin acted similarly to the protonophore FCCP, abolishing the ATP induced fluorescence quenching (IC(50) = 4.3 x 10(-7) M). Hyperforin and FCCP had similar potencies for inhibiting rat brain synaptosomal uptake of [3H]monoamines as well as vesicular monoamine uptake. The efflux of [3H]5HT from synaptic vesicles was sensitive to both drugs, thus 50% of preloaded [3H]5HT was released in the presence of 2.1 x 10(-7) M FCCP and 4 x 10(-7) M hyperforin. The effect of hyperforin on the pH gradient in synaptic vesicle membrane may explain its inhibitory effect on monoamines uptake, but could only partially explain its antidepressant properties.

  4. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

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    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhe Wu [Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  5. Protective actions of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in monoaminergic neurons.

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    Guillot, Thomas S; Miller, Gary W

    2009-04-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs) are responsible for the packaging of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and epinephrine into synaptic vesicles. These proteins evolved from precursors in the major facilitator superfamily of transporters and are among the members of the toxin extruding antiporter family. While the primary function of VMATs is to sequester neurotransmitters within vesicles, they can also translocate toxicants away from cytosolic sites of action. In the case of dopamine, this dual role of VMAT2 is combined-dopamine is more readily oxidized in the cytosol where it can cause oxidative stress so packaging into vesicles serves two purposes: neurotransmission and neuroprotection. Furthermore, the deleterious effects of exogenous toxicants on dopamine neurons, such as MPTP, can be attenuated by VMAT2 activity. The active metabolite of MPTP can be kept within vesicles and prevented from disrupting mitochondrial function thereby sparing the dopamine neuron. The highly addictive drug methamphetamine is also neurotoxic to dopamine neurons by using dopamine itself to destroy the axon terminals. Methamphetamine interferes with vesicular sequestration and increases the production of dopamine, escalating the amount in the cytosol and leading to oxidative damage of terminal components. Vesicular transport seems to resist this process by sequestering much of the excess dopamine, which is illustrated by the enhanced methamphetamine neurotoxicity in VMAT2-deficient mice. It is increasingly evident that VMAT2 provides neuroprotection from both endogenous and exogenous toxicants and that while VMAT2 has been adapted by eukaryotes for synaptic transmission, it is derived from phylogenetically ancient proteins that originally evolved for the purpose of cellular protection.

  6. Phenyl Ring-Substituted Lobelane Analogs: Inhibition of [3H]Dopamine Uptake at the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2

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    Nickell, Justin R.; Zheng, Guangrong; Deaciuc, Agripina G.; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Lobeline attenuates the behavioral effects of methamphetamine via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2). To increase selectivity for VMAT2, chemically defunctionalized lobeline analogs, including lobelane, were designed to eliminate nicotinic acetylcholine receptor affinity. The current study evaluated the ability of lobelane analogs to inhibit [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding to VMAT2 and [3H]dopamine (DA) uptake into isolated synaptic vesicles and determined the m...

  7. Age-dependent methamphetamine-induced alterations in vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function: implications for neurotoxicity.

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    Truong, Jannine G; Wilkins, Diana G; Baudys, Jakub; Crouch, Dennis J; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Gibb, James W; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2005-09-01

    Tens of thousands of adolescents and young adults have used illicit methamphetamine. This is of concern since its high-dose administration causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in adult animal models. The effects in adolescents are less studied. In adult rodents, toxic effects of methamphetamine may result partly from aberrant cytosolic dopamine accumulation and subsequent reactive oxygen species formation. The vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) sequesters cytoplasmic dopamine into synaptic vesicles for storage and perhaps protection against dopamine-associated oxidative consequences. Accordingly, aberrant VMAT-2 function may contribute to the methamphetamine-induced persistent dopaminergic deficits. Hence, this study examined effects of methamphetamine on VMAT-2 in adolescent (postnatal day 40) and young adult (postnatal day 90) rats. Results revealed that high-dose methamphetamine treatment caused greater acute (within 1 h) decreases in vesicular dopamine uptake in postnatal day 90 versus 40 rats, as determined in a nonmembrane-associated subcellular fraction. Greater basal levels of VMAT-2 at postnatal day 90 versus 40 in this purified fraction seemed to contribute to the larger effect. Basal tissue dopamine content was also greater in postnatal day 90 versus 40 rats. In addition, postnatal day 90 rats were more susceptible to methamphetamine-induced persistent dopaminergic deficits as assessed by measuring VMAT-2 activity and dopamine content 7 days after treatment, even if drug doses were adjusted for age-related pharmacokinetic differences. Together, these data demonstrate dynamic changes in VMAT-2 susceptibility to methamphetamine as a function of development. Implications with regard to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic deficits, as well as dopamine-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, are discussed.

  8. Regulation of the Dopamine and Vesicular Monoamine Transporters: Pharmacological Targets and Implications for Disease.

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    German, Christopher L; Baladi, Michelle G; McFadden, Lisa M; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a well recognized role in a variety of physiologic functions such as movement, cognition, mood, and reward. Consequently, many human disorders are due, in part, to dysfunctional dopaminergic systems, including Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and substance abuse. Drugs that modify the DA system are clinically effective in treating symptoms of these diseases or are involved in their manifestation, implicating DA in their etiology. DA signaling and distribution are primarily modulated by the DA transporter (DAT) and by vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT)-2, which transport DA into presynaptic terminals and synaptic vesicles, respectively. These transporters are regulated by complex processes such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interactions, and changes in intracellular localization. This review provides an overview of 1) the current understanding of DAT and VMAT2 neurobiology, including discussion of studies ranging from those conducted in vitro to those involving human subjects; 2) the role of these transporters in disease and how these transporters are affected by disease; and 3) and how selected drugs alter the function and expression of these transporters. Understanding the regulatory processes and the pathologic consequences of DAT and VMAT2 dysfunction underlies the evolution of therapeutic development for the treatment of DA-related disorders. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Effects of dopaminergic drug treatments on in vivo radioligand binding to brain vesicular monoamine transporters

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    Kilbourn, Michael R; Frey, Kirk A; Vander Borght, Thierry; Sherman, Phillip S

    1996-05-01

    The effects of various dopaminergic drug treatments on the in vivo regional brain distribution of high-affinity radioligands ([{sup 11}C]dihydrotetrabenazine and [{sup 11}C]methoxytetrabenazine) for the rat brain vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) were determined. Acute treatments with reserpine (2 mg/kg i.p.), tetrabenazine (10 mg/kg i.v.) or related benzoisoquinolines significantly reduced radiotracer binding in vivo. In contrast, radiotracer distributions remained unchanged after treatments with other dopaminergic drugs, whether given by single injection (haloperidol, 1 mg/kg i.p., pargyline 80 mg/kg), repeatedly (pargyline, 80 mg/kg s.c., 14 days), or by continuous infusion (deprenyl, 10 mg/kg/day, 5 days; L-DOPA methyl ester 100 mg/kg/day, 5 days). Repeated injections of tetrabenazine (5 mg/kg i.p., twice daily, 3 days) did not alter in vivo radioligand binding measured after allowing drug washout from the brain. These studies support the proposal that in vivo PET imaging of VMAT2 radioligands in patients with extrapyramidal movement disorders will not be affected by concurrent use of L-DOPA or deprenyl.

  10. Dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter knockout mice : implications for Parkinson's disease.

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    Miller, G W; Wang, Y M; Gainetdinov, R R; Caron, M G

    2001-01-01

    One of the most valuable methods for understanding the function of a particular protein is the generation of animals that have had the gene encoding for the protein of interest disrupted, commonly known as a "quo;knockout"quo; or null mutant. By incorporating a sequence of DNA (typically encoding antibiotic resistance to aid in the selection of the mutant gene) into embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination, the normal transcription of the gene is effectively blocked (Fig. 1). Since a particular protein is encoded by two copies of a gene, it is necessary to have the gene on both alleles "quo;knocked out."quo; This is performed by cross-breeding animals with one affected allele (heterozygote) to generate offspring that have inherited two mutant alleles (homozygote). This procedure has been used to generate animals lacking either the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT; Fig. 2) or the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2; Fig. 3). Both DAT and VMAT2 are essential for dopamine homeostasis and are thought to participate in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (1-5). Fig. 1. Maps of the targeting vector and the mock construct. The mouse genomic fragment (clone 11) was isolated from a Stratagene 129 SvJ library by standard colony hybridization using a PCR probe from the 5' end of rat cDNA. The restriction site abbreviations are as follows: H, HindIII; N, NotI; Sc, SacI; Sn, SnaI; X, XbaI; and Xh, XhoI. The region between HindIII and SnaI on clone 11 containing the coding sequence from transmembrane domains 3 and 4 of VMAT2 was deleted and replaced with PGK-neo. The 3' fragment of clone 11 was reserved as an external probe for Southern analysis. To facilitate PCR screening of embryonic stem cell clones, a mock construct containing the SnaI/XbaI fragment and part of the Neo cassette was generated as a positive control. pPNT and pGEM4Z were used to construct knockout and mock vectors, respectively. (Reproduced with permission from ref. 1). Fig. 2. DAT and

  11. Preliminary evidence of apathetic-like behavior in aged vesicular monoamine transporter 2 deficient mice

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    Aron Baumann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Apathy is considered to be a core feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD and has been associated with a variety of states and symptoms of the disease, such as increased severity of motor symptoms, impaired cognition, executive dysfunction, and dementia. Apart from the high prevalence of apathy in PD, which is estimated to be about 40%, the underlying pathophysiology remains poorly understood and current treatment approaches are unspecific and proved to be only partially effective. In animal models, apathy has been sub-optimally modeled, mostly by means of pharmacological and stress-induced methods, whereby concomitant depressive-like symptoms could not be ruled out. In the context of PD only a few studies on toxin-based models (i.e. 6-OHDA or MPTP claimed to have determined apathetic symptoms in animals. The assessment of apathetic symptoms in more elaborated and multifaceted genetic animal models of PD could help to understand the pathophysiological development of apathy in PD and eventually advance specific treatments for afflicted patients. Here we report the presence of behavioral signs of apathy in 12 months old mice that express only ~5% of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2. Apathetic-like behavior in VMAT2 deficient (LO mice was evidenced by impaired burrowing and nest building skills, and a reduced preference for sweet solution in the saccharin preference test, while the performance in the forced swimming test was normal. Our preliminary results suggest that VMAT2 deficient mice show an apathetic-like phenotype that might be independent of depressive-like symptoms. Therefore VMAT2 LO mice could be a useful tool to study of the pathophysiological substrates of apathy and to test novel treatment strategies for apathy in the context of PD.

  12. Vesicular Axonal Transport is Modified In Vivo by Tau Deletion or Overexpression in Drosophila

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    Yasmina Talmat-Amar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural microtubule associated protein Tau is found in high amount in axons and is involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. Although many studies have highlighted the toxicity of an excess of Tau in neurons, the in vivo understanding of the endogenous role of Tau in axon morphology and physiology is poor. Indeed, knock-out mice display no strong cytoskeleton or axonal transport phenotype, probably because of some important functional redundancy with other microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. Here, we took advantage of the model organism Drosophila, which genome contains only one homologue of the Tau/MAP2/MAP4 family to decipher (endogenous Tau functions. We found that Tau depletion leads to a decrease in microtubule number and microtubule density within axons, while Tau excess leads to the opposite phenotypes. Analysis of vesicular transport in tau mutants showed altered mobility of vesicles, but no change in the total amount of putatively mobile vesicles, whereas both aspects were affected when Tau was overexpressed. In conclusion, we show that loss of Tau in tau mutants not only leads to a decrease in axonal microtubule density, but also impairs axonal vesicular transport, albeit to a lesser extent compared to the effects of an excess of Tau.

  13. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

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    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  14. In vivo imaging of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in pancreas using an {sup 18}F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

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    Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu; Lieberman, Brian P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zhuang Zhiping [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi; Kung Meiping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Choi, Seok Rye [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Poessl, Karl; Blankemeyer, Eric; Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Objectives: Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper, a new imaging agent, [{sup 18}F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7, 11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [{sup 18}F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney, thus reducing the background signal. Methods: Both {sup 18}F- and {sup 19}F-labeled (+) and (-) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine [(+)-DTBZ] or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine [FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2]. Results: In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a K{sub i} value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and ({+-})4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min postinjection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85% blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [{sup 18}F](-)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min postinjection). Animal PET imaging studies of [{sup 18}F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion: The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [{sup 18}F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly

  15. Melatonin mediated antidepressant-like effect in the hippocampus of chronic stress-induced depression rats: Regulating vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and monoamine oxidase A levels.

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    Stefanovic, Bojana; Spasojevic, Natasa; Jovanovic, Predrag; Jasnic, Nebojsa; Djordjevic, Jelena; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2016-10-01

    The hippocampus is sensitive to stress which activates norepinephrine terminals deriving from the locus coeruleus. Melatonin exerts positive effects on the hippocampal neurogenic process and on depressive-like behaviour. Thus, in the present study, an examination was made of the effect of chronic melatonin treatment on norepinephrine content, synthesis, uptake, vesicular transport and degradation in the hippocampus of rats exposed to CUMS. This entailed quantifying the norephinephrine, mRNA and protein levels of DBH, NET, VMAT 2, MAO-A and COMT. The results show that CUMS evoked prolonged immobility. Melatonin treatment decreased immobility in comparison with the placebo group, reflecting an antidepressant-like effect. Compared with the placebo group, a dramatic decrease in norepinephrine content, decreased VMAT2 mRNA and protein and increased MAO-A protein levels in the hippocampus of the CUMS rats were observed. However, no significant differences in the levels of DBH, NET, COMT mRNA and protein and MAO-A mRNA levels between the placebo and the stressed groups were found. The results showed the restorative effects of melatonin on the stress-induced decline in the norepinephrine content of the hippocampus. It was observed that melatonin treatment in the CUMS rats prevented the stress-induced decrease in VMAT2 mRNA and protein levels, whereas it reduced the increase of the mRNA of COMT and protein levels of MAO-A. Chronic treatment with melatonin failed to alter the gene expression of DBH or NET in the hippocampus of the CUMS rats. Additionally, the results show that melatonin enhances VMAT2 expression and norepinephrine storage, whilst it reduces norepinephrine degrading enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluoroethoxy-1,4-diphenethylpiperidine and piperazine derivatives: Potent and selective inhibitors of [3H]dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

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    Hankosky, Emily R; Joolakanti, Shyam R; Nickell, Justin R; Janganati, Venumadhav; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2017-12-15

    A small library of fluoroethoxy-1,4-diphenethyl piperidine and fluoroethoxy-1,4-diphenethyl piperazine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit [ 3 H]dopamine (DA) uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT), [ 3 H]serotonin (5-HT) uptake at the serotonin transporter (SERT), and [ 3 H]dofetilide binding at the human-ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. The majority of the compounds exhibited potent inhibition of [ 3 H]DA uptake at VMAT2, Ki changes in the nanomolar range (K i  = 0.014-0.073 µM). Compound 15d exhibited the highest affinity (K i  = 0.014 µM) at VMAT2, and had 160-, 5-, and 60-fold greater selectivity for VMAT2 vs. DAT, SERT and hERG, respectively. Compound 15b exhibited the greatest selectivity (>60-fold) for VMAT2 relative to all the other targets evaluated, and 15b had high affinity for VMAT2 (K i  = 0.073 µM). Compound 15b was considered the lead compound from this analog series due to its high affinity and selectivity for VMAT2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of anesthetics on vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 binding to 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ: a biodistribution study in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhengping; Tang, Jie; Liu, Chunyi; Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Hongbo; Xu, Xijie; Yu, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The in vivo binding analysis of vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) to radioligand has provided a means of investigating related disorders. Anesthesia is often inevitable when the investigations are performed in animals. In the present study, we tested effects of four commonly-used anesthetics: isoflurane, pentobarbital, chloral hydrate and ketamine, on in vivo VMAT2 binding to 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ, a specific VMAT2 radioligand, in rat brain. Methods: The transient equilibrium time window for in vivo binding of 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ after a bolus injection was firstly determined. The brain biodistribution studies under anesthetized and awake rats were then performed at the equilibrium time. Standard uptake values (SUVs) of the interest brain regions: the striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), cortex (CX) and cerebellum (CB) were obtained; and ratios of tissue to cerebellum were calculated. Results: Isoflurane and pentobarbital did not alter distribution of 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ in the brain relative to the awake group; neither SUVs nor ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB were altered significantly. Chloral hydrate significantly increased SUVs of all the brain regions, but did not significantly alter ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB. Ketamine significantly increased SUVs of the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, and insignificantly increased the SUV of the cerebellum; consequently, ketamine significantly increased ratios of ST/CB and HP/CB. Conclusions: It is concluded that in vivo VMAT2 binding to 18 F-FP-(+)-DTBZ are not altered by isoflurane and pentobarbital, but altered by chloral hydrate and ketamine. Isoflurane and pentobarbital may be promising anesthetic compounds for investigating in vivo VMAT2 binding. Further studies are warranted to investigate the interactions of anesthetics with VMAT2 binding potential with in vivo PET studies.

  18. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

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    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Kim, Grace E.; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy; Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin; Yanik, Gregory A.; Kreissman, Susan G.; Hogarty, Michael; DuBois, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  19. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

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    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kim, Grace E. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy [UCSF School of Pharmacy, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, San Francisco, CA (United States); Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin [University of Florida, Children' s Oncology Group Statistics and Data Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yanik, Gregory A. [University of Michigan, CS Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kreissman, Susan G. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hogarty, Michael [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DuBois, Steven G. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  20. Protein expression profiling of the drosophila fragile X mutant brain reveals up-regulation of monoamine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong Q; Friedman, David B; Wang, Zhe; Woodruff, Elvin; Pan, Luyuan; O'donnell, Janis; Broadie, Kendal

    2005-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation, associated with both cognitive and behavioral anomalies. The disease is caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene, which encodes the mRNA-binding, translational regulator FMRP. Previously we established a disease model through mutation of Drosophila fmr1 (dfmr1) and showed that loss of dFMRP causes defects in neuronal structure, function, and behavioral output similar to the human disease state. To uncover molecular targets of dFMRP in the brain, we use here a proteomic approach involving two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analyses followed by mass spectrometry identification of proteins with significantly altered expression in dfmr1 null mutants. We then focus on two misregulated enzymes, phenylalanine hydroxylase (Henna) and GTP cyclohydrolase (Punch), both of which mediate in concert the synthetic pathways of two key monoamine neuromodulators, dopamine and serotonin. Brain enzymatic assays show a nearly 2-fold elevation of Punch activity in dfmr1 null mutants. Consistently brain neurochemical assays show that both dopamine and serotonin are significantly increased in dfmr1 null mutants. At a cellular level, dfmr1 null mutant neurons display a highly significant elevation of the dense core vesicles that package these monoamine neuromodulators for secretion. Taken together, these data indicate that dFMRP normally down-regulates the monoamine pathway, which is consequently up-regulated in the mutant condition. Elevated brain levels of dopamine and serotonin provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for aspects of cognitive and behavioral deficits in human patients.

  1. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  2. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  3. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. (UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Surgical treatment of vesicular lithiasis has changed in past years. The addition of the new techniques in daily medical practice not always is immediate. Reasons relative to when to operate a patient presenting with gall bladder calculi are argued and documenting how this procedure is mainly reserved for symptomatic patients where pain is considered as a symptom par excellence. Also, it is exposed how this change has been faced. (author)

  5. Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease revealed in an animal model with reduced monoamine storage capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tonya N; Caudle, W Michael; Shepherd, Kennie R; Noorian, AliReza; Jackson, Chad R; Iuvone, P Michael; Weinshenker, David; Greene, James G; Miller, Gary W

    2009-06-24

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, culminating in severe motor symptoms, including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. In addition to motor deficits, there are a variety of nonmotor symptoms associated with PD. These symptoms generally precede the onset of motor symptoms, sometimes by years, and include anosmia, problems with gastrointestinal motility, sleep disturbances, sympathetic denervation, anxiety, and depression. Previously, we have shown that mice with a 95% genetic reduction in vesicular monoamine transporter expression (VMAT2-deficient, VMAT2 LO) display progressive loss of striatal dopamine, L-DOPA-responsive motor deficits, alpha-synuclein accumulation, and nigral dopaminergic cell loss. We hypothesized that since these animals exhibit deficits in other monoamine systems (norepinephrine and serotonin), which are known to regulate some of these behaviors, the VMAT2-deficient mice may display some of the nonmotor symptoms associated with PD. Here we report that the VMAT2-deficient mice demonstrate progressive deficits in olfactory discrimination, delayed gastric emptying, altered sleep latency, anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent depressive behavior. These results suggest that the VMAT2-deficient mice may be a useful model of the nonmotor symptoms of PD. Furthermore, monoamine dysfunction may contribute to many of the nonmotor symptoms of PD, and interventions aimed at restoring monoamine function may be beneficial in treating the disease.

  6. Transmission and pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is caused by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative single stranded RNA arthropod-borne virus member of the Family Rhabdoviridae. The virion is composed of the host derived plasma membrane, the envelope, and an internal ribonucleoprotein core. The envelope contain...

  7. Action potential-independent and pharmacologically unique vesicular serotonin release from dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Commons, Kathryn G.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin released within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) induces feedback inhibition of serotonin neuron activity and consequently regulates mood-controlling serotonin release throughout the forebrain. Serotonin packaged in vesicles is released in response to action potentials by the serotonin neuron soma and terminals, but the potential for release by dendrites is unknown. Here three-photon (3P) microscopy imaging of endogenous serotonin in living rat brain slice, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy detection of VMAT2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2) establish the presence of vesicular serotonin within DR dendrites. Furthermore, activation of glutamate receptors is shown to induce vesicular serotonin release from dendrites. However, unlike release from the soma and terminals, dendritic serotonin release is independent of action potentials, relies on L-type Ca2+ channels, is induced preferentially by NMDA, and displays distinct sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine. The unique control of dendritic serotonin release has important implications for DR physiology and the antidepressant action of SSRIs, dihydropyridines and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23136413

  8. Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, FL; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL; 3DBS Labs Inc, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Disagreement exists regarding the etiology of cessation of the observed clinical results with administration of reuptake inhibitors. Traditionally, when drug effects wane, it is known as tachyphylaxis. With reuptake inhibitors, the placebo effect is significantly greater than the drug effect in the treatment of depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, leading some to assert that waning of drug effects is placebo relapse, not tachyphylaxis.Methods: Two groups were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 was composed of subjects with depression and Group 2 was composed of bariatric subjects treated with reuptake inhibitors for appetite suppression.Results: In Group 1, 200 subjects with depression were treated with citalopram 20 mg per day. A total of 46.5% (n = 93 achieved relief of symptoms (Hamilton-D rating score ≤ 7, of whom 37 (39.8% of whom experienced recurrence of depression symptoms, at which point an amino acid precursor formula was started. Within 1–5 days, 97.3% (n = 36 experienced relief of depression symptoms. In Group 2, 220 subjects were treated with phentermine 30 mg in the morning and citalopram 20 mg at 4 pm. In this group, 90.0% (n = 198 achieved adequate appetite suppression. The appetite suppression ceased in all 198 subjects within 4–48 days. Administration of an amino acid precursor formula restored appetite suppression in 98.5% (n = 195 of subjects within 1–5 days.Conclusion: Reuptake inhibitors do not increase the total number of monoamine molecules in the central nervous system. Their mechanism of action facilitates redistribution of monoamines from one place to another. In the process, conditions are induced that facilitate depletion of monoamines. The "reuptake inhibitor monoamine depletion theory" of this paper

  9. The antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, ..... on the inhibition of the catabolism of serotonin, .... Structure of human monoamine oxidase B, a drug target for.

  10. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine™) is a monoamine releasing agent, rather than only a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Dirk D; López, Víctor; Smith, Carine

    2016-01-11

    Extracts from and alkaloids contained in plants in the genus Sceletium have been reported to inhibit ligand binding to serotonin transporter. From this, the conclusion was made that Sceletium products act as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. However, other mechanisms which may similarly result in the anxiolytic or anti-depressant effect ascribed to Sceletium, such as monoamine release, have not been investigated. The current study investigated simultaneously and at two consecutive time points, the effect of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract on both monoamine release and serotonin reuptake into both human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal neurons, as well as potential inhibitory effects on relevant enzyme activities. Human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal cells were treated with citalopram or Sceletium extract for 15 and 30min, after which protein expression levels of serotonin transporter (SERT) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VAMT-2) was assessed using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Efficacy of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidate-A (MAO-A) activity were assessed using the Ellman and Olsen methods (and appropriate controls) respectively. We report the first investigation of mechanism of action of Sceletium extract in the context of serotonin transport, release and reuptake in a cellular model. Cell viability was not affected by Sceletium treatment. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract down-regulated SERT expression similarly to citalopram. In addition, VMAT-2 was upregulated significantly in response to Sceletium treatment. The extract showed only relatively mild inhibition of AChE and MAO-A. We conclude that the serotonin reuptake inhibition activity ascribed to the Sceletium plant, is a secondary function to the monoamine-releasing activity of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine(TM)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals.

  12. Regulation of vesicular trafficking by Parkinson's disease-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Inoshita

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms that control intracellular vesicular trafficking play important roles in cellular function and viability. Neurons have specific vesicular trafficking systems for synaptic vesicle formation, release and recycling. Synaptic vesicular trafficking impairments induce neuronal dysfunction and physiological and behavioral disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dopamine depletion and loss of dopamine neurons in the midbrain. The molecular mechanism responsible for the neurodegeneration that occurs during PD is still not understood; however, recent functional analyses of familial PD causative genes suggest that a number of PD causative genes regulate intracellular vesicular trafficking, including synaptic vesicular dynamics. This review focuses on recent insights regarding the functions of PD causative genes, their relationship with vesicular trafficking and how mutations associated with PD affect vesicular dynamics and neuronal survival.

  13. The antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarchonanthus camphoratus (camphor bush) has been widely used for numerous medicinal purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase inhibition activities of the crude dichloromethane leaf extract of T. camphoratus. The antioxidant activities were ...

  14. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressloff, Paul C; Karamched, Bhargav R

    2016-01-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states. (paper)

  15. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JianYing; Zhang, Tong; Lu, Yi; Zhou, GuangYa; Chen, Qin; Niu, Bing

    2018-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends. American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression. For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity), SP (specificity) and ACC (prediction accuracy) values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively. This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast.

  16. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhou, GuangYa; Chen, Qin

    2018-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends. Methods American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression. Results For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity), SP (specificity) and ACC (prediction accuracy) values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively. Conclusion This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast. PMID:29385198

  17. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianYing Wang

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis (VS is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends.American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression.For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity, SP (specificity and ACC (prediction accuracy values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively.This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast.

  18. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors from Gentiana lutea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Kabbash, Amal; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2004-08-01

    Three monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were isolated from Gentiana lutea. Their structures were elucidated to be 3-3''linked-(2'-hydroxy-4-O-isoprenylchalcone)-(2'''-hydroxy-4''-O-isoprenyldihydrochalcone) (1), 2-methoxy-3-(1,1'-dimethylallyl)-6a,10a-dihydrobenzo(1,2-c)chroman-6-one and 5-hydroxyflavanone. These compounds, and the hydrolysis product of 1, displayed competitive inhibitory properties against MAO-B which was more effective than MAO-A.

  19. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  20. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets

  1. Pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta el caso un paciente diabético que desarrolló un cuadro de pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular, en el que se evaluó la aplicabilidad de los criterios de clasificación y manejo de la hoja de ruta para pancreatitis aguda, así mismo se proponen algunos tópicos que pudieran ser investigados a futuro We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification ...

  2. Neurophysiology of Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ryan J H; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A C; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic) neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak's scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing.

  3. Monoamine related functional gene variants and relationships to monoamine metabolite concentrations in CSF of healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Propping Peter

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concentrations of monoamine metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF have been used extensively as indirect estimates of monoamine turnover in the brain. CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations are partly determined by genetic influences. Methods We investigated possible relationships between DNA polymorphisms in the serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C, the serotonin 3A receptor (HTR3A, the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4, and the dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH genes and CSF concentrations of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG in healthy volunteers (n = 90. Results The HTR3A 178 C/T variant was associated with 5-HIAA levels (p = 0.02. The DBH-1021 heterozygote genotype was associated with 5-HIAA (p = 0.0005 and HVA (p = 0.009 concentrations. Neither the HTR2C Cys23Ser variant, nor the DRD4 -521 C/T variant were significantly associated with any of the monoamine metabolites. Conclusions The present results suggest that the HTR3A and DBH genes may participate in the regulation of dopamine and serotonin turnover rates in the central nervous system.

  4. Clinical features and pharmacotherapy of childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Heales, S J R; Kurian, M A

    2014-08-01

    Childhood neurotransmitter disorders are increasingly recognised as an expanding group of inherited neurometabolic syndromes. They are caused by disturbance in synthesis, metabolism, and homeostasis of the monoamine neurotransmitters, including the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine) and serotonin. Disturbances in monoamine neurotransmission will lead to neurological symptoms that often overlap with clinical features of other childhood neurological disorders (such as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, cerebral palsy, other movement disorders, and paroxysmal conditions); consequently, neurotransmitter disorders are frequently misdiagnosed. The diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is made through detailed clinical assessment, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters, and further supportive diagnostic investigations. Early and accurate diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is important, as many are amenable to therapeutic intervention. The principles of treatment for monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are mainly directly derived from understanding these metabolic pathways. In disorders characterized by enzyme deficiency, we aim to increase monoamine substrate availability, boost enzyme co-factor levels, reduce monoamine breakdown, and replace depleted levels of monoamines with pharmacological analogs as clinically indicated. Most monoamine neurotransmitter disorders lead to reduced levels of central dopamine and/or serotonin. Complete amelioration of motor symptoms is achievable in some disorders, such as Segawa's syndrome, and, in other conditions, significant improvement in quality of life can be attained with pharmacotherapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical features and current treatment strategies for childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

  5. Armadillo motifs involved in vesicular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available Armadillo (ARM repeat proteins function in various cellular processes including vesicular transport and membrane tethering. They contain an imperfect repeating sequence motif that forms a conserved three-dimensional structure. Recently, structural and functional insight into tethering mediated by the ARM-repeat protein p115 has been provided. Here we describe the p115 ARM-motifs for reasons of clarity and nomenclature and show that both sequence and structure are highly conserved among ARM-repeat proteins. We argue that there is no need to invoke repeat types other than ARM repeats for a proper description of the structure of the p115 globular head region. Additionally, we propose to define a new subfamily of ARM-like proteins and show lack of evidence that the ARM motifs found in p115 are present in other long coiled-coil tethering factors of the golgin family.

  6. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  7. Platelet monoamine oxidase: specific activity and turnover number in headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, K.M.; Brown, G.K.; Craig, I.W.; Peatfield, R.; Rose, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase turnover numbers (molecules of substrate converted to product per minute per active site) have been calculated for the human platelet enzyme using [ 3 H]pargyline. Headache patients with high and low monoamine oxidase specific activities relative to controls were found to have turnover numbers very close to those for controls. This finding suggests that their specific activities vary because of differences in the concentration of active monoamine oxidase molecules, rather than differences in the ability of those enzyme molecules to catalyse the deamination reaction. (Auth.)

  8. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... ... association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil ..... an Agrostis capillaris population on a copper contaminated soil. Plant ... vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Amazonian Peru.

  9. Current research on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity: animal models of monoamine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Taizo; Wagner, George C; Nakashima, Toshikatsu

    2003-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity is characterized by a long-lasting depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and serotonin as well as damage to striatal dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve terminals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanism underlying METH-induced neurotoxicity have been proposed. In particular, it is thought that endogenous DA in the striatum may play an important role in mediating METH-induced neuronal damage. This hypothesis is based on the observation of free radical formation and oxidative stress produced by auto-oxidation of DA consequent to its displacement from synaptic vesicles to cytoplasm. In addition, METH-induced neurotoxicity may be linked to the glutamate and nitric oxide systems within the striatum. Moreover, using knockout mice lacking the DA transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter 2, c-fos, or nitric oxide synthetase, it was determined that these factors may be connected in some way to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Finally a role for apoptosis in METH-induced neurotoxicity has also been established including evidence of protection of bcl-2, expression of p53 protein, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), activity of caspase-3. The neuronal damage induced by METH may reflect neurological disorders such as autism and Parkinson's disease.

  10. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  11. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effect of Kaixinsan on monoamine oxidase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi; Dong, Xian-Zhe; Tan, Xiao; Wang, Yu-Ning; Liu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    To observe the effect of antidepressant medicine prescription, Kaixinsan (KXS) on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity, and explore the mechanism of KXS in elevating the levels of monoamine neurotransmitter from the perspective of metabolism, in vitro enzyme reaction system and C6 neuroglial cells, the effect of KXS at different concentrations on MAO-A and MAO-B activity was observed. In animal studies, the effect of KXS at different concentrations on MAO-A and MAO-B activities of brain mitochondrialin normal rats and solitary chronic unpredictable moderate stress (CMS) model rats after intragastric administration for 1, 2, 3 weeks. Results showed that 10 g•L⁻¹ KXS could significantly reduce the activity of MAO-A and MAO-B in enzyme reaction system; and in C6 cells, KXS within 0.625-10 g•L⁻¹ concentration range had no significant effect on the activity of MAO-A, but had obvious inhibitory effect on the activity of MAO-B in a dose dependent manner. KXS had no significant effect on the activity of MAO-A and MAO-B in brains of normal rats after action for 1, 2, 3 weeks. After 2 and 3 weeks treatment with 338 mg•kg⁻¹ dose KXS, MAO-A activity in the brain of CMS rats was decreased as compared with the model group (PMAO-B activity after 1, 2, 3 weeks of treatment. The results indicated that KXS had certain effect on in vitro MAO-A and MAO-B activity, had no effect on brain MAO-A and MAO-B activity in vivo in normal rats, and had certain inhibitory effect on MAO-A activity in brains of CMS rats. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. Changes in brain monoamine levels and monoamine oxidase activity in the catfish, Clarias batrachus, during chronic treatments with mercurials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirubagaran, R.; Joy, K.P.

    1990-01-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system is the primary target for CH 3 Hg poisoning which is clinically known as Minamata disease. Hg is a widely recognized neurotoxin and has been reported to impair brain monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism. Reports on effects of Hg on brain monoamine activity in fishes are scarce. In the present study, therefore, changes in the brain monoamine levels and the degradation enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), are described in the catfish, Clarias batrachus, exposed to sublethal concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 -inorganic Hg), methylmercuric chloride (CH 3 HgCl-organic Hg), and a commercial mercurial fungicide formulation, emisan 6 (methoxyethyl Hg-organic Hg) for 45, 90 and 180 d during gonadal recrudescence. These intervals correspond to late preparatory, prespawning and spawning phases, respectively, of the annual reproductive cycle of the catfish

  14. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Ebola Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regules, Jason A; Beigel, John H; Paolino, Kristopher M; Voell, Jocelyn; Castellano, Amy R; Hu, Zonghui; Muñoz, Paula; Moon, James E; Ruck, Richard C; Bennett, Jason W; Twomey, Patrick S; Gutiérrez, Ramiro L; Remich, Shon A; Hack, Holly R; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Josleyn, Matthew D; Kwilas, Steven A; Van Deusen, Nicole; Mbaya, Olivier Tshiani; Zhou, Yan; Stanley, Daphne A; Jing, Wang; Smith, Kirsten S; Shi, Meng; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Sullivan, Nancy J; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Peel, Sheila A; Alimonti, Judie B; Hooper, Jay W; Silvera, Peter M; Martin, Brian K; Monath, Thomas P; Ramsey, W Jay; Link, Charles J; Lane, H Clifford; Michael, Nelson L; Davey, Richard T; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-01-26

    The worst Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in history has resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths. We present the final results of two phase 1 trials of an attenuated, replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine candidate designed to prevent EVD. We conducted two phase 1, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-escalation trials of an rVSV-based vaccine candidate expressing the glycoprotein of a Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV). A total of 39 adults at each site (78 participants in all) were consecutively enrolled into groups of 13. At each site, volunteers received one of three doses of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine (3 million plaque-forming units [PFU], 20 million PFU, or 100 million PFU) or placebo. Volunteers at one of the sites received a second dose at day 28. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. The most common adverse events were injection-site pain, fatigue, myalgia, and headache. Transient rVSV viremia was noted in all the vaccine recipients after dose 1. The rates of adverse events and viremia were lower after the second dose than after the first dose. By day 28, all the vaccine recipients had seroconversion as assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the glycoprotein of the ZEBOV-Kikwit strain. At day 28, geometric mean titers of antibodies against ZEBOV glycoprotein were higher in the groups that received 20 million PFU or 100 million PFU than in the group that received 3 million PFU, as assessed by ELISA and by pseudovirion neutralization assay. A second dose at 28 days after dose 1 significantly increased antibody titers at day 56, but the effect was diminished at 6 months. This Ebola vaccine candidate elicited anti-Ebola antibody responses. After vaccination, rVSV viremia occurred frequently but was transient. These results support further evaluation of the vaccine dose of 20 million PFU for preexposure prophylaxis and suggest that a second dose may boost antibody responses

  15. What do monoamines do in pain modulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2016-06-01

    Here, we give a topical overview of the ways in which brain processing can alter spinal pain transmission through descending control pathways, and how these change in pain states. We link preclinical findings on the transmitter systems involved and discuss how the monoamines, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and dopamine, can interact through inhibitory and excitatory pathways. Descending pathways control sensory events and the actions of the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and 5-HT in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord are chiefly implicated in nociception or antinociception according to the receptor that is activated. Abnormalities in descending controls effect central pain processing. Following nerve injury a noradrenaline-mediated control of spinal excitability is lost, whereas its restoration reduces neuropathic hypersensitivity. The story with 5-HT remains more complex because of the myriad of receptors that it can act upon; however the most recent findings support that facilitations may dominate over inhibitions. The monoaminergic system can be manipulated to great effect in the clinic resulting in improved treatment outcomes and is the basis for the actions of the antidepressant drugs in pain. Looking to the future, prediction of treatment responses will possible by monitoring a form of inhibitory descending control for optimized pain relief.

  16. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  17. Vesicular storage and release of acetylcholine in Torpedo electroplaque synapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suszkiw, J B; Zimmermann, H; Whittaker, V P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie (Karl-Friedrich-Bonhoefer-Inst.), Goettingen (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-06-01

    The disposition of newly synthesized ACh subsequent to depletion of vesicular endogenous ACh by stimulation was studied in the electromotor nerve terminals of Torpedo marmorata using (/sup 3/H) acetate as a precursor of ACh. Little vesicular (/sup 3/H) ACh could be isolated from tissue immediately after stimulation at 1 Hz. After 3 h post-stimulation recovery the newly-synthesized (/sup 3/H) ACh is found predominantly in a subpopulation of vesicles distinct from the vesicles containing most of the endogenous poorly labelled ACh. Restimulation of the tissue causes release of highly labelled ACh with a specific radioactivity (SRA) comparable to that of the newly synthesized (/sup 3/H) ACh in the highly labelled subpopulation of vesicles and significantly greater than the SRA of ACh in the main vesicular pool of the total tissue.

  18. Structural modifications of vesicular aggregates following gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantaka-Marketou, A.E.; Domasou, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The structural changes of the didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) vesicular bilayers after γ-irradiation and under conditions where mainly OH radicals are present are reported. Alterations of the vesicular structure, such as polarity and fluidity, were detected after a dose of 0.65 kGy. A higher dose of ∼14kGy cause important damage to the well organized molecular structure and this is manifested by an important augmentation of the fluidity and polarity of the Stern region of the aggregates. Increased water penetration into the bilayer of the vesicle is probably the reason for these changes and electron micrographs support this hypothesis. (author)

  19. Vesicular stomatitis virus enables gene transfer and transsynaptic tracing in a wide range of organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Nathan A; Beier, Kevin T; Pan, Y Albert; Lapan, Sylvain W; Göz Aytürk, Didem; Berezovskii, Vladimir K; Wark, Abigail R; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Bielecki, Jan; Born, Richard T; Schier, Alexander F; Cepko, Constance L

    2015-08-01

    Current limitations in technology have prevented an extensive analysis of the connections among neurons, particularly within nonmammalian organisms. We developed a transsynaptic viral tracer originally for use in mice, and then tested its utility in a broader range of organisms. By engineering the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to encode a fluorophore and either the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) or its own glycoprotein (VSV-G), we created viruses that can transsynaptically label neuronal circuits in either the retrograde or anterograde direction, respectively. The vectors were investigated for their utility as polysynaptic tracers of chicken and zebrafish visual pathways. They showed patterns of connectivity consistent with previously characterized visual system connections, and revealed several potentially novel connections. Further, these vectors were shown to infect neurons in several other vertebrates, including Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, axolotls, and Xenopus. They were also shown to infect two invertebrates, Drosophila melanogaster, and the box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, a species previously intractable for gene transfer, although no clear evidence of transsynaptic spread was observed in these species. These vectors provide a starting point for transsynaptic tracing in most vertebrates, and are also excellent candidates for gene transfer in organisms that have been refractory to other methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  1. Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Livia; Vecsei, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence increasing with age. Oxidative stress and glutamate toxicity are involved in its pathomechanism. There are still many unmet needs of PD patients, including the alleviation of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, and the development of therapies with neuroprotective potential. To give an overview of the pharmacological properties, the efficacy and safety of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors in the treatment of PD, with special focus on the results of randomized clinical trials. A literature search was conducted in PubMed for 'PD treatment', 'MAO-B inhibitors', 'selegiline', 'rasagiline', 'safinamide' and 'clinical trials' with 'MAO-B inhibitors' in 'Parkinson' disease'. MAO-B inhibitors have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, improve the dopamine deficient state and may have neuroprotective properties. Safinamide exhibits an anti-glutamatergic effect as well. When applied as monotherapy, MAO-B inhibitors provide a modest, but significant improvement of motor function and delay the need for levodopa. Rasagiline and safinamide were proven safe and effective when added to a dopamine agonist in early PD. As add-on to levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors significantly reduced off-time and were comparable in efficacy to COMT inhibitors. Improvements were achieved as regards certain non-motor symptoms as well. Due to the efficacy shown in clinical trials and their favorable side-effect profile, MAO-B inhibitors are valuable drugs in the treatment of PD. They are recommended as monotherapy in the early stages of the disease and as add-on therapy to levodopa in advanced PD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Subaqueous non-vesicular to poorly-vesicular shards: hydroclastic fragmentation on seamounts and summit calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, W. U.; Dingwell, D. B.; Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.

    2008-12-01

    Recognizing pyroclastic deposits that originate directly from magmatic and phreatomagmatic explosions in a subaqueous setting is based upon sedimentary structures, such as massive, stratified, and graded beds as well as (pyro)clast size. Ideally such deposits form ordered fining-and thinning-upward sequences. Pumice, scoria, glass shards, euhedral and broken crystals, and lithic fragments are constituents that support an explosive heritage. Recent deep-sea ROV and submersible dives have retrieved non-vesicular to vesicle- poor, mm-scale, mafic shards in 5-15 cm-thick massive and/or graded (stratified) deposits, for which a subaqueous explosive origin has been inferred. These sheet hyaloclastites with variable shard shapes were first documented on Seamount 6 as deep-sea Limu O Pele at water depths > 1000 m. We identified in Seamount 6 samples equant to blocky shards with angular to subrounded terminations, but also subordinate hair-like and contorted glassy filaments, warped shards and irregular shards. Shards display internal laminations (flow-banding?) and have local perlitic fractures. Bubble wall shards derived from scoria burst were rare. In combination with all the above and a poor shard vesicularity (tubes and ponded magma in depths > 1000 m. We envision that hydrostatic pressure commensurate with water depth played a significant role. The deposits can be readily explained by a hydroclastic process whereby fragmentation occurred at the milli-second (Limu) to second scale (hyaloclastite). Hence, hyperquenched glass shards or thread-like glass filaments need not require magmatic explosivity. Constant surface interaction between aphyric, low-viscosity, high temperature, magma-lava at depth with seawater causes fragmentation (granulation) that can generate such delicate shards. The transfer of heat to the ambient medium, seawater, favours turbulent convection causing strong water movement that strips glassy rinds and lofts the fine-grained shards and Limu O Pele

  3. Monoamines stimulate sex reversal in the saddleback wrasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Earl T; Norris, David O; Gordon Grau, E; Summers, Cliff H

    2003-02-15

    Monoamine neurotransmitters (norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin) play an important role in reproduction and sexual behavior throughout the vertebrates. They are the first endogenous chemical signals in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In teleosts with behavioral sex determination, much is known about behavioral cues that induce sex reversal. The cues are social, processed via the visual system and depend on the ratio of females to males in the population. The mechanisms by which these external behavioral cues are converted to an internal chemical regulatory process are largely unknown. The protogynous Hawaiian saddleback wrasse, Thalassoma duperrey, was used to investigate the biological pathway mediating the conversion of a social cue into neuroendocrine events regulating sex reversal. Because monoamines play an important role in the regulation of the HPG axis, they were selected as likely candidates for such a conversion. To determine if monoamines could affect sex reversal, drugs affecting monoamines were used in an attempt to either induce sex reversal under non-permissive conditions, or prevent sex reversal under permissive conditions. Increasing norepinephrine or blocking dopamine or serotonin lead to sex reversal in experimental animals under non-permissive conditions. Increasing serotonin blocked sex reversal under permissive conditions, while blocking dopamine or norepinephrine retarded the process. The results presented here demonstrate that monoamines contribute significantly to the control sex reversal. Norepinephrine stimulates initiation and completion of gonadal sex of reversal as well as color change perhaps directly via its effects on the HPG axis. Dopamine exercises inhibitory action on the initiation of sex reversal while 5-HT inhibits both initiation and completion of sex reversal. The serotonergic system appears to be an integral part of the pathway mediating the conversion of a social cue into a

  4. Practical Microform Materials for Libraries: Silver, Diazo, Vesicular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veaner, Allen B.

    1982-01-01

    Remarks on the relative permanence and durability of three types of film in use in library microform reproduction (silver, diazo, and vesicular) and points out some technical and economic facts that govern the choice of microform materials for libraries. A 6-item reference list is included. (Author/JL)

  5. Reconstitution of the fusogenic activity of vesicular stomatitis virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metsikkö, K.; van Meer, G.; Simons, K.

    1986-01-01

    Enveloped virus glycoproteins exhibit membrane fusion activity. We have analysed whether the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, reconstituted into liposomes, is able to fuse nucleated cells in a pH-dependent fashion. Proteoliposomes produced by octylglucoside dialysis did not exhibit cell

  6. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis | Quilambo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are associated with the majority ot the terrestrial plants. Their function ranges from stress alleviation to bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals. However, our knowledge about this symbiosis is still limited. For the semi-arid tropics, where some african countries are located, ...

  7. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  8. The distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, R; Mukerji, K G

    1990-01-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are widely distributed throughout the area studied including different altitudes ranging from sea level to 2500 ft above sea level. VAM fungi were recorded from 88% of the sites examined with Glomus fasciculatum and Glomus macrocarpum being the most commonly recorded. Mean species diversity was found to be maximum in the areas thickly vegetated and undisturbed.

  9. Effect of Alkaloids Isolated from Phyllodium pulchellum on Monoamine Levels and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Dong, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Bao-Jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Sheng-Ming; Zhong, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodium pulchellum (P. pulchellum) is a folk medicine with a significant number of bioactivities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects displayed by alkaloids fractions, isolated from the roots of P. pulchellum, on neurotransmitters monoamine levels and on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Six alkaloids, which had indolealkylamine or β-carboline skeleton, were obtained by chromatographic technologies and identified by spectroscopic methods such as NMR and MS. After treatment with alkaloids of P. pulchellum, the reduction of DA levels (54.55%) and 5-HT levels (35.01%) in rat brain was observed by HPLC-FLD. The effect of alkaloids on the monoamines metabolism was mainly related to MAO inhibition, characterized by IC50 values of 37.35 ± 6.41 and 126.53 ± 5.39 μg/mL for MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. The acute toxicity indicated that P. pulchellum extract was nontoxic.

  10. Metabolomic Studies in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James E; Thummel, Carl S; Tennessen, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis provides a powerful new tool for studies of Drosophila physiology. This approach allows investigators to detect thousands of chemical compounds in a single sample, representing the combined contributions of gene expression, enzyme activity, and environmental context. Metabolomics has been used for a wide range of studies in Drosophila , often providing new insights into gene function and metabolic state that could not be obtained using any other approach. In this review, we survey the uses of metabolomic analysis since its entry into the field. We also cover the major methods used for metabolomic studies in Drosophila and highlight new directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Neurophysiology of Drosophila Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. H. West

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson’s disease- (PD- related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson’s disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak’s scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing.

  12. [Domino principle--monoamines in bottom-view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümegi, András

    2008-06-01

    One of the first neurobiological theories of major depression was the monoamine deficiency hypothesis. The classic monoamine theory of depression suggested that a deficit in monoamine neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft was the main and primary cause of depression. Recent and newer versions and modifications of the primary classic theory also mainly included this postulate, while other theories of depression preferred departing from the monoamine-based model altogether. Unfortunately, the clear neurobiology of major depression remains an elusive issue, despite intense research. It is clearly held that most, if not all, antidepressant pharmacotherapies treatments produce their therapeutic antidepressant effects, at least in part, by modulating monoamine systems (noradrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic) by a selective or a multi-acting way; however, much less is known about the neurobiological pathology of these monoamine systems in depression. Much of the past 10-15 years of research in the biology of mood disorders has led to considerable evidence in depression implicating multiple system pathology, including abnormalities of monoamine as well as other neurotransmitter systems. These approaches and findings have led researchers to propose broader theories regarding the neurobiology of depression, just like a spreading disorder of specific neuronal networks in the brain. A model for the pathophysiology of depression ill be discussed in the next pages, after describing the main components of depression pathogenesis. Suggestion is that the primary defect emerges in the cross-regulation and vulnerability of special monoaminergic and non-monoaminergic neural networks, which leads to a decrease in the tonic release of neurotransmitters in their projection areas, altering postsynaptic sensitivity, and following, overexaggerated responses to acute increases in the presynaptic firing rate and transmitter release. It is proposed that the primary defect should be

  13. The dual-gate lumen model of renal monoamine transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Hinz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc. Cape Coral, Florida, USA; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, Florida, USA; 3DBS Labs, Duluth, Minnesota, USAAbstract: The three-phase response of urinary serotonin and dopamine in subjects ­simultaneously taking amino acid precursors of serotonin and dopamine has been defined.1,2 No model exists regarding the renal etiology of the three-phase response. This writing outlines a model explaining the origin of the three-phase response of urinary serotonin and dopamine. A “dual-gate lumen transporter model” for the basolateral monoamine transporters of the kidneys is proposed as being the etiology of the three-phase urinary serotonin and dopamine responses.Purpose: The purpose of this writing is to document the internal renal function model that has evolved in research during large-scale assay with phase interpretation of urinary serotonin and dopamine.Patients and methods: In excess of 75,000 urinary monoamine assays from more than 7,500 patients were analyzed. The serotonin and the dopamine phase were determined for specimens submitted in the competitive inhibition state. The phase determination findings were then correlated with peer-reviewed literature.Results: The correlation between the three-phase response of urinary serotonin and dopamine with internal renal processes of the bilateral monoamine transporter and the apical monoamine transporter of the proximal convoluted renal tubule cells is defined.Conclusion: The phase of urinary serotonin and dopamine is dependent on the status of the serotonin gate, dopamine gate, and lumen of the basolateral monoamine transporter while in the competitive inhibition state.Keywords: serotonin, dopamine, basolateral, apical, kidney, proximal

  14. Vesicular thick-walled swollen hyphae in pulmonary zygomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masatomo; Ito, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    An autopsy case of pulmonary zygomycosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on immunosuppressive therapy is presented herein. There was a pulmonary cavitated infarct caused by mycotic thrombosis. Thin-walled narrow hyphae and vesicular thick-walled swollen hyphae were found on the pleural surface and in the necrotic tissue at the periphery of the cavity. Findings of such shaped fungal elements may cause erroneous histopathological diagnosis because pauciseptate broad thin-walled hyphae are usually the only detectable fungal elements in zygomycosis tissue. Although immunohistochemistry confirmed these unusual elements to be zygomycetous in the present case, it is important for the differential diagnosis to be aware that zygomycetes can form thin narrow hyphae and vesicular thick-walled swollen hyphae.

  15. An Atypical Local Vesicular Reaction to the Yellow Fever Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Wauters, Robert H.; Hernandez, Camellia L.; Petersen, Maureen M.

    2017-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine is a live attenuated viral inoculation indicated for patients traveling to endemic areas. The vaccine is generally well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Typical side effects include malaise, pain at the injection site, and, albeit rarely, immediate hypersensitivity reactions. We present a case of a rare adverse reaction to yellow fever vaccine in which a patient developed vesicular lesions resulting in bullae and circumferential hyperpigmentation.

  16. An Atypical Local Vesicular Reaction to the Yellow Fever Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Robert H; Hernandez, Camellia L; Petersen, Maureen M

    2017-09-19

    Yellow fever vaccine is a live attenuated viral inoculation indicated for patients traveling to endemic areas. The vaccine is generally well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Typical side effects include malaise, pain at the injection site, and, albeit rarely, immediate hypersensitivity reactions. We present a case of a rare adverse reaction to yellow fever vaccine in which a patient developed vesicular lesions resulting in bullae and circumferential hyperpigmentation.

  17. Dual inhibitors of cholinesterases and monoamine oxidases for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Damijan; Sova, Matej; Košak, Urban; Gobec, Stanislav

    2017-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a solid relationship between several enzymes and Alzheimer's disease. Cholinesterases and monoamine oxidases are closely associated with the disease symptomatology and progression and have been tackled simultaneously using several multifunctional ligands. This design strategy offers great chances to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease, in addition to alleviation of the symptoms. More than 15 years of research has led to the identification of various dual cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitors, while some showing positive outcomes in clinical trials, thus giving rise to additional research efforts in the field. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the novel dual inhibitors identified recently and to shed light on their therapeutic potential.

  18. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  20. Stereoselective effects of MDMA on inhibition of monoamine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, T.D.; Nichols, D.E.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1986-01-01

    The R(-)-isomers of hallucinogenic phenylisopropylamines are most active, whereas the S(+)-enantiomers of amphetamine (AMPH) and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) are more potent centrally. To determine if MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects at the biochemical level that resemble either those of amphetamine or the potent hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), the ability of the isomers of MDMA, AMPH and DOM to inhibit uptake of radiolabelled monoamines into synaptosomes was measured. AMPH was more potent than MDMA in inhibiting uptake of 3 H-norepinephrine (NE) into hypothalamic synaptosomes and 3 H-dopamine (DA) into striatal synaptosomes. The S(+)-isomer was more active in each case. MDMA was more potent than AMPH in inhibiting uptake of 3 H-serotonin (5-HT) into hippocampal synaptosomes and exhibited a high degree of stereoselectivity, in favor of the S(+)-isomer. DOM showed only minimal activity in inhibiting uptake of any monoamine (IC 50 > 10 -5 M). These results suggest that MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects similar to those of amphetamine on monoamine uptake inhibition, a parameter that is unrelated to the mechanism of action of the hallucinogen DOM

  1. A study of monoamine oxidase activity in fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, A; Ishikawa, H; Morimoto, T; Hirose, K; Suzuki, A; Saito, H; Yanaihara, T; Arai, Y; Oguchi, K

    1996-05-01

    To study the role of decidual monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and -B activities before delivery, the relationship between MAO activity in fetal membranes and catecholamine (CA) concentration in amniotic fluid (AF) was determined. Fetal membranes and AF were obtained at the time of elective Cesarean section (CS group, n = 11) and Cesarean section due to fetal distress without labor pains (FD group, n = 5). MAO-A and -B activities were radiometrically measured using 14C-5-hydroxytriptamine for MAO-A substrate and 14C-benzylamine for MAO-B substrate. CA concentrations in AF were measured by high performance liquid chromatograph with an electro-chemical detector. Both MAO-A and -B activities in decidua obtained from CS were significantly lower than those obtained from FD. Both norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP) concentrations were significantly lower in the CS group than the FD group. A significant positive correlation between decidual MAO-A activity and NE concentration in AF was observed. No significant correlation was observed between MAO-B activity and the concentration of NE in AF. There was no correlation between EP concentrations and MAO activities. These results suggest that CA concentration in AF may be related to the activity of MAO in fetal membranes, determined by certain physiological processes during pregnancy. It has been suggested that metabolism of monoamines in fetal membranes also plays an important role in reducing monoamine influx into maternal myometrium from the AF.

  2. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... in fumigated plots, although both it and P uptake were increased by adding P fertilizer. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. A supplementary survey on infection development at five other field sites showed that peas are extensively colonized by VAM fungi, even in soils where a standard...

  3. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  4. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  5. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  6. Modeling Human Cancers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoshita, M; Cagan, R L

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that affects multiple organs. Whole-body animal models provide important insights into oncology that can lead to clinical impact. Here, we review novel concepts that Drosophila studies have established for cancer biology, drug discovery, and patient therapy. Genetic studies using Drosophila have explored the roles of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that when dysregulated promote cancer formation, making Drosophila a useful model to study multiple aspects of transformation. Not limited to mechanism analyses, Drosophila has recently been showing its value in facilitating drug development. Flies offer rapid, efficient platforms by which novel classes of drugs can be identified as candidate anticancer leads. Further, we discuss the use of Drosophila as a platform to develop therapies for individual patients by modeling the tumor's genetic complexity. Drosophila provides both a classical and a novel tool to identify new therapeutics, complementing other more traditional cancer tools. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mood is indirectly related to serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine levels in humans: a meta-analysis of monoamine depletion studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, H. G.; Mason, N. S.; Schene, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunction in the monoamine systems of serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) may causally be related to major depressive disorder (MDD). Monoamine depletion studies investigate the direct effects of monoamines on mood. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) or para-chlorophenylalanine

  8. The molecular mechanism for overcoming the rate-limiting step in monoamine neurotransmitter transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinning, Steffen; Said, Saida; Malinauskaite, Lina

    The monoamine transporter family consists of dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) that mediate the reuptake of the monoamine neurotransmitters after their release during neurotransmission. These transporters play prominent roles in psychiatric disorders and are t......The monoamine transporter family consists of dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) that mediate the reuptake of the monoamine neurotransmitters after their release during neurotransmission. These transporters play prominent roles in psychiatric disorders...... membrane. The rate-limiting step in monoamine reuptake is the return of the empty transporter from an inward-facing to an outward-facing conformation without neurotransmitter and sodium bound. The molecular mechanism underlying this important conformational transition has not been described. Crystal...

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J; Habl, Samar S; Barnes, Roxann D; Rasmussen, Keith G

    2004-12-01

    Concerns have been expressed regarding the use of general anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). We review the published literature and present 4 new cases and conclude that there is no evidence of a dangerous interaction between ECT and MAOI use. In general, a cautious approach would be to discontinue MAOIs before ECT if the medication has not been helpful; however, there is no need for a washout interval before starting ECT. Furthermore, if there is otherwise a reason for continuing the MAOI, it can be continued during index ECT or initiated during maintenance ECT.

  10. Tolerance in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2009-01-01

    The set of genes that underlie ethanol tolerance (inducible resistance) are likely to overlap with the set of genes responsible for ethanol addiction. Whereas addiction is difficult to recognize in simple model systems, behavioral tolerance is readily identifiable and can be induced in large populations of animals. Thus, tolerance lends itself to analysis in model systems with powerful genetics. Drosophila melanogaster has been used by a variety of laboratories for the identification of genes...

  11. Metabolic control of vesicular glutamate transport and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-10-06

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl(-). Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl(-) acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl(-) at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal populations in stored topsoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.A.; Hunter, D.; Birch, P.; Short, K.C. (North East London Polytechnic, London (UK). Environment and Industry Research Unit, Dept. of Biology and Biochemistry)

    1987-01-01

    Two soil stores of different ages were sampled to investigate their vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) populations. The soils collected were assessed for pH, moisture content, loss on ignition, spore numbers, number and size of root fragments present and percentage of these roots infected with VAM. A corn-root bioassay was used to determine soil infectivity. Root fragment number, size, % root infection and soil infectivity were negatively correlated with soil depth. VAM spore number was not significantly correlated with depth in either store. It appears that infected root fragments and fresh roots were the source of inoculum although there may have been a contribution from spores in the younger store. The infectivity of the older store soil was less than that of the younger store. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  14. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Patrick J.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48 h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01–2.36 mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy.

  15. Selective inhibition of monoamine oxidase A by purpurin, an anthraquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Ryu, Hyung Won; Kang, Myung-Gyun; Park, Daeui; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidation of monoamines that act as neurotransmitters. During a target-based screening of natural products using two isoforms of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, purpurin (an anthraquinone derivative) was found to potently and selectively inhibit MAO-A, with an IC 50 value of 2.50μM, and not to inhibit MAO-B. Alizarin (also an anthraquinone) inhibited MAO-A less potently with an IC 50 value of 30.1μM. Furthermore, purpurin was a reversible and competitive inhibitor of MAO-A with a K i value of 0.422μM. A comparison of their chemical structures suggested the 4-hydroxy group of purpurin might play an important role in its inhibition of MAO-A. Molecular docking simulation showed that the binding affinity of purpurin for MAO-A (-40.0kcal/mol) was higher than its affinity for MAO-B (-33.9kcal/mol), and that Ile 207 and Gly 443 of MAO-A were key residues for hydrogen bonding with purpurin. The findings of this study suggest purpurin is a potent, selective, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A, and that it be considered a new potential lead compound for development of novel reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legoabe LJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lesetja J Legoabe,1 Anél Petzer,1 Jacobus P Petzer1,21Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South AfricaAbstract: Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15 and related compounds (two were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: monoamine oxidase, MAO, inhibition, 2-acetylphenol, structure–activity relationship

  17. Behavioral Teratogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Monalisa; Barik, Bedanta Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Developmental biology is a fascinating branch of science which helps us to understand the mechanism of development, thus the findings are used in various therapeutic approach. Drosophila melanogaster served as a model to find the key molecules that initiate and regulate the mechanism of development. Various genes, transcription factors, and signaling pathways helping in development are identified in Drosophila. Many toxic compounds, which can affect the development, are also recognized using Drosophila model. These compounds, which can affect the development, are named as a teratogen. Many teratogens identified using Drosophila may also act as a teratogen for a human being since 75% of conservation exist between the disease genes present in Drosophila and human. There are certain teratogens, which do not cause developmental defect if exposed during pregnancy, however; behavioral defect appears in later part of development. Such compounds are named as a behavioral teratogen. Thus, it is worthy to identify the potential behavioral teratogen using Drosophila model. Drosophila behavior is well studied in various developmental stages. This chapter describes various methods which can be employed to test behavioral teratogenesis in Drosophila.

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina O. Igboin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster host model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O; Griffen, Ann L; Leys, Eugene J

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen-host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial-host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis-host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  1. Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT): appearance of an actress on the stage of purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hiasa, Miki; Sakamoto, Shohei; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    Vesicular storage of ATP is one of the processes initiating purinergic chemical transmission. Although an active transport mechanism was postulated to be involved in the processes, a transporter(s) responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP remained unidentified for some time. In 2008, SLC17A9, the last identified member of the solute carrier 17 type I inorganic phosphate transporter family, was found to encode the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) that is responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP. VNUT transports various nucleotides in a membrane potential-dependent fashion and is expressed in the various ATP-secreting cells. Mice with knockout of the VNUT gene lose vesicular storage and release of ATP from neurons and neuroendocrine cells, resulting in blockage of the initiation of purinergic chemical transmission. Thus, VNUT plays an essential role in the vesicular storage and release of ATP. The VNUT knockout mice exhibit resistance for neuropathic pain and a therapeutic effect against diabetes by way of increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, VNUT inhibitors and suppression of VNUT gene expression may be used for therapeutic purposes through suppression of purinergic chemical transmission. This review summarizes the studies to date on VNUT and discusses what we have learned about the relevance of vesicular ATP release as a potential drug target.

  2. The increasing role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in Parkinson's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Lawrence W; Bertoni, John M

    2008-11-01

    The role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has expanded with the new monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets. As primary therapy in early disease monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce motor disability and delay the need for levodopa. In more advanced disease requiring levodopa, adjunctive monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce 'off' time and may improve gait and freezing. Rasagiline and selegiline oral disintegrating tablets may reduce the safety risks associated with the amfetamine and methamfetamine metabolites of conventional oral selegiline while retaining or improving therapeutic efficacy. Articles were identified by searches of PubMed and searches on the Internet and reviewed. All articles and other referenced materials were retrieved using the keywords 'Parkinson's disease', 'treatment' and 'monoamine oxidase B inhibitor' and were published between 1960 and 2007, with older references selected for historical significance. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Accumulating data support the use of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors as monotherapy for early and mild Parkinson's disease and as adjunctive therapy for more advanced Parkinson's disease with levodopa-associated motor fluctuations. The recently released monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets, have potential advantages over conventional oral selegiline.

  3. Amperometric biosensor for total monoamines using a glassy carbon paste electrode modified with human monoamine oxidase B and manganese dioxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, Maximilian; Telsnig, Dietlind; Teubl, Christian; Ortner, Astrid; Kalcher, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Wallner, Silvia; Edmondson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    We have prepared a biosensor for the determination of the total monoamine content in complex matrices by immobilizing a human monoamine oxidase B (hMAO B) on a glassy carbon paste electrode and adding manganese dioxide microparticles as the mediator. The enzyme hMAO B (expressed in Pichia pastoris and immobilized by using a dialysis membrane) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of monoamines, and this results in the formation of the corresponding aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. The latter was detected at pH 7.5 at a working voltage of 400 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) by differential pulse voltammetry and amperometrically by applying flow injection analysis. Analytical parameters were established by using phenylethylamine (PEA) as a standard substrate. Peak height and concentration of PEA are linearly related in the 0.5 to 150 μg mL −1 concentration range, and the limits of detection and of quantification are 0.15 and 0.5 μg mL −1 of PEA, respectively. Substrate specificity was investigated with different monoamines including PEA, serotonin, benzylamine, dopamine, tyramine, and norepinephrine. The applicability of the biosensor was successfully tested in a commercial fish sauce that served as a complex matrix. The total monoamine content was calculated as PEA-equivalents. (author)

  4. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, J.L.; Saiz-Ruiz, J.; Hollander, E.; Cesar, J.; Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.)

  5. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, J.L. [Department of Psychiatry, Centro de Salud Mental, Parla Madrid (Spain); Saiz-Ruiz, J. [Department of Psychiatry and Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Hollander, E. [Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Queens Hospital Center, New York (United States); Cesar, J. [Department of Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr. [Department of Psychiatry, Hospital San Carlos, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.).

  6. Magnetic field effects on brain monoamine oxidase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borets, V.M.; Ostrovskiy, V.Yu.; Bankovskiy, A.A.; Dudinskaya, T.F.

    1985-03-01

    In view of the increasing use of magnetotherapy, studies were conducted on the effects of 35 mTesla magnetic fields on monoamine oxidase activity in the rat brain. Under in vitro conditions a constant magnetic field in the continuous mode was most effective in inhibiting deamination of dopamine following 1 min exposure, while in vivo studies with 8 min or 10 day exposures showed that inhibition was obtained only with a variable field in the continuous mode. However, inhibition of dopamine deamination was only evident within the first 24 h after exposure was terminated. In addition, in none of the cases was norepinephrine deamination inhibited. The effects of the magnetic fields were, therefore, transient and selective with the CNS as the target system. 9 references.

  7. Suicide attempts, platelet monoamine oxidase and the average evoked response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Haier, R.J.; Murphy, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between suicides and suicide attempts and two biological measures, platelet monoamine oxidase levels (MAO) and average evoked response (AER) augmenting was examined in 79 off-medication psychiatric patients and in 68 college student volunteers chosen from the upper and lower deciles of MAO activity levels. In the patient sample, male individuals with low MAO and AER augmenting, a pattern previously associated with bipolar affective disorders, showed a significantly increased incidence of suicide attempts in comparison with either non-augmenting low MAO or high MAO patients. Within the normal volunteer group, all male low MAO probands with a family history of suicide or suicide attempts were AER augmenters themselves. Four completed suicides were found among relatives of low MAO probands whereas no high MAO proband had a relative who committed suicide. These findings suggest that the combination of low platelet MAO activity and AER augmenting may be associated with a possible genetic vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. (author)

  8. Infection of guinea pigs with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus Transmitted by Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez De León, Adalberto A; O'Toole, Donal; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2006-05-01

    Intrathoracically inoculated Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones were capable of transmitting vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (family Rhabdoviridae, genus Vesiculovirus, VSNJV) during blood feeding on the abdomen of six guinea pigs. None of the guinea pigs infected in this manner developed clinical signs of vesicular stomatitis despite seroconversion for VSNJV. Guinea pigs infected by intradermal inoculations of VSNJV in the abdomen also failed to develop clinical signs of vesicular stomatitis. Three guinea pigs given intradermal inoculations of VSNJV in the foot pad developed lesions typical of vesicular stomatitis. Transmission by the bite of C. sonorensis may have facilitated guinea pig infection with VSNJV because a single infected C. sonorensis caused seroconversion and all guinea pigs infected by insect bite seroconverted compared with 50% of the guinea pigs infected by intradermal inoculation with a higher titer VSNJV inoculum. The role of C. sonorensis in the transmission of VSNJV is discussed.

  9. Epizootic vesicular stomatitis in Colorado, 1982: epidemiologic and entomologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, T E; Webb, P A; Kramer, W L; Smith, G C; Davis, T; Holbrook, F R; Moore, C G; Schiefer, T J; Jones, R H; Janney, G C

    1987-01-01

    An epizootic of vesicular stomatitis (VS) caused by the New Jersey serotype of VS virus affected livestock and humans in 14 western states in 1982-1983. Epidemiological observations were made on at least 10% of the cattle in 4 dairy herds that were located in the vicinity of Grand Junction, Colorado. High rates of neutralizing antibody to the New Jersey serotype were seen in all cattle regardless of whether livestock in the dairy had clinical VS or a decrease in mild production. Antibody titers remained high in these cattle for as long as 2 years after the epizootic. No virus isolations were made from 32 humans with clinical signs compatible with viral disease. Entomological information was obtained during the epizootic from 23 premises in northwestern Colorado. Insect collections yielded 4 isolates from Culicoides spp. midges, 2 from C. variipennis, and 1 each from C. stellifer and C. (Selfia) spp. This is the first report of VS virus isolations from field-collected Culicoides.

  10. Vesicular glutamate release from central axons contributes to myelin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sean; Hansen, Daniel Bloch; Vella, Jasmine; Bond, Peter; Harper, Glenn; Zammit, Christian; Valentino, Mario; Fern, Robert

    2018-03-12

    The axon myelin sheath is prone to injury associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor activation but the source of glutamate in this context is unknown. Myelin damage results in permanent action potential loss and severe functional deficit in the white matter of the CNS, for example in ischemic stroke. Here, we show that in rats and mice, ischemic conditions trigger activation of myelinic NMDA receptors incorporating GluN2C/D subunits following release of axonal vesicular glutamate into the peri-axonal space under the myelin sheath. Glial sources of glutamate such as reverse transport did not contribute significantly to this phenomenon. We demonstrate selective myelin uptake and retention of a GluN2C/D NMDA receptor negative allosteric modulator that shields myelin from ischemic injury. The findings potentially support a rational approach toward a low-impact prophylactic therapy to protect patients at risk of stroke and other forms of excitotoxic injury.

  11. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: Advances in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bishnoi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  12. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV): Advances in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Suman; Tiwari, Ritudhwaj; Gupta, Sharad; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Nayak, Debasis

    2018-02-23

    Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV) has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  13. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  14. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X 3 , an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp

  15. Dynamics of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae during old field succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nancy Collins; Zak, Donald R; Tilman, David; Pfleger, F L

    1991-05-01

    The species composition of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungal communities changed during secondary succession of abandoned fields based on a field to forest chronosequence. Twenty-five VAM fungal species were identified. Seven species were clearly early successional and five species were clearly late successional. The total number of VAM fungal species did not increase with successional time, but diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index tended to increase, primarily because the community became more even as a single species, Glomus aggregatum, became less dominant in the older sites. Diversity of the VAM fungal community was positively correlated with soil C and N. The density of VAM fungi, as measured by infectivity and total spore count, first increased with time since abandonment and then decreased in the late successional forest sites. Within 12 abandoned fields, VAM fungal density increased with increasing soil pH, H 2 O soluble soil C, and root biomass, but was inversely related to extractable soil P and percent cover of non-host plant species. The lower abundance of VAM fungi in the forest sites compared with the field sites agrees with the findings of other workers and corresponds with a shift in the dominant vegetation from herbaceous VAM hosts to woody ectomycorrhizal hosts.

  16. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralalka, Shruti [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Abmayr, Susan M., E-mail: sma@stowers.org [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 66160 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  17. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  18. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  19. First case report of vesicular stomatitis in the State of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inácio José Clementino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the first case of vesicular stomatitis in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. Records from the Official Veterinary Services of the State of Paraíba were analyzed while responding to a suspected case of vesicular disease at a property (property I in the municipality of Pombal in which the cattle showed clinical signs and lesions of vesicular disease. Surveillance in the surrounding area revealed similar lesions in cattle at two other properties (II and III. Based on these events, the suspicion was considered well founded, and samples were collected for evaluation at the National Agricultural Laboratory of the State of Pará. The property was interdicted, and those located within a 3 km radius (perifocal from the focus were inspected. At property I, 42.86% (6/14 of the cattle showed vesicular disease lesions characterized by intense sialorrhea, ruptured oral vesicles, epithelial detachment of the tongue and muzzle, and vesicular lesions in the udder and interdigital space. Similar lesions were detected in cattle at properties II and III, affecting 80.95% (34/42 and 11.54% (3/26 of the animals, respectively. Tissue samples collected from the three properties were positive for the vesicular stomatitis virus (Indiana 3 subtype. The properties were monitored for 21 days after the last infected animal was cured, and afterwards, the three properties were released.

  20. Evolutionary genetics: the Drosophila model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Evolutionary genetics straddles the two fundamental processes of life, ... of the genus Drosophila have been used extensively as model systems in experimental ... issue will prove interesting, informative and thought-provoking for both estab-.

  1. Validity of urinary monoamine assay sales under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Uncini, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Spot baseline urinary monoamine assays have been used in medicine for over 50 years as a screening test for monoamine-secreting tumors, such as pheochromocytoma and carcinoid syndrome. In these disease states, when the result of a spot baseline monoamine assay is above the specific value set by the laboratory, it is an indication to obtain a 24-hour urine sample to make a definitive diagnosis. There are no defined applications where spot baseline urinary monoamine assays can be used to diagnose disease or other states directly. No peer-reviewed published original research exists which demonstrates that these assays are valid in the treatment of individual patients in the clinical setting. Since 2001, urinary monoamine assay sales have been promoted for numerous applications under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model". There is no published peer-reviewed original research that defines the scientific foundation upon which the claims for these assays are made. On the contrary, several articles have been published that discredit various aspects of the model. To fill the void, this manuscript is a comprehensive review of the scientific foundation and claims put forth by laboratories selling urinary monoamine assays under the spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model.

  2. Radio-isotopic determination of platelet monoamine oxidase and regulation of its activity by an indigenous drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, G.P.; Srivastava, V.K.; Agrawal, A.; Udupa, K.N.

    1988-01-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase is a mitochondrial enzyme taking part in the deamination reaction of total catecholamine. Recent studies of monoamine oxidase inhibitors have gained its importance in the control of variety of psychosomatic disorders like mental depression, arterial hypertension and anxiety neurosis. 30 apparently normal individuals and 42 diagnosed cases of essential hypertension were selected for the present study. The platelet monoamine oxidase activity was measured by using 14 C-tryptamine bisuccinate. Comparatively low activity of platelet monoamine oxidase was noticed in hypertension cases than in the normal. After oral administration of an indigenous drug 'Geriforte' for three months, a significant rise in platelet monoamine oxidase activity was noticed in hypertension cases. It can be concluded that this indigenous formulation has the capacity to regulate the monoamine oxidase activity, as such, it may provide an alternative remedy in the management of psychosomatic disorders. (author). 11 refs

  3. Sheared-root inocula of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, D M; Jarstfer, A G

    1992-01-01

    For efficient handling, vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi should be processed into small and uniform inocula; however, processing can reduce the inoculum density. In this article we describe the preparation and use of sheared-root inocula of Glomus spp. in which inoculum densities were increased during processing. Our objectives were to determine inoculum viability and density after shearing and to ascertain if the sheared inocula could be pelletized or used with a gel carrier. Root samples were harvested from aeroponic cultures, blotted dry, cut into 1-cm lengths, and sheared in a food processor for up to 80 s. After shearing, the inoculum was washed over sieves, and the propagule density in each fraction was determined. Sheared inocula were also encapsulated in carrageenan or used in a gel carrier. Shearing aeroponically produced root inocula reduced particle size. Propagule density increased with decreasing size fraction down to a size of 63 mum, after which propagule density decreased. The weighted-average propagule density of the inoculum was 135,380 propagules g (dry weight) of sheared root material. Sheared roots were encapsulated successfully in carrageenan, and the gel served as an effective carrier. Aeroponic root inoculum was stored dry at 4 degrees C for 23 months without significant reduction in propagule density; however, this material was not appropriate for shearing. Moist roots, useful for shearing, began to lose propagule density after 1 month of storage. Shearing proved to be an excellent method to prepare viable root inocula of small and uniform size, allowing for more efficient and effective use of limited inoculum supplies.

  4. Humidity Sensing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjin, Anders; Zaharieva, Emanuela E; Frank, Dominic D; Mansourian, Suzan; Suh, Greg S B; Gallio, Marco; Stensmyr, Marcus C

    2016-05-23

    Environmental humidity influences the fitness and geographic distribution of all animals [1]. Insects in particular use humidity cues to navigate the environment, and previous work suggests the existence of specific sensory mechanisms to detect favorable humidity ranges [2-5]. Yet, the molecular and cellular basis of humidity sensing (hygrosensation) remains poorly understood. Here we describe genes and neurons necessary for hygrosensation in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that members of the Drosophila genus display species-specific humidity preferences related to conditions in their native habitats. Using a simple behavioral assay, we find that the ionotropic receptors IR40a, IR93a, and IR25a are all required for humidity preference in D. melanogaster. Yet, whereas IR40a is selectively required for hygrosensory responses, IR93a and IR25a mediate both humidity and temperature preference. Consistent with this, the expression of IR93a and IR25a includes thermosensory neurons of the arista. In contrast, IR40a is excluded from the arista but is expressed (and required) in specialized neurons innervating pore-less sensilla of the sacculus, a unique invagination of the third antennal segment. Indeed, calcium imaging showed that IR40a neurons directly respond to changes in humidity, and IR40a knockdown or IR93a mutation reduced their responses to stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that the preference for a specific humidity range depends on specialized sacculus neurons, and that the processing of environmental humidity can happen largely in parallel to that of temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, XG.; Hao, WY.; Wu, TH.

    1993-01-01

    Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight ...

  6. Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila Resources with University of Texas. In Austin his experiments on fruit flies (Drosophila) first showed that exposure to September to spend a year at the only Drosophila laboratory in Europe which was doing parallel work

  7. Use of Drosophila to study DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Harris, P.V.; Sakaguchi, K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses Drosophila, the premier metazoan organism for analyzing many fundamental features of eukaryotic gene regulation. The authors present adaptations of several approaches for studying DNA repair to an analysis of repair-defective mutants in Drosophila. A current understanding of Drosophila DNA repair is described

  8. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rossana C.N., E-mail: rossana.melo@ufjf.edu.br [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, ICB, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Rua José Lourenço Kelmer, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Weller, Peter F. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  9. Computed tomography of the vesicular glands: anatomical animal model (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, R.; Stamatova-Yovcheva, K.; Hamza, S.; Toneva, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Spiral CT is a non-invasive imaging method of choice for animal anatomical studies. The aim of the study was to establish the imaging anatomical features of the vesicular glands in the rabbit. Eight sexually mature healthy clinically male New Zealand rabbits of 18 months of age with body weight from 2.8 kg to 3.2 kg were used. The animals were anesthetized. As contrast medium Opti-ray350 was administrated. The computed tomography scan was complied with certain bone and soft tissue markers. For this purpose, a whole body multi-slice spiral computed tomography scanner was used. The both soft tissue glands were heterogeneous and relatively hyperdense structures, and defined in detail from the adjacent soft tissues. The urinary bladder neck was ventrally to the glands. Both vesicular glands were better differentiated each other when the rabbit is examined in abdominal recumbence. In dorsal recumbence the shape of the transversal image of the glandular finding was oval. In abdominal recumbence both the left and right soft tissue vesicular gland were defined. Transversal anatomical computed tomographic investigation of the rabbit vesicular gland is a detailed and definitive method, to study the normal morphology of these glands. Key words: Vesicular Gland. Helical Computed Tomography. Anatomy. Rabbit

  10. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Rossana C.N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  11. Early attempts to visualize cortical monoamine nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hökfelt, Tomas

    2016-08-15

    The Falck-Hillarp, formaldehyde fluorescence method for the demonstration of monoamine neurons in a microscope was established in Lund, Sweden and published in 1962. In the same year Hillarp moved to Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. Two years later Dahlström and Fuxe published the famous supplement in Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, describing the distribution of the dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin cell groups in the rat brain. This landmark paper also represented an important contribution to an emerging discipline in neuroscience - chemical neuroanatomy. During the following years several modifications of the original method were developed, attempting to solve some shortcomings, one being the reproducible demonstration of noradrenaline nerve terminals in cortical regions. One result was the paper focused on in the present article, which also describes other efforts in the same direction going on in parallel, primarily, in Lund and Stockholm. As a result there was, in the mid 1970s, a fairly complete knowledge of the catecholamine systems in the rat brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cataplexy and monoamine oxidase deficiency in Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossler, D G; Wyler, A R; Wilkus, R J; Gardner-Walker, G; Vlcek, B W

    1996-05-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is an X-linked recessive disorder causing ocular atrophy, mental retardation, deafness, and dysmorphic features. Virtually absent monoamine oxidase (MAO) type-A and -B activity has been found in some boys with chromosome deletions. We report the coexistence of cataplexy and abnormal REM sleep organization with ND. Three related boys, referred for treatment of medically refractory atonic spells and apneas, underwent extended EEG-video-polysomnographic monitoring. They demonstrated attacks of cataplexy and inappropriate periods of REM sleep during which they were unarousable. One boy also had generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Previous testing revealed that all three have complete ND gene deletions. In all subjects, platelet MAO-B activity was absent, serum serotonin levels were markedly increased, and plasma catecholamine levels were normal. Data from the canine narcolepsy syndrome model implicate abnormal catecholaminergic and cholinergic activities in the pathogenesis of cataplexy. Our findings suggest that abnormal MAO activity or an imbalance between serotonin and other neurotransmitter levels may be involved in the pathogenesis of human cataplexy.

  13. Indanones as high-potency reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-05-01

    Recent reports document that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is an appropriate scaffold for the design of high-potency monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Based on the structural similarity between α-tetralone and 1-indanone, the present study involved synthesis of 34 1-indanone and related indane derivatives as potential inhibitors of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B. The results show that C6-substituted indanones are particularly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, with IC50 values ranging from 0.001 to 0.030 μM. C5-Substituted indanone and indane derivatives are comparatively weaker MAO-B inhibitors. Although the 1-indanone and indane derivatives are selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform, a number of homologues are also potent MAO-A inhibitors, with three homologues possessing IC50 values 1-indanone as a reversible MAO inhibitor with a competitive mode of inhibition. It may be concluded that 1-indanones are promising leads for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with 14 C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome

  15. A legacy of discovery: from monoamines to GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enna, S J

    2011-06-01

    Seldom does a single individual have such a profound effect on the development of a scientific discipline as Erminio Costa had on neuropharmacology. During nearly sixty years of research, Costa and his collaborators helped established many of the basic principles of the pharmacodynamic actions of psychotherapeutics. His contributions range from defining basic neurochemical, physiological and behavioral properties of neurotransmitters and their receptors, to the development of novel theories for drug discovery. Outlined in this report is a portion of his work relating to the involvement of monoamines and GABA in mediating the symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders and as targets for drug therapies. These studies were selected for review because of their influence on my own work and as an illustration of his logical and insightful approach to research and his clever use of techniques and technologies. Given the significance of his work, the legions of scientist who collaborated with him, and those inspired by his reports, his research will continue to have an impact as long as there is a search for new therapeutics to alleviate the pain and suffering associated with neurological and psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A role for the deep orange and carnation eye color genes in lysosomal delivery in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrioukov, E A; He, J P; Moghrabi, N; Sunio, A; Krämer, H

    1999-10-01

    Deep orange and carnation are two of the classic eye color genes in Drosophila. Here, we demonstrate that Deep orange is part of a protein complex that localizes to endosomal compartments. A second component of this complex is Carnation, a homolog of Sec1p-like regulators of membrane fusion. Because complete loss of deep orange function is lethal, the role of this complex in intracellular trafficking was analyzed in deep orange mutant clones. Retinal cells devoid of deep orange function completely lacked pigmentation and exhibited exaggerated multivesicular structures. Furthermore, a defect in endocytic trafficking was visualized in developing photoreceptor cells. These results provide direct evidence that eye color mutations of the granule group also disrupt vesicular trafficking to lysosomes.

  17. Chronic scream sound exposure alters memory and monoamine levels in female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; Zhao, Xiaoge; Yang, Juan; Wang, Lumin; Yang, Yang; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2014-10-01

    Chronic scream sound alters the cognitive performance of male rats and their brain monoamine levels, these stress-induced alterations are sexually dimorphic. To determine the effects of sound stress on female rats, we examined their serum corticosterone levels and their adrenal, splenic, and thymic weights, their cognitive performance and the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the brain. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, with and without exposure to scream sound (4h/day for 21 day) were tested for spatial learning and memory using a Morris water maze. Stress decreased serum corticosterone levels, as well as splenic and adrenal weight. It also impaired spatial memory but did not affect the learning ability. Monoamines and metabolites were measured in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. The dopamine (DA) levels in the PFC decreased but the homovanillic acid/DA ratio increased. The decreased DA and the increased 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were observed in the striatum. Only the 5-HIAA level increased in the hypothalamus. In the hippocampus, stress did not affect the levels of monoamines and metabolites. The results suggest that scream sound stress influences most physiologic parameters, memory, and the levels of monoamine neurotransmitter and their metabolites in female rats. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Phylogeny of the Genus Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, Patrick M.; DeSalle, Rob

    2018-01-01

    Understanding phylogenetic relationships among taxa is key to designing and implementing comparative analyses. The genus Drosophila, which contains over 1600 species, is one of the most important model systems in the biological sciences. For over a century, one species in this group, Drosophila melanogaster, has been key to studies of animal development and genetics, genome organization and evolution, and human disease. As whole-genome sequencing becomes more cost-effective, there is increasing interest in other members of this morphologically, ecologically, and behaviorally diverse genus. Phylogenetic relationships within Drosophila are complicated, and the goal of this paper is to provide a review of the recent taxonomic changes and phylogenetic relationships in this genus to aid in further comparative studies. PMID:29716983

  19. Specific genetic deficiencies of the A and B isoenzymes of monoamine oxidase are characterized by distinct neurochemical and clinical phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenders, J. W.; Eisenhofer, G.; Abeling, N. G.; Berger, W.; Murphy, D. L.; Konings, C. H.; Wagemakers, L. M.; Kopin, I. J.; Karoum, F.; van Gennip, A. H.; Brunner, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) exists as two isoenzymes and plays a central role in the metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters. In this study we compared the neurochemical phenotypes of previously described subjects with genetically determined selective lack of MAO-A or a lack of both MAO-A and MAO-B

  20. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression. PMID:29693007

  1. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena E. Richardson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression.

  2. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-07-01

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasdev, Neil; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in the central nervous system with PET is an important goal for psychiatric studies. We here report an improved and automated radiosynthesis of N-(6-[ 18 F]-fluorohexyl)-N-methylpropargylamine ([ 18 F]FHMP; [ 18 F]-1), as well as the radiosynthesis of two new promising candidates for imaging cerebral MAO-B, namely, carbon-11-labeled 3-(4-[ 11 C]-methoxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one ([ 11 C]-2) and N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl)-N-[ 11 C]-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine ([ 11 C]-3). Methods: Fluorine-18-labeled 1 was prepared via a tosyloxy precursor in 29%±5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to [ 18 F]-fluoride. Both carbon-11-labeled compounds were prepared with [ 11 C]CH 3 I using the 'LOOP' method in 11% and 18% uncorrected radiochemical yields, respectively, relative to starting [ 11 C]CO 2 . All radiotracers had specific activities >37 GBq/μmol and were >98% radiochemically pure at end of synthesis ( 18 F]-1. While [ 11 C]-2 had moderate brain penetration and good clearance from normal brain tissue, distribution of radioactivity in brain was indicative of free and nonspecific binding. Good brain uptake was observed with [ 11 C]-3 (0.8%-1.4% injected dose per gram at 5 min postinjection), binding appeared to be reversible and distribution conformed with regional distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. Preinjection of 3 or L-deprenyl showed a modest reduction (up to 25%) of brain activity. Conclusion: Carbon-11-labeled 3 was found to have the most favorable properties of the radiotracers evaluated; however, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to warrant further in vivo imaging studies. Alternative radiotracers for imaging MAO-B are under development.

  4. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV (∼ 5 log) and VSV (∼ 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells

  6. The use of monoamine pharmacological agents in the treatment of sexual dysfunction: evidence in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Jennifer L; Brown, Candace S

    2011-04-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine play an important role in many medical and psychological conditions, including sexual responsiveness and behavior. Pharmacological agents that modulate monoamines may help alleviate sexual dysfunction. To provide an overview of pharmacological agents that modulate monoamines and their use in the treatment of sexual dysfunction. EMBASE and PubMed search for articles published between 1950 and 2010 using key words "sexual dysfunction,"monoamines,"monoaminergic receptors," and "generic names for pharmacological agents." To assess the literature evaluating the efficacy of monoamine pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of sexual dysfunction. The literature primarily cites the use of monoaminergic agents to treat sexual side effects from serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), with bupropion, buspirone and ropinirole providing the most convincing evidence. Controlled trials have shown that bupropion improves overall sexual dysfunction, but not frequency of sexual activity in depressed and nondepressed patients. Nefazodone and apomorphine have been used to treat sexual dysfunction, but their use is limited by significant side effect and safety profiles. New research on pharmacologic agents with subtype selectivity at dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors and those that possess dual mechanisms of action are being investigated. There has been tremendous progress over the past 50 years in understanding the role of monoamines in sexual function and the effect of pharmacologic agents which stimulate or antagonize monoaminergic receptors on sexual dysfunction. Nevertheless, large, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies evaluating the efficacy of currently available agents in populations without comorbid disorders are limited, preventing adequate interpretation of data. Continued research on sexual function and specific receptor subtypes will result in the development of more selective

  7. Cognitive Function and Monoamine Neurotransmission in Schizophrenia: Evidence From Positron Emission Tomography Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumasa Takano

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive imaging technique used to assess various brain functions, including cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, and neurotransmission, in the living human brain. In particular, neurotransmission mediated by the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, has been extensively examined using PET probes, which specifically bind to the monoamine receptors and transporters. This useful tool has revealed the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, and the mechanisms of action of psychotropic drugs. Because monoamines are implicated in various cognitive processes such as memory and executive functions, some PET studies have directly investigated the associations between monoamine neurotransmission and cognitive functions in healthy individuals and patients with psychiatric disorders. In this mini review, I discuss the findings of PET studies that investigated monoamine neurotransmission under resting conditions, specifically focusing on cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia. With regard to the dopaminergic system, some studies have examined the association of dopamine D1 and D2/D3 receptors, dopamine transporters, and dopamine synthesis capacity with various cognitive functions in schizophrenia. With regard to the serotonergic system, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors have been studied in the context of cognitive functions in schizophrenia. Although relatively few PET studies have examined cognitive functions in patients with psychiatric disorders, these approaches can provide useful information on enhancing cognitive functions by administering drugs that modulate monoamine transmission. Moreover, another paradigm of techniques such as those exploring the release of neurotransmitters and further development of radiotracers for novel targets are warranted.

  8. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  9. Laminar and Cellular Distribution of Monoamine Receptors in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Santana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex (PFC is deeply involved in higher brain functions, many of which are altered in psychiatric conditions. The PFC exerts a top-down control of most cortical and subcortical areas through descending pathways and is densely innervated by axons emerging from the brainstem monoamine cell groups, namely, the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively, the ventral tegmental area and the locus coeruleus (LC. In turn, the activity of these cell groups is tightly controlled by afferent pathways arising from layer V PFC pyramidal neurons. The reciprocal connectivity between PFC and monoamine cell groups is of interest to study the pathophysiology and treatment of severe psychiatric disorders, such as major depression and schizophrenia, inasmuch as antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs target monoamine receptors/transporters expressed in these areas. Here we review previous reports examining the presence of monoamine receptors in pyramidal and GABAergic neurons of the PFC using double in situ hybridization. Additionally, we present new data on the quantitative layer distribution (layers I, II–III, V, and VI of monoamine receptor-expressing cells in the cingulate (Cg, prelimbic (PrL and infralimbic (IL subfields of the medial PFC (mPFC. The receptors examined include serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT3, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, and α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-adrenoceptors. With the exception of 5-HT3 receptors, selectively expressed by layers I–III GABA interneurons, the rest of monoamine receptors are widely expressed by pyramidal and GABAergic neurons in intermediate and deep layers of mPFC (5-HT2C receptors are also expressed in layer I. This complex distribution suggests that monoamines may modulate the communications between PFC and cortical/subcortical areas through the activation of receptors expressed by neurons in intermediate (e.g., 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, α1D-adrenoceptors, dopamine D1 receptors and deep

  10. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection Promotes Immune Evasion by Preventing NKG2D-Ligand Surface Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has recently gained attention for its oncolytic ability in cancer treatment. Initially, we hypothesized that VSV infection could increase immune recognition of cancer cells through induction of the immune stimulatory NKG2D-ligands. Here we show that VSV infection ...

  11. Signifiance of Arginine 20 in the 2A protease for swine vesicular disease virus pathogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Toru; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Leyuan

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic and attenuated strains of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), an enterovirus, have been characterized previously and, by using chimeric infectious cDNA clones, the key determinants of pathogenicity in pigs have been mapped to the coding region for 1D–2A. Within this region, residue 20...

  12. Variants in SLC18A3, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, cause congenital myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Grady, Gina L.; Verschuuren, Corien; Yuen, Michaela; Webster, Richard; Menezes, Manoj; Fock, Johanna M.; Pride, Natalie; Best, Heather A.; Damm, Tatiana Benavides; Turner, Christian; Lek, Monkol; Engel, Andrew G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Cooper, Sandra T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and genetic characteristics of presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome secondary to biallelic variants in SLC18A3. Methods: Individuals from 2 families were identified with biallelic variants in SLC18A3, the gene encoding the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

  13. Nanoscale distribution of presynaptic Ca(2+) channels and its impact on vesicular release during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukihiro; Harada, Harumi; Kamasawa, Naomi; Matsui, Ko; Rothman, Jason S; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Silver, R Angus; DiGregorio, David A; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-07

    Synaptic efficacy and precision are influenced by the coupling of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) to vesicles. But because the topography of VGCCs and their proximity to vesicles is unknown, a quantitative understanding of the determinants of vesicular release at nanometer scale is lacking. To investigate this, we combined freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling of Cav2.1 channels, local [Ca(2+)] imaging, and patch pipette perfusion of EGTA at the calyx of Held. Between postnatal day 7 and 21, VGCCs formed variable sized clusters and vesicular release became less sensitive to EGTA, whereas fixed Ca(2+) buffer properties remained constant. Experimentally constrained reaction-diffusion simulations suggest that Ca(2+) sensors for vesicular release are located at the perimeter of VGCC clusters (<30 nm) and predict that VGCC number per cluster determines vesicular release probability without altering release time course. This "perimeter release model" provides a unifying framework accounting for developmental changes in both synaptic efficacy and time course. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Toluene-induced, Ca2+-dependent vesicular catecholamine release in rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952; Vijverberg, H.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068856474

    2002-01-01

    Acute effects of toluene on vesicular catecholamine release from intact PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells have been investigated using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry. The frequency of vesicles released is low under basal conditions and is enhanced by depolarization. Toluene causes an increase in

  15. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  16. Stimulation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by mycotrophic and nonmycotrophic plant root systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, R P; Koide, R T

    1993-08-01

    Transformed root cultures of three nonmycotrophic and one mycotrophic plant species stimulated germination and hyphal growth of the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum (Becker & Gerd.) in a gel medium. However, only roots of the mycotrophic species (carrot) supported continued hyphal exploration after 3 to 4 weeks and promoted appressoria formation by G. etunicatum.

  17. Stimulation of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Mycotrophic and Nonmycotrophic Plant Root Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiner, R. Paul; Koide, Roger T.

    1993-01-01

    Transformed root cultures of three nonmycotrophic and one mycotrophic plant species stimulated germination and hyphal growth of the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum (Becker & Gerd.) in a gel medium. However, only roots of the mycotrophic species (carrot) supported continued hyphal exploration after 3 to 4 weeks and promoted appressoria formation by G. etunicatum.

  18. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  19. Influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elizondo, Elisa; Larsen, Jannik; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    A confocal fluorescence microscopy-based assay was used for studying the influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system. In this work, vesicles composed of cholesterol and CTAB (1/1 mol %) or cholesterol and DOPC (2/8 mol %) and incorporating...

  20. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdev, Neil, E-mail: neil.vasdev@utoronto.ca; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Imaging monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in the central nervous system with PET is an important goal for psychiatric studies. We here report an improved and automated radiosynthesis of N-(6-[{sup 18}F]-fluorohexyl)-N-methylpropargylamine ([{sup 18}F]FHMP; [{sup 18}F]-1), as well as the radiosynthesis of two new promising candidates for imaging cerebral MAO-B, namely, carbon-11-labeled 3-(4-[{sup 11}C]-methoxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one ([{sup 11}C]-2) and N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl)-N-[{sup 11}C]-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine ([{sup 11}C]-3). Methods: Fluorine-18-labeled 1 was prepared via a tosyloxy precursor in 29%{+-}5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to [{sup 18}F]-fluoride. Both carbon-11-labeled compounds were prepared with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I using the 'LOOP' method in 11% and 18% uncorrected radiochemical yields, respectively, relative to starting [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2}. All radiotracers had specific activities >37 GBq/{mu}mol and were >98% radiochemically pure at end of synthesis (<40 min). All radiotracers were evaluated by ex vivo biodistribution studies in conscious rodents. Results: A major radioactive metabolite in the rodent brain was observed following administration of [{sup 18}F]-1. While [{sup 11}C]-2 had moderate brain penetration and good clearance from normal brain tissue, distribution of radioactivity in brain was indicative of free and nonspecific binding. Good brain uptake was observed with [{sup 11}C]-3 (0.8%-1.4% injected dose per gram at 5 min postinjection), binding appeared to be reversible and distribution conformed with regional distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. Preinjection of 3 or L-deprenyl showed a modest reduction (up to 25%) of brain activity. Conclusion: Carbon-11-labeled 3 was found to have the most favorable properties of the radiotracers evaluated; however, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to warrant further in vivo imaging studies. Alternative radiotracers for imaging MAO

  1. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula

    2012-01-01

    The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+) channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether...... genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice....

  2. Aging rather than aneuploidy affects monoamine neurotransmitters in brain regions of Down syndrome mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Alain D; Vermeiren, Yannick; Albac, Christelle; Lana-Elola, Eva; Watson-Scales, Sheona; Gibbins, Dorota; Aerts, Tony; Van Dam, Debby; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Potier, Marie-Claude; De Deyn, Peter P

    Altered concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolites have been repeatedly found in people with Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Because of the limited availability of human post-mortem tissue, DS mouse models are of great interest to study these changes and the underlying

  3. Age-related ultrastructural and monoamine oxidase changes in the rat optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurone, S; Ripandelli, G; Minni, A; Lattanzi, R; Miglietta, S; Pepe, N; Fumagalli, L; Micera, A; Pastore, F S; Artico, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the morphology and the distribution of the monoamine oxidase enzymatic system in the optic nerve of 4 month-old Wistar (young) and 28 month-old Wistar (old) rats. The optic nerve was harvested from 20 young and old rats. The segment of optic nerve was divided longitudinally into two pieces, each 0.1 mm in length. The first piece was used for transmission electron microscopy. The second piece was stained with histochemical reaction for monoamine oxidase. The agerelated changes in the optic nerve of rats include micro-anatomical details, ultrastructure and monoamine oxidase histochemical staining. A strong decrease of the thin nerve fibers and a swelling of the thick ones can be observed in optic nerve fibers of old rats. Increased monoamine oxidase histochemical staining of the optic nerve of aged rats is well demonstrated. The increase of meningeal shealth and the decrease of thin nerve fibers of the optic nerve in old rats are well documented. Morphological, ultrastructural and histochemical changes observed in optic nerve fibers of the old rats show a close relation with aging.

  4. Nitric oxide production and monoamine oxidase activity in cancer patients during interferon-a therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fekkes (Durk); A.R. van Gool (Arthur); M. Bannink (Marjolein); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); W.H.J. Kruit (Wim); B. van der Holt (Bronno); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel); G. Stoter (Gerrit)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Both increased and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis have been reported in patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Animal studies showed that IFN-alpha administration results in increased levels of biogenic amines, subsequent activation of monoamine oxidases

  5. Semi-automated quantitative Drosophila wings measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Yang Michael; Ogawa, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Sara; Tamura, Koichiro; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2017-06-28

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important organism used in many fields of biological research such as genetics and developmental biology. Drosophila wings have been widely used to study the genetics of development, morphometrics and evolution. Therefore there is much interest in quantifying wing structures of Drosophila. Advancement in technology has increased the ease in which images of Drosophila can be acquired. However such studies have been limited by the slow and tedious process of acquiring phenotypic data. We have developed a system that automatically detects and measures key points and vein segments on a Drosophila wing. Key points are detected by performing image transformations and template matching on Drosophila wing images while vein segments are detected using an Active Contour algorithm. The accuracy of our key point detection was compared against key point annotations of users. We also performed key point detection using different training data sets of Drosophila wing images. We compared our software with an existing automated image analysis system for Drosophila wings and showed that our system performs better than the state of the art. Vein segments were manually measured and compared against the measurements obtained from our system. Our system was able to detect specific key points and vein segments from Drosophila wing images with high accuracy.

  6. Effect of aging and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology on brain monoamines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Linstow, C U; Severino, M; Metaxas, A; Waider, J; Babcock, A A; Lesch, K P; Gramsbergen, J B; Finsen, B

    2017-09-01

    Aging is the greatest single risk factor of the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD). The monoaminergic system, including serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) modulates cognition, which is affected in AD. Changes in monoamine levels have been observed in AD, but these can both be age- and/or disease-related. We examined whether brain monoamine levels change as part of physiological aging and/or AD-like disease in APP SWE /PS1 ΔE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. The neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum of 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old B6C3 wild-type (WT) mice and of 18-month old APP/PS1 and WT mice were analysed for 5-HT, DA and NA contents by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), along with neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 and WT mice. While, we observed no aging effect in WT mice, we detected region-specific changes in the levels of all monoamines in 18-month-old transgenic compared with WT mice. This included reductions in 5-HT (-30%), DA (-47%) and NA (-32%) levels in the neocortex and increases of 5-HT in the brainstem (+18%). No changes were observed in any of the monoamines in the neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 mice. In combination, these findings indicate that aging alone is not sufficient to affect brain monoamine levels, unlike the APP SWE /PS1 ΔE9 genotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Distribution of metallothionein I + II and vesicular zinc in the developing central nervous system: correlative study in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Nielsen, H; Hidalgo, J

    1999-01-01

    in hippocampal cortex, basal forebrain, neocortex, cerebellar cortex, and cranial nerve nuclei. MT I + II mRNAs were detected in regions of the brain that also displayed MT I + IIir, indicating transcriptional events. Vesicular Zn was recorded in neonatal brain solely in the dentate hi of the hippocampus...... candidates for chelating unbound Zn released from Zn-containing nerve terminals or transported into the brain. Whether vesicular Zn and MT I + II occur in identical regions of the developing brain is unknown. Accordingly, the developmental distribution of MT I + II and vesicular Zn was mapped. By using...

  8. A Drosophila wing spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaki, Toshikazu; Yoshikawa, Isao; Niikawa, Norio; Hoshi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    A Drosophila wing spot test system was used to investigate the effects of low doses of X-rays, gamma rays, and both 2.3 and 14.1 MeV neutrons on somatic chromosome mutation (SCM) induction. The incidence of SCM was significantly increased with any type of radiation, with evident linear dose-response relationship within the range of 3 to 20 cGy. It was estimated that relative biological effectiveness value for SCM induction of 2.3 MeV neutrons to X-rays and gamma rays is much higher than that of 14.1 MeV neutrons to those photons (2.4 vs 8.0). The Drosophila wing spot test system seems to become a promising in vivo experimental method for higher animals in terms of the lack of necessity for a marvelously large number of materials required in conventional test system. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Limited taste discrimination in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Scott, Kristin

    2010-08-17

    In the gustatory systems of mammals and flies, different populations of sensory cells recognize different taste modalities, such that there are cells that respond selectively to sugars and others to bitter compounds. This organization readily allows animals to distinguish compounds of different modalities but may limit the ability to distinguish compounds within one taste modality. Here, we developed a behavioral paradigm in Drosophila melanogaster to evaluate directly the tastes that a fly distinguishes. These studies reveal that flies do not discriminate among different sugars, or among different bitter compounds, based on chemical identity. Instead, flies show a limited ability to distinguish compounds within a modality based on intensity or palatability. Taste associative learning, similar to olfactory learning, requires the mushroom bodies, suggesting fundamental similarities in brain mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity. Overall, these studies provide insight into the discriminative capacity of the Drosophila gustatory system and the modulation of taste behavior.

  10. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitive strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.P.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1976-01-01

    45 of radiosensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated by Curly/Lobe technique after EMS treatment of Livadia population males. The lethality of non-Curly late larvae after gamma-irradiation (4000r) characterized radiosensitivity strains. Most of them exhibited higher frequency of the spontaneous dominant lethals (up to 69%). The males of 6 strains were semi-sterile. 5 of these strains exhibited higher frequency of X-chromosome non-disjunction

  11. Olfactory memory traces in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jacob; Krause, William C.; Davis, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila the fruit fly, coincident exposure to an odor and an aversive electric shock can produce robust behavioral memory. This behavioral memory is thought to be regulated by cellular memory traces within the central nervous system of the fly. These molecular, physiological or structural changes in neurons, induced by pairing odor and shock, regulate behavior by altering the neurons’ response to the learned environment. Recently, novel in vivo functional imaging techniques have allowed...

  12. Drosophila: Retrotransposons Making up Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacuberta, Elena

    2017-07-19

    Drosophila and extant species are the best-studied telomerase exception. In this organism, telomere elongation is coupled with targeted retrotransposition of Healing Transposon (HeT-A) and Telomere Associated Retrotransposon (TART) with sporadic additions of Telomere Associated and HeT-A Related (TAHRE), all three specialized non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. These three very special retroelements transpose in head to tail arrays, always in the same orientation at the end of the chromosomes but never in interior locations. Apparently, retrotransposon and telomerase telomeres might seem very different, but a detailed view of their mechanisms reveals similarities explaining how the loss of telomerase in a Drosophila ancestor could successfully have been replaced by the telomere retrotransposons. In this review, we will discover that although HeT-A, TART, and TAHRE are still the only examples to date where their targeted transposition is perfectly tamed into the telomere biology of Drosophila, there are other examples of retrotransposons that manage to successfully integrate inside and at the end of telomeres. Because the aim of this special issue is viral integration at telomeres, understanding the base of the telomerase exceptions will help to obtain clues on similar strategies that mobile elements and viruses could have acquired in order to ensure their survival in the host genome.

  13. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  14. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Quantification of Drosophila Grooming Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradale, Francesca; Sinha, Kairav; Lebestky, Tim

    2017-07-19

    Drosophila grooming behavior is a complex multi-step locomotor program that requires coordinated movement of both forelegs and hindlegs. Here we present a grooming assay protocol and novel chamber design that is cost-efficient and scalable for either small or large-scale studies of Drosophila grooming. Flies are dusted all over their body with Brilliant Yellow dye and given time to remove the dye from their bodies within the chamber. Flies are then deposited in a set volume of ethanol to solubilize the dye. The relative spectral absorbance of dye-ethanol samples for groomed versus ungroomed animals are measured and recorded. The protocol yields quantitative data of dye accumulation for individual flies, which can be easily averaged and compared across samples. This allows experimental designs to easily evaluate grooming ability for mutant animal studies or circuit manipulations. This efficient procedure is both versatile and scalable. We show work-flow of the protocol and comparative data between WT animals and mutant animals for the Drosophila type I Dopamine Receptor (DopR).

  16. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguly, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Keywords. circadian rhythm; neuronal network; ion channel; behaviour; neurotransmitter; electrophysiology; Drosophila. Abstract. As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools ...

  18. Analysis of micellar and vesicular lecithin and cholesterol in model bile using 1H- and 31P-NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, M. P.; Groen, A. K.; Bovée, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of phospholipid and cholesterol between the vesicular and micellar phases in bile plays an important role in the formation of cholesterol gallstones. Conventional analytical procedures to determine the distribution are potentially unreliable because they disturb the distribution of

  19. Increased Sporulation of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Manipulation of Nutrient Regimens †

    OpenAIRE

    Douds, David D.; Schenck, N. C.

    1990-01-01

    Adjustment of pot culture nutrient solutions increased root colonization and sporulation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Paspalum notatum Flugge and VAM fungi were grown in a sandy soil low in N and available P. Hoagland nutrient solution without P enhanced sporulation in soil and root colonization of Acaulospora longula, Scutellospora heterogama, Gigaspora margarita, and a wide range of other VAM fungi over levels produced by a tap water control or nutrient solutions contain...

  20. Airstream Fractionation of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Concentration and Enumeration of Propagules

    OpenAIRE

    Tommerup, Inez C.

    1982-01-01

    Spores and fragments of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in dry soils were concentrated up to 100-fold when the soils were partitioned by fluidization and elutriation with a series of upward airstreams at progressively increasing velocities. The propagules were transported with the finer soil particles according to their equivalent spherical diameters. The system was used to predict the transport of propagules by wind. Concentrated propagules were rapidly separated from the soil particl...

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF MONOAMINES AND THEIR METABOLITES IN BOTH SIDES OF THE RAT BRAIN AND ITS RELATION WITH FUNCTIONAL MOTOR ASYMMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    E.D. Morenkov; V.S. Kudrin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this neurochemical study was to quantitatively determine the regional distribution of monoamines (DA, 5HT, and NE) and their metabolites (DOPAC, HVA, and 5HIAA) in paired brain structures (the frontomedial cortex, hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and brainstem tegmentum) of the rat by performing HPLC/ED assays. Further, we aimed to relate these distributions to neuronal mechanisms of lateralized motor behavior. We found differences in monoamine levels and their...

  2. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: vesicular stomatitis virus [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term vesicular stomatitis virus 名詞 一般 ...* * * * 水疱性口内炎ウイルス スイホウセイコウナイエンウイルス スイホーセイコーナイエンウイルス Thesaurus2015 200906056003651861 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 vesicular stomatitis virus

  3. Identification of a Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus by Using Monoclonal Antibodies in an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay †

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Sara F.; Morton, Joseph B.; Sworobuk, Janis E.

    1987-01-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were no...

  4. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  5. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Robottom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J RobottomDepartment of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.Keywords: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, rasagiline, selegiline, Parkinson's disease, efficacy, safety

  6. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tada, Keiya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE. (author)

  7. Effect of Progressive Heart Failure on Cerebral Hemodynamics and Monoamine Metabolism in CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalyga, M L; Mamalyga, L M

    2017-07-01

    Compensated and decompensated heart failure are characterized by different associations of disorders in the brain and heart. In compensated heart failure, the blood flow in the common carotid and basilar arteries does not change. Exacerbation of heart failure leads to severe decompensation and is accompanied by a decrease in blood flow in the carotid and basilar arteries. Changes in monoamine content occurring in the brain at different stages of heart failure are determined by various factors. The functional exercise test showed unequal monoamine-synthesizing capacities of the brain in compensated and decompensated heart failure. Reduced capacity of the monoaminergic systems in decompensated heart failure probably leads to overstrain of the central regulatory mechanisms, their gradual exhaustion, and failure of the compensatory mechanisms, which contributes to progression of heart failure.

  8. Effects of trace elements and mono- and dithiols on mitochondrial monoamine oxidase of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revis, N.; Horton, C.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of several trace elements on mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) were studied. Elements were studied at a concentration of 1 mM; only mercury, cadmium, and copper were significantly effective in reducing the activity of this enzyme. Of several thiols tested, only dithiothreitol could reverse the inhibition of MAO by these elements. Evidence is also presented in this report to show that cysteine, homocysteine, and reduced glutathione inhibit this MAO, whereas dithiothreitol or dithioerythritol evoke stimulatory responses.

  9. Monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens correlate with male sexual behavior in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Houng-Wei; Shui, Hao-Ai; Liu, Hang-Shen; Tai, Mei-Yun; Tsai, Yuan-Feen

    2006-02-01

    The correlation between monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and male sexual behavior was studied in middle-aged rats. Male rats (18-19months) were assigned to three groups: (1) Group MIE consisted of rats showing mounts, intromissions, and ejaculations; (2) Group MI was composed of rats showing mounts and intromissions, but no ejaculation; and (3) Group NC were non-copulators showing no sexual behavior. Young adult rats (4-5months), displaying complete copulatory behavior, were used as the control group. Levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin, and norepinephrine and their metabolites in the NAcc were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. No difference was seen in DA levels between MIE rats and young controls, whereas DA levels in NC rats were significantly lower than those in both MIE and MI rats. Serotonin levels in NC rats were significantly higher than those in MIE and MI rats. Conversely, norepinephrine levels in NC rats were lower than those in MIE rats. These results suggest that monoamine levels in the NAcc correlate with sexual performance in male rats and that changes in NAcc monoamine levels might affect male sexual behavior in middle-aged rats.

  10. Forced swimming stress does not affect monoamine levels and neurodegeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Naqvi, Sabira; Mehmood, Shahab; Kabir, Nurul; Dar, Ahsana

    2011-10-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the correlations between immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST, a behavioral indicator of stress level) and hippocampal monoamine levels (markers of depression), plasma adrenalin level (a peripheral marker of stress) as well as fluoro-jade C staining (a marker of neurodegeneration). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to acute, sub-chronic (7 d) or chronic (14 d) FSTs and immobility time was recorded. Levels of noradrenalin, serotonin and dopamine in the hippocampus, and adrenalin level in the plasma were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Brain sections from rats after chronic forced swimming or rotenone treatment (3 mg/kg subcutaneously for 4 d) were stained with fluoro-jade C. The rats subjected to swimming stress (acute, sub-chronic and chronic) showed long immobility times [(214 +/- 5), (220 +/- 4) and (231 +/- 7) s, respectively], indicating that the animals were under stress. However, the rats did not exhibit significant declines in hippocampal monoamine levels, and the plasma adrenalin level was not significantly increased compared to that in unstressed rats. The rats that underwent chronic swimming stress did not manifest fluoro-jade C staining in brain sections, while degenerating neurons were evident after rotenone treatment. The immobility time in the FST does not correlate with markers of depression (monoamine levels) and internal stress (adrenalin levels and neurodegeneration), hence this parameter may not be a true indicator of stress level.

  11. Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis of 3-phenylcoumarin-Based Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhamäki, Sanna; Postila, Pekka A.; Niinivehmas, Sanna; Kortet, Sami; Schildt, Emmi; Pasanen, Mira; Manivannan, Elangovan; Ahinko, Mira; Koskimies, Pasi; Nyberg, Niina; Huuskonen, Pasi; Multamäki, Elina; Pasanen, Markku; Juvonen, Risto O.; Raunio, Hannu; Huuskonen, Juhani; Pentikäinen, Olli T.

    2018-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) catalyzes deamination of monoamines such as neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Accordingly, small-molecule MAO-B inhibitors potentially alleviate the symptoms of dopamine-linked neuropathologies such as depression or Parkinson’s disease. Coumarin with a functionalized 3-phenyl ring system is a promising scaffold for building potent MAO-B inhibitors. Here, a vast set of 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives was designed using virtual combinatorial chemistry or rationally de novo and synthesized using microwave chemistry. The derivatives inhibited the MAO-B at 100 nM - 1 µM. The IC50 value of the most potent derivative 1 was 56 nM. A docking-based structure-activity relationship analysis summarizes the atom-level determinants of the MAO-B inhibition by the derivatives. Finally, the cross-reactivity of the derivatives was tested against monoamine oxidase A and a specific subset of enzymes linked to estradiol metabolism, known to have coumarin-based inhibitors. Overall, the results indicate that the 3-phenylcoumarins, especially derivative 1, present unique pharmacological features worth considering in future drug development.

  12. Effect of aging and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology on brain monoamines in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Linstow, C. U.; Severino, Maurizio; Metaxas, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    , but these can both be age- and/or disease-related. We examined whether brain monoamine levels change as part of physiological aging and/or AD-like disease in APPSWE/PS1δE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. The neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum of 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old B6C3 wild......-type (WT) mice and of 18-month old APP/PS1 and WT mice were analysed for 5-HT, DA and NA contents by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), along with neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 and WT mice. While, we observed no aging effect in WT mice, we detected region-specific changes in the levels...... of all monoamines in 18-month-old transgenic compared with WT mice. This included reductions in 5-HT (-30%), DA (-47%) and NA (-32%) levels in the neocortex and increases of 5-HT in the brainstem (+18%). No changes were observed in any of the monoamines in the neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 mice...

  13. Social isolation alters central nervous system monoamine content in prairie voles following acute restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Neal; Anderson, Eden M; Moenk, Deirdre; Trahanas, Diane; Matuszewich, Leslie; Grippo, Angela J

    2018-04-01

    Animal models have shown that social isolation and other forms of social stress lead to depressive- and anxiety-relevant behaviors, as well as neuroendocrine and physiological dysfunction. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of prior social isolation on neurotransmitter content following acute restraint in prairie voles. Animals were either paired with a same-sex sibling or isolated for 4 weeks. Plasma adrenal hormones and ex vivo tissue concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites were measured following an acute restraint stressor in all animals. Isolated prairie voles displayed significantly increased circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, as well as elevated serotonin and dopamine levels in the hypothalamus, and potentially decreased levels of serotonin in the frontal cortex. However, no group differences in monoamine levels were observed in the hippocampus or raphe. The results suggest that social stress may bias monoamine neurotransmission and stress hormone function to subsequent acute stressors, such as restraint. These findings improve our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the consequences of social stress.

  14. Adaptive genic evolution in the Drosophila genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Joshua A; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenhui

    2007-01-01

    and stable population. In this study, we sequenced 419 genes from 24 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives. Together with data from Drosophila simulans, these data reveal the following. (i) Approximately 10% of the loci in regions of normal recombination are much less polymorphic at silent...... sites than expected, hinting at the action of selective sweeps. (ii) The level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with the rate of nonsynonymous divergence across loci. Thus, even under strict neutrality, the ratio of amino acid to silent nucleotide changes (A:S) between Drosophila species...

  15. Eficacia del microsistema de oreja en el diagnóstico de la litiasis vesicular Effectiveness of the ear microsystem in the diagnosis of the vesicular lithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Cobas Pérez

    Full Text Available Se llevó a cabo un ensayo clínico para el diagnóstico de la litiasis vesicular mediante el microsistema de oreja en 110 pacientes ingresados en los Servicios de Cirugía y Medicina Interna del Hospital General Docente "Dr. Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso" de Santiago de Cuba, a fin de evaluar la eficacia del método tradicional. Los principales signos estuvieron dados por manchas blancas en el punto de vesícula biliar en ambas orejas y nódulos en la parte posterior de la concha de la oreja derecha. Se concluyó que este es un procedimiento eficaz, por lo cual es necesario generalizarlo, para de esta manera favorecer la calidad de atención a los pacientes y garantizar la base científica de su aplicación.A clinical trial for the diagnosis of the vesicular lithiasis was carried out by means of the ear microsystem in 110 patients admitted in the Surgery and Internal Medicine Services of "Dr. Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso" Teaching General Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional method. The main signs were white stains in the billiary vesicle site in both ears and nodules, in the back part of the right ear shell. The conclusion was that this it is an effective procedure, thus it is necessary to generalize it, so as to favor the quality of care to the patients and to guarantee the scientific base of its application.

  16. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitivity strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.U.

    1985-01-01

    Fertility of radiosensitive mutant drosophila female strain rad (2) 201 61 after irradiation and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM), induced by γ-radiation for 0-5 h and 5-7 days, are investigated. It is shown, that oocytes of the mutant strain are more radiosensitive as compared with cells of mongrel flies as to criterion of DLM appearance over the period of maturing. Early oocytes of stages 2-7 are the most sensitive, i.e. at the stages, corresponding to the manifestation of previously established recombination-defective properties of mutations rad (2) 201 61 . It is also sown, that doses of γ-rays, exceeding 10 Gy produce a strong sterilizing effect on mutant females due to destruction and resorption of egg chambers, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenetic growth of oocytes. In females, carrying mutation of radiosensitivity there is no direct correlation betwen sensitivity of oocytes proper to DLM induction and sensitivity of egg folleicles to resorbing effect of γ-rays. The ways of possible involvement of mutant locus studied into genetic processes in various specialized cells of drosophila

  17. Functional Analysis of Drosophila NF1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernards, Andre

    2005-01-01

    ...) for Ras, yet homozygous loss of a highly conserved Drosophila NF1 ortholog results in several phenotypes that are insensitive to manipulating Ras signal transduction, but rescued by increasing...

  18. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PARUL BANERJEE

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH ARTICLE. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic relationship among different members based on chromosomal variations. PARUL BANERJEE and BASHISTH N. SINGH. ∗. Genetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi ...

  19. Drosophila melanogaster gene expression changes after spaceflight.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gene expression levels were determined in 3rd instar and adult Drosophila melanogaster reared during spaceflight to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms...

  20. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  1. REGULATED VESICULAR TRAFFICKING OF SPECIFIC PCDH15 AND VLGR1 VARIANTS IN AUDITORY HAIR CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Delimont, Duane; Meehan, Daniel T.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hearing and balance dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. Mouse models carrying mutations for the nine Usher-associated genes have splayed stereocilia and some show delayed maturation of ribbon synapses suggesting these proteins may play different roles in terminal differentiation of auditory hair cells. The presence of the Usher proteins at the basal and apical aspects of the neurosensory epithelia suggests the existence of regulated trafficking through specific transport proteins and routes. Immature mouse cochleae and UB/OC-1 cells were used in this work to address whether specific variants of PCDH15 and VLGR1 are being selectively transported to opposite poles of the hair cells. Confocal co-localization studies between apical and basal vesicular markers and the different PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants along with sucrose density gradients and the use of vesicle trafficking inhibitors show the existence of Usher protein complexes in at least two vesicular sub-pools. The apically trafficked pool co-localized with the early endosomal vesicle marker, rab5, while the basally trafficked pool associates with membrane microdomains and SNAP25. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments between SNAP25 and VLGR1 show a physical interaction of these two proteins in organ of Corti and brain. Collectively, these findings establish the existence of a differential vesicular trafficking mechanism for specific Usher protein variants in mouse cochlear hair cells, with the apical variants playing a potential role in endosomal recycling and stereocilia development/maintenance and the basolateral variants involved in vesicle docking and/or fusion through SNAP25-mediated interactions. PMID:23035094

  2. Enhanced Gene Transfer with Fusogenic Liposomes Containing Vesicular Stomatitis Virus G Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akihiro; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Friedmann, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of Lipofectin-DNA complexes to the partially purified G glycoprotein of the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSV-G) results in loss of serum-mediated inhibition and in enhanced efficiency of gene transfer. Sucrose density gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that the VSV-G associates physically with the DNA-lipid complex to produce a VSV-G liposome. The ability to incorporate surrogate viral or cellular envelope components such as VSV-G into liposomes may allow more-efficient and possibly targeted gene delivery by lipofection, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9621082

  3. Analysis of the RNA species isolated from defective particles of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Banerjee, A K

    1976-10-01

    Serial high multiplicity passage of a cloned stock of vesicular stomatitis virus was found to generate defective interfering particles containing three size classes of RNA, with sedimentaiton coefficients of 31 S, 23 S and 19 S. The 31 S and 23 S RNA species were found to be complementary to both the 12 to 18 S and 31 S size classes of VSV mRNAs. The 19 S class of RNA was found to be partially base-paired. All three RNA species were found to contain ppAp at their 5' termini.

  4. Conditional expression of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein gene in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, J K; Shafferman, A

    1981-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids that directed expression of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (G-protein) gene under control of the tryptophan operon regulatory region were constructed. A plasmid directing the synthesis of a G-protein-like protein (containing the NH2-terminal segment of seven amino acids encoded by the trpE gene fused to the complete G-protein sequence lacking only its NH2-terminal methionine) could be transformed into trpR+ (repressed) but not into trpR- (derepressed) cells. Th...

  5. Natural re-establishment of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae following stripmine reclamation in Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, E.B.; Allen, M.F. (University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (USA))

    1980-01-01

    The % root infection of {ital Agropyron smithii} and {ital A. intermedium} by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae was measured and spoil spores were counted in six reclaimed stripmine sites in Wyoming. On 2- and 3-yr old sites % infection and spore counts were c. 50% or less than native prairie levels. Spore counts of a 3-yr old disked prairie site were not different from the undisturbed prairie level, but infection was significantly lower. Spore counts of the reclimed sites were not highly correlated with % root infection. Five of seven annuals which colonized the reclaimed and disked sites were non-mycorrhizal. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Mapping of gene mutations in drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Charlotte Marie

    2004-01-01

    In this experiment, mutant genes of a given unknown mutant strain of Drosophila melanogaster were mapped to specific chromosomes. Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, was the appropriate choice for the organism to use in this specific experiment because of its relatively rapid life cycle of 10-14 days and because of the small amount of space and food neccessary for maintaining thousands of flies. The D. Melanogaster unknown strain specifically used in this experiment wa...

  7. Metabolome analysis of Drosophila melanogaster during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Phan Nguyen Thuy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster embryo has been widely utilized as a model for genetics and developmental biology due to its small size, short generation time, and large brood size. Information on embryonic metabolism during developmental progression is important for further understanding the mechanisms of Drosophila embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the changes in embryos' metabolome that occur at different stages of the Drosophila embryonic development. Time course samples of Drosophila embryos were subjected to GC/MS-based metabolome analysis for profiling of low molecular weight hydrophilic metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. The results showed that the metabolic profiles of Drosophila embryo varied during the course of development and there was a strong correlation between the metabolome and different embryonic stages. Using the metabolome information, we were able to establish a prediction model for developmental stages of embryos starting from their high-resolution quantitative metabolite composition. Among the important metabolites revealed from our model, we suggest that different amino acids appear to play distinct roles in different developmental stages and an appropriate balance in trehalose-glucose ratio is crucial to supply the carbohydrate source for the development of Drosophila embryo.

  8. Characterization of Autophagic Responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Kumar, S; Denton, D

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying autophagy during animal development due to the availability of genetic reagents and opportunity for in vivo cell biological analysis. The regulation and mechanism of autophagy are highly evolutionarily conserved and the role of autophagy has been characterized during various stages of Drosophila development as well as following starvation. Studies in Drosophila have revealed novel insights into the role of distinct components of the autophagy machinery. This chapter describes protocols for examining autophagy during Drosophila development. A crucial step in the induction of autophagy is the incorporation of Atg8a into the autophagosome. This can be measured as autophagic puncta using live fluorescent imaging, immunostaining, or immunoblot analysis of LC3/Atg8a processing. The level of autophagy can also be examined using other specific components of the autophagy pathway as markers detected by immunofluorescent imaging. Based on the distinct morphology of autophagy, it can also be examined by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, one of the advantages of using Drosophila as a model is the ability to undertake genetic analysis of individual components of the autophagy machinery. Current approaches that can be used to monitor autophagy, including the overall flux and individual steps in Drosophila melanogaster, will be discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of non-nutritive sugars to decrease the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of non-nutritive sugars and sugar alcohols on the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, and found erythritol and erythrose as potentially toxic to the fly. In a dose-dependent study, erythritol and erythrose significantly reduced fly ...

  10. New record for the invasive Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Anillaco, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is reported for the first time in La Rioja, Argentina. This represents a major range expansion for this species. The natural enemies of SWD, Leptopilina clavipes and Ganaspis hookeri were also collected with the SWD at the s...

  11. Morphological identification and development of neurite in Drosophila ventral nerve cord neuropil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Gan

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, ventral nerve cord (VNC occupies most of the larval central nervous system (CNS. However, there is little literature elaborating upon the specific types and growth of neurites as defined by their structural appearance in Drosophila larval VNC neuropil. Here we report the ultrastructural development of different types VNC neurites in ten selected time points in embryonic and larval stages utilizing transmission electron microscopy. There are four types of axonal neurites as classified by the type of vesicular content: clear vesicle (CV neurites have clear vesicles and some T-bar structures; Dense-core vesicle (DV neurites have dense-core vesicles and without T-bar structures; Mixed vesicle (MV neurites have mixed vesicles and some T-bar structures; Large vesicle (LV neurites are dominated by large, translucent spherical vesicles but rarely display T-bar structures. We found dramatic remodeling in CV neurites which can be divided into five developmental phases. The neurite is vacuolated in primary (P phase, they have mitochondria, microtubules or big dark vesicles in the second (S phase, and they contain immature synaptic features in the third (T phase. The subsequent bifurcate (B phase appears to undergo major remodeling with the appearance of the bifurcation or dendritic growth. In the final mature (M phase, high density of commensurate synaptic vesicles are distributed around T-bar structures. There are four kinds of morphological elaboration of the CVI neurite sub-types. First, new neurite produces at the end of axon. Second, new neurite bubbles along the axon. Third, the preexisting neurite buds and develops into several neurites. The last, the bundled axons form irregularly shape neurites. Most CVI neurites in M phase have about 1.5-3 µm diameter, they could be suitable to analyze their morphology and subcellular localization of specific proteins by light microscopy, and they could serve as a potential model in CNS in vivo

  12. Morphological identification and development of neurite in Drosophila ventral nerve cord neuropil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Guangming; Lv, Huihui; Xie, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, ventral nerve cord (VNC) occupies most of the larval central nervous system (CNS). However, there is little literature elaborating upon the specific types and growth of neurites as defined by their structural appearance in Drosophila larval VNC neuropil. Here we report the ultrastructural development of different types VNC neurites in ten selected time points in embryonic and larval stages utilizing transmission electron microscopy. There are four types of axonal neurites as classified by the type of vesicular content: clear vesicle (CV) neurites have clear vesicles and some T-bar structures; Dense-core vesicle (DV) neurites have dense-core vesicles and without T-bar structures; Mixed vesicle (MV) neurites have mixed vesicles and some T-bar structures; Large vesicle (LV) neurites are dominated by large, translucent spherical vesicles but rarely display T-bar structures. We found dramatic remodeling in CV neurites which can be divided into five developmental phases. The neurite is vacuolated in primary (P) phase, they have mitochondria, microtubules or big dark vesicles in the second (S) phase, and they contain immature synaptic features in the third (T) phase. The subsequent bifurcate (B) phase appears to undergo major remodeling with the appearance of the bifurcation or dendritic growth. In the final mature (M) phase, high density of commensurate synaptic vesicles are distributed around T-bar structures. There are four kinds of morphological elaboration of the CVI neurite sub-types. First, new neurite produces at the end of axon. Second, new neurite bubbles along the axon. Third, the preexisting neurite buds and develops into several neurites. The last, the bundled axons form irregularly shape neurites. Most CVI neurites in M phase have about 1.5-3 µm diameter, they could be suitable to analyze their morphology and subcellular localization of specific proteins by light microscopy, and they could serve as a potential model in CNS in vivo development.

  13. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) detection of endogenous octopamine in Drosophila melanogaster ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Poojan; Privman, Eve; Venton, B. Jill

    2016-01-01

    Octopamine is an endogenous biogenic amine neurotransmitter, neurohormone, and neuromodulator in invertebrates, and has functional analogy with norepinephrine in vertebrates. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) can detect rapid changes in neurotransmitters, but FSCV has not been optimized for octopamine detection in situ. The goal of this study was to characterize octopamine release in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila larvae for the first time. An FSCV waveform was optimized so that the potential for octopamine oxidation would not be near the switching potential where interferences can occur. Endogenous octopamine release was stimulated by genetically inserting either the ATP sensitive channel, P2X2, or the red-light sensitive channelrhodopsin, CsChrimson, into cells expressing tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), an octopamine synthesis enzyme. To ensure that release is due to octopamine and not the precursor tyramine, the octopamine synthesis inhibitor disulfiram was applied, and the signal decreased by 80%. Stimulated release was vesicular and a 2 s continuous light stimulation of CsChrimson evoked 0.22 ± 0.03 μM of octopamine release in the larval VNC. Repeated stimulations were stable with 2 or 5 minutes interstimulation times. With pulsed stimulations, the release was dependent on the frequency of applied light pulse. An octopamine transporter has not been identified, and blockers of the dopamine transporter and serotonin transporter had no significant effect on the clearance time of octopamine, suggesting they do not take up octopamine. This study shows that octopamine can be monitored in Drosophila, facilitating future studies of how octopamine release functions in the insect brain. PMID:27326831

  14. Identification of four Drosophila allatostatins as the cognate ligands for the Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Hansen, G N

    2001-01-01

    The allatostatins are generally inhibitory insect neuropeptides. The Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor, having 47% amino acid residue identity with another Drosophila receptor, DAR-1 (which is also called dros. GPCR, or DGR) that was previously shown...... to be the receptor for an intrinsic Drosophila A-type (cockroach-type) allatostatin. Here, we have permanently expressed DAR-2 in CHO cells and found that it is the cognate receptor for four Drosophila A-type allatostatins, the drostatins-A1 to -A4. Of all the drostatins, drostatin-A4 (Thr...... weakly in the brain. The Drosophila larval gut also contains about 20-30 endocrine cells, expressing the gene for the drostatins-A1 to -A4. We suggest, therefore, that DAR-2 mediates an allatostatin (drostatin)-induced inhibition of gut motility. This is the first report on the permanent and functional...

  15. Effect of Hawthorn on Drosophila Melanogaster Antioxidant-Related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results indicate that hawthorn extract prolonged the life span of Drosophila, with 50 % survival time of 0.8 ... Drosophila's aging gene is highly similar to humans [4,5]. ..... reduces lipid peroxidation in senescence-accelerated mice .

  16. Identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus by using monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S F; Morton, J B; Sworobuk, J E

    1987-09-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were nonreactive with the monoclonal antibodies. A single spore of G. occultum was detectable in the presence of high numbers of spores of other vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Variation in the reaction of G. occultum isolates from West Virginia, Florida, and Colombia suggests that monoclonal antibodies may differentiate strains.

  17. Regulation of vesicular traffic by a GTP-binding protein on the cytoplasmic surface of secretory vesicles in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, P.J.; Goud, B.; Salminen, A.; Walworth, N.C.; Nair, J.; Potenza, M.

    1988-01-01

    Vesicular transport is an important mechanism for the intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Vesicles mediate the passage of proteins between the various organelles of the secretory pathway and the exocytic release of these proteins into the extracellular environment. Vesicles also mediate the uptake of proteins and fluid from the external environment, delivering them to endosomes. Despite the generality of the vesicular transport mechanism, the process is not yet understood at a molecular level. The key questions that are addressed are (1) How are vesicles formed from the membrane of the donor organelle? (2) How are these vesicles transported? (3) How do the vesicles recognize the membrane of the target (acceptor) organelle? (4) How is membrane fusion accomplished? The genetic flexibility of yeast has been exploited to identify components of the cellular machinery required for vesicular transport

  18. Gustatory Processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kristin

    2018-01-07

    The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint control for food acceptance or rejection. The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes many of the same stimuli as mammals and provides an excellent model system for comparative studies of taste detection. The relative simplicity of the fly brain and behaviors, along with the molecular genetic and functional approaches available in this system, allow the examination of gustatory neural circuits from sensory input to motor output. This review discusses the molecules and cells that detect taste compounds in the periphery and the circuits that process taste information in the brain. These studies are providing insight into how the detection of taste compounds regulates feeding decisions.

  19. Dual and Direction-Selective Mechanisms of Phosphate Transport by the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Preobraschenski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs fill synaptic vesicles with glutamate and are thus essential for glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, VGLUTs were originally discovered as members of a transporter subfamily specific for inorganic phosphate (Pi. It is still unclear how VGLUTs accommodate glutamate transport coupled to an electrochemical proton gradient ΔμH+ with inversely directed Pi transport coupled to the Na+ gradient and the membrane potential. Using both functional reconstitution and heterologous expression, we show that VGLUT transports glutamate and Pi using a single substrate binding site but different coupling to cation gradients. When facing the cytoplasm, both ions are transported into synaptic vesicles in a ΔμH+-dependent fashion, with glutamate preferred over Pi. When facing the extracellular space, Pi is transported in a Na+-coupled manner, with glutamate competing for binding but at lower affinity. We conclude that VGLUTs have dual functions in both vesicle transmitter loading and Pi homeostasis within glutamatergic neurons. : Preobraschenski et al. show that the vesicular glutamate transporter functions as a bi-directional phosphate transporter that is coupled with different cations in each direction and hence may play a key role in neuronal phosphate homeostasis. Keywords: VGLUT, SLC17 family, type I Na+-dependent inorganic phosphate transporter, ATPase, proteoliposomes, hybrid vesicles, anti-VGLUT1 nanobody

  20. The H2O/D2O exchange across vesicular lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbert, H.P.; Lawaczek, R.

    1985-01-01

    A new method to measure the water (D 2 O/H 2 O) permeation across vesicular lipid bilayers is described. The method is based on the solvent isotope effect of the light scattering which is a consequence of the different indices of refraction of D 2 O and H 2 O. Unilamellar lipid vesicles in excess of H 2 O are rapidly mixed with D 2 O or vice versa. As result of the H 2 O/D 2 O exchange across the vesicular bilayer the light scattering signal has a time dependent, almost single exponential component allowing the deduction of the exchange relaxation rate and, at known size, of the permeability coefficient. The experimental results are in accord with calculations from the Mie theory of light scattering for coated spheres. The method is applicable for large vesicles where the permeation is the rate-limiting step. Size separations are performed by a flow dialysis through a sequence of pore-membrane-filters. For dimyristoyl-lecithin bilayers the water permeability-coefficient is 1.9 . 10 -5 cm/s in the crystalline phase and increases by a factor of 10-100 in the liquid-crystalline state. The temperature dependence of the permeation exhibits a sharp change at the phase transition. For binary mixtures of lecithins this sharp change follows the solidus curve of the non-ideal phase diagram determined by spectroscopic techniques. (orig.)

  1. Two transcription products of the vesicular stomatitis virus genome may control L-cell protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunigan, D.D.; Lucas-Lenard, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    When mouse L-cells are infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, there is a decrease in the rate of protein synthesis ranging from 20 to 85% of that in mock-infected cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus, irradiated with increasing doses of UV light, eventually loses this capacity to inhibit protein synthesis. The UV inactivation curve was biphasic, suggesting that transcription of two regions of the viral genome is necessary for the virus to become inactivated in this capacity. The first transcription produced corresponded to about 373 nucleotides, and the second corresponded to about 42 nucleotides. Inhibition of transcription of the larger product by irradiating the virus with low doses of UV light left a residual inhibition of protein synthesis consisting of approximately 60 to 65% of the total inhibition. This residual inhibition could be obviated by irradiating the virus with a UV dose of greater than 20,000 ergs/mm 2 and was thus considered to represent the effect of the smaller transcription product. In the R1 mutant of another author, the inhibition of transcription of the larger product sufficed to restore protein synthesis to the mock-infected level, suggesting that the smaller transcription product is nonfunctional with respect to protein synthesis inhibition. Extracts from cells infected with virus irradiated with low doses of UV light showed a protein synthesis capacity quite similar to that of their in vivo counterparts, indicating that these extracts closely reflect the in vivo effects of virus infection

  2. Black fly involvement in the epidemic transmission of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (Rhabdoviridae: Vesiculovirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Daniel G; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Murphy, Molly D; Gray, Elmer W; Noblet, Raymond; Stallknecht, David E

    2004-01-01

    The transmission routes of Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), a causative agent of vesicular stomatitis, an Office International des Epizooties List-A disease, are not completely understood. Epidemiological and entomological studies conducted during the sporadic epidemics in the western United States have identified potential virus transmission routes involving insect vectors and animal-to-animal contact. In the present study we experimentally tested the previously proposed transmission routes which were primarily based on field observations. Results obtained provide strong evidence for the following: (1) hematophagous insects acquire VSNJV by unconventional routes while blood feeding on livestock, (2) clinical course of VSNJV infection in livestock following transmission by an infected insect is related to insect bite site, (3) infection of livestock via insect bite can result in multiple transmission possibilities, including animal-to-animal contact. Taken together, these data significantly add to our understanding of the transmission routes of a causative agent of one of the oldest known infectious diseases of livestock, for which the details have remained largely unknown despite decades of research.

  3. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  4. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

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    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  5. Vesicular GABA Uptake Can Be Rate Limiting for Recovery of IPSCs from Synaptic Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Yamashita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Synaptic efficacy plays crucial roles in neuronal circuit operation and synaptic plasticity. Presynaptic determinants of synaptic efficacy are neurotransmitter content in synaptic vesicles and the number of vesicles undergoing exocytosis at a time. Bursts of presynaptic firings depress synaptic efficacy, mainly due to depletion of releasable vesicles, whereas recovery from strong depression is initiated by endocytic vesicle retrieval followed by refilling of vesicles with neurotransmitter. We washed out presynaptic cytosolic GABA to induce a rundown of IPSCs at cerebellar inhibitory cell pairs in slices from rats and then allowed fast recovery by elevating GABA concentration using photo-uncaging. The time course of this recovery coincided with that of IPSCs from activity-dependent depression induced by a train of high-frequency stimulation. We conclude that vesicular GABA uptake can be a limiting step for the recovery of inhibitory neurotransmission from synaptic depression. : Recovery of inhibitory synaptic transmission from activity-dependent depression requires refilling of vesicles with GABA. Yamashita et al. find that vesicular uptake rate of GABA is a slow process, limiting the recovery rate of IPSCs from depression.

  6. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Guariglia, Sara R; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Stanton, Patric K; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development.

  7. Partitioning of Intermediary Carbon Metabolism in Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Leek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar-Hill, Y.; Pfeffer, P. E.; Douds, D.; Osman, S. F.; Doner, L. W.; Ratcliffe, R. G.

    1995-05-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are symbionts for a large variety of crop plants; however, the form in which they take up carbon from the host is not established. To trace the course of carbon metabolism, we have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with [13C]glucose labeling in vivo and in extracts to examine leek (Allium porrum) roots colonized by Glomus etunicatum (and uncolonized controls) as well as germinating spores. These studies implicate glucose as a likely substrate for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the symbiotic state. Root feeding of 0.6 mM 1-[13C]glucose labeled only the fungal metabolites trehalose and glycogen. The time course of this labeling was dependent on the status of the host. Incubation with 50 mM 1-[13C]glucose caused labeling of sucrose (in addition to fungal metabolites) with twice as much labeling in uncolonized plants. There was no detectable scrambling of the label from C1 glucose to the C6 position of glucose moieties in trehalose or glycogen. Labeling of mannitol C1,6 in the colonized root tissue was much less than in axenically germinating spores. Thus, carbohydrate metabolism of host and fungus are significantly altered in the symbiotic state.

  8. Interaction of rhizosphere bacteria, fertilizer, and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with sea oats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, M E; Sylvia, D M

    1990-07-01

    Plants must be established quickly on replenished beaches in order to stabilize the sand and begin the dune-building process. The objective of this research was to determine whether inoculation of sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) with bacteria (indigenous rhizosphere bacteria and N(2) fixers) alone or in combination with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi would enhance plant growth in beach sand. At two fertilizer-N levels, Klebsiella pneumoniae and two Azospirillum spp. did not provide the plants with fixed atmospheric N; however, K. pneumoniae increased root and shoot growth. When a sparingly soluble P source (CaHPO(4)) was added to two sands, K. pneumoniae increased plant growth in sand with a high P content. The phosphorus content of shoots was not affected by bacterial inoculation, indicating that a mechanism other than bacterially enhanced P availability to plants was responsible for the growth increases. When sea oats were inoculated with either K. pneumoniae or Acaligenes denitrificans and a mixed Glomus inoculum, there was no consistent evidence of a synergistic effect on plant growth. Nonetheless, bacterial inoculation increased root colonization by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi when the fungal inoculum consisted of colonized roots but had no effect on colonization when the inoculum consisted of spores alone. K. pneumoniae was found to increase spore germination and hyphal growth of Glomus deserticola compared with the control. The use of bacterial inoculants to enhance establishment of pioneer dune plants warrants further study.

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic Mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that recently have revolutionized human, mouse, and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila by using a sequence tagged site-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that sp...

  10. Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord: a different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates...... that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects...... that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles...

  11. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is an enterovirus that is both genetically and antigenically closely related to human coxsackievirus B5 within the Picornaviridae family. SVDV is the causative agent of a highly contagious (though rarely fatal) vesicular disease in pigs. We report a rapid method...... with significant genetic distances within the same species of viruses. All reference mappings used an iterative method to avoid bias. Further verification was achieved through phylogenetic analysis against published SVDV genomes and additional Enterovirus B sequences. This approach allows high confidence...

  13. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robottom, Bradley J

    2011-01-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.

  14. Brain monoamine oxidase B and A in human parkinsonian dopamine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Rathitharan, Gausiha; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Guttman, Mark; Hornykiewicz, Oleh; Kish, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    See Jellinger (doi:10.1093/awx190) for a scientific commentary on this article. The enzyme monoamine oxidases (B and A subtypes, encoded by MAOB and MAOA, respectively) are drug targets in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Inhibitors of MAOB are used clinically in Parkinson's disease for symptomatic purposes whereas the potential disease-modifying effect of monoamine oxidase inhibitors is debated. As astroglial cells express high levels of MAOB, the enzyme has been proposed as a brain imaging marker of astrogliosis, a cellular process possibly involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis as elevation of MAOB in astrocytes might be harmful. Since brain monoamine oxidase status in Parkinson's disease is uncertain, our objective was to measure, by quantitative immunoblotting in autopsied brain homogenates, protein levels of both monoamine oxidases in three different degenerative parkinsonian disorders: Parkinson's disease (n = 11), multiple system atrophy (n = 11), and progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 16) and in matched controls (n = 16). We hypothesized that if MAOB is 'substantially' localized to astroglial cells, MAOB levels should be generally associated with standard astroglial protein measures (e.g. glial fibrillary acidic protein). MAOB levels were increased in degenerating putamen (+83%) and substantia nigra (+10%, non-significant) in multiple system atrophy; in caudate (+26%), putamen (+27%), frontal cortex (+31%) and substantia nigra (+23%) of progressive supranuclear palsy; and in frontal cortex (+33%), but not in substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, a region we previously reported no increase in astrocyte protein markers. Although the magnitude of MAOB increase was less than those of standard astrocytic markers, significant positive correlations were observed amongst the astrocyte proteins and MAOB. Despite suggestions that MAOA (versus MAOB) is primarily responsible for metabolism of dopamine in dopamine neurons, there was no loss of the

  15. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  16. Electrophoresis of platelet monoamine oxidase in schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmaker, R.H.; Ebstein, R.; Rimon, R.; Wyatt, R.J.; Murphy, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase is an important enzyme in the catabolism of biogenic amines and can be measured in human platelets. Platelet MAO has been reported to be reduced in schizophrenic and manic-depressive patients, though other reports are contradictory. The present study evaluated the possibility that qualitative genetic enzyme abnormalities of MAO could be responsible for the different enzyme activities of platelet MAO in different populations. However, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of platelet MAO from 10 manic-depressive, 12 schizophrenic, and 11 normal individuals did not reveal any genetic mutant forms. (author)

  17. Monoamines and sexual function in rats bred for increased catatonic reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klochkov, D V; Alekhina, T A; Kuznetsova, E G; Barykina, N N

    2009-07-01

    Body weight, ovary and uterus weight, the nature of estral cycles, and hypothalamus dopamine and noradrenaline levels and plasma testosterone levels were studied in female GC rats, bred for increased catatonic reactivity, at different stages of the estral cycle (estrus, proestrus). The outbred Wistar strain served as controls. On the background of decreased body weight, GC females showed impairments to the morphological cyclical changes in the ovaries and uterus, with a reduction in ovary weight in diestrus (p rats showed higher levels of these monoamines in estrus and lower levels in diestrus. Plasma testosterone levels in female GC rats were higher in diestrus than in estrus and in Wistar rats.

  18. Drosophila insulin-producing cells are differentially modulated by serotonin and octopamine receptors and affect social behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Luo

    Full Text Available A set of 14 insulin-producing cells (IPCs in the Drosophila brain produces three insulin-like peptides (DILP2, 3 and 5. Activity in IPCs and release of DILPs is nutrient dependent and controlled by multiple factors such as fat body-derived proteins, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides. Two monoamine receptors, the octopamine receptor OAMB and the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A, are expressed by the IPCs. These receptors may act antagonistically on adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the action of the two receptors on activity in and output from the IPCs. Knockdown of OAMB by targeted RNAi led to elevated Dilp3 transcript levels in the brain, whereas 5-HT1A knockdown resulted in increases of Dilp2 and 5. OAMB-RNAi in IPCs leads to extended survival of starved flies and increased food intake, whereas 5-HT1A-RNAi produces the opposite phenotypes. However, knockdown of either OAMB or 5-HT1A in IPCs both lead to increased resistance to oxidative stress. In assays of carbohydrate levels we found that 5-HT1A knockdown in IPCs resulted in elevated hemolymph glucose, body glycogen and body trehalose levels, while no effects were seen after OAMB knockdown. We also found that manipulations of the two receptors in IPCs affected male aggressive behavior in different ways and 5-HT1A-RNAi reduced courtship latency. Our observations suggest that activation of 5-HT1A and OAMB signaling in IPCs generates differential effects on Dilp transcription, fly physiology, metabolism and social interactions. However the findings do not support an antagonistic action of the two monoamines and their receptors in this particular system.

  19. Drosophila insulin-producing cells are differentially modulated by serotonin and octopamine receptors and affect social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiangnan; Lushchak, Oleh V; Goergen, Philip; Williams, Michael J; Nässel, Dick R

    2014-01-01

    A set of 14 insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the Drosophila brain produces three insulin-like peptides (DILP2, 3 and 5). Activity in IPCs and release of DILPs is nutrient dependent and controlled by multiple factors such as fat body-derived proteins, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides. Two monoamine receptors, the octopamine receptor OAMB and the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A, are expressed by the IPCs. These receptors may act antagonistically on adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the action of the two receptors on activity in and output from the IPCs. Knockdown of OAMB by targeted RNAi led to elevated Dilp3 transcript levels in the brain, whereas 5-HT1A knockdown resulted in increases of Dilp2 and 5. OAMB-RNAi in IPCs leads to extended survival of starved flies and increased food intake, whereas 5-HT1A-RNAi produces the opposite phenotypes. However, knockdown of either OAMB or 5-HT1A in IPCs both lead to increased resistance to oxidative stress. In assays of carbohydrate levels we found that 5-HT1A knockdown in IPCs resulted in elevated hemolymph glucose, body glycogen and body trehalose levels, while no effects were seen after OAMB knockdown. We also found that manipulations of the two receptors in IPCs affected male aggressive behavior in different ways and 5-HT1A-RNAi reduced courtship latency. Our observations suggest that activation of 5-HT1A and OAMB signaling in IPCs generates differential effects on Dilp transcription, fly physiology, metabolism and social interactions. However the findings do not support an antagonistic action of the two monoamines and their receptors in this particular system.

  20. A comparison of cell proliferation in normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelia following either biogenic amine depletion or monoamine oxidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1976-08-11

    Epithelial cell proliferation was studied in the jejunum and in the colon of normal rats, in the colon of dimethylhydrazine-treated rats and in dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma of the colon using a stathmokinetic technique. Estimates of cell proliferation rates in these four tissues were then repeated in animals which had been depleted of biogenic animes by treatment with reserpine and in animals whose monoamine oxidase was inhibited by treatment with nialamide. In amine-depleted animals cell proliferation essentially ceased in all four tissues examined. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase did not significantly influence cell proliferation in nonmalignant tissues but accelerated cell division in colonic tumours.

  1. Gut-associated microbes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Nichole; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in using Drosophila melanogaster to elucidate mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota. In addition to the many genetic resources and tools Drosophila provides, its associated microbiota is relatively simple (1–30 taxa), in contrast to the complex diversity associated with vertebrates (> 500 taxa). These attributes highlight the potential of this system to dissect the complex cellular and molecular interactions that occur between a host and its microbiota. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the composition of gut-associated microbes of Drosophila and their impact on host physiology. We also discuss these interactions in the context of their natural history and ecology and describe some recent insights into mechanisms by which Drosophila and its gut microbiota interact. “Workers with Drosophila have been considered fortunate in that they deal with the first multicellular invertebrate to be cultured monoxenically (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910); the first to be handled axenically on a semisynthetic diet (Guyenot, 1917); and the first to be grown on a defined diet (Schultz et al., 1946). This list of advantages is somewhat embarrassing, since it implies an interest in nutrition that, in reality, was only secondary. The very first studies were concerned with the reduction of variability in genetic experiments (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910) and standardization of the nutritional environment.” -James Sang, 1959 Ann NY Acad 1 PMID:22572876

  2. Shear-induced Bubble Coalescence in Rhyolitic Melts with Low Vesicularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, S.; Nakamura, M.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2006-12-01

    Development of bubble structure during magma ascent controls the dynamics of volcanic eruption, because the bubble structure influences the magma rheology and permeability, and hence magma degassing. In the flowing magmas, the bubble structure is expected to be changed by shear, as pointed out by some previous studies based on geological observations. However, the development of bubble structure has been experimentally studied only in the isostatic magmas. We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time, the shear-induced development of number density, size and shape of bubbles in a rhyolitic melt. The deformation experiments were performed by using an externally heated, piston-cylinder type apparatus with a rotational piston. At 975°C, natural obsidian (initial water content of 0.5 wt%) having cylindrical shape (ca. 4.7 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length) was vesiculated in the graphite container (ca. 5 and 9 mm in the inner and the outer diameters, respectively, and 5 mm in length), and the vesiculated samples were twisted at various rotational speeds up to 1 rpm. The number density, size and shape of bubbles in the quenched samples were then measured by using the X-ray computed tomography. The size distribution of bubbles shows that the number of larger bubbles increases with the rotational speed and at the outer zone of the samples at which the shear rate is high. In the high shear rate zone, the magnitude of bubble deformation is large. The 3D images of large bubbles clearly indicate that they were formed by coalescence. These results indicate that the degree of bubble coalescence is enhanced with the shear rate. The experimental results also demonstrated that the coalescence of bubbles occur even at low vesicularity (ca. 20 vol.%). Because the shear rate induced in this study (in the order of 0.01 1/s) seems to be produced for magmas ascending in a volcanic conduit, we propose the possibility that the vesiculated magmas undergo bubble coalescence at a

  3. Bovine Vaccinia in dairy cattle and suspicion of vesicular disease on milkers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Garcia da Silva

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bovine vaccinia (BV is a vesicular disease induced by the Vaccinia virus (VACV that affects milk production and is an occupational zoonosis. This research had the following objectives: (i detection of VACV by qPCR in cattle with clinical suspicion of vesicular disease; (ii symptoms characterization in animals and milkers with clinical suspicion of the disease and virus detection in humans; and (iii identification of risk factors for infections of VACV in herds from several Brazilian states. A total of 471 bovine epithelial samples from dairy farms, in 15 Brazilian states, were evaluated between 2007 and 2012. The samples were tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR using SYBR Green® reagents, validated with a lower limit of detection of 100 TCID50/50µL (1.7x100 viral particles, and 45.1% of VACV positive samples were detected. Using official forms for epidemiological investigation (FORM-IN, the risk factors for VACV infections in cattle were determined to be farms with a lack of technological facilities (P=0.029 and the presence of rodents (P=0.001. There was an effect of seasonality in cattle with a higher occurrence of BV during the dry season. A total of 420 epidemiological questionnaires were applied at public health care centers, where 100% of the milkers had vesicular lesions on their hands (98.1% and on their arms (6.9%. The most frequent clinical symptoms in humans were: local swelling (74.2%, headache (20.7%, fever (10.4% and inguinal lymphadenopathy (74.2%. Only 19.98% of milkers aged between 39 and 58 years were seroreactive to VACV and were immunized with the human anti-smallpox vaccine. There was an increase in the frequency of BV in older individuals due to their natural decrease in specific immunity. It has been shown that the implementation of zootechnical management techniques and health planning are important for the prevention of BV in animals and humans.

  4. Altered Cerebellar Organization and Function in Monoamine Oxidase A Hypomorphic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Loai; Bortolato, Marco; Delis, Foteini; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Darling, Ryan D.; Godar, Sean C; Zhang, Junlin; Grant, Samuel; Wang, Gene-Jack; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Chen, Kevin; Volkow, Nora D.; Lin, Rick C.S.; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is the key enzyme for the degradation of brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA). We recently generated and characterized a novel line of MAO-A hypormorphic mice (MAO-ANeo), featuring elevated monoamine levels, social deficits and perseverative behaviors as well as morphological changes in the basolateral amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex. Here we showed that MAO-ANeo mice displayed deficits in motor control, manifested as subtle disturbances in gait, motor coordination, and balance. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebellum revealed morphological changes and a moderate reduction in the cerebellar size of MAO- ANeo mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses using calbindin-D-28k (CB) expression of Purkinje cells revealed abnormal cerebellar foliation with vermal hypoplasia and decreased in Purkinje cell count and their dendritic density in MAO- ANeo mice compared to WT. Our current findings suggest that congenitally low MAO-A activity leads to abnormal development of the cerebellum. PMID:22971542

  5. Selection for increased voluntary wheel-running affects behavior and brain monoamines in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, R.Parrish; Pringle, R.B.; Forster, G.L.; Renner, K.J.; Malisch, J.L.; Garland, T.; Swallow, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Selective-breeding of house mice for increased voluntary wheel-running has resulted in multiple physiological and behavioral changes. Characterizing these differences may lead to experimental models that can elucidate factors involved in human diseases and disorders associated with physical inactivity, or potentially treated by physical activity, such as diabetes, obesity, and depression. Herein, we present ethological data for adult males from a line of mice that has been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel-running and from a non-selected control line, housed with or without wheels. Additionally, we present concentrations of central monoamines in limbic, striatal, and midbrain regions. We monitored wheel-running for 8 weeks, and observed home-cage behavior during the last 5 weeks of the study. Mice from the selected line accumulated more revolutions per day than controls due to increased speed and duration of running. Selected mice exhibited more active behaviors than controls, regardless of wheel access, and exhibited less inactivity and grooming than controls. Selective-breeding also influenced the longitudinal patterns of behavior. We found statistically significant differences in monoamine concentrations and associated metabolites in brain regions that influence exercise and motivational state. These results suggest underlying neurochemical differences between selected and control lines that may influence the observed differences in behavior. Our results bolster the argument that selected mice can provide a useful model of human psychological and physiological diseases and disorders. PMID:23352668

  6. Monoamine Oxidase-A Genetic Variants and Childhood Abuse Predict Impulsiveness in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolla, Nathan J; Meyer, Jeffrey; Sanches, Marcos; Charbonneau, James

    2017-11-30

    Impulsivity is a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) that likely arises from combined genetic and environmental influences. The interaction of the low activity variant of the monoamine oxidase-A (MAOA-L) gene and early childhood adversity has been shown to predict aggression in clinical and non-clinical populations. Although impulsivity is a risk factor for aggression in BPD and ASPD, little research has investigated potential gene-environment (G×E) influences impacting its expression in these conditions. Moreover, G×E interactions may differ by diagnosis. Full factorial analysis of variance was employed to investigate the influence of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) genotype, childhood abuse, and diagnosis on Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) scores in 61 individuals: 20 subjects with BPD, 18 subjects with ASPD, and 23 healthy controls. A group×genotype×abuse interaction was present (F(2,49)=4.4, p =0.018), such that the interaction of MAOA-L and childhood abuse predicted greater BIS-11 motor impulsiveness in BPD. Additionally, BPD subjects reported higher BIS-11 attentional impulsiveness versus ASPD participants (t(1,36)=2.3, p =0.025). These preliminary results suggest that MAOA-L may modulate the impact of childhood abuse on impulsivity in BPD. Results additionally indicate that impulsiveness may be expressed differently in BPD and ASPD.

  7. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Overli, O.

    2009-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  8. Monoamine oxidase B layer-by-layer film fabrication and characterization toward dopamine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; Pereira, Tamyris Paschoal [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, UFSCar, CCTS, Sorocaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares [Universidade Estadual de São Paulo — UNESP, Sorocaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Leite de Moraes, Marli [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Unifesp, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Ferreira, Marystela, E-mail: marystela@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, UFSCar, CCTS, Sorocaba, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    In this work nanostructured film composites of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) enzyme, free or encapsulated in liposomes, were fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, employing polyethylene imine (PEI) as polycation. Initially, the MAO-B enzyme was incorporated into liposomes in order to preserve its enzymatic structure ensuring their activity and catalytic stability. The LbL film growth was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by gold resonance angle shift analysis after each bilayer deposition. Subsequently, the films were applied as amperometric biosensors for dopamine detection using Prussian Blue (PB) as the electron mediator. The biosensor fabricated by MAO-B incorporated into liposomes composed of DPPG:POPG in the ratio (1:4) (w/w) showed the best performance with a sensitivity of 0.86 (μA cm{sup −2})/(mmol L{sup −1}) and a detection limit of 0.33 mmol L{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Monoamine oxidase B incorporation in liposomes was proposed to preserve the enzyme. • Layer-by-layer films composed of MAO-B (free and in liposomes) were fabricated. • Amperometric response using ITO/Prussian Blue covered with the MAO-B films was studied. • Sensitivity, limit of detection and apparent Michaelis–Menten constant were compared.

  9. Development of radioiodinated ligands for exploration of brain monoamine oxidase by tomo-scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.

    1996-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases, MAO, are important in the regulation of monoaminergic neuro-transmissions. The fluctuations in MAO activities has been observed in some psychiatric and neuro-degenerative diseases. Thus, quantification of cerebral MAO activity would be useful for diagnosis and the therapeutic follow-up of these disorders. With the object of doing an in vivo scintigraphic exploration of cerebral MAO by SPECT, we have undertaken to synthesize some radioiodinated MAO inhibitors. In the first part of this work, we have discussed the general properties of the monoamine oxidases and their inhibitors. In the second part we have described the scintigraphic methods. the ligands to be used for MAO exploration, and the radioiodination methods. At last in the third part, the development of three radioiodinated ligands has been presented: - [ 125 I]3-iodopargyline. In vivo results showed that, this radioligand blocked the cerebral MAO-B with moderate selectivity. However, complementary in vivo studies would be needed to define precisely its activity.- [ 125 I]Ro 16-6491. The cerebral fixation of this radioligand was in accordance with the MAO-B sites in the rat brains, but its fixation was too low for scintigraphic exploration in vivo with iodine-123. - [ 125 I]Ro 11-9900. In vivo studies of rat brains showed that the MAO-A sites were bound preferentially by this radioligand. The cerebral biodistribution of this ligand labelled with iodine-123 is considered for use in a model animal nearest to human pathology. (author)

  10. Relationships of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Levels With Clinical Variables in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Hattori, Kotaro; Ogawa, Shintaro; Sasayama, Daimei; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    Many studies have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite levels in depressive disorders. However, their clinical significance is still unclear. We tried to determine whether CSF monoamine metabolite levels could be a state-dependent marker for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on analyses stratified by clinical variables in a relatively large sample. Subjects were 75 patients with MDD according to DSM-IV criteria and 87 healthy controls, matched for age, sex, and ethnicity (Japanese). They were recruited between May 2010 and November 2013. We measured homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG) in CSF samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. We analyzed the relationships of the metabolite levels with age, sex, diagnosis, psychotropic medication use, and depression severity. There was a weak positive correlation between age and 5-HIAA levels in controls (ρ = 0.26, P 12) were significantly lower than those in controls (P .1), were related to depression severity. CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels could be state-dependent markers in MDD patients. Since 5-HIAA levels greatly decrease with the use of antidepressants, HVA levels might be more useful in the clinical setting. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. Monoamine oxidase B layer-by-layer film fabrication and characterization toward dopamine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; Pereira, Tamyris Paschoal; Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; Leite de Moraes, Marli; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-01-01

    In this work nanostructured film composites of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) enzyme, free or encapsulated in liposomes, were fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, employing polyethylene imine (PEI) as polycation. Initially, the MAO-B enzyme was incorporated into liposomes in order to preserve its enzymatic structure ensuring their activity and catalytic stability. The LbL film growth was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by gold resonance angle shift analysis after each bilayer deposition. Subsequently, the films were applied as amperometric biosensors for dopamine detection using Prussian Blue (PB) as the electron mediator. The biosensor fabricated by MAO-B incorporated into liposomes composed of DPPG:POPG in the ratio (1:4) (w/w) showed the best performance with a sensitivity of 0.86 (μA cm −2 )/(mmol L −1 ) and a detection limit of 0.33 mmol L −1 . - Highlights: • Monoamine oxidase B incorporation in liposomes was proposed to preserve the enzyme. • Layer-by-layer films composed of MAO-B (free and in liposomes) were fabricated. • Amperometric response using ITO/Prussian Blue covered with the MAO-B films was studied. • Sensitivity, limit of detection and apparent Michaelis–Menten constant were compared.

  12. The lipidomes of vesicular stomatitis virus, semliki forest virus, and the host plasma membrane analyzed by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host plasma membrane and the two different viruses after exit from the host cells and analyzed the lipid...

  13. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells’ communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE, which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM−1·µm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax and the released charge (Q of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  14. APPARENT LACK OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA (VAM) IN SEAGRASSES ZOSTERA MARINA L. AND THALASSIA TESTUDIUM BANKS EX KONIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined two populations of Zostera marina L. and one of Thalassia testudinum Banks ex Konig for presence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM). None of these plants showed any VAM colonization. In addition, we were unable to find any literature references on the presence o...

  15. Loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 impair vesicular trafficking, tropoelastin secretion and cell survival.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hucthagowder, V.; Morava, E.; Kornak, U.; Lefeber, D.J.; Fischer, B.; Dimopoulou, A.; Aldinger, A.; Choi, J.; Davis, E.C.; Abuelo, D.N.; Adamowicz, M.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Basel-Vanagaite, L.; Fernandez, B.; Greally, M.T.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Kayserili, H.; Lemyre, E.; Tekin, M.; Turkmen, S.; Tuysuz, B.; Yuksel-Konuk, B.; Mundlos, S.; Maldergem, L. van; Wevers, R.A.; Urban, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump (ATP6V0A2). The goal of this study was to define the disease mechanisms that lead to connective tissue

  16. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of SKF38393.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Like dexamphetamine, SKF38393 induces an increase in striatal dopamine efflux which is insensitive for tetrodotoxin, Ca(2+) independent and prevented by a dopamine transporter inhibitor. The dexamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine efflux originates from both the reserpine-sensitive vesicular

  17. ATP is stored in lamellar bodies to activate vesicular P2X4 in an autocrine fashion upon exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Giorgio; Winkelmann, Veronika Eva; Bareis, Lara; Staudenmaier, Laura; Hecht, Elena; Ziller, Charlotte; Ehinger, Konstantin; Schymeinsky, Jürgen; Kranz, Christine; Frick, Manfred

    2018-02-05

    Vesicular P2X 4 receptors are known to facilitate secretion and activation of pulmonary surfactant in the alveoli of the lungs. P2X 4 receptors are expressed in the membrane of lamellar bodies (LBs), large secretory lysosomes that store lung surfactant in alveolar type II epithelial cells, and become inserted into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Subsequent activation of P2X 4 receptors by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) results in local fusion-activated cation entry (FACE), facilitating fusion pore dilation, surfactant secretion, and surfactant activation. Despite the importance of ATP in the alveoli, and hence lung function, the origin of ATP in the alveoli is still elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that ATP is stored within LBs themselves at a concentration of ∼1.9 mM. ATP is loaded into LBs by the vesicular nucleotide transporter but does not activate P2X 4 receptors because of the low intraluminal pH (5.5). However, the rise in intravesicular pH after opening of the exocytic fusion pore results in immediate activation of vesicular P2X 4 by vesicular ATP. Our data suggest a new model in which agonist (ATP) and receptor (P2X 4 ) are located in the same intracellular compartment (LB), protected from premature degradation (ATP) and activation (P2X 4 ), and ideally placed to ensure coordinated and timely receptor activation as soon as fusion occurs to facilitate surfactant secretion. © 2018 Fois et al.

  18. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  19. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  20. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human.

  1. Interactions of macrophages with probiotic bacteria lead to increased antiviral response against vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivec, Martin; Botic, Tanja; Koren, Srecko

    2007-01-01

    and by producing chemokines and immunoregulatory cytokines that enable the adaptive immune response to recognize infected cells and perform antiviral effector functions. Probiotics, as a part of the normal gut intestinal flora, are important in supporting a functional yet balanced immune system. Improving our...... understanding of their role in the activation of macrophages and their stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production in early viral infection was the main goal of this study. Our in vitro model study showed that probiotic bacteria, either from the species Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria have the ability...... dehydrogenases activity could be implied as the first indicator of potential inhibitory effects of the probiotics on virus replication. The interactions between probiotic bacteria, macrophages and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), markedly depended on the bacterial strain studied....

  2. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions...... and non-coding regions supports that SVDV has a recombinant origin between coxsackievirus B5 and another Enterovirus B serotype, most likely coxsackievirus A9. Extensive Bayesian sequence-based analysis of the time of the most recent common ancestor of all analysed sequences places this within a few years...... around 1961. Epidemiological evidence points to China as an origin, but there are no available samples to test this conclusively. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Historical investigation and the clinical aspects of the involved Enterovirus B serotypes, makes the current results consistent with a hypothesis...

  3. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  4. Pharmacological factors in the saliva of blood-feeding insects. Implications for vesicular stomatitis epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, W J

    2000-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) epizootics in the Western United States have caused substantial economic losses to U.S. livestock industries in 1995, 1997, and 1998. The role of arthropods in transmitting VS to U.S. livestock is unclear. In particular, the impact of arthropod salivary gland factors in VS infections in livestock needs study. Pharmacological effects of arthropod salivary gland factors on animals are reviewed. The potential effects of arthropod saliva on the transmission and spread of VS virus to livestock in the Western U.S. is presented with emphasis on the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis. Information is discussed with attention to vector potential of C. sonorensis, and its use as a model for evaluating insect salivary gland pharmacology on livestock response to VS.

  5. Airstream fractionation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: concentration and enumeration of propagules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommerup, I C

    1982-09-01

    Spores and fragments of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in dry soils were concentrated up to 100-fold when the soils were partitioned by fluidization and elutriation with a series of upward airstreams at progressively increasing velocities. The propagules were transported with the finer soil particles according to their equivalent spherical diameters. The system was used to predict the transport of propagules by wind. Concentrated propagules were rapidly separated from the soil particles in each soil fraction by an aqueous flotation method. The technique is proposed as a quantitative method for estimating the numbers of spores and fragments of mycorrhizae. The scheme includes a viability test that was used to differentiate between potentially infective propagules and those that were either dormant or incapable of regrowth.

  6. Phosphorus use efficiency of tomato as influenced by phosphorus and vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi inoculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhinakaran, R.; Savithri, P.

    1997-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.var. CO3) grown in red non-calcareous soil (Paralythic Ustochrept) to study the effect of different P treatments involving single superphosphate (SSP) and Mussoorie rock phosphate (MRP) added at different levels, viz. 100 and 75 kg P 2 O 5 /ha along with and without vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi inoculation. The results revealed that the P application as superphosphate at 100 kg P 2 O 5 /ha significantly increased the yield of tomato but the application of VAM fungi did not have any pronounced effect on tomato yield. The 32 P studies confirmed the increased uptake of P by the plants at higher level of P application. P content and its uptake by tomato fruit increased with the increasing levels of P application and VAM inoculation. The VAM fungi inoculation was also helpful in increasing the fertilizer use efficiency and also per cent P derived from fertilizer. (author)

  7. Increased sporulation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by manipulation of nutrient regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douds, D D; Schenck, N C

    1990-02-01

    Adjustment of pot culture nutrient solutions increased root colonization and sporulation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Paspalum notatum Flugge and VAM fungi were grown in a sandy soil low in N and available P. Hoagland nutrient solution without P enhanced sporulation in soil and root colonization of Acaulospora longula, Scutellospora heterogama, Gigaspora margarita, and a wide range of other VAM fungi over levels produced by a tap water control or nutrient solutions containing P. However, Glomus intraradices produced significantly more spores in plant roots in the tap water control treatment. The effect of the nutrient solutions was not due solely to N nutrition, because the addition of NH(4)NO(3) decreased both colonization and sporulation by G. margarita relative to levels produced by Hoagland solution without P.

  8. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, S; Akgun, A

    2006-07-01

    The experiment was undertaken to test the efficiency of inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species used as rootstocks. The stratified Pistacia seeds were inoculated with VAM fungi. The highest rate of inoculated roots was 96.7% in P. khinjuck seedlings with G. clarum and G. etunicatum, 83.3% in P. vera seedlings with G. caledonium and 73.3% in P. terebinthus seedlings with G. caledonium. Mycorrhizal inoculations improved seedling height only in P. terebinthus. Certain mycorrhizal inoculations increased the leaf N, but not P and K contents. Seedlings inoculated with G. caledonium had higher reducing sugar contents. It was concluded that pre-inoculated Pistacia seedlings could have a better growth in the harsh field conditions.

  9. Unusual armadillo fold in the human general vesicular transport factor p115.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available The golgin family gives identity and structure to the Golgi apparatus and is part of a complex protein network at the Golgi membrane. The golgin p115 is targeted by the GTPase Rab1a, contains a large globular head region and a long region of coiled-coil which forms an extended rod-like structure. p115 serves as vesicle tethering factor and plays an important role at different steps of vesicular transport. Here we present the 2.2 A-resolution X-ray structure of the globular head region of p115. The structure exhibits an armadillo fold that is decorated by elongated loops and carries a C-terminal non-canonical repeat. This terminal repeat folds into the armadillo superhelical groove and allows homodimeric association with important implications for p115 mediated multiple protein interactions and tethering.

  10. Biochemical characterization of native Usher protein complexes from a vesicular subfraction of tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Sisson, Joseph H; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2010-02-16

    Usher syndrome is the major cause of deaf/blindness in the world. It is a genetic heterogeneous disorder, with nine genes already identified as causative for the disease. We noted expression of all known Usher proteins in bovine tracheal epithelial cells and exploited this system for large-scale biochemical analysis of Usher protein complexes. The dissected epithelia were homogenized in nondetergent buffer and sedimented on sucrose gradients. At least two complexes were evident after the first gradient: one formed by specific isoforms of CDH23, PCDH15, and VLGR-1 and a different one at the top of the gradient that included all of the Usher proteins and rab5, a transport vesicle marker. TEM analysis of these top fractions found them enriched in 100-200 nm vesicles, confirming a vesicular association of the Usher complex(es). Immunoisolation of these vesicles confirmed some of the associations already predicted and identified novel interactions. When the vesicles are lysed in the presence of phenylbutyrate, most of the Usher proteins cosediment into the gradient at a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 50 S, correlating with a predicted molecular mass of 2 x 10(6) Da. Although it is still unclear whether there is only one complex or several independent complexes that are trafficked within distinct vesicular pools, this work shows for the first time that native Usher protein complexes occur in vivo. This complex(es) is present primarily in transport vesicles at the apical pole of tracheal epithelial cells, predicting that Usher proteins may be directionally transported as complexes in hair cells and photoreceptors.

  11. Antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus in horses from southern, midwestern and northeastern Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Leobet Lunkes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the agent of a vesicular disease that affects many animal species and may be clinically confounded with foot-and-mouth disease in ruminant and swine. Horses are especially susceptible to VSV and may serve as sentinels for virus circulation. The present study investigated the presence of neutralizing antibodies against VSV Indiana III (VSIV-3 in serum samples of 3,626 horses from six states in three Brazilian regions: Southern (RS, n = 1,011, Midwest (GO/DF, n = 1,767 and Northeast (PB, PE, RN and CE, n = 848 collected between 2013 and 2014. Neutralizing antibodies against VSIV-3 (titers ≥40 were detected in 641 samples (positivity of 17.7%; CI95%:16.5-19.0%, being 317 samples from CE (87.3%; CI95%: 83.4-90.5 %; 109 from RN (65.7%; CI95%: 57.8 -72.7%; 124 from PB (45.4%; CI95%: 39.4-51.5%; 78 from GO/DF (4.4%; CI95%: 3.5-5.5% and nine samples of RS (0.9%; CI95%: 0.4-1.7%. Several samples from the Northeast and Midwest harbored high neutralizing titers, indicating a recent exposure to the virus. In contrast, samples from RS had low titers, possibly due to a past remote exposure. Several positive samples presented neutralizing activity against other VSV serotypes (Indiana I and New Jersey, yet in lower titers, indicating the specificity of the response to VSIV-3. These results demonstrated a relatively recent circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazilian States, confirming clinical findings and demonstrating the sanitary importance of this infection.

  12. Topical vesicular formulations of Curcuma longa extract on recuperating the ultraviolet radiation-damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Chanchal Deep; Saraf, Swarnlata

    2011-12-01

      Ultraviolet radiations generate reactive oxygen species, leading to adverse effects on skin properties. Botanical extracts are multifunctional in nature having various properties like photoprotection, anti-aging, moisturizing, antioxidant, astringent, anti-irritant, and antimicrobial activity.   The aim of this study was to formulate creams having Curcuma longa extract loaded novel vesicular systems (liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes) and study their photoprotective effect by assessment of skin hydration (Cutometer) and sebum content (Sebumeter).   The alcoholic C. longa extract loaded liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes having 0.5-2.0% w/w extract were prepared, evaluated for size, entrapment efficiency, and incorporated into the cream. Their long-term interaction with skin (6 weeks) was compared in terms of their effects on skin hydration and sebum content.   Vesicular size obtained was in the range 167.3 ± 3.0 to 262.4 ± 2.4 nm with low polydispersity index (0.2-0.3) and high entrapment efficiency. The efficacy was in the order C. longa extract loaded transfersomal creams > C. longa extract loaded ethosomal creams > C. longa extract loaded liposomal creams > C. longa extract loaded creams > Empty transfersome loaded cream > Empty ethosome loaded cream > Empty liposome loaded cream > Base cream.   The photoprotective properties of the constituents of C. longa extract and hydrant, moisturizing lipid components of nano vesicles with better skin penetration resulted in improvement in skin properties like skin hydration and sebum content. The herbal extract loaded nano vesicles incorporated in cream could be used as photoprotective formulations. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NATIVE USHER PROTEIN COMPLEXES FROM A VESICULAR SUBFRACTION OF TRACHEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Sisson, Joseph H.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the major cause of deaf/blindness in the world. It is a genetic heterogeneous disorder, with nine genes already identified as causative for the disease. We noted expression of all known Usher proteins in bovine tracheal epithelial cells, and exploited this system for large-scale biochemical analysis of Usher protein complexes. The dissected epithelia were homogenized in non-detergent buffer, and sedimented on sucrose gradients. At least two complexes were evident after the first gradient: one formed by specific isoforms of CDH23, PCDH15 and VLGR-1, and a different one at the top of the gradient that included all the Usher proteins and rab5, a transport vesicle marker. TEM analysis of these top fractions found them enriched in 100–200 nm vesicles, confirming a vesicular association of the Usher complex(es). Immunoisolation of these vesicles confirmed some of the associations already predicted and identified novel interactions. When the vesicles are lysed in the presence of phenylbutyrate, most of the Usher proteins co-sediment into the gradient at a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 50S, correlating with a predicted molecular mass of 2 × 106 Daltons. Although it is still unclear whether there is only one complex or several independent complexes that are trafficked within distinct vesicular pools, this work shows for the first time that native Usher proteins complexes occur in vivo. This complex(es) is present primarily in transport vesicles at the apical pole of tracheal epithelial cells, predicting that Usher proteins may be directionally transported as complexes in hair cells and photoreceptors. PMID:20058854

  14. Microwave effects in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardalhon, M.; Averbeck, D.; Berteaud, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were set up to investigate the effects of open space microwave irradiation of the millimeter (73 GHz) and the centimeter (17 GHz) range in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the wild type strain Paris and the strain delta carrying melanitic tumors in the 3rd larval stage, in the pupae and the adults. The power densities were up to 100mW.cm -2 for 73 GHz and about 60 mW.cm -2 for microwaves at 17 GHz. After 2h exposure to microwaves of 17 GHz or 73 GHz the hatching of the irradiated eggs and their development were normal. In a few cases there was a tendency towards a diminution of the survival of eggs treated at different stages, of larvae treated in the stages 1, 2 and 3 and of treated pupae. However, this was not always statistically significant. The microwave treatment did not induce teratological changes in the adults. A statistical analysis brought about slight diminutions in the incidence and multiplicity of tumors in adult flies. When wild type females were exposed to microwaves of 17 GHz for 16 or 21 h and crossed with untreated males we observed a marked increase in fertility as compared to untreated samples. The viability and tumor incidence in the offspring was not affected. Similar results were obtained when microwaves treated males were crossed with untreated females

  15. Olfactory memory traces in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jacob; Krause, William C; Davis, Ronald L

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila, the fruit fly, coincident exposure to an odor and an aversive electric shock can produce robust behavioral memory. This behavioral memory is thought to be regulated by cellular memory traces within the central nervous system of the fly. These molecular, physiological, or structural changes in neurons, induced by pairing odor and shock, regulate behavior by altering the neurons' response to the learned environment. Recently, novel in vivo functional imaging techniques have allowed researchers to observe cellular memory traces in intact animals. These investigations have revealed interesting temporal and spatial dynamics of cellular memory traces. First, a short-term cellular memory trace was discovered that exists in the antennal lobe, an early site of olfactory processing. This trace represents the recruitment of new synaptic activity into the odor representation and forms for only a short period of time just after training. Second, an intermediate-term cellular memory trace was found in the dorsal paired medial neuron, a neuron thought to play a role in stabilizing olfactory memories. Finally, a long-term protein synthesis-dependent cellular memory trace was discovered in the mushroom bodies, a structure long implicated in olfactory learning and memory. Therefore, it appears that aversive olfactory associations are encoded by multiple cellular memory traces that occur in different regions of the brain with different temporal domains.

  16. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 facilitates vesicular stomatitis virus infection by binding vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hongjun; Tan, Binghe; Wei, Yinglei; Xiong, Qingqing; Yan, Yan; Hou, Lili; Wu, Nannan; Siwko, Stefan; Cimarelli, Andrea; Xu, Jianrong; Han, Honghui; Qian, Min; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing

    2017-10-06

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies and Chandipura viruses belong to the Rhabdovirus family. VSV is a common laboratory virus to study viral evolution and host immune responses to viral infection, and recombinant VSV-based vectors have been widely used for viral oncolysis, vaccination, and gene therapy. Although the tropism of VSV is broad, and its envelope glycoprotein G is often used for pseudotyping other viruses, the host cellular components involved in VSV infection remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the host protein leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is essential for VSV and VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus (VSVG-LV) to infect susceptible cells. Accordingly, Lgr4-deficient mice had dramatically decreased VSV levels in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, Lgr4 knockdown in RAW 264.7 cells also significantly suppressed VSV infection, and Lgr4 overexpression in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced VSV infection. Interestingly, only VSV infection relied on Lgr4, whereas infections with Newcastle disease virus, influenza A virus (A/WSN/33), and herpes simplex virus were unaffected by Lgr4 status. Of note, assays of virus entry, cell ELISA, immunoprecipitation, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that VSV bound susceptible cells via the Lgr4 extracellular domain. Pretreating cells with an Lgr4 antibody, soluble LGR4 extracellular domain, or R-spondin 1 blocked VSV infection by competitively inhibiting VSV binding to Lgr4. Taken together, the identification of Lgr4 as a VSV-specific host factor provides important insights into understanding VSV entry and its pathogenesis and lays the foundation for VSV-based gene therapy and viral oncolytic therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity in tobacco particulate matter: Are harman and norharman the only physiologically relevant inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Penelope; Grounds, Peter; Brennan, Katharine A

    2017-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibition is significant in smokers, but it is still unclear how the inhibition that is seen in the brains and bodies of smokers is brought about. Our aim was to test the contribution of the harman and norharman in tobacco smoke to MAO-A inhibition from tobacco smoke preparations, as part of a re-examination of harman and norharman as the cause of the inhibition of MAO-A inhibition in the brain. Tobacco smoke particulate matter and cigarette smoke particulate matter were prepared and the amounts of harman and norharman measured. The results were compared with the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity. At a nicotine concentration of 0.6μM (a "physiological" concentration in blood) the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity measured in these samples was sufficient to inhibit the enzyme by approximately 10%. Of this inhibitory activity, only a small proportion of the total was found to be due to harman and norharman. These results show that harman and norharman provide only a moderate contribution to the total monoamine oxidase-A inhibitory activity of tobacco smoke, perhaps under 10%. This suggests that other inhibitors (either known or unknown) may be more significant contributors to total inhibitory activity than has yet been established, and deserve closer examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. SAD-B kinase regulates pre-synaptic vesicular dynamics at hippocampal Schaffer collateral synapses and affects contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Ayako M; Nagase, Masashi; Hagiwara, Akari; Hida, Yamato; Tsuji, Megumi; Ochiai, Toshitaka; Kato, Fusao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Synapses of amphids defective (SAD)-A/B kinases control various steps in neuronal development and differentiation, such as axon specifications and maturation in central and peripheral nervous systems. At mature pre-synaptic terminals, SAD-B is associated with synaptic vesicles and the active zone cytomatrix; however, how SAD-B regulates neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in vivo remains unclear. Thus, we used SAD-B knockout (KO) mice to study the function of this pre-synaptic kinase in the brain. We found that the paired-pulse ratio was significantly enhanced at Shaffer collateral synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region in SAD-B KO mice compared with wild-type littermates. We also found that the frequency of the miniature excitatory post-synaptic current was decreased in SAD-B KO mice. Moreover, synaptic depression following prolonged low-frequency synaptic stimulation was significantly enhanced in SAD-B KO mice. These results suggest that SAD-B kinase regulates vesicular release probability at pre-synaptic terminals and is involved in vesicular trafficking and/or regulation of the readily releasable pool size. Finally, we found that hippocampus-dependent contextual fear learning was significantly impaired in SAD-B KO mice. These observations suggest that SAD-B kinase plays pivotal roles in controlling vesicular release properties and regulating hippocampal function in the mature brain. Synapses of amphids defective (SAD)-A/B kinases control various steps in neuronal development and differentiation, but their roles in mature brains were only partially known. Here, we demonstrated, at mature pre-synaptic terminals, that SAD-B regulates vesicular release probability and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, hippocampus-dependent contextual fear learning was significantly impaired in SAD-B KO mice, suggesting that SAD-B kinase plays pivotal roles in controlling vesicular release properties and regulating hippocampal function in the mature brain. © 2015 International

  19. Monte carlo simulation of vesicular release, spatiotemporal distribution of glutamate in synaptic cleft and generation of postsynaptic currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavinovíc, M I

    1999-02-01

    The release of vesicular glutamate, spatiotemporal changes in glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and the subsequent generation of fast excitatory postsynaptic currents at a hippocampal synapse were modeled using the Monte Carlo method. It is assumed that glutamate is released from a spherical vesicle through a cylindrical fusion pore into the synaptic cleft and that S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy -5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are uniformly distributed postsynaptically. The time course of change in vesicular concentration can be described by a single exponential, but a slow tail is also observed though only following the release of most of the glutamate. The time constant of decay increases with vesicular size and a lower diffusion constant, and is independent of the initial concentration, becoming markedly shorter for wider fusion pores. The cleft concentration at the fusion pore mouth is not negligible compared to vesicular concentration, especially for wider fusion pores. Lateral equilibration of glutamate is rapid, and within approximately 50 micros all AMPA receptors on average see the same concentration of glutamate. Nevertheless the single-channel current and the number of channels estimated from mean-variance plots are unreliable and different when estimated from rise- and decay-current segments. Greater saturation of AMPA receptor channels provides higher but not more accurate estimates. Two factors contribute to the variability of postsynaptic currents and render the mean-variance nonstationary analysis unreliable, even when all receptors see on average the same glutamate concentration. Firstly, the variability of the instantaneous cleft concentration of glutamate, unlike the mean concentration, first rapidly decreases before slowly increasing; the variability is greater for fewer molecules in the cleft and is spatially nonuniform. Secondly, the efficacy with which glutamate produces a response changes with time. Understanding

  20. Drosophila Studies on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Tian; Zi Chao Zhang; Junhai Han

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade,numerous genes associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been identified.These genes encode key regulators of synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity.Drosophila is a prominent model system for ASD studies to define novel genes linked to ASDs and decipher their molecular roles in synaptogenesis,synaptic function,synaptic plasticity,and neural circuit assembly and consolidation.Here,we review Drosophila studies on ASD genes that regulate synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity through modulating chromatin remodeling,transcription,protein synthesis and degradation,cytoskeleton dynamics,and synaptic scaffolding.

  1. REDfly: a Regulatory Element Database for Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Steven M; Li, Long; Hu, Zihua; Halfon, Marc S

    2006-02-01

    Bioinformatics studies of transcriptional regulation in the metazoa are significantly hindered by the absence of readily available data on large numbers of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Even the richly annotated Drosophila melanogaster genome lacks extensive CRM information. We therefore present here a database of Drosophila CRMs curated from the literature complete with both DNA sequence and a searchable description of the gene expression pattern regulated by each CRM. This resource should greatly facilitate the development of computational approaches to CRM discovery as well as bioinformatics analyses of regulatory sequence properties and evolution.

  2. Longevity and the stress response in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    briefly review the state of the art of research on ageing and longevity in the model organism Drosophila, with focus on the role of the general stress response. We will conclude by contemplating some of the implications of the findings in this research and will suggest several directions for future...... research. Keywords: Ageing; Stress response; Hsp; Drosophila; Stress......The concept that lifespan is a function of the capacity to withstand extrinsic stress is very old. In concordance with this, long-lived individuals often have increased resistance against a variety of stresses throughout life. Genes underlying the stress response may therefore have the ability...

  3. Effect of aspartame on oxidative stress and monoamine neurotransmitter levels in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Salem, Neveen A; Hussein, Jihan Seid

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress and brain monoamines in normal circumstances and after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) in mice. Aspartame (0.625-45 mg/kg) was given via subcutaneous route at the time of endotoxin administration. Mice were euthanized 4 h later. Reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; TBARS), and nitrite concentrations were measured in brain and liver. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and glucose were determined in brain. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in liver. The administration of only aspartame (22.5 and 45 mg/kg) increased brain TBARS by 17.7-32.8%, decreased GSH by 25.6-31.6%, and increased TNF-α by 16.7-44%. Aspartame caused dose-dependent inhibition of brain serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, AST, ALT, or ALP. The administration of LPS increased nitrite in brain and liver by 26.8 and 37.1%, respectively; decreased GSH in brain and liver by 21.6 and 31.1%, respectively; increased brain TNF-α by 340.4%, and glucose by 39.9%, and caused marked increase in brain monoamines. LPS increased AST, ALT, and ALP in liver tissue by 84.4, 173.7, and 258.9%, respectively. Aspartame given to LPS-treated mice at 11.25 and 22.5 mg/kg increased brain TBARS by 15.5-16.9%, nitrite by 12.6-20.1%, and mitigated the increase in monoamines. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, ALT, AST, or ALP. Thus, the administration of aspartame alone or in the presence of mild systemic inflammatory response increases oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain, but not in the liver.

  4. Genetic changeover in Drosophila populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, B.

    1986-01-01

    Three populations of Drosophila melanogaster that were daughter populations of two others with histories of high, continuous radiation exposure [population 5 (irradiated, small population size) gave rise to populations 17 (small) and 18 (large); population 6 (irradiated, large population size) gave rise to population 19 (large)] were maintained for 1 year with no radiation exposure. The frequency with which random combinations of second chromosomes taken from population 19 proved to be lethal changed abruptly after about 8 months, thus revealing the origin of a selectively favored element in that population. (This element may or may not have been the cause of the lethality.) A comparison of the loss of lethals in populations 17 and 18 with a loss that occurred concurrently in the still-irradiated population 5 suggests that a second, selectively favored element had arisen in that population just before populations 17 and 18 were split off. This element was on a nonlethal chromosome. The result in population 5 was the elimination of many lethals from that population, followed by a subsequent increase as mutations occurred in the favored nonlethal chromosome. Populations 17 and 18, with no radiation exposure, underwent a loss of lethals with no subsequent increase. The events described here, as well as others to be described elsewhere, suggest that populations may be subject to episodic periods of rapid gene frequency changes that occur under intense selection pressure. In the instances in which the changeover was revealed by the elimination of preexisting lethals, earlier lethal frequencies were reduced by approximately one-half; the selectively favored elements appear, then, to be favored in the heterozygous--not homozygous--condition

  5. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution...

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  7. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  8. Behavioural reproductive isolation and speciation in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the genus Drosophila, the phenomenon of behavioural reproductive isolation, which is an important type of premating (prezygotic) reproductive isolating mechanisms, has been extensively studied and interesting data have been documented. In many cases incomplete sexual isolation has been observed and the pattern ...

  9. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arceo-Maldonado, C.

    1989-01-01

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y + y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  10. Low-resolution structure of Drosophila translin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Gupta, Gagan D.

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of native Drosophila melanogaster translin diffracted to 7 Å resolution. Reductive methylation of the protein improved crystal quality. The native and methylated proteins showed similar profiles in size-exclusion chromatography analyses but the methylated protein displayed reduced DNA-binding activity. Crystals of the methylated protein diffracted to 4.2 Å resolution at BM14 of the ESRF synchrotron. Crystals with 49% solvent content belonged to monoclinic space group P21 with eight protomers in the asymmetric unit. Only 2% of low-resolution structures with similar low percentage solvent content were found in the PDB. The crystal structure, solved by molecular replacement method, refined to Rwork (Rfree) of 0.24 (0.29) with excellent stereochemistry. The crystal structure clearly shows that drosophila protein exists as an octamer, and not as a decamer as expected from gel-filtration elution profiles. The similar octameric quaternary fold in translin orthologs and in translin–TRAX complexes suggests an up-down dimer as the basic structural subunit of translin-like proteins. The drosophila oligomer displays asymmetric assembly and increased radius of gyration that accounts for the observed differences between the elution profiles of human and drosophila proteins on gel-filtration columns. This study demonstrates clearly that low-resolution X-ray structure can be useful in understanding complex biological oligomers. PMID:23650579

  11. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  12. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguly, M.L.; Marques, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms of radioresistance in Drosophila are studied. The mutagenic effects of 5KR of 60 Cobalt gamma radiation and of 0,006M dose of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) on four D. Melanogaster strains (RC 1 , CO 3 , BUE and LEN) are investigated. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  14. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Banerjee P. and Singh B. N. 2017 The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic relationship among different members based on chromosomal variations. J. Genet. 96, 97–107]. Introduction ..... loops touch the chromocenter and in our microphotograph. (depicting both the arms) too, the involvement of chromo-.

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of monoamine oxidase in the hypothalamus of ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorova, B.; Stanikova, A.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated changes in monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the hypothalamus of ewes in the anoestrous period exposed to a whole body Co-60 irradiation with a total dose of 6.7 Gy for the period of 7 days. The activity of MAO was determined by means of a radiochemical method using C-14 tryptamine as a substrate. Whole body exposure to gamma radiation of total dose of 6.7 Gy increased significantly (P < 0.001) the activity of MAO in the caudal, medial and rostral hypothalamus of the investigated ewes. It may by assumed that an increased degradation of catecholamines caused by MAO is one of the mechanisms responsible for pronounced changes in the level of catecholamines in the hypothalamus of ewes after irradiation. (authors)

  16. Cerebral monoamine oxidase A inhibition in tobacco smokers confirmed with PET and [11C]Befloxatone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch.; Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch.; Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch.; Berlin, I.; Gregoire, M.C.; Bottlaender, M.; Roumenov, D.; Dolle, F.; Bourgeois, S.; Artiges, E.; Trichard, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibition of cerebral monoamine oxidases (MAOs) by cigarette smoke components could participate to the tobacco addiction. However, the actual extent of this inhibition in vivo in smokers is still poorly known. We investigated cerebral MAO-A availability in 7 tobacco-dependent subjects and 6 healthy nonsmokers, using positron emission tomography (PET) and the MAO-A selective radioligand [ 11 C]befloxatone. In comparison to nonsmokers, smokers showed a significant overall reduction of [ 11 C]befloxatone binding potential (BP) in cortical areas (average reduction, -60%) and a similar trend in caudate and thalamus (-40%). Our findings confirm a widespread inhibition of cerebral MAO-A in smokers. This mechanism may contribute to tobacco addiction and for a possible mood-modulating effect of tobacco. (authors)

  17. Quantum chemical modeling of the inhibition mechanism of monoamine oxidase by oxazolidinone and analogous heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Safiye Sağ; Özpınar, Gül Altınbaş; Boz, Ümüt

    2014-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO, EC 1.4.3.4) is responsible from the oxidation of a variety of amine neurotransmitters. MAO inhibitors are used for the treatment of depression or Parkinson's disease. They also inhibit the catabolism of dietary amines. According to one hypothesis, inactivation results from the formation of a covalent adduct to a cysteine residue in the enzyme. If the adduct is stable enough, the enzyme is inhibited for a long time. After a while, enzyme can turn to its active form as a result of adduct breakdown by β-elimination. In this study, the proposed inactivation mechanism was modeled and tested by quantum chemical calculations. Eight heterocyclic methylthioamine derivatives were selected to represent the proposed covalent adducts. Activation energies related to their β-elimination reactions were calculated using ab initio and density functional theory methods. Calculated activation energies were in good agreement with the relative stabilities of the hypothetical adducts predicted in the literature by enzyme inactivation measurements.

  18. [Substrate-inhibitory analysis of monoamine oxidase from hepatopancreas of the octopus Bathypolypus arcticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basova, I N; Iagodina, O V

    2012-01-01

    Study of the substrate-inhibitory specificity of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) of hepatopancreas of the octopus Bathypolypus arcticus revealed distinctive peculiarities of catalytic properties of this enzyme. The studied enzyme, on one hand, like the classic MAO of homoiothermal animals, is able to deaminate tyramine, serotonin, benzylamine, tryptamine, beta-phenylethylamine, while, on the other hand, deaminates histamine and does not deaminate putrescine--classic substrates of diamine oxidase (DAO). Results of the substrate-inhibitory analysis with use of chlorgiline and deprenyl are indirect proofs of the existence in the octopus hepatopancreas of one molecular MAO form. Semicarbazide and pyronine G turned out to be weak irreversible inhibitors, four derivatives of acridine--irreversible inhibitors of the intermediate effectiveness with respect to the octopus hepatopancreas MAO; specificity of action of inhibitors at deamination of different substrates was equal.

  19. The importance of the descending monoamine system for the pain experience and its treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    Brainstem and midbrain areas engage descending facilitatory and inhibitory neurones to potentiate or suppress the passage of sensory inputs from spinal loci to the brain. The balance between descending controls, both excitatory and inhibitory, can be altered in various pain states and can critically determine the efficacy of certain analgesic drugs. There is good evidence for a prominent α2 adrenoceptor-mediated inhibitory system and for 5-HT3 receptor-mediated excitatory control of spinal cord activity that originates in supraspinal areas. Given the multiple roles of these transmitters in pain and functions such as sleep, depression, and anxiety, the link between spinal and supraspinal processing of noxious inputs (via the monoamine transmitters) could be pivotal for linking the sensory and affective components of pain and their common co-morbidities, and also may potentially explain differences in pain scores and treatment outcomes in the patient population. PMID:20948695

  20. Improved method for HPLC analysis of polyamines, agmatine and aromatic monoamines in plant tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucas carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues.

  1. Monoamine oxidase B layer-by-layer film fabrication and characterization toward dopamine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; Pereira, Tamyris Paschoal; Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; de Moraes, Marli Leite; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-01-01

    In this work nanostructured film composites of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) enzyme, free or encapsulated in liposomes, were fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, employing polyethylene imine (PEI) as polycation. Initially, the MAO-B enzyme was incorporated into liposomes in order to preserve its enzymatic structure ensuring their activity and catalytic stability. The LbL film growth was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by gold resonance angle shift analysis after each bilayer deposition. Subsequently, the films were applied as amperometric biosensors for dopamine detection using Prussian Blue (PB) as the electron mediator. The biosensor fabricated by MAO-B incorporated into liposomes composed of DPPG:POPG in the ratio (1:4) (w/w) showed the best performance with a sensitivity of 0.86 (μA cm(-2))/(mmol L(-1)) and a detection limit of 0.33 mmol L(-1).

  2. Combination monoamine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker treatment of migraine, with anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikangas, K R; Merikangas, J R

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study comparing the effectiveness of a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, atenolol, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAO-I), phenelzine, and the combination in treatment of 61 adults with migraine headache. The goals of the study are (1) to investigate the safety of concomitant treatment of migraine with beta-blockers and phenelzine, (2) to assess whether orthostatic hypertension and other side effects would be relieved, and (3) to compare the results of this open trial of phenelzine to those of a previous study using similar methods. Phenelzine was associated with a large decrease in the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Anxiety and depression were also reduced by phenelzine both alone, and in combination with a beta-blocker. The results show that the combination of MAO-I's and beta-blockers can be administered safely, and can lead to the reduction in the side effects with either drug alone.

  3. Vascular dysfunction associated with major depression-like symptoms: monoamine homeostasis and endothelial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzinova, Elena; Andresen, Jørgen; Wiborg, Ove

    Major depression and cardiovascular diseases have strong co-morbidity but the reason for this is unknown. In Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) model of depression only some rats develop depression-like symptoms (i.e. anhedonia, measured by sucrose intake) while others are resilient to 8 weeks of CMS...... and reduced expression of extra-neuronal transporter (OCT-2) in anhedonic arteries. The contractility of middle cerebral arteries to 5-HT was reduced by CMS but recovered by anti-depressant treatment. Resistance arteries from anhedonic rats were less sensitive to acetylcholine compared to non......-like response) was significantly reduced in anhedonic rats. This was associated with decreased transcription of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. Our results indicate that CMS-induced depression-like symptoms in rats are associated with changes in monoamine uptake and endothelial dysfunctions...

  4. Effect of Zuogui Pill () on monoamine neurotransmitters and sex hormones in climacteric rats with panic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2017-03-01

    To explore the effects of Chinese medicine prescription Zuogui Pill (, ZGP) on monoamine neurotransmitters and sex hormones in climacteric rats with induced panic attacks. Forty-eight climacteric female rats were randomized into 6 groups with 8 rats in each group: the control group, the model group, the low-, medium- and high-dose ZGP groups and the alprazolam group. Rats in the low-, medium- and high-dose ZGP groups were administered 4.725, 9.45, or 18.9 g/kg ZGP by gastric perfusion, respectively. The alprazolam group was treated by gastric perfusion with 0.036 mg/kg alprazolam. The control and model groups were treated with distilled water. The animals were pretreated once daily for 8 consecutive weeks. The behaviors of rats in the open fifield test and the elevated T-maze (ETM) were observed after induced panic attack, and the levels of brain monoamine neurotransmitters and the plasma levels of sex hormones were measured. Compared with the control group, the mean ETM escape time and the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenalin (NE) of the model group were signifificantly reduced (P<0.05), Compared with the model group, the mean ETM escape time and the 5-HT and NE levels of all the ZGP groups increased signifificantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01). However, no signifificant difference was observed in the levels of sex hormones between the groups. Pretreatment with ZGP in climacteric rats may improve the behavior of panic attack, which may be related to increased 5-HT and NE in the brain.

  5. Monoamine transporter availability in Parkinson's disease patients with or without depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Strecker, Karl; Wegner, Florian; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Schwarz, Johannes; Oehlwein, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common symptom in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and markedly reduces their quality of life. As post-mortem studies have shown, its presence may reflect extensive cell loss in the midbrain and brainstem with imbalances in monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, in vivo evidence of specific monoaminergic deficits in depressed PD patients is still sparse. Therefore, we studied PD patients with depression (PD+D) and without depression (PD-D) using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the monoamine transporter marker [ 123 I]FP-CIT. A magnetic resonance imaging-based region-of-interest analysis was applied to quantify the specific-to-nondisplaceable [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding coefficient V 3 '' in the striatum, thalamus and midbrain/brainstem regions. PD+D patients had significantly lower V 3 '' compared with PD-D patients in the striatum (p 3 '' than controls (p 3 '' nor midbrain/brainstem V 3 '' differed from those in PD-D patients (p=0.168, p=0.201) or controls (p=0.384, p=0.318). Our data indicate that depression in PD is associated with a more pronounced loss of striatal dopamine transporter availability that is most likely secondary to increased dopaminergic degeneration. In addition, depressed PD patients have a lower availability of midbrain/brainstem monoamine transporters than nondepressed PD patients. These findings provide in vivo evidence in support of the known post-mortem data demonstrating more extensive nerve cell loss in PD with depression and indicate that SPECT imaging can help to identify pathophysiological changes underlying nonmotor symptoms in this common movement disorder. (orig.)

  6. Monoamine reuptake site occupancy of sibutramine: Relationship to antidepressant-like and thermogenic effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Wen; Langdon, Shaun; Pieschl, Rick; Strong, Todd; Wright, Robert N; Rohrbach, Kenneth; Lelas, Snjezana; Lodge, Nicholas J

    2014-08-15

    Sibutramine was formerly marketed as an anti-obesity agent. The current study investigated the relationships between monoamine reuptake site occupancy for sibutramine and both its antidepressant-like efficacy and thermogenic effects. Sibutramine's effects on locomotor activity (LMA) and food intake were also evaluated. Sibutramine occupied monoamine reuptake binding sites with the rank order of potency of NET>SERT>DAT; at 10mg/kg, po, occupancy was 95% NET, 81% SERT and 73% DAT. Sibutramine produced antidepressant-like behavior in the forced swim test; at the lowest effective dose (3mg/kg, po) occupancy was 61%, 90% and 23% at SERT, NET and DAT sites, respectively. Sibutramine also increased body core temperature in a dose- and time-dependent manner; at the lowest effective dose (30mg/kg) SERT, NET and DAT occupancies were respectively 78%, 86% and 59%. A significant decrease in food consumption was observed at 3 and 10mg/kg, po. LMA was increased at ≥10mg/kg, sc. The relationship between efficacy in the FST and occupancy was also determined for citalopram, fluoxetine and reboxetine. Similarly, the relationship between thermogenesis and target occupancy for several single or double/triple reuptake inhibitors was measured and showed that >40-50% DAT binding was required for thermogenesis. Thermogenesis was blocked by the D1 antagonist SCH39166 (3mg/kg, sc). Our findings indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of sibutramine may result from additive or synergistic actions on the three reuptake binding targets. At higher doses, sibutramine produces thermogenesis; DAT inhibition and activation of dopamine D1 receptors are required for this effect. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Iododerivative of pargyline: A potential tracer for the exploration of monoamine oxidase sites by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lena, Isabelle; Ombetta, Jean-Edouard; Chalon, Sylvie; Dognon, Anne-Marie; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Frangin, Yves; Garreau, Lucette; Besnard, Jean-Claude; Guilloteau, Denis

    1995-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases are important in the regulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission. An increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) has been observed in some neurodegenerative diseases, and therefore quantification of cerebral MAO B activity by SPECT would be useful for the diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up of these disorders. We have developed an iodinated derivative of pargyline, a selective inhibitor of MAO B, in order to explore this enzyme by SPECT. Stable bromo and iodo derivatives of pargyline were synthesized and chemically characterized. The radioiodinated ligand [ 125 I]-2-iodopargyline was obtained with high specific activity from the bromo precursor by nucleophilic exchange. Affinity and selectivity of 2-iodopargyline were tested in vitro. Biodistribution study of [ 125 I]-2-iodopargyline was performed in rats. Radioiodinated ligand were obtained in a no-carrier-added form. 2-iodopargyline has a higher in vitro affinity for MAO B than pargyline. However, the in vitro selectivity for MAO B was better for pargyline than for 2-iodopargyline. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies and in vivo saturation studies with selective inhibitors of MAO showed that the cerebral biodistribution of [ 125 I]-2-iodopargyline in the rat is consistent with high level binding to MAO B sites in the pineal gland and in the thalamus. In conclusion, 2-iodopargyline preferentially binds in vivo to MAO B sites with high affinity. However, its selectivity for MAO B in rats is not very high, whereas this ligand binds to a lesser extent to MAO A. It will be then of great value to evaluate the specificity of 2-iodopargyline in humans. This new ligand labeled with 123 I should therefore be a suitable tool for SPECT exploration of MAO B in the human brain

  8. Drosophila increase exploration after visually detecting predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel de la Flor

    Full Text Available Novel stimuli elicit behaviors that are collectively known as specific exploration. These behaviors allow the animal to become more familiar with the novel objects within its environment. Specific exploration is frequently suppressed by defensive reactions to predator cues. Herein, we examine if this suppression occurs in Drosophila melanogaster by measuring the response of these flies to wild harvested predators. The flies used in our experiments have been cultured and had not lived under predator threat for multiple decades. In a circular arena with centrally-caged predators, wild type Drosophila actively avoided the pantropical jumping spider, Plexippus paykulli, and the Texas unicorn mantis, Phyllovates chlorophaena, indicating an innate defensive reaction to these predators. Interestingly, wild type Drosophila males also avoided a centrally-caged mock spider, and the avoidance of the mock spider became exaggerated when it was made to move within the cage. Visually impaired Drosophila failed to detect and avoid the Plexippus paykulli and the moving mock spider, while the broadly anosmic orco2 mutants were fully capable of detecting and avoiding Plexippus paykulli, indicating that these flies principally relied upon vison to perceive the predator stimuli. During early exploration of the arena, exploratory activity increased in the presence of Plexippus paykulli and the moving mock spider. The elevated activity induced by Plexippus paykulli disappeared after the fly had finished exploring, suggesting the flies were capable of habituating the predator cues. Taken together, these results indicate that despite being isolated from predators for decades Drosophila will visually detect these predators, retain innate defensive behaviors, respond by increasing exploratory activity in the arena rather than suppressing activity, and may habituate to normal predator cues.

  9. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  10. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  11. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Arboleda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ e Indiana (VSV-IN, afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar, bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos de los cascos; hay pérdida de peso y decrecimiento en la producción de leche. Está clasificada en la Lista A de la Organización Internacional de Epizootias, debido a su gran poder de difusión, a las graves consecuencias socioeconómicas y a las restricciones comerciales. Además, clínicamente la EV es indistinguible de la Fiebre Aftosa (FA (1.
    La enfermedad se presenta por ciclos estacionales; la mayoría
    de ellos ocurre en las épocas de transición de los períodos de lluvias a los de verano y viceversa (2. Estudios serológicos realizados en áreas endémicas han demostrado que VSV-NJ y VSV-IN infectan en forma natural una amplia variedad de animales silvestres, los cuales están posiblemente implicados en la ecozootiología de la EV, bien como hospederos portadores, amplificadores o reservorios. Igualmente, dos especies de artrópodos, Lutzomyia shannoni y Simulium vittatum son infectados naturalmente, replican y transmiten experimentalmente
    el VSV, convirtiéndolos en posibles vectores y/o reservorios.
    Sin embargo, en ningún animal se produce la viremia necesaria para infectar los artrópodos hematófagos. El reservorio natural nunca ha sido encontrado entre los animales domésticos y silvestres investigados (3.

    El objetivo es identificar los factores ecológicos (cobertura
    vegetal, temperatura promedio, pluviosidad y humedad relativa, los vectores artrópodos y los mamíferos reservorios asociados con el antenimiento y transmisión de la VSV en

  12. A Polyamide Inhibits Replication of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Targeting RNA in the Nucleocapsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumpper, Ryan H.; Li, Weike; Castañeda, Carlos H.; Scuderi, M. José; Bashkin, James K.; Luo, Ming; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2018-02-07

    Polyamides have been shown to bind double-stranded DNA by complementing the curvature of the minor groove and forming various hydrogen bonds with DNA. Several polyamide molecules have been found to have potent antiviral activities against papillomavirus, a double-stranded DNA virus. By analogy, we reason that polyamides may also interact with the structured RNA bound in the nucleocapsid of a negative-strand RNA virus. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was selected as a prototype virus to test this possibility since its genomic RNA encapsidated in the nucleocapsid forms a structure resembling one strand of an A-form RNA duplex. One polyamide molecule, UMSL1011, was found to inhibit infection of VSV. To confirm that the polyamide targeted the nucleocapsid, a nucleocapsid-like particle (NLP) was incubated with UMSL1011. The encapsidated RNA in the polyamide-treated NLP was protected from thermo-release and digestion by RNase A. UMSL1011 also inhibits viral RNA synthesis in the intracellular activity assay for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The crystal structure revealed that UMSL1011 binds the structured RNA in the nucleocapsid. The conclusion of our studies is that the RNA in the nucleocapsid is a viable antiviral target of polyamides. Since the RNA structure in the nucleocapsid is similar in all negative-strand RNA viruses, polyamides may be optimized to target the specific RNA genome of a negative-strand RNA virus, such as respiratory syncytial virus and Ebola virus.

    IMPORTANCENegative-strand RNA viruses (NSVs) include several life-threatening pathogens, such as rabies virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Ebola virus. There are no effective antiviral drugs against these viruses. Polyamides offer an exceptional opportunity because they may be optimized to target each NSV. Our studies on vesicular stomatitis virus, an NSV, demonstrated that a polyamide molecule could specifically target the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid and inhibit

  13. Autocrine regulation of ecdysone synthesis by β3-octopamine receptor in the prothoracic gland is essential for Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohhara, Yuya; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kayashima, Yasunari; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Akagi, Kazutaka; Ueda, Hitoshi; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2015-02-03

    In Drosophila, pulsed production of the steroid hormone ecdysone plays a pivotal role in developmental transitions such as metamorphosis. Ecdysone production is regulated in the prothoracic gland (PG) by prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) and insulin-like peptides (Ilps). Here, we show that monoaminergic autocrine regulation of ecdysone biosynthesis in the PG is essential for metamorphosis. PG-specific knockdown of a monoamine G protein-coupled receptor, β3-octopamine receptor (Octβ3R), resulted in arrested metamorphosis due to lack of ecdysone. Knockdown of tyramine biosynthesis genes expressed in the PG caused similar defects in ecdysone production and metamorphosis. Moreover, PTTH and Ilps signaling were impaired by Octβ3R knockdown in the PG, and activation of these signaling pathways rescued the defect in metamorphosis. Thus, monoaminergic autocrine signaling in the PG regulates ecdysone biogenesis in a coordinated fashion on activation by PTTH and Ilps. We propose that monoaminergic autocrine signaling acts downstream of a body size checkpoint that allows metamorphosis to occur when nutrients are sufficiently abundant.

  14. Novel multifunctional neuroprotective iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor drugs for neurodegenerative diseases: in vitro studies on antioxidant activity, prevention of lipid peroxide formation and monoamine oxidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hailin; Gal, Shunit; Weiner, Lev M; Bar-Am, Orit; Warshawsky, Abraham; Fridkin, Mati; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2005-10-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative stress, elevated levels of iron and of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B activity, and depletion of antioxidants in the brain may be major pathogenic factors in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. Accordingly, iron chelators, antioxidants and MAO-B inhibitors have shown efficacy in a variety of cellular and animal models of CNS injury. In searching for novel antioxidant iron chelators with potential MAO-B inhibitory activity, a series of new iron chelators has been designed, synthesized and investigated. In this study, the novel chelators were further examined for their activity as antioxidants, MAO-B inhibitors and neuroprotective agents in vitro. Three of the selected chelators (M30, HLA20 and M32) were the most effective in inhibiting iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates with IC50 values (12-16 microM), which is comparable with that of desferal, a prototype iron chelator that is not has orally active. Their antioxidant activities were further confirmed using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In PC12 cell culture, the three novel chelators at 0.1 microM were able to attenuate cell death induced by serum deprivation and by 6-hydroxydopamine. M30 possessing propargyl, the MAO inhibitory moiety of the anti-Parkinson drug rasagiline, displayed greater neuroprotective potency than that of rasagiline. In addition, in vitro, M30 was a highly potent non-selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitor (IC50 < 0.1 microM). However, HLA20 was more selective for MAO-B but had poor MAO inhibition, with an IC50 value of 64.2 microM. The data suggest that M30 and HLA20 might serve as leads in developing drugs with multifunctional activities for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Interorgan Communication Pathways in Physiology: Focus on Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Droujinine, Ilia A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Studies in mammals and Drosophila have demonstrated the existence and significance of secreted factors involved in communication between distal organs. In this review, primarily focusing on Drosophila, we examine the known interorgan communication factors and their functions, physiological inducers, and integration in regulating physiology. Moreover, we describe how organ-sensing screens in Drosophila can systematically identify novel conserved interorgan communication factors. Finally, we di...

  16. Early Olfactory Processing in Drosophila: Mechanisms and Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Rachel I.

    2013-01-01

    In the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster, it is relatively straightforward to make in vivo measurements of activity in neurons corresponding to targeted processing. This, together with the numerical simplicity of the Drosophila olfactory system, has produced rapid gains in our understanding of Drosophila olfaction. This review summarizes the neurophysiology of the first two layers of this system: the peripheral olfactory receptor neurons and their postsynaptic targets in the antenna...

  17. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Extensive In Vitro Hyphal Growth of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Presence of CO(2) and Flavonols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécard, G; Douds, D D; Pfeffer, P E

    1992-03-01

    Various flavonoids were tested for their ability to stimulate in vitro growth of germinated spores of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Experiments were performed in the presence of 2% CO(2), previously demonstrated to be required for growth of Gigaspora margarita (G. Bécard and Y. Piché, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55:2320-2325, 1989). Only the flavonols stimulated fungal growth. The flavones, flavanones, and isoflavones tested were generally inhibitory. Quercetin (10 muM) prolonged hyphal growth from germinated spores of G. margarita from 10 to 42 days. An average of more than 500 mm of hyphal growth and 13 auxiliary cells per spore were obtained. Quercetin also stimulated the growth of Glomus etunicatum. The glycosides of quercetin, rutin, and quercitrin were not stimulatory. The axenic growth of G. margarita achieved here under rigorously defined conditions is the most ever reported for a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

  19. Characterization of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Recombinants That Express and Incorporate High Levels of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore, Linda; Blight, Keril J.; Rice, Charles M.; Rose, John K.

    2002-01-01

    We generated recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) expressing genes encoding hybrid proteins consisting of the extracellular domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoproteins fused at different positions to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the VSV G glycoprotein (E1G and E2G). We show that these chimeric proteins are transported to the cell surface and incorporated into VSV virions efficiently. We also generated VSV recombinants in which the gene encoding the VSV G protein...

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Survival of CD169+ Cells Promotes Immune Activation during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain...... stomatitis virus infection, phagocytes produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) which signals via TNFR1 and promote "enforced virus replication" in CD169(+) macrophages. Consequently, lack of TNF or TNFR1 resulted in defective immune activation and VSV clearance....

  1. Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Selma H.; Linhares, Rosa E.C.; Nozawa, Carlos M.; Montalván, Ricardo; Paccola-Meirelles, Luzia D.

    2001-01-01

    Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai) were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae) and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA). The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficie...

  2. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal status of plant species in the peat swamp forest of Setia Alam Jaya, Sebangau, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suciatmih Suciatmih

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM status of plants growing on peat soil, a study was carried out inthe peat swamp forest of Setia Alam Jaya in Sebangau, Central Kalimantan. Out of 146 plant root samples belonging to 48 plantspecies from 25 families examined, all plants colonized by VAM fungi namely 14 (29.2% high level, 32 (66.7% medium level, and 2(4.1% low level respectively.

  3. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal status of plant species in the peat swamp forest of Setia Alam Jaya, Sebangau, Central Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    Suciatmih Suciatmih

    2003-01-01

    In order to describe the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) status of plants growing on peat soil, a study was carried out inthe peat swamp forest of Setia Alam Jaya in Sebangau, Central Kalimantan. Out of 146 plant root samples belonging to 48 plantspecies from 25 families examined, all plants colonized by VAM fungi namely 14 (29.2%) high level, 32 (66.7%) medium level, and 2(4.1%) low level respectively.

  4. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The database of the Drosophila Genome Project contains the sequences of two genes, CG8784 and CG8795, predicted to code for two structurally related G protein-coupled receptors. We have cloned these genes and expressed their coding parts in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that both receptors...... can be activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2 (CG8784, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 1x10(-9)M; CG8795, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 5 x 10(-10)M). The precise role of Drosophila pyrokinin-2 (SVPFKPRLamide) in Drosophila is unknown, but in other insects, pyrokinins have...... embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  5. Transmission of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus to cattle by the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez de Leon, Adalberto A; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2006-03-01

    Laboratory-reared Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones were infected with vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (family Rhabdoviridae, genus Vesiculovirus, VSNJV) through intrathoracic inoculation. After 10-d incubation at 25 degrees C, these insects were allowed to blood feed on four steers. Two other steers were exposed to VSNJV through intralingual inoculation with 10(8) tissue culture infective dose50 VSNJV. All six steers became seropositive for VSNJV. The results demonstrate the ability of C. sonorensis to transmit VSNJV to livestock. Only the animals intralingually inoculated with VSNJV showed clinical signs in the form of vesicles at the site of inoculation. Uninfected C. sonorensis allowed to feed on the exposed animals did not become infected with VSNJV. Animals infected by C. sonorensis showed a slower antibody response compared with intralingually inoculated animals. This is probably because of different amounts of virus received via insect transmission and syringe inoculation. A significant difference was found in the serum acute-phase protein alpha-1-acid glycoprotein in animals that received VSNJV through C. sonorensis transmission. These animals had previously been exposed to insect attack in the field compared with intralingually inoculated animals and C. sonorensis-infected animals that had been protected from insect attack. The failure to observe clinical signs of vesicular stomatitis through transmission of VSNJV by C. sonorensis may explain widespread subclinical infections during vesicular stomatitis epidemics.

  6. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  7. 1995 epizootic of vesicular stomatitis (New Jersey serotype) in the western United States: an entomologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, E T; Tabachnick, W J; Hunt, G J; Thompson, L H; Hurd, H S

    1999-01-01

    Entomologic and epizootic data are reviewed concerning the potential for transmission of vesicular stomatitis (VS) virus by insects, including field data from case-positive premises in New Mexico and Colorado during the 1995 outbreak of the New Jersey serotype (VSNJ). As with previous outbreaks of VSNJ in the western United States, the 1995 epizootic illustrated that risk of exposure is seasonal, increasing during warm weather and decreasing with onset of cool weather; virus activity spread from south to north along river valleys of the southwestern and Rocky Mountain states; clinical disease was detected most commonly in horses, but also occurred in cattle and 1 llama; and most infections were subclinical. Overall, 367 case-positive premises were identified during the 1995 outbreak, with foci of virus activity along the Rio Grande River south of Albuquerque, NM, in southwestern Colorado, and along the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO. The establishment of a 16-km (10-mile) radius zone of restricted animal movement around confirmed positive premises, along with imposition of state and international embargoes, created economic hardship for livestock owners and producers. The importance of defining the role of blood-feeding insects as biological vectors of VSNJ virus relative to risk factors that promote high levels of insect transmission, such as the presence of livestock along western river valleys, blood feeding activity, and frequent transport of animals for recreational purposes, is emphasized as a basis for developing effective disease management.

  8. Perturbed cholesterol and vesicular trafficking associated with dengue blocking in Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Vincent; Stainton, Kirsty; Rainey, Stephanie M; Ant, Thomas H; Dowle, Adam A; Larson, Tony; Hester, Svenja; Charles, Philip D; Thomas, Benjamin; Sinkins, Steven P

    2017-09-13

    Wolbachia are intracellular maternally inherited bacteria that can spread through insect populations and block virus transmission by mosquitoes, providing an important approach to dengue control. To better understand the mechanisms of virus inhibition, we here perform proteomic quantification of the effects of Wolbachia in Aedes aegypti mosquito cells and midgut. Perturbations are observed in vesicular trafficking, lipid metabolism and in the endoplasmic reticulum that could impact viral entry and replication. Wolbachia-infected cells display a differential cholesterol profile, including elevated levels of esterified cholesterol, that is consistent with perturbed intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Cyclodextrins have been shown to reverse lipid accumulation defects in cells with disrupted cholesterol homeostasis. Treatment of Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti cells with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin restores dengue replication in Wolbachia-carrying cells, suggesting dengue is inhibited in Wolbachia-infected cells by localised cholesterol accumulation. These results demonstrate parallels between the cellular Wolbachia viral inhibition phenotype and lipid storage genetic disorders. Wolbachia infection of mosquitoes can block dengue virus infection and is tested in field trials, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Using proteomics, Geoghegan et al. here identify effects of Wolbachia on cholesterol homeostasis and dengue virus replication in Aedes aegypti.

  9. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Moeschler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT. Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses.

  10. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    development and subsequent rupturing of vesicles at the coronary band and in the oral cavity. Vesicles and ulcerations can also occur on the mammary gland. Recovery in adult animals usually occurs in 8-15 days. Clinical signs for most serotypes are less dramatic in sheep and goats. Swine can develop very severe coronary band lesions and high mortality in piglets has been observed. One of the challenges of diagnosing FMD is that it may be clinically similar to several other vesicular or ulcerative diseases. FMD is clinically indistinguishable from Vesicular stomatitis, Swine vesicular disease and Vesicular exanthema of swine. It may also resemble Bovine viral diarrhea, Mucosal disease, Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, Bluetongue, Bovine papular stomatitis, Bovine mammillitis and Rinderpest.

  11. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  12. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeschler, Sarah; Locher, Samira; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Krämer, Beate; Zimmer, Gert

    2016-09-16

    Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV) although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses.

  13. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in peripheral vestibular structures and vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F X; Pang, Y W; Zhang, M M; Zhang, T; Dong, Y L; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Li, J L; Li, Y Q

    2011-01-26

    Glutamate transmission from vestibular end organs to central vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) plays important role in transferring sensory information about head position and movements. Three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) have been considered so far the most specific markers for glutamatergic neurons/cells. In this study, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were immunohistochemically localized to axon terminals in VNC and somata of vestibular primary afferents in association with their central and peripheral axon endings, and VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 were co-localized to hair cells of otolith maculae and cristae ampullaris. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 defined three subsets of Scarpa's neurons (vestibular ganglionic neurons): those co-expressing VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 or expressing only VGLUT2, and those expressing neither. In addition, many neurons located in all vestibular subnuclei were observed to contain hybridized signals for VGLUT2 mRNA and a few VNC neurons, mostly scattered in medial vestibular nucleus (MVe), displayed VGLUT1 mRNA labelling. Following unilateral ganglionectomy, asymmetries of VGLUT1-immunoreactivity (ir) and VGLUT2-ir occurred between two VNCs, indicating that the VNC terminals containing VGLUT1 and/or VGLUT2 are partly of peripheral origin. The present data indicate that the constituent cells/neurons along the vestibular pathway selectively apply VGLUT isoforms to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles for glutamate transmission. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiao; Zhang, Fu-Xing; Pang, You-Wang; Li, Jin-Lian; Li, Yun-Qing

    2006-07-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1-3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  15. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao DENG; Fu-Xing ZHANG; You-Wang PANG; Jin-Lian LI; Yun-Qing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1~3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidinbiotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  16. Initial vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal development of slender wheatgrass on two amended mine spoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zak, J.C.; Parkinson, D. (University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biology)

    1982-01-01

    The initial vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal development of slender wheatgrass on extracted oil-sands and subalpine coal-mine spoils, amended with either fertilizer, peat, or liquid sewage sludge, was examined. Plants were sampled at 2,6 and 10 weeks after plant emergence and the level of infection was expressed as length of mycorrhizal root per plant and length of root which contained arbuscules, vesicles, or only hyphae. Mycorrhizal infection of slender wheatgrass on the oil sands was limited to plants on the peat-amended spoil. Infection of plants on the peat-amended oil-sands spoil was detected by 2 weeks. Plants on the subalpine spoil were infected at 2 weeks only on the peat-amended spoil. While slender wheatgrass on the control and fertilizer-amended spoil developed mycorrhizae by 6 weeks, infection was not observed in plants on the sewage-amended spoil until 10 weeks. At 10 weeks, there were no significant differences in lengths of mycorrhizal root per plant among the amendments. Increased P levels in the fertilizer- and sewage-amended subalpine spoil did not suppress VA mycorrhizal development. 43 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae of Easter lily in the northwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, R N; Linderman, R G

    1977-12-01

    The vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi of commercially grown Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) were studied. Soil and root samples were collected monthly from March through September 1975 from five fields in the coastal area of southern Oregon and northern California. Soil seivings were inoculated onto clover, onion, and lily to cause infections resulting in the production of many new mycorrhizal spores facilitating identification. Four VA mycorrhizal species were found: Acaulospora trappei, A. elegans, Glomus monosporus, and G. fasciculatus. All four VA species infected Easter lily, clover, and onion. Acaulospora trappei and G. fasciculatus were the most commonly isolated species from all five fields. Mycorrhizal infections in roots of field-grown lilies were sparse and presumably young in March and gradually increased in size and number until September when bulbs were harvested. Over 75% of each root system became infected with mycorrhizae in fields with all four fungal species, and those levels were reached by July. In fields with only two mycorrhizal species, usually 50% or less of each root system was infected, even by the end of the growing season.

  18. Interactions of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Phosphorus, and Heterodera glycines on Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, G L; Hussey, R S; Roncadori, R W

    1991-01-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and soil phosphorus (P) fertility on parasitism of soybean cultivars Bragg and Wright by soybean cyst nematode (SCN) were investigated in field micropiot and greenhouse experiments. VAM fungi increased height of both cultivars and yield of Wright in microplot studies in 1986 and 1987. Conversely, yield of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants of both cultivars was suppressed by SCN. Soil population densities of SCN were unaffected by VAM fungi in 1986 but were greater in microplots infested with VAM fungi than in control microplots in 1987. Growth of Wright soybean was stimulated by VAM fungi and suppressed by SCN in greenhouse experiments. The effect of VAM fungi on SCN varied with time. Numbers of SCN in roots and soil were decreased by VAM fungi by as much as 73% at the highest SCN inoculum level through 49 days after planting. Later, however, SCN numbers were usually comparable on mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. Soil P fertility generally had no effect on SCN. Results of a split-root experiment indicated that VAM fungal suppression of SCN was not systemic.

  19. Occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in mixed overburden mine spoils of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, J.B.; Zuberer, D.A.

    1987-07-01

    Presently in east Texas, lignite surface mines are reclaimed and revegetated using mixed overburden materials which are equivalent to or better in physical-chemical properties than the poor topsoils removed during mining. Little information is available regarding the biological characteristics of levelled mixed overburden and the re-establishment of endomycorrhizal associations on revegetated mixed overburden sites. Therefore, the authors investigated the occurrence of infection of coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon), planted vegetatively on reclamation sites (1-10 years post-mining), with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Numbers of spores were also monitored. For comparison, infection of coastal bermudagrass and spore numbers were determined for an unmined old field succession on soil typical of the region. VAM infection, measured as a percentage of root length infected or as a percentage of root segments exhibiting infection, returned to pre-mining levels by 3-7 years after disturbance. Intensity of infection was not altered by disturbance, age of reclaimed site, or season. Significantly greater numbers of spores (ca. 10-fold) were observed in the unmined soil and no differences were found between numbers of spores from variously aged mine spoil sites. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Interaction of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizae and Cultivars of Alfalfa Susceptible and Resistant to Meloidogyne hapla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandison, G S; Cooper, K M

    1986-04-01

    The interaction between vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and the root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) was investigated using both nematode-susceptible (Grasslands Wairau) and nematode-resistant (Nevada Synthetic XX) cultivars of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) at four levels of applied phosphate. Mycorrhizal inoculation improved plant growth and reduced nematode numbers and adult development in roots in dually infected cultures of the susceptible cultivar. The tolerance of plants to nematode infection and development when preinfected with mycorrhizal fungi was no greater than when they were inoculated with nematodes and mycorrhizal fungi simultaneously. Growth of plants of the resistant cultivar was unaffected by nematode inoculation but was improved by mycorrhizal inoculation. Numbers of nematode juveniles were lower in the roots of the resistant than of the susceptible cultivar and were further reduced by mycorrhizal inoculation, although no adult nematodes developed in any resistant cultivar treatment. Inoculation of alfalfa with VAM fungi increased the tolerance and resistance of a cultivar susceptible to M. hapla and improved the resistance of a resistant cultivar.

  1. Production of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus inoculum in aeroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L L; Sylvia, D M

    1988-02-01

    Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) and industrial sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) colonized by Glomus deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices were grown in aeroponic cultures. After 12 to 14 weeks, all roots were colonized by the inoculated vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Abundant vesicles and arbuscules formed in the roots, and profuse sporulation was detected intra-and extraradically. Within each fungal species, industrial sweet potato contained significantly more roots and spores per plant than bahia grass did, although the percent root colonization was similar for both hosts. Mean percent root colonization and sporulation per centimeter of colonized root generally increased with time, although with some treatments colonization declined by week 14. Spore production ranged from 4 spores per cm of colonized root for G. etunicatum to 51 spores per cm for G. intraradices. Infectivity trials with root inocula resulted in a mean of 38, 45, and 28% of bahia grass roots colonized by G. deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices, respectively. The germination rate of G. etunicatum spores produced in soil was significantly higher than that produced in aeroponic cultures (64% versus 46%) after a 2-week incubation at 28 degrees C. However, infectivity studies comparing G. etunicatum spores from soil and aeroponic culture indicated no biological differences between the spore sources. Aeroponically produced G. deserticola and G. etunicatum inocula retained their infectivity after cold storage (4 degrees C) in either sterile water or moist vermiculite for at least 4 and 9 months, respectively.

  2. A plausible mechanism of biosorption in dual symbioses by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmat, Rafia; Hamid, Neelofer

    2015-03-01

    Dual symbioses of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi with growth of Momordica charantia were elucidated in terms of plausible mechanism of biosorption in this article. The experiment was conducted in green house and mixed inoculum of the VAM fungi was used in the three replicates. Results demonstrated that the starch contents were the main source of C for the VAM to builds their hyphae. The increased plant height and leaves surface area were explained in relation with an increase in the photosynthetic rates to produce rapid sugar contents for the survival of plants. A decreased in protein, and amino acid contents and increased proline and protease activity in VAM plants suggested that these contents were the main bio-indicators of the plants under biotic stress. The decline in protein may be due to the degradation of these contents, which later on converted into dextrose where it can easily be absorbed by for the period of symbioses. A mechanism of C chemisorption in relation with physiology and morphology of plant was discussed.

  3. Ammonia Assimilation in Zea mays L. Infected with a Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus fasciculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliquet, J. B.; Stewart, G. R.

    1993-03-01

    To investigate nitrogen assimilation and translocation in Zea mays L. colonized by the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum (Thax. sensu Gerd.), we measured key enzyme activities, 15N incorporation into free amino acids, and 15N translocation from roots to shoots. Glutamine synthetase and nitrate reductase activities were increased in both roots and shoots compared with control plants, and glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased in roots only. In the presence of [15N]ammonium, glutamine amide was the most heavily labeled product. More label was incorporated into amino acids in VAM plants. The kinetics of 15N labeling and effects of methionine sulfoximine on distribution of 15N-labeled products were entirely consistent with the operation of the glutamate synthase cycle. No evidence was found for ammonium assimilation via glutamate dehydrogenase. 15N translocation from roots to shoots through the xylem was higher in VAM plants compared with control plants. These results establish that, in maize, VAM fungi increase ammonium assimilation, glutamine production, and xylem nitrogen translocation. Unlike some ectomycorrhizal fungi, VAM fungi do not appear to alter the pathway of ammonium assimilation in roots of their hosts.

  4. Seasonality of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in sedges in a semi-arid tropical grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, T.; Udaiyan, K.

    2002-10-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) colonization and spore numbers in the rhizosphere of Cyperus iria L. and C. rotundus L., growing in a semi-arid tropical grassland, was studied during the 1993 and 1994 monsoons. In addition, climatic and chemical properties of the soils were determined in order to investigate their influence on mycorrhizal variables. VAM fungal association in the sedges was confirmed by plant- and root-trap culture techniques. The soil nutrients exhibited seasonal variations, but were highly variable between years. Intercellular hyphae and vesicles with occasional intraradical spores characterized mycorrhizal association in sedges. Dark septate fungi also colonized roots of sedges. Temporal variations in mycorrhizal colonization and spore numbers occurred, indicating seasonality. However, the patterns of mycorrhizal colonization and spore numbers were different during both the years. The VAM fungal structures observed were intercellular hyphae and vesicles. Changes in the proportion of root length with VAM structures, total colonization levels and spore numbers were related to climatic and edaphic factors. However, the intensity of influence of climatic and soil factors on VAM tended to vary with sedge species.

  5. Arbuscules of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inhabit an acidic compartment within plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberger, M

    2000-08-01

    The most widespread type of mycorrhiza is the so-called vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza. In this endomycorrhiza, fungal hyphae penetrate plant cell walls in the root cortex. There they form densely branched arbuscules. Fungus and plant plasma membrane are separated by a common interfacial apoplast. The pH of the compartment between the symbionts is of pivotal importance for nutrient transfer. Histochemical experiments were conducted to check for an acidic nature of the interface in the model system Glomus versiforme (Karst.) Berch-Allium porrum L. Two chemically different acidotropic dyes (neutral red and LysoSensor Green DND-189) stained the arbuscules intensely. The staining of arbuscules could be eliminated by addition of the protonophore carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or treatments leading to membrane rupture. Therefore, the staining of the arbuscules was based on the ion-trap mechanism, which indicates acidic, membrane-bound compartments. Microscopic examination of stained arbuscules at high optical resolution revealed a peripheral accumulation of the dye. Since plasmolysis rapidly destained the arbuscules, it is concluded that the dyes accumulate in the arbuscular interface, indicating the highly acidic nature of this compartment. The findings are discussed with respect to their relevance for the nutrient transfer in mycorrhizas. In addition, evidence for a discontinuity in the arbuscular interface between the stem and the branches of the arbuscule is given.

  6. Interaction of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with erosion in an oxisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, M; Fox, R L; Aziz, T; El-Swaify, S A

    1988-04-01

    The development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) symbiosis was monitored in Leucaena leucocephala grown in an Oxisol subjected to incremental simulated erosion. The density of VAM infective propagules in the soil diminished as the level of simulated erosion (removal of surface soil) was increased from 0 to 50 cm. The level of infection on L. leucocephala roots observed at harvest was not significantly influenced by simulated erosion unless removal of surface soil exceeded 25 cm. Inoculation of this soil and the uneroded soil with Glomus aggregatum enhanced the early onset of infection but did not significantly influence the level of infection observed at the time of harvest. Simulated erosion in excess of 7.5 cm of surface soil removal significantly delayed the development of VAM effectiveness monitored in terms of the P status of L. leucocephala subleaflets and also curtailed the level of maximum effectiveness observed. Decreases in VAM effectiveness were significantly correlated with decreases in soil chemical constituents. However, VAM effectiveness in a soil subjected to 30 cm of surface soil removal was not restored to a significant extent unless the soil was amended with P, even though other nutrients were restored to sufficiency levels. Our results demonstrate that the development of VAM effectiveness is the phase of the VAM symbiosis that is most adversely influenced by simulated erosion and that this effect appears to be caused primarily by insufficient P in the soil solution.

  7. Factors influencing survival of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza propagules during topsoil storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.M.; Carnes, B.A.; Moorman, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    The survival dynamics of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were determined, (using a bioassay procedure) for soils stored from 0.5 to 6.0 years in topsoil stockpiles associated with a coal surface-mine in the western United States. Propagule mortality could best be related to in situ soil moisture potential using a piecewise regression model (R/sup 2/ = 0.57; P less than or equal to 0.001) with the breaking point occurring at -2 MPa. The addition of length of storage time was found to contribute significantly to the accuracy of the model (R/sup 2/ = 0.70; P less than or equal to 0.001). In addition, the piece-wise nature of the data suggested two separate populations of VAM fungi - those propagules found in soils with moisture potentials less than -2 MPa and those occurring in soils with moisture potentials greater than -2 MPa. Soil moisture and length of storage time had differing effects on each of these populations. When water potential was less than -2 MPa, moisture was an important predictor of inoculum (P < 0.001), while length of storage had little predictive capability (P = 0.17). However, when water potentials were greater than -2 MPa, the predictive importance of soil moisture (P = 0.86) and length of storage (P = 0.04) were reversed. The significance of these findings to topsoil replacement and subsequent plant community development are discussed. 28 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Anterograde or Retrograde Transsynaptic Circuit Tracing in Vertebrates with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Kevin T; Mundell, Nathan A; Pan, Y Albert; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-04

    Viruses have been used as transsynaptic tracers, allowing one to map the inputs and outputs of neuronal populations, due to their ability to replicate in neurons and transmit in vivo only across synaptically connected cells. To date, their use has been largely restricted to mammals. In order to explore the use of such viruses in an expanded host range, we tested the transsynaptic tracing ability of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vectors in a variety of organisms. Successful infection and gene expression were achieved in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Moreover, rVSV enabled transsynaptic tracing of neural circuitry in predictable directions dictated by the viral envelope glycoprotein (G), derived from either VSV or rabies virus (RABV). Anterograde and retrograde labeling, from initial infection and/or viral replication and transmission, was observed in Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, jellyfish, zebrafish, chickens, and mice. These vectors are widely applicable for gene delivery, afferent tract tracing, and/or directional connectivity mapping. Here, we detail the use of these vectors and provide protocols for propagating virus, changing the surface glycoprotein, and infecting multiple organisms using several injection strategies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Curcumin and Boswellia serrata gum resin extract inhibit chikungunya and vesicular stomatitis virus infections in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rhein, Christine; Weidner, Tatjana; Henß, Lisa; Martin, Judith; Weber, Christopher; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever and has infected millions of people mainly in developing countries. The associated disease is characterized by rash, high fever, and severe arthritis that can persist for years. CHIKV has adapted to Aedes albopictus, which also inhabits temperate regions including Europe and the United States of America. CHIKV has recently caused large outbreaks in Latin America. No treatment or licensed CHIKV vaccine exists. Traditional medicines are known to have anti-viral effects; therefore, we examined whether curcumin or Boswellia serrata gum resin extract have antiviral activity against CHIKV. Both compounds blocked entry of CHIKV Env-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and inhibited CHIKV infection in vitro. In addition, vesicular stomatitis virus vector particles and viral infections were also inhibited to the same extent, indicating a broad antiviral activity. Although the bioavailability of these compounds is rather poor, they might be used as a lead structure to develop more effective antiviral drugs or might be used topically to prevent CHIKV spread in the skin after mosquito bites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Antitumor effects of matrix protein of vesicular stomatic virus on EL4 lymphoma mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-jia; Yu, Qin-mei; Meng, Wen-tong; Wen, Yan-jun; Chen, Li-juan; Niu, Ting

    2011-03-01

    To explore antitumor effects of plasmid pcDNA3. 1-MP encoding matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP:CHOL) in mice with EL4 lymphoma. C57BL/6 mouse model with EL4 lymphoma was established. Sixty mice bearing EL4 lymphoma were divided randomly into five groups including Lip-MP, Lip-pVAX, Lip, ADM and NS groups, which were intravenously injected with liposome-pcDNA 3. 1-MP complex, liposome-pVAX complex, empty liposome, Adriamycin and normal saline respectively every three days. Tumor volumes and survival time were monitored. Microvessel density and tumor proliferative index in tumor tissues were determined by CD31, Ki-67 immunohistochemistry staining, meanwhile the tumor apoptosis index was measured by TUNEL method. From 6 days after treatments on, the tumor volume in Lip-MP group was much smaller than that in Lip-pVAX, Lip and NS group (P EL4 tumor cells in vivo (P EL4 lymphoma, which may be related to the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor cell proliferation.

  11. Mutants dissecting development and behaviour in drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Adita; Chandrashekaran, Shanti; Sharma, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    We have traced in this paper the progress in Drosophila genetics research from the 1960s, at the IARI, spearheaded by the visionary insight of M. S. Swaminathan. The work started with the study of indirect effect of radiation and the synergistic interaction of physical and chemical mutagens on chromosomal and genetic changes. This paved the way for the study of single gene mutants in dissecting developmental and behavioural processes. New genes discovered by us have been shown to encode conserved cell signalling molecules controlling developmental and behavioural pathways. With the complete sequencing of the Drosophila genome, in the year 2000, mounting evidence for the homology between Drosophila and human genes controlling genetic disorders became available. This has led to the fly becoming an indispensable tool for studying human diseases as well as a model to test for drugs and pharmaceuticals against human diseases and complex behavioural processes. For example wingless in Drosophila belongs to the conserved Wnt gene family and aberrant WNT signalling is linked to a range of human diseases, most notably cancer. Inhibition as well as activation of WNT signalling form the basis of an effective therapy for some cancers as well as several other clinical conditions. Recent experiments have shown that WNTs might also normally participate in self-renewal, proliferation or differentiation of stem cells and altering WNT signalling might be beneficial to the use of stem cells for therapeutic means. Likewise, the stambhA mutant of Drosophila which was discovered for its temperature-dependent paralytic behaviour is the fly homologue of Phospholipase Cβ. Phospholipase C mediated G protein signalling plays a central role in vital processes controlling epilepsy, vision, taste, and olfaction in animals. Proteins of the G-signalling pathway are of intense research interest since many human diseases involve defects in G-protein signalling pathways. In fact, approximately 50

  12. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp. Sucessão de micorrizas vesicular-arbuscular e ectomicorrizas em mudas de Eucalyptus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia dos Santos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM and ectomycorrhizae (ECM in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonization increased followed by a decrease in AM. Pisolithus tinctorius was favored in simultaneous inoculation with G. etunicatum, and the positive effect of the simultaneous inoculation of both fungi in the percent colonization by the AM fungus occurred up to 60 days after inoculation. After 120 days, colonization of roots by G. etunicatum decreased in the presence of P. tinctorius. When inoculated simultaneously, the proportion of AM and ECM varied with evaluation time, while the combined percentage of mycorrhizal roots approached the maximum and remained more or less constant after 60 days, suggesting that there could be competition between the fungi for limiting substrate. The maximum percent mycorrhizal colonization varied with Eucalyptus species and the highest value was observed for E. camaldulensis, followed in order by E. citriodora, E. urophylla, E. grandis and E. cloeziana.A ocorrência de micorrizas arbusculares (AM e ectomicorrizas (ECM no mesmo sistema radicular foi observada quando Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook F., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell e E. camaldulensis Dehnh foram inoculadas simultaneamente com Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch. A sucessão entre os dois fungos foi observada. De modo geral, o aumento da colonização ECM foi acompanhado de um decréscimo em AM. A inoculação simultânea resultou em percentagens de colonização diferenciadas das

  13. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buades-Rotger M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Macià Buades-Rotger,1,2 David Gallardo-Pujol1,3 1Department of Personality, Faculty of Psychology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany; 3Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior (IR3C, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. Keywords: behavioral genetics, antisocial behaviors, monoamine oxidase A

  14. Vascular dysfunction in Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) induced depression model in rats: monoamine homeostasis and endothelial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzinova, Elena; Wiborg, Ove; Aalkjær, Christian

    Major depression and cardiovascular diseases have strong co-morbidity but the reason for this is unknown. In CMS model of depression only some rats develop depression-like symptoms (i.e. anhedonia, measured by sucrose intake) while others are resilient to 8 weeks of CMS. Anhedonic rats have...... decreased cardiac output and unchanged blood pressure, suggesting increased total peripheral resistance. Small mesenteric and femoral arteries from CMS and non-stressed rats responded similarly to noradrenaline (NA) under control conditions but inhibition of neuronal reuptake with cocaine increased NA...... sensitivity stronger in anhedonic than in resilient and non-stressed groups. In contrast, corticosterone-sensitive extra-neuronal monoamine uptake was diminished in rats exposed to CMS. These changes in monoamine homeostasis were associated with upregulation neuronal NA transporter and reduced expression...

  15. [THE INFLUENCE OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER AND MONOAMINE OXIDASE A GENES POLYMORPHISM ON PSYCHO-EMOTION AND KARYOLOGICAL STABILITY OF ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaev, V N; Nechaeva, M S; Korneeva, O S; Cherenkov, D A

    2015-11-01

    The influence of polymorphism of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase A genes, associated with man's aggressiveness on the psycho-emotional state and karyological status of single combat athletes. It was revealed that the carriers of less active ("short"), monoamine oxidase A gene variant have a high motivation to succeed and less rigidity and frustrated, compared to the carriers of more active ("long") version of the gene. Heterozygote carriers of less active ("short") variant of the serotonin transporter gene 5-HTTL had more physical aggression, guilt and were less frustrated compared with carriers of two long alleles. It has been revealed the association of studied genes with the karyological status of athletes. So fighters who are carriers of the short and long alleles of the serotonin transporter gene had more cells with nuclear abnormalities in the buccal epithelium than single combat athletes which both alleles were long.

  16. [Changes in the monoamine content in different parts of hypothalamus depending on the stages of the estrous cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, V N; Adamskaia, E I

    1976-01-01

    Fluorimetric determination of monoamines in various regions of the hypothalamus and at different stages of the estral cycle in rats showed that the serotonin, noradrenaline, and particularly dophamine content changed both in the course of the cycle and at different time (10, 15 and 18 hours) of the same stage of the cycle. Dophamine concentration in the arcuate area--the centre of the tonic activity--reached its maximum at 18 hours of the diestrus-2 (D2) and fell to the minimum at 10 hours of the proestrus (P). Noradrenaline level in the preoptic area increased at 18 hours of the D2 and fell at 10 hours of the P. It is supposed that in the hypothalamic regulation of the estral cycle at least two monoamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) took part; the trigger role belongs to noradrenaline of the preoptic area (the cyclic centre).

  17. Fluorinated phenmetrazine "legal highs" act as substrates for high-affinity monoamine transporters of the SLC6 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Felix P; Burchardt, Nadine V; Decker, Ann M; Partilla, John S; Li, Yang; McLaughlin, Gavin; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Sandtner, Walter; Blough, Bruce E; Brandt, Simon D; Baumann, Michael H; Sitte, Harald H

    2018-05-15

    A variety of new psychoactive substances (NPS) are appearing in recreational drug markets worldwide. NPS are compounds that target various receptors and transporters in the central nervous system to achieve their psychoactive effects. Chemical modifications of existing drugs can generate NPS that are not controlled by current legislation, thereby providing legal alternatives to controlled substances such as cocaine or amphetamine. Recently, 3-fluorophenmetrazine (3-FPM), a derivative of the anorectic compound phenmetrazine, appeared on the recreational drug market and adverse clinical effects have been reported. Phenmetrazine is known to elevate extracellular monoamine concentrations by an amphetamine-like mechanism. Here we tested 3-FPM and its positional isomers, 2-FPM and 4-FPM, for their abilities to interact with plasma membrane monoamine transporters for dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin (SERT). We found that 2-, 3- and 4-FPM inhibit uptake mediated by DAT and NET in HEK293 cells with potencies comparable to cocaine (IC 50 values 80 μM). Experiments directed at identifying transporter-mediated reverse transport revealed that FPM isomers induce efflux via DAT, NET and SERT in HEK293 cells, and this effect is augmented by the Na + /H + ionophore monensin. Each FPM evoked concentration-dependent release of monoamines from rat brain synaptosomes. Hence, this study reports for the first time the mode of action for 2-, 3- and 4-FPM and identifies these NPS as monoamine releasers with marked potency at catecholamine transporters implicated in abuse and addiction. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Designer Drugs and Legal Highs.' Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiovascular activity of rasagiline, a selective and potent inhibitor of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase B: comparison with selegiline

    OpenAIRE

    Abassi, Zaid A; Binah, Ofer; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2004-01-01

    Selegiline is used for treating Parkinson's disease. Despite its efficacy, the clinical use of selegiline in combination with L-dihydroxphenylalanine in Parkinsonian patients is hampered by cardiovascular complications, such as hypotension. This study was designed to compare in rats the cardiovascular effects of selegiline and rasagiline, their metabolites L-methamphetamine and aminoindan (TVP-136), respectively, and the second rasagiline metabolite non-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor TVP-1...

  19. The tau positron-emission tomography tracer AV-1451 binds with similar affinities to tau fibrils and monoamine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeiren, Céline; Motte, Philippe; Viot, Delphine; Mairet-Coello, Georges; Courade, Jean-Philippe; Citron, Martin; Mercier, Joël; Hannestad, Jonas; Gillard, Michel

    2018-02-01

    Lilly/Avid's AV-1451 is one of the most advanced tau PET tracers in the clinic. Although results obtained in Alzheimer's disease patients are compelling, discrimination of tracer uptake in healthy individuals and patients with supranuclear palsy (PSP) is less clear as there is substantial overlap of signal in multiple brain regions. Moreover, accurate quantification of [ 18 F]AV-1451 uptake in Alzheimer's disease may not be possible. The aim of the present study was to characterize the in vitro binding of AV-1451 to understand and identify potential off-target binding that could explain the poor discrimination observed in PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 and AV-1451 were characterized in in vitro binding assays using recombinant and native proteins/tissues from postmortem samples of controls and Alzheimer's disease and PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 binds to multiple sites with nanomolar affinities in brain homogenates and to tau fibrils isolated from Alzheimer's disease or PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 also binds with similarly high affinities in brain homogenates devoid of tau pathology. This unexpected binding was demonstrated to be because of nanomolar affinities of [ 3 H]AV-1451 for monoamine oxidase A and B enzymes. High affinity of AV-1451 for monoamine oxidase proteins may limit its utility as a tau PET tracer in PSP and Alzheimer's disease because of high levels of monoamine oxidase expression in brain regions also affected by tau deposition, especially if monoamine oxidase levels change over time or with a treatment intervention. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  1. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  2. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Buescher

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  3. The fabulous destiny of the Drosophila heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medioni, Caroline; Sénatore, Sébastien; Salmand, Pierre-Adrien; Lalevée, Nathalie; Perrin, Laurent; Sémériva, Michel

    2009-10-01

    For the last 15 years the fly cardiovascular system has attracted developmental geneticists for its potential as a model system of organogenesis. Heart development in Drosophila indeed provides a remarkable system for elucidating the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenesis and, more recently, for understanding the genetic control of cardiac physiology. The success of these studies can in part be attributed to multidisciplinary approaches, the multiplicity of existing genetic tools, and a detailed knowledge of the system. Striking similarities with vertebrate cardiogenesis have long been stressed, in particular concerning the conservation of key molecular regulators of cardiogenesis and the new data presented here confirm Drosophila cardiogenesis as a model not only for organogenesis but also for the study of molecular mechanisms of human cardiac disease.

  4. Remembering components of food in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eDas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies. This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. Dopaminergic neurons are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila.

  5. Imaging cell competition in Drosophila imaginal discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Shizue; Sugimura, Kaoru; Takino, Kyoko; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2012-01-01

    Cell competition is a process in which cells with higher fitness ("winners") survive and proliferate at the expense of less fit neighbors ("losers"). It has been suggested that cell competition is involved in a variety of biological processes such as organ size control, tissue homeostasis, cancer progression, and the maintenance of stem cell population. By advent of a genetic mosaic technique, which enables to generate fluorescently marked somatic clones in Drosophila imaginal discs, recent studies have presented some aspects of molecular mechanisms underlying cell competition. Now, with a live-imaging technique using ex vivo-cultured imaginal discs, we can dissect the spatiotemporal nature of competitive cell behaviors within multicellular communities. Here, we describe procedures and tips for live imaging of cell competition in Drosophila imaginal discs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  7. Overview of Drosophila immunity: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imler, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The functional analysis of genes from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has provided invaluable information for many cellular and developmental or physiological processes, including immunity. The best-understood aspect of Drosophila immunity is the inducible humoral response, first recognized in 1972. This pioneering work led to a remarkable series of findings over the next 30 years, ranging from the identification and characterization of the antimicrobial peptides produced, to the deciphering of the signalling pathways activating the genes that encode them and, ultimately, to the discovery of the receptors sensing infection. These studies on an insect model coincided with a revival of the field of innate immunity, and had an unanticipated impact on the biomedical field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Some Aspects of Transmutation Studies in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oftedal, P.; Kaplan, W. D. [Norsk Hydro Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); City of Hope Medical Research Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1968-06-15

    The experimental data pertaining to the mutagenic efficiency of {sup 32}P in Drosophila are discussed. It is estimated that the efficiency of the transmutation phenomena is of the order of 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -3} for the induction of recessive lethals. It is thus orders of magnitude lower than that found in bacteria and fungi. The efficiency would be lower - in comparison with the radiation effects - in organisms of greater dimensions than Drosophila, where a smaller fraction of dose is lost through the escape from the organism of high-energy {beta}-particles. Data are also reported on the genetic effects of {sup 3}H-thymidine, {sup 3}H-lysine and {sup 3}H-arginine. It appears that in all probability the effects may be interpreted as caused by radiation alone, if due regard is given to variations in radiation sensitivity and cellular dimensions during spermiogenesis. (author)

  9. Neuromodulation of Innate Behaviors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Susy M; Su, Chih-Ying; Wang, Jing W

    2017-07-25

    Animals are born with a rich repertoire of robust behaviors that are critical for their survival. However, innate behaviors are also highly adaptable to an animal's internal state and external environment. Neuromodulators, including biogenic amines, neuropeptides, and hormones, are released to signal changes in animals' circumstances and serve to reconfigure neural circuits. This circuit flexibility allows animals to modify their behavioral responses according to environmental cues, metabolic demands, and physiological states. Aided by powerful genetic tools, researchers have made remarkable progress in Drosophila melanogaster to address how a myriad of contextual information influences the input-output relationship of hardwired circuits that support a complex behavioral repertoire. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding neuromodulation of Drosophila innate behaviors, with a special focus on feeding, courtship, aggression, and postmating behaviors.

  10. The translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marygold, Steven J; Attrill, Helen; Lasko, Paul

    2017-01-02

    Synthesis of polypeptides from mRNA (translation) is a fundamental cellular process that is coordinated and catalyzed by a set of canonical 'translation factors'. Surprisingly, the translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster have not yet been systematically identified, leading to inconsistencies in their nomenclature and shortcomings in functional (Gene Ontology, GO) annotations. Here, we describe the complete set of translation factors in D. melanogaster, applying nomenclature already in widespread use in other species, and revising their functional annotation. The collection comprises 43 initiation factors, 12 elongation factors, 3 release factors and 6 recycling factors, totaling 64 of which 55 are cytoplasmic and 9 are mitochondrial. We also provide an overview of notable findings and particular insights derived from Drosophila about these factors. This catalog, together with the incorporation of the improved nomenclature and GO annotation into FlyBase, will greatly facilitate access to information about the functional roles of these important proteins.

  11. Motor Control of Drosophila Courtship Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy R. Shirangi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many animals utilize acoustic signals—or songs—to attract mates. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males vibrate a wing to produce trains of pulses and extended tone, called pulse and sine song, respectively. Courtship songs in the genus Drosophila are exceedingly diverse, and different song features appear to have evolved independently of each other. How the nervous system allows such diversity to evolve is not understood. Here, we identify a wing muscle in D. melanogaster (hg1 that is uniquely male-enlarged. The hg1 motoneuron and the sexually dimorphic development of the hg1 muscle are required specifically for the sine component of the male song. In contrast, the motoneuron innervating a sexually monomorphic wing muscle, ps1, is required specifically for a feature of pulse song. Thus, individual wing motor pathways can control separate aspects of courtship song and may provide a “modular” anatomical substrate for the evolution of diverse songs.

  12. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  13. Identification of 5-(1-Methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)thiophene-2-Carboxamides as Novel and Selective Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors Used to Improve Memory and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan P; Keenan, Terence; Scott, Roderick; Zhou, Xianbo; Bourchouladze, Rusiko; McRiner, Andrew J; Wilson, Mark E; Romashko, Darlene; Miller, Regina; Bletsch, Matthew; Anderson, Gary; Stanley, Jennifer; Zhang, Adia; Lee, Dong; Nikpur, John

    2017-12-20

    Initial work in Drosophila and mice demonstrated that the transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) is a master control gene for memory formation. The relationship between CREB and memory has also been found to be true in other species, including aplysia and rats. It is thus well-established that CREB activation plays a central role in memory enhancement and that CREB is activated during memory formation. On the basis of these findings, a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign utilizing a CRE-luciferase (CRE-Luci) SK-N-MC cell line was performed to identify compounds that enhance transcriptional activation of the CRE promoter with a suboptimal dose of forskolin. A number of small-molecule hits of unknown mechanisms of action were identified in the screening campaign, including HT-0411. Follow-up studies suggested that the CREB activation by HT-0411 is attributed to its specific and selective inhibition of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). Further, HT-0411 was shown to improve 24 h memory in rodents in a contextual fear conditioning model. This report describes the lead optimization of a series of 5-(1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl) thiophene-2-carboxamides that were identified as novel, potent, and selective inhibitors of MAO-B. Extensive SAR studies and in vivo behavioral evaluations of this and other related analogue series identified a number of potential clinical development candidates; ultimately, compound 8f was identified as a candidate molecule with high selectivity toward MAO-B (29-56 nM) over MAO-A (19% inhibition at a screening concentration of 50 μM), an excellent profile against a panel of other enzymes and receptors, good pharmacokinetic properties in rodents and dogs, and efficacy in multiple rodent memory models.

  14. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual Communication in the Drosophila Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Gwénaëlle Bontonou; Claude Wicker-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In insects, sexual behavior depends on chemical and non-chemical cues that might play an important role in sexual isolation. In this review, we present current knowledge about sexual behavior in the Drosophila genus. We describe courtship and signals involved in sexual communication, with a special focus on sex pheromones. We examine the role of cuticular hydrocarbons as sex pheromones, their implication in sexual isolation, and their evolution. Finally, we discuss the roles of male cuticular...

  16. Adaptive dynamics of cuticular hydrocarbons in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajpurohit, S.; Hanus, Robert; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Behrman, E. L.; Bergland, A. O.; Petrov, D.; Cvačka, Josef; Schmidt, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2017), s. 66-80 ISSN 1010-061X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/1093 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cuticular hydrocarbons * Drosophila * experimental evolution * spatiotemporal variation * thermal plasticity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jeb.12988/full

  17. Diet-induced mating preference in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Zilber-Rosenberg, Ilana; Sharon, Gil; Segal, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Diet-induced mating preference was initially observed by Dodd (1). Subsequently, we reported that diet-induced mating preference occurred in Drosophila melanogaster. Treatment of the flies with antibiotics abolished the mating preference, suggesting that fly-associated commensal bacteria were responsible for the phenomenon (2). The hypothesis was confirmed when it was shown that colonizing antibiotic-treated flies with Lactobacillus plantarum reestablished mating preference in multiple-choice...

  18. Studies on maternal repair in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, D.

    1976-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis is mainly concerned with studies on the nature of the repair mechanism(s) operating in Drosophila oocytes, and which act on chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation of post-meiotic male germ-cells. Caffeine treatment of the females has been used as an analytical tool to gain an insight into the nature of this repair mechanism and its genetic basis

  19. A Drosophila Model to Image Phagosome Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo.

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeanne McGurk

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major hindrance to imaging the intact adult Drosophila is that the dark exoskeleton makes it impossible to image through the cuticle. We have overcome this obstacle and describe a method whereby the internal organs of adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D by bleaching and clearing the adult and then imaging using a technique called optical projection tomography (OPT. The data is displayed as 2D optical sections and also in 3D to provide detail on the shape and structure of the adult anatomy.We have used OPT to visualize in 2D and 3D the detailed internal anatomy of the intact adult Drosophila. In addition this clearing method used for OPT was tested for imaging with confocal microscopy. Using OPT we have visualized the size and shape of neurodegenerative vacuoles from within the head capsule of flies that suffer from age-related neurodegeneration due to a lack of ADAR mediated RNA-editing. In addition we have visualized tau-lacZ expression in 2D and 3D. This shows that the wholemount adult can be stained without any manipulation and that this stain penetrates well as we have mapped the localization pattern with respect to the internal anatomy.We show for the first time that the intact adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D using OPT, also we show that this method of clearing is also suitable for confocal microscopy to image the brain from within the intact head. The major advantage of this is that organs can be represented in 3D in their natural surroundings. Furthermore optical sections are generated in each of the three planes and are not prone to the technical limitations that are associated with manual sectioning. OPT can be used to dissect mutant phenotypes and to globally map gene expression in both 2D and 3D.

  1. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry exten...

  2. Neurophysiology of Drosophila Models of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    West, Ryan J. H.; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A. C.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's ...

  3. Flying Drosophila orient to sky polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Peter T; Dickinson, Michael H

    2012-01-10

    Insects maintain a constant bearing across a wide range of spatial scales. Monarch butterflies and locusts traverse continents [1, 2], and foraging bees and ants travel hundreds of meters to return to their nests [1, 3, 4], whereas many other insects fly straight for only a few centimeters before changing direction. Despite this variation in spatial scale, the brain region thought to underlie long-distance navigation is remarkably conserved [5, 6], suggesting that the use of a celestial compass is a general and perhaps ancient capability of insects. Laboratory studies of Drosophila have identified a local search mode in which short, straight segments are interspersed with rapid turns [7, 8]. However, this flight mode is inconsistent with measured gene flow between geographically separated populations [9-11], and individual Drosophila can travel 10 km across desert terrain in a single night [9, 12, 13]-a feat that would be impossible without prolonged periods of straight flight. To directly examine orientation behavior under outdoor conditions, we built a portable flight arena in which a fly viewed the natural sky through a liquid crystal device that could experimentally rotate the polarization angle. Our findings indicate that Drosophila actively orient using the sky's natural polarization pattern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium and Egg Activation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartain, Caroline V.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In many animals, a rise in intracellular calcium levels is the trigger for egg activation, the process by which an arrested mature oocyte transitions to prepare for embryogenesis. In nearly all animals studied to date, this calcium rise, and thus egg activation, is triggered by the fertilizing sperm. However in the insects that have been examined, fertilization is not necessary to activate their oocytes. Rather, these insects’ eggs activate as they transit through the female’s reproductive tract, regardless of male contribution. Recent studies in Drosophila have shown that egg activation nevertheless requires calcium and that the downstream events and molecules of egg activation are also conserved, despite the difference in initial trigger. Genetic studies have uncovered essential roles for the calcium-dependent enzyme calcineurin and its regulator calcipressin, and have hinted at roles for calmodulin, in Drosophila egg activation. Physiological and in vitro studies have led to a model in which mechanical forces that impact the Drosophila oocyte as it moves through the reproductive tract triggers the influx of calcium from the external environment, thereby initiating egg activation. Future research will aim to test this model, as well as to determine the spatiotemporal dynamics of cytoplasmic calcium flux and mode of signal propagation in this unique system. PMID:23218670

  5. An automated paradigm for Drosophila visual psychophysics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Evans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations that cause learning and memory defects in Drosophila melanogaster have been found to also compromise visual responsiveness and attention. A better understanding of attention-like defects in such Drosophila mutants therefore requires a more detailed characterization of visual responsiveness across a range of visual parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed an automated behavioral paradigm for efficiently dissecting visual responsiveness in Drosophila. Populations of flies walk through multiplexed serial choice mazes while being exposed to moving visuals displayed on computer monitors, and infra-red fly counters at the end of each maze automatically score the responsiveness of a strain. To test our new design, we performed a detailed comparison between wild-type flies and a learning and memory mutant, dunce(1. We first confirmed that the learning mutant dunce(1 displays increased responsiveness to a black/green moving grating compared to wild type in this new design. We then extended this result to explore responses to a wide range of psychophysical parameters for moving gratings (e.g., luminosity, contrast, spatial frequency, velocity as well as to a different stimulus, moving dots. Finally, we combined these visuals (gratings versus dots in competition to investigate how dunce(1 and wild-type flies respond to more complex and conflicting motion effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that dunce(1 responds more strongly than wild type to high contrast and highly structured motion. This effect was found for simple gratings, dots, and combinations of both stimuli presented in competition.

  6. Tet protein function during Drosophila development.

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    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available The TET (Ten-eleven translocation 1, 2 and 3 proteins have been shown to function as DNA hydroxymethylases in vertebrates and their requirements have been documented extensively. Recently, the Tet proteins have been shown to also hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine in RNA. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmrC is enriched in messenger RNA but the function of this modification has yet to be elucidated. Because Cytosine methylation in DNA is barely detectable in Drosophila, it serves as an ideal model to study the biological function of 5hmrC. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression and requirement of Tet throughout Drosophila development. We show that Tet is essential for viability as Tet complete loss-of-function animals die at the late pupal stage. Tet is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and at more moderate levels in somatic muscle precursors in embryos and larvae. Depletion of Tet in muscle precursors at early embryonic stages leads to defects in larval locomotion and late pupal lethality. Although Tet knock-down in neuronal tissue does not cause lethality, it is essential for neuronal function during development through its affects upon locomotion in larvae and the circadian rhythm of adult flies. Further, we report the function of Tet in ovarian morphogenesis. Together, our findings provide basic insights into the biological function of Tet in Drosophila, and may illuminate observed neuronal and muscle phenotypes observed in vertebrates.

  7. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice.In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice.KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  8. Monoamine transporter availability in Parkinson's disease patients with or without depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Strecker, Karl; Wegner, Florian; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Schwarz, Johannes [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Oehlwein, Christian [Specialized Parkinson' s Disease Outpatient Centre, Gera (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Depression is a common symptom in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and markedly reduces their quality of life. As post-mortem studies have shown, its presence may reflect extensive cell loss in the midbrain and brainstem with imbalances in monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, in vivo evidence of specific monoaminergic deficits in depressed PD patients is still sparse. Therefore, we studied PD patients with depression (PD+D) and without depression (PD-D) using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the monoamine transporter marker [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. A magnetic resonance imaging-based region-of-interest analysis was applied to quantify the specific-to-nondisplaceable [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding coefficient V{sub 3}'' in the striatum, thalamus and midbrain/brainstem regions. PD+D patients had significantly lower V{sub 3}'' compared with PD-D patients in the striatum (p<0.001), thalamus (p=0.002), and midbrain/brainstem (p=0.025). Only PD+D patients without selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment showed lower thalamic and midbrain V{sub 3}'' than controls (p<0.001, p=0.029). In a small sub-group of SSRI-treated PD+D patients neither thalamic V{sub 3}'' nor midbrain/brainstem V{sub 3}'' differed from those in PD-D patients (p=0.168, p=0.201) or controls (p=0.384, p=0.318). Our data indicate that depression in PD is associated with a more pronounced loss of striatal dopamine transporter availability that is most likely secondary to increased dopaminergic degeneration. In addition, depressed PD patients have a lower availability of midbrain/brainstem monoamine transporters than nondepressed PD patients. These findings provide in vivo evidence in support of the known post-mortem data demonstrating more extensive nerve cell loss in PD with depression and indicate that SPECT imaging can help to identify pathophysiological changes underlying nonmotor

  9. Factores de riesgo en la litiasis vesicular: Estudio en pacientes colecistectomizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Romero Díaz

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio prospectivo desde diciembre de 1991 hasta noviembre de 1997, en 276 pacientes ingresados e intervenidos quirúrgicamente con el diagnóstico de litiasis vesicular. Dichos pacientes se intervinieron por nuestro grupo básico de trabajo y en su mayoría eran remitidos por médicos de la familia graduados en nuestra facultad. Se clasificaron los cálculos en pigmentarios y de colesterol según sus características macroscópicas al corte, y se realizó una encuesta con los posibles factores de riesgos. Predominaron los cálculos de colesterol (76,1 % sobre los pigmentarios, y existió predominio del sexo femenino sobre el masculino en relación de 4:1. El diagnóstico de litiasis vesicular se efectuó con mayor frecuencia en la cuarta y quinta décadas de la vida, mientras los pigmentarios se observaron con mayor frecuencia en edades más avanzadas. La obesidad (39,5 %, la diabetes mellitus (19,5 % y la paridad (31,8 % constituyeron los principales factores de riesgo, por lo que se deberá tomar en cuenta los antecedentes de litiasis en familiares de primera línea y la ingestión de anticonceptivos orales. En los estados hemolíticos predominaron los cálculos pigmentarios y se demostró la relación de las hiperlipoproteinemias de las fracciones IIb y IV con la colelitiasis. Sólo el 34,5 % de los bilicultivos realizados tuvieron crecimiento bacteriano, y fueron la Escherichia coli y el estreptococo los más aisladosA prospective study of 276 patients admitted and operated on with the diagnosis of cholelithiasis was conducted from December, 1991, to November, 1997. These patients were operated on by our basic working group and most of them were referred by family physicians graduated in our Faculty. Gallstones were classified into pigment gallstones and cholesterol gallstones according to their macroscopic characteristics on cutting. A survey was done with the possible risk factors. Cholesterol gallstones (76

  10. First foreign exploration for asian parasitoids of Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Dipt.: Drosophilidae), is a native of East Asia and is now widely established in North America and Europe, where it is a serious pest of small and stone fruit crops. The lack of effective indigenous parasitoids of D. suzukii in the ...

  11. Ionizing radiation causes the stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruntenko, N.E.; Zakharenko, L.P.; Raushenbakh, I.Yu.

    1998-01-01

    Potentiality of the stress-reaction arising in Drosophila melanogaster under gamma-irradiation of the source with 137 Cs (irradiation dose is 10 Gy , radiation dose rate amounts 180 c Gy/min) is studied. It is shown that radiation induces the stress-reaction in Drosophila resulting in alterations in energetic metabolism (biogenic amines metabolic system) and in reproductive function [ru

  12. Drosophila suzukii population response to environment and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  13. Drosophila Courtship Conditioning As a Measure of Learning and Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koemans, T.S.; Oppitz, C.; Donders, R.; Bokhoven, H. van; Schenck, A.; Keleman, K.; Kramer, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Many insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory have been elucidated through the use of simple behavioral assays in model organisms such as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila is useful for understanding the basic neurobiology underlying cognitive deficits

  14. Genetic monitoring of irradiated Drosophila populations treated with antimutagen melanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosseh, I.B.; Savchenko, V.K.; Lyakh, I.P.

    1986-01-01

    It was shown that viability of irradiated Drosophila is, on an average, lower than in intact populations. The fertility first decreases then increases exceeding the control level. Melanine added to the diet increases fertility and viability of both exposed and intact Drosophila populations

  15. Medium-term changes in Drosophila subobscura chromosomal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... Krimbas C. B. 1993 Drosophila subobscura: biology, genetics and inversion polymorphism. Verlag Dr, Kovac, Hamburg. Menozzi P. and Krimbas C. B. 1992 The inversion polymorphism of Drosophila subobscura revisited: synthetic maps of gene arrangements frequencies and their interpretation. J. Evol.

  16. Insulin replacement restores the vesicular secretory apparatus in the diabetic rat lacrimal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Dias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: In the lacrimal gland (LG acinar cells, signaling regulates the release of secretory vesicles through specific Rab and SNARE exocytotic proteins. In diabetes mellitus (DM, the LGs are dysfunctional. The aim of this work was to determine if secretory apparatus changes were associated with any effects on the secretory vesicles (SV in diabetic rats as well as the expression levels of constituent Rab and members of the SNARE family, and if insulin supplementation reversed those changes. Methods: DM was induced in male Wistar rats with an intravenous dose of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg. One of the two diabetic groups was then treated every other day with insulin (1 IU. A third control group was injected with vehicle. After 10 weeks, Western blotting and RT-PCR were used to compared the Rab and SNARE secretory factor levels in the LGs. Transmission electron microscopy evaluated acinar cell SV density and integrity. Results: In the diabetes mellitus group, there were fewer and enlarged SV. The Rab 27b, Rab 3d, and syntaxin-1 protein expression declined in the rats with diabetes mellitus. Insulin treatment restored the SV density and the Rab 27b and syntaxin expression to their control protein levels, whereas the Vamp 2 mRNA expression increased above the control levels. Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus LG changes were associated with the declines in protein expression levels that were involved in supporting exocytosis and vesicular formation. They were partially reversed by insulin replacement therapy. These findings may help to improve therapeutic management of dry eye in diabetes mellitus.

  17. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancement of absorption and hepatoprotective potential through soya-phosphatidylcholine-andrographolide vesicular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pushpendra Kumar; Khurana, Navneet; Pounikar, Yogesh; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Kharya, Murli Dhar

    2013-06-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a medicinal herb used extensively for various ailments and contains therapeutically active phytoconstituent, andrographolide (AN). Although hepatoprotective activity of AN is established, but their bioavailability is restricted due to its rapid clearance. The aim of this study, therefore, was to formulate AN herbosomes (ANH) through complexation with naturally occurring soya-phosphatidylcholine (SPC), in order to enhance absorption. Prepared andrographolide-soy phosphatidylcholine (AN-SPC) complex prepared was subjected for characterisation of complex and formation of vesicular system known as ANH using rotary evaporation techniques. This complex was subjected to in vitro study using everted small intestine sac technique which showed significantly increased absorption of AN from the ANH as compared to the plain AN. The hepatoprotective potential of ANH and plain AN was evaluated using carbon tetrachloride inducing hepatotoxicity rat model and compared, in which ANH equivalent to 50 mg/kg of plain AN significantly restore serum glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (112.4 ± 9.67 for AN whereas 90.2 ± 4.23 for ANH) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (109.3 ± 7.89 for AN whereas 90.6 ± 4.34 for ANH) level as compared to control group. The ANH showed significantly better absorption than plain AN and this effect of ANH was also comparable to the standard drug (Silymarin). The findings of present study reveal that ANH has better bioavailability as shown by in vitro absorption study and hence improved hepatoprotection as compared to plain AN at equivalent dose.

  19. Reovirus FAST Protein Enhances Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Oncolytic Virotherapy in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Le Boeuf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins are the smallest known viral fusogens (∼100–150 amino acids and efficiently induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation in multiple cell types. Syncytium formation enhances cell-cell virus transmission and may also induce immunogenic cell death, a form of apoptosis that stimulates immune recognition of tumor cells. These properties suggest that FAST proteins might serve to enhance oncolytic virotherapy. The oncolytic activity of recombinant VSVΔM51 (an interferon-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] mutant encoding the p14 FAST protein (VSV-p14 was compared with a similar construct encoding GFP (VSV-GFP in cell culture and syngeneic BALB/c tumor models. Compared with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 exhibited increased oncolytic activity against MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer spheroids in culture and reduced primary 4T1 breast tumor growth in vivo. VSV-p14 prolonged survival in both primary and metastatic 4T1 breast cancer models, and in a CT26 metastatic colon cancer model. As with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 preferentially replicated in vivo in tumors and was cleared rapidly from other sites. Furthermore, VSV-p14 increased the numbers of activated splenic CD4, CD8, natural killer (NK, and natural killer T (NKT cells, and increased the number of activated CD4 and CD8 cells in tumors. FAST proteins may therefore provide a multi-pronged approach to improving oncolytic virotherapy via syncytium formation and enhanced immune stimulation.

  20. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Bundibugyo ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for human use. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV-based vaccine vectors, which encode an EBOV glycoprotein in place of the VSV glycoprotein, have shown 100% efficacy against homologous Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV or Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV challenge in NHPs. In addition, a single injection of a blend of three rVSV vectors completely protected NHPs against challenge with SEBOV, ZEBOV, the former Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus, and Marburg virus. However, recent studies suggest that complete protection against the newly discovered Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BEBOV using several different heterologous filovirus vaccines is more difficult and presents a new challenge. As BEBOV caused nearly 50% mortality in a recent outbreak any filovirus vaccine advanced for human use must be able to protect against this new species. Here, we evaluated several different strategies against BEBOV using rVSV-based vaccines. Groups of cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with a single injection of a homologous BEBOV vaccine, a single injection of a blended heterologous vaccine (SEBOV/ZEBOV, or a prime-boost using heterologous SEBOV and ZEBOV vectors. Animals were challenged with BEBOV 29-36 days after initial vaccination. Macaques vaccinated with the homologous BEBOV vaccine or the prime-boost showed no overt signs of illness and survived challenge. In contrast, animals vaccinated with the heterologous blended vaccine and unvaccinated control animals developed severe clinical symptoms consistent with BEBOV infection with 2 of 3 animals in each group succumbing. These data show that complete protection against BEBOV will likely require incorporation of BEBOV glycoprotein into the vaccine or employment of a prime-boost regimen. Fortunately, our results demonstrate that heterologous rVSV-based filovirus vaccine

  1. Vesicular transport of progeny parvovirus particles through ER and Golgi regulates maturation and cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P F

    2013-09-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway.

  2. Infection of Melanoplus sanguinipes Grasshoppers following Ingestion of Rangeland Plant Species Harboring Vesicular Stomatitis Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Barbara S.; Stuart, Melissa A.; Derner, Justin D.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the many mechanisms of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) transmission is critical for understanding of the epidemiology of sporadic disease outbreaks in the western United States. Migratory grasshoppers [Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius)] have been implicated as reservoirs and mechanical vectors of VSV. The grasshopper-cattle-grasshopper transmission cycle is based on the assumptions that (i) virus shed from clinically infected animals would contaminate pasture plants and remain infectious on plant surfaces and (ii) grasshoppers would become infected by eating the virus-contaminated plants. Our objectives were to determine the stability of VSV on common plant species of U.S. Northern Plains rangelands and to assess the potential of these plant species as a source of virus for grasshoppers. Fourteen plant species were exposed to VSV and assayed for infectious virus over time (0 to 24 h). The frequency of viable virus recovery at 24 h postexposure was as high as 73%. The two most common plant species in Northern Plains rangelands (western wheatgrass [Pascopyrum smithii] and needle and thread [Hesperostipa comata]) were fed to groups of grasshoppers. At 3 weeks postfeeding, the grasshopper infection rate was 44 to 50%. Exposure of VSV to a commonly used grasshopper pesticide resulted in complete viral inactivation. This is the first report demonstrating the stability of VSV on rangeland plant surfaces, and it suggests that a significant window of opportunity exists for grasshoppers to ingest VSV from contaminated plants. The use of grasshopper pesticides on pastures would decrease the incidence of a virus-amplifying mechanical vector and might also decontaminate pastures, thereby decreasing the inter- and intraherd spread of VSV. PMID:19286779

  3. Infection of Melanoplus sanguinipes grasshoppers following ingestion of rangeland plant species harboring vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Barbara S; Stuart, Melissa A; Derner, Justin D

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the many mechanisms of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) transmission is critical for understanding of the epidemiology of sporadic disease outbreaks in the western United States. Migratory grasshoppers [Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius)] have been implicated as reservoirs and mechanical vectors of VSV. The grasshopper-cattle-grasshopper transmission cycle is based on the assumptions that (i) virus shed from clinically infected animals would contaminate pasture plants and remain infectious on plant surfaces and (ii) grasshoppers would become infected by eating the virus-contaminated plants. Our objectives were to determine the stability of VSV on common plant species of U.S. Northern Plains rangelands and to assess the potential of these plant species as a source of virus for grasshoppers. Fourteen plant species were exposed to VSV and assayed for infectious virus over time (0 to 24 h). The frequency of viable virus recovery at 24 h postexposure was as high as 73%. The two most common plant species in Northern Plains rangelands (western wheatgrass [Pascopyrum smithii] and needle and thread [Hesperostipa comata]) were fed to groups of grasshoppers. At 3 weeks postfeeding, the grasshopper infection rate was 44 to 50%. Exposure of VSV to a commonly used grasshopper pesticide resulted in complete viral inactivation. This is the first report demonstrating the stability of VSV on rangeland plant surfaces, and it suggests that a significant window of opportunity exists for grasshoppers to ingest VSV from contaminated plants. The use of grasshopper pesticides on pastures would decrease the incidence of a virus-amplifying mechanical vector and might also decontaminate pastures, thereby decreasing the inter- and intraherd spread of VSV.

  4. Serodiagnosis of Human Cysticercosis by Using Antigens from Vesicular Fluid of Taenia crassiceps Cysticerci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ednéia C.; Snege, Miriam; Vaz, Adelaide J.; Leser, Paulo G.

    2001-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by the presence of Taenia solium metacestodes in tissues, is a severe parasitic infection of the central nervous system with universal distribution. To determine the efficiency of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot with antigens of T. crassiceps vesicular fluid (Tcra) compared to standard techniques (indirect immunofluorescence test [IFT] and complement fixation test [CFT]) using T. solium cysticerci (Tso) for the serodiagnosis of NC, we studied serum samples from 24 patients with NC, 30 supposedly healthy individuals, 76 blood bank donors, 45 individuals with other non-NC parasitoses, and 97 samples from individuals screened for cysticercosis serology (SC). The sensitivity observed was 100% for ELISA-Tso and ELISA-Tcra, 91.7% for the IFT, and 87.5% for the CFT. The specificity was 90% for ELISA-Tso, 96.7% for ELISA-Tcra, 50% for IFT, and 63.3% for CFT. The efficiency was highest for ELISA-Tcra, followed by ELISA-Tso, IFT, and CFT. Of the 23 samples from SC group, which were reactive to ELISA-Tso and/or ELISA-Tcra, only 3 were positive to immunblot-Tcra (specific peptides of 14- and 18-kDa) and to glycoprotein peptides purified from Tcra antigen (gp-Tcra), showing the low predictive value of ELISA for screening. None of the samples from the remaining groups showed specific reactivity in immunoblot-Tcra. These results demonstrate that ELISA-Tcra can be used as a screening method for the serodiagnosis of NC and support the need for specific tests for confirmation of the results. The immunoblot can be used as a confirmatory test both with Tcra and gp-Tcra, with the latter having an advantage in terms of visualization of the results. PMID:11687454

  5. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  6. Glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain sequences required for rescue of a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitt, M.A.; Chong, L.; Rose, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used transient expression of the wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) from cloned cDNA to rescue a temperature-sensitive G protein mutant of VSV in cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Using cDNAs encoding G proteins with deletions in the normal 29-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain, they determined that the presence of either the membrane-proximal 9 amino acids or the membrane-distal 12 amino acids was sufficient for rescue of the temperature-sensitive mutant. G proteins with cytoplasmic domains derived from other cellular or viral G proteins did not rescue the mutant, nor did G proteins with one or three amino acids of the normal cytoplasmic domain. Rescue correlated directly with the ability of the G proteins to be incorporated into virus particles. This was shown by analysis of radiolabeled particles separated on sucrose gradients as well as by electron microscopy of rescued virus after immunogold labeling. Quantitation of surface expression showed that all of the mutated G proteins were expressed less efficiently on the cell surface than was wild-type G protein. However, they were able to correct for differences in rescue efficiency resulting from differences in the level of surface expression by reducing wild-type G protein expression to levels equivalent to those observed for the mutated G proteins. The results provide evidence that at least a portion of the cytoplasmic domain is required for efficient assembly of the VSV G protein into virions during virus budding

  7. The value of Tzanck smear test in diagnosis of erosive, vesicular, bullous, and pustular skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Murat; Baba, Mete; Seçkin, Deniz

    2008-12-01

    Tzanck smear is generally used for the diagnosis of the pemphigus group of autoimmune bullous diseases and mucocutaneous herpesvirus infections. There are only a few studies in the literature investigating its diagnostic value. We aimed to investigate Tzanck smear findings and to determine the diagnostic value of this test in moist (erosive, vesicular, bullous, and pustular) skin lesions. We also aimed to develop an algorithmic approach for the diagnosis of these types of skin lesions according to the Tzanck smear findings. Samples were stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa and evaluated by the same dermatologist. In some patients, methylene blue and Gram staining or direct immunofluorescence examinations were additionally performed. In all of the study cases, after the evaluation of clinical and laboratory findings (including, when appropriate, potassium hydroxide examination; viral serology; bacterial and fungal cultures; histopathology; direct and indirect immunofluorescence; patch testing), the definite diagnosis was established. We also determined the sensitivity and the specificity of certain Tzanck smear findings. Tzanck smear was performed in a total of 400 patients with moist skin lesions. The sensitivities of multinucleated giant cells and acantholytic cells in herpetic infections, dyskeratotic acantholytic cells and cocci in bullous impetigo, pseudohyphae in candidiasis, acantholytic cells in pemphigus and more than 10 tadpole cells (magnification x100) in spongiotic dermatitis were 84.7%, 92%, 100%, 100%, and 81.5%, respectively. Because Tzanck smears were evaluated by the same dermatologist, no comment could be made regarding the interobserver reliability of this test and how the level of experience with this technique might affect the results. Also, the sensitivity and the specificity of Tzanck smear test findings for certain diseases could not be calculated because of an insufficient number of patients. The Tzanck smear test is an inexpensive, useful

  8. Echinococcus multilocularis vesicular fluid inhibits activation and proliferation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Mougey, Valentine; Pallandre, Jean-Rene; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Godet, Yann; Millon, Laurence

    2017-08-25

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a severe chronic helminthic disease that mimics slow-growing liver cancer. The immune evasion strategy of Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the impact of E. multilocularis vesicular fluid (Em-VF) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on natural killer (NK) cells. PBMC and NK cells were exposed to Em-VF (1 µg/ml) during six days. The effect of Em-VF was assessed on CD69, viability and proliferation, and on and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 10, using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Exposure to Em-VF had no bearing on PBMC's viability, proliferation and expression of CD69. In contrast, higher levels of IL-17 at day three and of TGF-β at day six were observed in PBMC supernatant after exposure to Em-VF (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Exposure to Em-VF induced a significant decrease of CD69 expression of NK cells at day three and a significant decrease of proliferation of NK cells at day six (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In contrast, NK cells viability and levels of cytokines did not vary significantly over Em-VF stimulation. Exposure to Em-VF had a significant bearing on activation and proliferation of NK cells. NK cells may play an important role in the immune response of the host against E. multilocularis.

  9. Dromedary milk exosomes as mammary transcriptome nano-vehicle: Their isolation, vesicular and phospholipidomic characterizatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya M. Yassin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular nanovesicles that play a role in cellular trafficking and communication. Camel milk exosomes might carry the potential of recovery of several illnesses that coins the dromedary milk. This study shows for the first time their isolation and fine characterization. The differential ultracentrifugation was used for their isolation. Their recovery from dromedary milk during different lactation periods was evaluated. The vesicular characterization and stability testing of the recovered exosome were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The proteome footprinting was resolved by gel electrophoresis prior to their specific protein biomarker analysis. The immunoblotting of their specific protein biomarker TSG101 unexpectedly revealed a truncated 35 KDa protein specific for dromedary milk exosome rather than the previously reported 43 KDa mammalian one. The reversed-phase HPLC screening of their phospholipid makeup was compared with that of cattle milk exosomes at different lactation periods. Since dromedary milk exosomes reflect their mammary transcriptome outcome, further assessment of their content of αs1casein, αs2casein β-casein κ-casein mRNAs parallel with a constitutive glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (GAPD gene was performed using real-time PCR. The TEM scanning indicated that dromedary milk exosomes are freeze-stress unstable homogeneous with average size of 30 nm. There was no significant difference in expression level of different casein genes in mid lactation period in dromedary milk exosomes over late lactation period. The phospholipidomic survey proved that phosphatidylcholine is the major candidate of the examined phospholipids in dromedary milk exosomes. The obtained data give novel interpretation about the content of camel milk exosomes with possible insight for use as potentially-safe nano carrier.

  10. Distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, V.; Ragupathy, S.; Parthipan, B.; Rani, D.B.R.; Mahadevan, A.

    1991-12-31

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorhizzal (VAM) status was assessed for coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils. The three study sites were: The Kothagudem coal field in the south central region where waste materials are piled 1 to 2 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from plants growing on the waste. Neyveli, on the southeastern coast, is a lignite coal mine where the spoil is piled 70 to 100 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from recently revegetated mine spoil and from 25 year old revegetated sites. The calcite mine at Thazhaiyuthu in the south where the spoil is piled up 2 to 3 m on the soil surface. Samples were collected from 4 to 7 year old reclaimed sites. The wastes generally supported different plant species. The level of VAM infection of plants was markedly different in each mine spoil, with the maximum infection in the coal and calcite spoils, and the least in the lignite spoil. There was more infection in the 25 year old lignite spoil than in the newly revegetated spoil. There were different VAM species in each spoil, and no one species was present in all of the samples. The authors conclude that one of the factors leading to the differences between spoils is the amount of topsoil contained in the spoil (least in the lignite spoils which are very deep). The other is age of the spoils. Unfortunately the authors concluded that the best approach is to enrich the spoils with VAM rather than salvaging and replacing topsoil

  11. Interaction of Vesicular-arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Phosphorus with Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, K M; Hussey, R S; Roncadori, R W

    1983-07-01

    The influence of two vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus (P) nutrition on penetration, development, and reproduction by Meloidogyne incognita on Walter tomato was studied in the greenhouse. Inoculation with either Gigaspora margarita or Glomus mosseae 2 wk prior to nematode inoculation did not alter infection by M. incognita compared with nonmycorrhizal plants, regardless of soil P level (either 3 mug [low P] or 30 mug [high P] available P/g soil). At a given soil P level, nematode penetration and reproduction did not differ in mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. However, plants grown in high P soil had greater root weights, increased nematode penetration and egg production per plant, and decreased colonization by mycorrhizal fungi, compared with plants grown in low P soil. The number of eggs per female nematode on mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants was not influenced by P treatment. Tomato plants with split root systems grown in double-compartment containers which had either low P soil in both sides or high P in one side and low P in the other, were inoculated at transplanting with G. margarita and 2 wk later one-half of the split root system of each plant was inoculated with M. incognita larvae. Although the mycoorhizal fungus increased the inorganic P content of the root to a level comparable to that in plants grown in high P soil, nematode penetration and reproduction were not altered. In a third series of experiments, the rate of nematode development was not influenced by either the presence of G. margarita or high soil P, compared with control plants grown in low P soil. These data indicate that supplemental P (30 mu/g soil) alters root-knot nematode infection of tomato more than G. mosseae and G. margarita.

  12. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  13. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244......,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts...... in the Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  14. Patterns of mutation and selection at synonymous sites in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Nadia D; Bauer DuMont, Vanessa L; Hubisz, Melissa J

    2007-01-01

    , when applied to 18 coding sequences in 3 species of Drosophila, confirmed an earlier report that the Notch gene in Drosophila melanogaster was evolving under selection in favor of those codons defined as unpreferred in this species. This finding opened the possibility that synonymous sites may...... be subject to a variety of selective pressures beyond weak selection for increased frequencies of the codons currently defined as "preferred" in D. melanogaster. To further explore patterns of synonymous site evolution in Drosophila in a lineage-specific manner, we expanded the application of the maximum...... likelihood framework to 8,452 protein coding sequences with well-defined orthology in D. melanogaster, Drosophila sechellia, and Drosophila yakuba. Our analyses reveal intragenomic and interspecific variation in mutational patterns as well as in patterns and intensity of selection on synonymous sites. In D...

  15. Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Cai, Yu; Bay, Boon-Huat; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an in vivo model organism for the study of genetics and development since 100 years ago. Recently, the fruit fly Drosophila was also developed as an in vivo model organism for toxicology studies, in particular, the field of nanotoxicity. The incorporation of nanomaterials into consumer and biomedical products is a cause for concern as nanomaterials are often associated with toxicity in many in vitro studies. In vivo animal studies of the toxicity of nanomaterials with rodents and other mammals are, however, limited due to high operational cost and ethical objections. Hence, Drosophila, a genetically tractable organism with distinct developmental stages and short life cycle, serves as an ideal organism to study nanomaterial-mediated toxicity. This review discusses the basic biology of Drosophila, the toxicity of nanomaterials, as well as how the Drosophila model can be used to study the toxicity of various types of nanomaterials.

  16. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  17. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  18. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma H. Sasaki

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA. The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficient on the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. The results widened the list of beneficial effects of L. edodes on the control and prevention of animal pathogenic virus and filamentous fungi.Quatro linhagens de Lentinula edodes (Le10, 46, K2, ASSAI foram avaliadas quanto ao seu efeito inibitório sobre quatro espécies de fungos filamentosos de importância agrícola (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp., Fusarium solani, Phomopsis sojae e sobre o sorotipo Alagoas vírus da estomatite vesicular (VSA. Foi observado que as linhagens de L. edodes estudadas apresentaram variabilidade quanto ao seu efeito, tanto sobre os fungos filamentosos quanto sobre o vírus VSA. As linhagens K2 e Le10 apresentaram-se antagônicas sobre os fungos e as linhagens 46 e K2 foram eficientes na inibição do vírus VSA. Os resultados obtidos permitem ampliar a lista de efeitos benéficos de algumas linhagens de L. edodes no controle e prevenção de vírus patogênicos animais e de fungos filamentosos.

  19. Determination of the rate constant for neuronal and extra-neuronal monoamine oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassis, L.; Ludwig, J.; Trendelenburg, U.

    1986-01-01

    In the rat vas deferens, neuronal deamination of 3 H-(-) noradrenaline ( 3 H-NA) to 3 H-dihydroxyphenethylglycol ( 3 HDOPEG) cannot be inhibited by pretreatment with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. However, in the extraneuronal compartment of the rat heart, inhibition of MAO abolishes the formation of 3 HDOPEG. To clarify this discrepancy, the authors determined the rate constant for MAO (/sup k/mao/) neuronally (rat vas deferens) and extraneuronally (rat heart). For neuronal /sup k/mao, vasa deferentia were incubated with 3 HNA for 300 minutes, and the cumulative formation of 3 HDOPEG measured. The delay in time before 3 HDOPEG achieves steady state (/sup tau/system), is inversely proportional to /sup k/mao. Because /sup tau/system is very short for neuronal MAO, an appreciable delay was only achieved after partial inhibition of MAO with various parglyline concentrations. To relate to the uninhibited enzyme, the percentage inhibition by pargyline was then determined in homogenate preparations. For extraneuronal MAO, a similar procedure was performed in perfused rat hearts. Results show a significantly greater /sup k/mao of neuronal origin, (/sup k/mao = .57min - 1) which when related to the fractional size of the neuronal compartment suggests a very high activity of neuronal MAO

  20. CT scanning of the brain and lumber CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei

    1984-01-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorder s (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrpphy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups. (J.P.N.)

  1. Monoamine oxidase enzymes and oxidative stress in the rat optic nerve: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Marcella; Pascarella, Antonia; Cavallotti, Carlo; Pescosolido, Nicola

    2012-12-01

    In this study, age-related changes in the monoamine oxidases (MAO) were studied in the optic nerve (ON) of both young and aged male rats. The aim of the study was to assess the role of MAO in age-related changes in the rat ON and explain the mechanisms of neuroprotection mediated by MAO-B-specific inhibitors. Fifteen three month old and fifteen 26 month old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The animals were killed by terminal anaesthesia. Staining of MAO, quantitative analysis of images, biochemical assays and statistical analysis of data were carried out. Samples of the ON were washed in water, fixed in Bowen fluid, dehydrated and embedded in Entellan. Histological sections were stained for MAO-enzymatic activities. The specificity of the reaction was evaluated by incubating control sections in a medium either without substrate or without dye. The quantitative analysis of images was carried out at the same magnification and the same lighting using a Zeiss photomicroscope. The histochemical findings were compared with the biochemical results. After enzymatic staining, MAO could be demonstrated in the ON fibres of both young and aged animals; however, MAO were increased in the nerve fibres of the elderly rats. These morphological findings were confirmed biochemically. The possibility that age-related changes in MAO levels may be attributed to impaired energy production mechanisms and/or represent the consequence of reduced energy needs is discussed. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2012 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  2. Radiosynthesis of [11C]brofaromine, a potential tracer for imaging monoamine oxidase A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ametamey, S.M.; Beer, H.-F.; Guenther, I.; Antonini, A.; Leenders, K.L.; Waldmeier, P.C.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Brofaromine(4-5(-methoxy-7-bromobenzofuranyl)-2-piperidine-HCl) is a potent and selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A. Two methods for its synthesis and a preliminary positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation in monkey brain are described. The first method, at low carrier concentration of CO 2 , consisted of direct O-methylation of (4-(5-hydroxy-7-bromobenzofuranyl)-2-piperidine). The total radiochemical yield achieved ranged from 30 to 50% (from end of bombardment [EOB] and decay corrected) with an overall synthesis time of 45 min. The second approach, with high carrier amounts of CO 2 arising from inherent target problems, was accomplished in a three-step route involving protection of secondary amino functionality, O-methylation and deprotection. The total radiochemical yield was 10% (from EOB and decay corrected) with a total synthesis time of 70 min. For both methods methylation was achieved using the classical methylating agent [ 11 C]CH 3 I, and radiochemical purity was higher than 98%. PET evaluation of the radioligand in a Rhesus monkey showed a high uptake of radioactivity in the brain. Using the irreversible MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline and reversible MAO-A inhibitors moclobemide and brofaromine, three blockade experiments were designed to determine the extent of specific binding of [ 11 C]brofaromine to MAO-A. No apparent decrease in accumulation of radioactivity in the monkey brain was observed when compared to a baseline scan

  3. Inactivation of purified human recombinant monoamine oxidases A and B by rasagiline and its analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubálek, Frantisek; Binda, Claudia; Li, Min; Herzig, Yaacov; Sterling, Jeffrey; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mattevi, Andrea; Edmondson, Dale E

    2004-03-25

    The inactivation of purified human recombinant monoamine oxidases (MAO) A and B by rasagiline [N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan] and four of its analogues [N-propargyl-1(S)-aminoindan (S-PAI), 6-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-HPAI), N-methyl-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-MPAI), and 6-(N-methyl-N-ethyl carbamoyloxy)-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-CPAI)] has been investigated. All compounds tested, with the exception of R-CPAI, form stoichiometric N(5) flavocyanine adducts with the FAD moiety of either enzyme. No H(2)O(2) is produced during either MAO A or MAO B inactivation, which demonstrates that covalent addition occurs in a single turnover. Rasagiline has the highest specificity for MAO B, as demonstrated by a 100-fold higher inhibition potency (k(inact)/K(i)) compared to MAO A, with the remaining compounds exhibiting lower isozyme specificities. MAO B and MAO A are more selective for the R-enantiomer (rasagiline) compared to the S-enantiomer (S-PAI) by 2500-fold and 17-fold, respectively. Differences in UV/vis and CD spectral data of the complexes of the studied compounds with both MAO A and MAO B are interpreted in light of crystallographic data of complexes of MAO B with rasagiline and its analogues (Binda, C.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 2004, 47, 1767-1774.

  4. Monoamine Oxidase-A Inhibition and Associated Antioxidant Activity in Plant Extracts with Potential Antidepressant Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Herraiz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoamine oxidase (MAO catalyzes the oxidative deamination of amines and neurotransmitters and is involved in mood disorders, depression, oxidative stress, and adverse pharmacological reactions. This work studies the inhibition of human MAO-A by Hypericum perforatum, Peganum harmala, and Lepidium meyenii, which are reported to improve and affect mood and mental conditions. Subsequently, the antioxidant activity associated with the inhibition of MAO is determined in plant extracts for the first time. H. perforatum inhibited human MAO-A, and extracts from flowers gave the highest inhibition (IC50 of 63.6 μg/mL. Plant extracts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD-MS and contained pseudohypericin, hypericin, hyperforin, adhyperforin, hyperfirin, and flavonoids. Hyperforin did not inhibit human MAO-A and hypericin was a poor inhibitor of this isoenzyme. Quercetin and flavonoids significantly contributed to MAO-A inhibition. P. harmala seed extracts highly inhibited MAO-A (IC50 of 49.9 μg/L, being a thousand times more potent than H. perforatum extracts owing to its content of β-carboline alkaloids (harmaline and harmine. L. meyenii root (maca extracts did not inhibit MAO-A. These plants may exert protective actions related to antioxidant effects. Results in this work show that P. harmala and H. perforatum extracts exhibit antioxidant activity associated with the inhibition of MAO (i.e., lower production of H2O2.

  5. Functional mechanism of neuroprotection by inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako

    2009-08-01

    Neuroprotective therapy has been proposed for age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase (MAOB-Is), rasagiline and (-)deprenyl, are the most promising candidate neuroprotective drugs. Clinical trials of rasagiline in patients with Parkinson's disease suggest that rasagiline may have some disease-modifying effects. Results using animal and cellular models have proved that the MAOB-Is protect neurons by the intervention of 'intrinsic' mitochondrial apoptotic cascade and the induction of prosurvival antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. Rasagiline-related MAOB-Is prevent mitochondrial permeability transition induced by various insults and activation of subsequent apoptotic cascades: cytochrome c release, casapase activation, and condensation and fragmentation of nuclear DNA. MAOB-Is increase transcription of prosurvival genes through activating the nuclear transcription factor-(NF) system. Rasagiline increases the protein and mRNA levels of GDNF in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, whereas (-)deprenyl increases those of BDNF. Systemic administration of (-)deprenyl and rasagiline increases these neurotrophic factors in the cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease and nonhuman primates. This review presents recent advances in our understanding of the neuroprotection offered by MAOB-Is and possible evaluation of neuroprotective efficacy in clinical samples is discussed.

  6. Monoamine Oxidase A in Antisocial Personality Disorder and Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolla, Nathan J; Vinette, Sarah A

    2017-01-01

    Variation in the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene and MAO-A enzyme levels have been linked to antisocial behavior and aggression in clinical and non-clinical populations. Here, we provide an overview of the genetic, epigenetic, and neuroimaging research that has examined MAO-A structure and function in antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD). The low-activity MAO-A variable nucleotide tandem repeat genetic polymorphism has shown a robust association with large samples of violent and seriously violent offenders, many of whom had ASPD. A recent positron emission tomography (PET) study of ASPD similarly revealed low MAO-A density in brain regions thought to contribute to the psychopathology of the condition. By contrast, PET has also demonstrated that brain MAO-A levels are increased in BPD and that they relate to symptoms of low mood and suicidality. Candidate gene studies have produced the most compelling evidence connecting MAO-A genetic variants to both ASPD and BPD. Still, conflicting results abound in the literature, making it highly unlikely that ASPD or BPD is related to a specific MAO-A genetic variant. Future research should strive to examine how MAO-A genotypes interact with broad-spectrum environmental influences to produce brain endophenotypes that may ultimately become tractable targets for novel treatment strategies.

  7. The development of a MIP-optosensor for the detection of monoamine naphthalenes in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Navarro, Angel; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Fernández-Sánchez, Jorge F; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Mallavia, Ricardo; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2009-03-15

    To enhance the advantages of fluorescent flow-through sensing for drinking water we have designed a novel sensing matrix based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The synergic combination of a tailor-made MIP recognition with a selective room temperature fluorescence detection is a novel concept for optosensing devices and is assessed here for the simple and selective determination of pollutants in water. We describe a simple approach to preparing synthetic receptors for monoamine naphthalene compounds (MA-NCs) using non-covalent molecular imprinting techniques and naphthalene as template. We examine in detail the binding characteristics of the imprinted polymer and describe the flow-through sensor of MA-NCs by solid-surface fluorescence. Its detection limits for recognizing 1-naphthylamine (1-NA) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) separately are 26 ngmL(-1) and 50 ngmL(-1), respectively, and it also determines 1-NA and 2-NA simultaneously with a detection limit of 45 ngmL(-1). All the instrumental, chemical and flow variables were carefully optimized and an interference study was carried out to demonstrate its applicability and selectivity. Finally, we applied it to the analysis of 1-NA and 2-NA in tap and mineral waters, obtaining a 98% average recovery rate.

  8. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-01-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined 3 H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid

  9. Nitric oxide production and monoamine oxidase activity in cancer patients during interferon-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekkes, Durk; Van Gool, Arthur R; Bannink, Marjolein; Sleijfer, Stefan; Kruit, Wim H J; van der Holt, Bronno; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hengeveld, Michiel W; Stoter, Gerrit

    2009-10-01

    Both increased and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis have been reported in patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Animal studies showed that IFN-alpha administration results in increased levels of biogenic amines, subsequent activation of monoamine oxidases (MAOs), and finally in a change in NO production due to the H(2)O(2) generated by MAOs. We examined the potential relationship between NO production in plasma and MAO-B activity in platelets of 43 cancer patients during 8 weeks of treatment with IFN-alpha. NO synthesis was quantitated by measuring both the ratio of citrulline and arginine (CIT/ARG-ratio) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels. Compared to baseline, MAO activity and NOx increased, while the CIT/ARG-ratio decreased. No associations were found between NOx, MAO and CIT/ARG-ratio. Only few associations were observed between changes in the biochemical parameters and changes in psychopathology induced by IFN-alpha, of which the association between changes in CIT and lassitude was the most consistent. The results suggest that peripheral NO production and MAO activity are unrelated to each other, and that peripheral changes in these biochemical parameters induced by IFN-alpha are unlikely to contribute to definite psychiatric disturbance.

  10. Release of [3H]-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-01-01

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10 -7 - 10 -5 M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of [ 3 H]5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of [ 3 H]DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both [ 5 H]5HT and [ 3 H]DA was Ca 2+ -independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)[ 3 H]MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA

  11. Attenuation of MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity by TV3326, a cholinesterase-monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Yotam; Weinstock, Marta; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2003-07-01

    (R)-[(N-propargyl-(3R) aminoindan-5-yl) ethyl methyl carbamate] (TV3326) is a novel cholinesterase and brain-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A/-B inhibitor. It was developed for the treatment of dementia co-morbid with extra pyramidal disorders (parkinsonism), and depression. On chronic treatment in mice it attenuated striatal dopamine depletion induced by MPTP and prevented the reduction in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity, like selective B and non-selective MAO inhibitors. TV3326 preferentially inhibits MAO-B in the striatum and hippocampus, and the degree of MAO-B inhibition correlates with the prevention of MPTP-induced dopamine depletion. Complete inhibition of MAO-B is not necessary for full protection from MPTP neurotoxicity. Unlike that seen after treatment with other MAO-A and -B inhibitors, recovery of striatal and hippocampal MAO-A and -B activities from inhibition by TV3326 did not show first-order kinetics. This has been attributed to the generation of a number of metabolites by TV3326 that cause differential inhibition of these enzymes. Inhibition of brain MAO-A and -B by TV3326 resulted in significant elevations of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in the striatum and hippocampus. This may explain its antidepressant-like activity, resembling that of moclobemide in the forced-swim test in rats.

  12. Single-photon emission tomography imaging of monoamine transporters in impulsive violent behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiihonen, J.; Hallikainen, T.; Hakola, P.; Kuikka, J.T.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Yang, J.; Karhu, J.; Viinamaeki, H.; Lehtonen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Several studies have shown that impulsive violent and suicidal behaviour is associated with a central serotonin deficit, but until now it has not been possible to use laboratory tests with high sensitivity and specificity to study this kind of deficit or to localize the sites of serotonergic abnormalities in the living human brain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that monoamine transporter density in brain is decreased in subjects with impulsive violent behaviour. We studied serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transporter specific binding in 52 subjects (21 impulsive violent offenders, 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and ten non-violent alcoholic controls) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using iodine-123-labelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT) as the tracer. The blind quantitative analysis revealed that the 5-HT specific binding of [ 123 I]β-CIT in the midbrain of violent offenders was lower than that in the healthy control subjects (P<0.005; t test) or the non-violent alcoholics (P<0.05). The results imply that habitual impulsive aggressive behaviour in man is associated with a decrease in the 5-HT transporter density. (orig.)

  13. CT scanning of the brain and lumbar CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei [Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorders (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrophy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of 2-benzylidene-1-tetralone derivatives for monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakali, Klaudia T; Legoabe, Lesetja Jan; Petzer, Anel; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2018-05-01

    Chalcone has been identified as a promising lead for the design of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. This study attempted to discover potent and selective chalcone-derived MAO inhibitors by synthesising a series consisting of various cyclic chalcone derivatives. The cyclic chalcones were selected based on the possibility that their restricted structures would confer a higher degree of MAO isoform selectivity, and included the following chemical classes: 1-indanone, 1-tetralone, 1-benzosuberone, chromone, thiochromone, 4-chromanone and 4-thiochromanone. The results showed that the cyclic chalcones are in general good potency, and in most instances specific inhibitors of the human MAO-B isoform. Among these compounds, the 4-chromanone derivative was the most potent MAO-B inhibitor with an IC50 value of 0.156 µM. To further investigate the MAO inhibition of cyclic chalcones, a series of twenty-three 2-benzylidene-1-tetralone derivatives were synthesised and evaluated as MAO inhibitors. Most 2-benzylidene-1-tetralones possess good inhibitory activity and specificity for MAO-B with the most potent inhibitor displaying an IC50 value of 0.0064 µM, while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor possessed an IC50 value of 0.754 µM. This study thus shows that certain cyclic chalcones are human MAO-B inhibitors, compounds that could be suitable for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Cortical enlargement in autism is associated with a functional VNTR in the monoamine oxidase A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lea K; Hazlett, Heather C; Librant, Amy L; Nopoulos, Peggy; Sheffield, Val C; Piven, Joesph; Wassink, Thomas H

    2008-10-05

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is an enzyme expressed in the brain that metabolizes dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and serotonin. Abnormalities of serotonin neurotransmission have long been implicated in the psychopathology of autism. A polymorphism exists within the promoter region of the MAOA gene that influences MAOA expression levels so that "low activity" alleles are associated with increased neurotransmitter levels in the brain. Individuals with autism often exhibit elevated serotonin levels. Additional studies indicate that the "low activity" allele may be associated with lower IQ and more severe autistic symptoms. In this study we genotyped the MAOA promoter polymorphism in a group of 29 males (age 2-3 years) with autism and a group of 39 healthy pediatric controls for whom brain MRI data was available. We found a consistent association between the "low activity" allele and larger brain volumes for regions of the cortex in children with autism but not in controls. We did not find evidence for over-transmission of the "low activity" allele in a separate sample of 114 affected sib pair families. Nor did we find any unknown SNPs in yet another sample of 96 probands. Future studies will determine if there is a more severe clinical phenotype associated with both the "low activity" genotype and the larger brain volumes in our sample.

  16. Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibition by active principles from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Chi; Lin, Rong-Dih; Chen, Cheng-Tang; Lee, Mei-Hsien

    2005-08-22

    Attenuation of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) activity may provide protection against oxidative neurodegeneration. For this reason, inhibition of MAO-B activity is used as part of the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's patients. The hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jacks. (Rubiaceae) is a traditional Chinese herbal drug that is generally used to treat convulsive disorders. In this study, the fractionation and purification of Uncaria rhynchophylla extracts using a bioguided assay isolated two known compounds, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. The compounds inhibited MAO-B, as measured by an assay of rat brain MAO-B separated by electrophoresis on a 7.5% native polyacrylamide gel. The IC(50) values of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin were 88.6 and 58.9 microM, respectively, and inhibition occurred in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by the fluorescence method. The Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed K(i) values for (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin of 74 and 21 microM, respectively. This suggests that these two compounds, isolated here for the first time from Uncaria rhynchophylla, might be able to protect against neurodegeneration in vitro, and, therefore, the molecular mechanism deserves further study. This finding may also increase interest in the health benefits of Uncaria rhynchophylla.

  17. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) by Chinese herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R D; Hou, W C; Yen, K Y; Lee, M H

    2003-11-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines accompaned by the release of H2O2. Two subtypes, MAO-A and MAO-B, exist on the basis of their specificities to substrates and inhibitors. The regulation of MAO-B activity is important in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Twenty-seven species of plants used in traditional Chinese medicines, selected from an enthnobotanical survey, were used in an investigation of their inhibitory effect on MAO-B in rat brain homogenates. The 50% aqueous methanol extracts of four active extracts, Arisaema amurense, Lilium brownii var. colchesteri, Lycium chinense, and Uncaria rhynchophylla, exhibited the best activity and selectivity towards MAO-B with IC50 values of 0.44, 0.29, 0.40, and 0.03 mg/ml, respectively. A kinetic study of MAO-B inhibition by the four extracts using the Lineweaver-Burk plot for each active extract revealed the IC50 concentrations, and results show that: Ki = 0.59 mg/ml for A. amurense for the mixed-type mode, Ki = 0.58 mg/ml for L. brownii var. colchesteri for the mixed-type mode, Ki = 5.01 mg/ml for L. chinense for the uncompetitive mode, and Ki = 0.02 mg/ml for U. rhynchophylla for the uncompetitive mode. These may therefore be candidates for use in delaying the progressive degeneration caused by neurological diseases.

  18. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ferulic Acid Amides: Curcumin-Based Design and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavath, Vishnu N; Baysal, İpek; Uçar, Gülberk; Mondal, Susanta K; Sinha, Barij N; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid has structural similarity with curcumin which is being reported for its monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity. Based on this similarity, we designed a series of ferulic acid amides 6a-m and tested for their inhibitory activity on human MAO (hMAO) isoforms. All the compounds were found to inhibit the hMAO isoforms either selectively or non-selectively. Nine compounds (6a, 6b, 6g-m) were found to inhibit hMAO-B selectively, whereas the other four (6c-f) were found to be non-selective. There is a gradual shift from hMAO-B selectivity (6a,b) to non-selectivity (6c-f) as there is an increase in chain length at the amino terminus. In case of compounds having an aromatic nucleus at the amino terminus, increasing the carbon number between N and the aromatic ring increases the potency as well as selectivity toward hMAO-B. Compounds 6f, 6j, and 6k were subjected to membrane permeability and metabolic stability studies by in vitro assay methods. They were found to have a better pharmacokinetic profile than curcumin, ferulic acid, and selegiline. In order to understand the structural features responsible for the potency and selectivity of 6k, we carried out a molecular docking simulation study. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The properties of B-form monoamine oxidase in mitochondria from monkey platelet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Toshio; Aomine, Masahiro

    The present study was examined the effect of the properties of monkey platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) based on inhibitor sensitivity. Monkey platelet showed a high MAO activity with beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) as substrate and a very low A-form MAO activity with 5 hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as substrate. Moreover, monkey platelet MAO was sensitive to the drugs deprenyl as B-form MAO inhibitor and less sensitive to clorgyline and harmaline as A form MAO inhibitor with beta-PEA as the B-form MAO substrate. B-form MAO from monkey platelet was more stable against heat treatment at 55 degrees C than B-form MAO in brain. After digestion with trypsin at 37 degrees C for 4 hrs, it was found that MAO from platelet was inhibited about 70% with beta-PEA as substrate with brain. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and nortriptyline inhibited B-form MAO activity more potency than B-form MAO in brain. However, when the noncyclic antidepressant nomifensine was used, monkey platelet B-form MAO activities were less potently inhibited. All these reagents were noncompetitive inhibitors of B form MAO in monkey platelet. The present studies demonstrated that monkey platelet MAO is a single of B-form MAO and sensitive to tricyclic antidepressants.

  20. Monoamine Oxidases, Oxidative Stress, and Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiac Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Maggiorani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in healthcare over the past several decades have resulted in populations now living longer. With this increase in longevity, a wider prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is more common and known to be a major factor in rising healthcare costs. A wealth of scientific evidence has implicated cell senescence as an important component in the etiology of these age-dependent pathologies. A number of studies indicate that an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS contributes to trigger and accelerate the cardiac senescence processes, and a new role of monoamine oxidases, MAO-A and MAO-B, is emerging in this context. These mitochondrial enzymes regulate the level of catecholamines and serotonin by catalyzing their oxidative deamination in the heart. MAOs’ expression substantially increases with ageing (6-fold MAO-A in the heart and 4-fold MAO-B in neuronal tissue, and their involvement in cardiac diseases is supposedly related to the formation of ROS, via the hydrogen peroxide produced during the substrate degradation. Here, we will review the most recent advances in this field and describe why MAOs could be effective targets in order to prevent age-associated cardiovascular disease.

  1. An autoradiographic method of mapping the distribution and density of monoamine neurons in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuoka, D.T.; Alcaraz, A.F.

    1975-01-01

    A combined in vitro uptake and autoradiographic procedure as an important complement to the histochemical fluorescence method is described. Slabs of fresh mouse brain were incubated with 14 C-NE, 14 C-DA or 14 C-5-HT, freeze-dried, and placed against X-ray film for autoradiography. Catecholamine nerve terminals were labeled by in vitro incubation with 14 C-NE or 14 C-DA. Dopaminergic terminals were labeled by 14 C-NE incubation preceded by desipramine (to block uptake into NE terminals). With 14 C-5-HT incubation, the uptake pattern indicated the possibility that 5-HT nerve terminals were being labeled. Advantages of this method are that it allows the visualization of overall density and distribution of selected monoamine nerve terminals or uptake sites of other putative neurotransmitters in whole coronal or sagittal sections, so that data are obtained from many areas of brain or spinal cord rather than in only those areas preselected for microscopic viewing

  2. Association study of monoamine oxidase A/B genes and schizophrenia in Han Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-Bin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monoamine oxidases (MAOs catalyze the metabolism of dopaminergic neurotransmitters. Polymorphisms of isoforms MAOA and MAOB have been implicated in the etiology of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. Association studies detected these polymorphisms in several populations, however the data have not been conclusive to date. Here, we investigated the association of MAOA and MAOB polymorphisms with schizophrenia in a Han Chinese population. Methods Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs6323 of MAOA and rs1799836 of MAOB, were selected for association analysis in 537 unrelated schizophrenia patients and 536 healthy controls. Single-locus and Haplotype associations were calculated. Results No differences were found in the allelic distribution of rs6323. The G allele of rs1799836 was identified as a risk factor in the development of schizophrenia (P = 0.00001. The risk haplotype rs6323T-rs1799836G was associated with schizophrenia in female patients (P = 0.0002, but the frequency difference was not significant among male groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that MAOB is a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. In contrast, no significant associations were observed for the MAOA functional polymorphism with schizophrenia in Han Chinese. These data support further investigation of the role of MAO genes in schizophrenia.

  3. Kinetic investigation of the catalytic mechanism for bovine liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behavior of the oxidative deamination reaction catalyzed by bovine liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase was investigated with a series of ring-substituted benzylamines. Oxidation rates were fastest with the meta isomers. Dalziel coefficients were consistent with a mechanism involving a ternary complex for all substrates tested. Alterations in the Michaelis constant for oxygen were similar in magnitude to those for the rate of catalysis. Deuterium and tritium isotope effects were determined to obtain more detailed information on the mechanism of catalysis. Large deuterium isotope effects expressed on k cat were obtained for all substrates. Determination of the tritium isotope effect for benzylamine allowed the calculation of an intrinsic isotope effect of 6.5 and a secondary isotope effect of 1.17. Steady-state experiments were supplemented with pre-steady-state kinetic techniques. Rates of flavin reduction were faster than that of turnover. The deuterium isotope effect obtained for the rate of flavin reduction was 7-15 for the various substrates. The observed isotope effect was found to be an appropriate estimate for the intrinsic isotope effect

  4. Single-photon emission tomography imaging of monoamine transporters in impulsive violent behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiihonen, J.; Hallikainen, T.; Hakola, P. [Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, FIN-70240 Kuopio (Finland); Kuikka, J.T.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Yang, J. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Karhu, J. [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Viinamaeki, H.; Lehtonen, J. [Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Several studies have shown that impulsive violent and suicidal behaviour is associated with a central serotonin deficit, but until now it has not been possible to use laboratory tests with high sensitivity and specificity to study this kind of deficit or to localize the sites of serotonergic abnormalities in the living human brain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that monoamine transporter density in brain is decreased in subjects with impulsive violent behaviour. We studied serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transporter specific binding in 52 subjects (21 impulsive violent offenders, 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and ten non-violent alcoholic controls) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using iodine-123-labelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT) as the tracer. The blind quantitative analysis revealed that the 5-HT specific binding of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the midbrain of violent offenders was lower than that in the healthy control subjects (P<0.005; t test) or the non-violent alcoholics (P<0.05). The results imply that habitual impulsive aggressive behaviour in man is associated with a decrease in the 5-HT transporter density. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 55 refs.

  5. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  6. High throughput Screening to Identify Natural Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzio, E; Deiab, S; Park, K; Soliman, KFA

    2012-01-01

    Age-related increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) may contribute to CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, MAO-B inhibitors are used in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson disease as preliminary monotherapy or adjunct therapy with L-dopa. To date, meager natural sources of MAO-B inhibitors have been identified, and the relative strength, potency and rank of many plants relative to standard drugs such as Selegiline (L-deprenyl, Eldepryl) are not known. In this work, we developed and utilized a high throughput enzyme microarray format to screen and evaluate 905 natural product extracts (0.025–.7 mg/ml) to inhibit human MAO-B derived from BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-tandem mass spectroscopy, and enzyme activity was confirmed by [1] substrate conversion (3-mM benzylamine) to H202 and [2] benzaldehyde. Of the 905 natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [Comfrey, Bringraj, Skullcap, Kava-kava, Wild Indigo, Gentian and Green Tea. In conclusion, the data reflect relative potency information by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human MAO-B inhibitory properties in their natural form. PMID:22887993

  7. Switching antipsychotics to aripiprazole or blonanserin and plasma monoamine metabolites levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Itaru; Shiga, Tetsuya; Katsumi, Akihiko; Kanno-Nozaki, Keiko; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2014-03-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug that has efficacy equal to risperidone. We investigated the effects of aripiprazole and blonanserin on clinical symptoms and plasma levels of homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol in the switching strategy of schizophrenia. Twenty two Japanese patients with schizophrenia were enrolled into this open study. The antipsychotics of all patients were switched to aripiprazole or blonanserin for the improvement of clinical symptoms or side effects. Plasma monoamine metabolites levels were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography. There were no significant effects for time (p = 0.346) or time × group interaction (p = 0.27) on the changes of positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) total score, although blonanserin decreased PANSS scores. We observed negative correlation between pHVA at baseline and the change in PANSS total score (rs = -0.450, p = 0.046). We also found positive correlation between the changes in pHVA and the changes in PANSS total (rs = 0.536, p = 0.015) and positive (rs = 0.572, p = 0.008) scores. There were no differences between blonanserin and aripiprazole in the improvement of clinical symptoms. Our results suggest that pHVA may be useful indicator for the switching strategy to aripiprazole or blonanserin in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Rapid and highly accurate detection of Drosophila suzukii, spotted wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), is currently a major pest that causes severe economic losses to thin-skinned, small fruit growers in North America and Europe. The monitoring and early detection of SWD in the field is of the utmost importance for its proper management. Althou...

  9. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D.

  10. Peptidergic control of a fruit crop pest: the spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptides play an important role in the regulation of feeding in insects and offer potential targets for the development of new chemicals to control insect pests. A pest that has attracted much recent attention is the highly invasive Drosophila suzukii, a polyphagous pest that can cause serious...

  11. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila; Efectos biologicos del radon en Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel P, A E; Tavera D, L; Cruces M, M P; Arceo M, C; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-15

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  12. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila; Efectos biologicos del radon en Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-15

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  13. Online micro-solid-phase extraction based on boronate affinity monolithic column coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2014-05-16

    Quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters is very important in diagnosing and monitoring of patients with neurological disorders. We developed an online analytical method to selectively determine urinary monoamine neurotransmitters, which coupled the boronate affinity monolithic column micro-solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared by in situ polymerization of vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAA) in a stainless capillary column. The prepared monolithic column showed good permeability, high extraction selectivity and capacity. The column-to-column reproducibility was satisfactory and the enrichment factors were 17-243 for four monoamine neurotransmitters. Parameters that influence the online extraction efficiency, including pH of sample solution, flow rate of extraction and desorption, extraction volume and desorption volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method exhibited low limit of detection (0.06-0.80μg/L), good linearity (with R(2) between 0.9979 and 0.9993). The recoveries in urine samples were 81.0-105.5% for four monoamine neurotransmitters with intra- and inter-day RSDs of 2.1-8.2% and 3.7-10.6%, respectively. The online analytical method was sensitive, accurate, selective, reliable and applicable to analysis of trace monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Depletion of rat cortical norepinephrine and the inhibition of [3H]norepinephrine uptake by xylamine does not require monoamine oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A through pretreatment of rats with clorgyline or the pro-drug MDL 72,394 did not block the amine-depleting action of xylamine. Xylamine treatment resulted in a loss of approximately 60% of the control level of norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex. A 1-hr pretreatment, but not a 24-hr pretreatment, with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, L-deprenyl, prevented the depletion of norepinephrine by xylamine. In addition, pretreatment with MDL 72,974, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor without amine-releasing or uptake - inhibiting effects, did not prevent cortical norepinephrine levels. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by either MDL 72,974 or MDL 72,394 did not prevent the inhibition of [ 3 H]norepinephrine uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes by xylamine. These data indicate that monoamine oxidase does not mediate the amine-releasing or uptake inhibiting properties of xylamine. The protection afforded by L-deprenyl following a 1-hr pretreatment most probably was due to accumulation of its metabolite, L-amphetamine, which would inhibit the uptake carrier. A functional carrier is required for depletion since desipramine administered 1 hr prior to xylamine, was also able to prevent depletion of norepinephrine

  15. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Hrnčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly species was unexpectedly detected in Tephri traps baited with the three-component female-biased attractant BioLure that is regularly used for monitoring the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedem. (Diptera: Tephritidae in Montenegro. Brief visual inspection identified the new species as the spotted wing drosophila D. suzukii. The pest was first recorded in several localities on the Montenegrin seacoast around Boka Kotor Bay. After the finding, all Drosophila specimens were collected from traps for further laboratory observation. A quick follow-up monitoring of other Tephri traps was carried out within the next few days on the rest of the seacoast (localities from Tivat to Ulcinj. Additionally, Tephri traps were set up around Lake Skadar and in the city of Podgorica, as well as on fresh fruit markets in Podgorica. The results of this preliminary study showed that D. suzukii was present in all surveyed locations and adults were captured until late December. Both sexes were found in traps with BioLure. Our data show that D. suzukii is present in southern parts of Montenegro and there is a serious threat of its further spreading, particularly towards northern parts of the country where the main raspberry and blueberry production is placed. The results also show that Tephri traps baited with BioLure can be used for detection and monitoring of spotted wing drosophila.

  16. Nematocytes: Discovery and characterization of a novel anculeate hemocyte in Drosophila falleni and Drosophila phalerata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianna Bozler

    Full Text Available Immune challenges, such as parasitism, can be so pervasive and deleterious that they constitute an existential threat to a species' survival. In response to these ecological pressures, organisms have developed a wide array of novel behavioral, cellular, and molecular adaptations. Research into these immune defenses in model systems has resulted in a revolutionary understanding of evolution and functional biology. As the field has expanded beyond the limited number of model organisms our appreciation of evolutionary innovation and unique biology has widened as well. With this in mind, we have surveyed the hemolymph of several non-model species of Drosophila. Here we identify and describe a novel hemocyte, type-II nematocytes, found in larval stages of numerous Drosophila species. Examined in detail in Drosophila falleni and Drosophila phalerata, we find that these remarkable cells are distinct from previously described hemocytes due to their anucleate state (lacking a nucleus and unusual morphology. Type-II nematocytes are long, narrow cells with spindle-like projections extending from a cell body with high densities of mitochondria and microtubules, and exhibit the ability to synthesize proteins. These properties are unexpected for enucleated cells, and together with our additional characterization, we demonstrate that these type-II nematocytes represent a biological novelty. Surprisingly, despite the absence of a nucleus, we observe through live cell imaging that these cells remain motile with a highly dynamic cellular shape. Furthermore, these cells demonstrate the ability to form multicellular structures, which we suggest may be a component of the innate immune response to macro-parasites. In addition, live cell imaging points to a large nucleated hemocyte, type-I nematocyte, as the progenitor cell, leading to enucleation through a budding or asymmetrical division process rather than nuclear ejection: This study is the first to report such a

  17. Actin-based vesicular transport in the first 20 min after dusk is crucial for daily rhabdom synthesis in the compound eye of the grapsid crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, A; Arikawa, K

    1997-09-01

    In the crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus, maintained under a 12 h:12 h light:dark cycle, the amount of vesicular smooth endoplasmic reticulum (vesicular sER) in the photoreceptor cell body increases after the light is turned off. This paper demonstrates that actin filaments in the photoreceptor cell body are involved in the transport of vesicular sER towards the rhabdom. To specify the time of actin contribution to rhabdom synthesis, we disrupted the organization of actin filaments in the cell body with cytochalasin D at various time around dusk. We then measured the rhabdom size and also examined the ultrastructure of the photoreceptor cell body 3 h after extinguishing the light. When cytochalasin D was applied from either 1 h before or immediately after extinguishing the light, the rhabdom size did not increase, whereas vesicular sER accumulated in the cell body. In contrast, cytochalasin D applied to the eyes from 20 min after turning the light off did not inhibit rhabdom synthesis. These results indicate that the first 20 min after the light is turned off is particularly important for the transport of vesicular sER towards the rhabdom by the cell body actin filaments.

  18. Development of a novel real-time RT-PCR assay to detect Seneca Valley virus-1 associated with emerging cases of vesicular disease in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Veronica L; Ransburgh, Russell H; Poulsen, Elizabeth G; Wadsworth, Jemma; King, Donald P; Mioulet, Valerie; Knowles, Nick J; Williamson, Susanna; Liu, Xuming; Anderson, Gary A; Fang, Ying; Bai, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Seneca Valley virus 1 (SVV-1) can cause vesicular disease that is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease, vesicular stomatitis and swine vesicular disease. SVV-1-associated disease has been identified in pigs in several countries, namely USA, Canada, Brazil and China. Diagnostic tests are required to reliably detect this emerging virus, and this report describes the development and evaluation of a novel real-time (r) reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay (rRT-PCR), targeting the viral polymerase gene (3D) of SVV-1. This new assay detected all historical and contemporary SVV-1 isolates examined (n=8), while no cross-reactivity was observed with nucleic acid templates prepared from other vesicular disease viruses or common swine pathogens. The analytical sensitivity of the rRT-PCR was 0.79 TCID 50 /ml and the limit of detection was equivalent using two different rRT-PCR master-mixes. The performance of the test was further evaluated using pig nasal (n=25) and rectal swab samples (n=25), where concordant results compared to virus sequencing were generated for 43/50 samples. The availability of this assay, will enable laboratories to rapidly detect SVV-1 in cases of vesicular disease in pigs, negated for notifiable diseases, and could enable existing knowledge gaps to be investigated surrounding the natural epidemiology of SVV-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma biomarkers of decreased vesicular storage distinguish Parkinson disease with orthostatic hypotension from the parkinsonian form of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David S; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Holmes, Courtney

    2015-02-01

    Parkinson disease with orthostatic hypotension (PD + OH) and the parkinsonian form of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P) can be difficult to distinguish clinically. Recent studies indicate that PD entails a vesicular storage defect in catecholaminergic neurons. Although cardiac sympathetic neuroimaging by (18)F-dopamine positron emission tomography can identify decreased vesicular storage, this testing is not generally available. We assessed whether plasma biomarkers of a vesicular storage defect can separate PD + OH from MSA-P. We conceptualized that after F-dopamine injection, augmented production of F-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (F-DOPAC) indicates decreased vesicular storage, and we therefore predicted that arterial plasma F-DOPAC would be elevated in PD + OH but not in MSA-P. We measured arterial plasma F-DOPAC after (18)F-dopamine administration (infused i.v. over 3 min) in patients with PD + OH (N = 12) or MSA-P (N = 21) and in healthy control subjects (N = 26). Peak F-DOPAC:dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) was also calculated to adjust for effects of denervation on F-DOPAC production. Plasma F-DOPAC accumulated rapidly after initiation of (18)F-dopamine infusion. Peak F-DOPAC (5-10 min) in PD + OH averaged three times that in MSA-P (P 300 nCi-kg/cc-mCi, in contrast with 7 of 12 PD + OH patients (χ(2) = 16.6, P < 0.0001). DHPG was lower in PD + OH (3.83 ± 0.36 nmol/L) than in MSA-P (5.20 ± 0.29 nmol/L, P = 0.007). All MSA-P patients had peak F-DOPAC:DHPG < 60, in contrast with 9 of 12 PD + OH patients (χ(2) = 17.5, P < 0.0001). Adjustment of peak F-DOPAC for DHPG increased test sensitivity from 58 to 81% at similar high specificity. After F-dopamine injection, plasma F-DOPAC and F-DOPAC:DHPG distinguish PD + OH from MSA-P.

  20. (E)-[125I]-5-AOIBV: a SPECT radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emond, Patrick; Mavel, Sylvie; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda; Kassiou, Michael; Garreau, Lucette; Bodard, Sylvie; Drossard, Marie-Laure; Chalon, Sylvie; Guilloteau, Denis

    2007-01-01

    The premise that, over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), changes in the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) occur in parallel with changes to other cholinergic marker proteins provides the basis for the applicability of benzovesamicol derivatives as radioligands for AD studies by single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography. We report the synthesis of enantiopure benzovesamicol derivatives: (R,R) or (S,S)-(E)-2-hydroxy-5-(3-iodoprop-2-en-1-oxy)-3- (4-phenylpiperidino)tetralin [(R,R)-AOIBV: K d =0.45 nM or (S,S)-5-AOIBV: K d =4.3 nM] and their corresponding tributyltin precursors for radioiodination. (R,R or S,S)-5-AOIBV was labeled with iodine-125 from their corresponding n-tributyltin precursors. Both compounds were obtained with radiochemical and optical purity greater than 97% and in radiochemical yields ranging 34-36%. To determine if these compounds could provide an advantage when compared to [ 125 I]-iodo benzovesamicol (IBVM), IBVM was also labeled and used as the reference compound in all ex vivo experiments. Ex vivo biodistribution experiments in rats revealed that [ 125 I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV displayed the most suitable pharmacological profile as the radioactivity distribution corresponded well with the known VAChT brain density. Moreover, pre-injection of vesamicol prevented the uptake of [ 125 I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV in striatum, cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating selectivity for the VAChT. However, even if time activity curves of [ 125 I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV confirmed that this compound could be used to visualize the VAChT in vivo, at each point of the kinetic study, [ 125 I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV showed a lower specific binding compared to [ 125 I]-IBVM. These results made [ 125 I]-( R,R)-5-AOIBV inferior to [ 125 I]-IBVM for the VAChT exploration in vivo

  1. (E)-[{sup 125}I]-5-AOIBV: a SPECT radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, Patrick [INSERM U619, 37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, CHRU, Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Medecine nucleaire, 37000 Tours (France); Mavel, Sylvie [INSERM U619, 37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, CHRU, Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Medecine nucleaire, 37000 Tours (France)], E-mail: sylvie.mavel@univ-tours.fr; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda [INSERM U619, 37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, CHRU, Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Medecine nucleaire, 37000 Tours (France); Kassiou, Michael [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Garreau, Lucette; Bodard, Sylvie; Drossard, Marie-Laure; Chalon, Sylvie; Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM U619, 37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, CHRU, Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Medecine nucleaire, 37000 Tours (France)

    2007-11-15

    The premise that, over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), changes in the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) occur in parallel with changes to other cholinergic marker proteins provides the basis for the applicability of benzovesamicol derivatives as radioligands for AD studies by single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography. We report the synthesis of enantiopure benzovesamicol derivatives: (R,R) or (S,S)-(E)-2-hydroxy-5-(3-iodoprop-2-en-1-oxy)-3- (4-phenylpiperidino)tetralin [(R,R)-AOIBV: K{sub d}=0.45 nM or (S,S)-5-AOIBV: K{sub d}=4.3 nM] and their corresponding tributyltin precursors for radioiodination. (R,R or S,S)-5-AOIBV was labeled with iodine-125 from their corresponding n-tributyltin precursors. Both compounds were obtained with radiochemical and optical purity greater than 97% and in radiochemical yields ranging 34-36%. To determine if these compounds could provide an advantage when compared to [{sup 125}I]-iodo benzovesamicol (IBVM), IBVM was also labeled and used as the reference compound in all ex vivo experiments. Ex vivo biodistribution experiments in rats revealed that [{sup 125}I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV displayed the most suitable pharmacological profile as the radioactivity distribution corresponded well with the known VAChT brain density. Moreover, pre-injection of vesamicol prevented the uptake of [{sup 125}I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV in striatum, cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating selectivity for the VAChT. However, even if time activity curves of [{sup 125}I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV confirmed that this compound could be used to visualize the VAChT in vivo, at each point of the kinetic study, [{sup 125}I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV showed a lower specific binding compared to [{sup 125}I]-IBVM. These results made [{sup 125}I]-( R,R)-5-AOIBV inferior to [{sup 125}I]-IBVM for the VAChT exploration in vivo.

  2. BDNF regulates the expression and distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in cultured hippocampal neurons.

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    Carlos V Melo

    Full Text Available BDNF is a pro-survival protein involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. BDNF strengthens excitatory synapses and contributes to LTP, presynaptically, through enhancement of glutamate release, and postsynaptically, via phosphorylation of neurotransmitter receptors, modulation of receptor traffic and activation of the translation machinery. We examined whether BDNF upregulated vesicular glutamate receptor (VGLUT 1 and 2 expression, which would partly account for the increased glutamate release in LTP. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were incubated with 100 ng/ml BDNF, for different periods of time, and VGLUT gene and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. At DIV7, exogenous application of BDNF rapidly increased VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels, in a dose-dependent manner. VGLUT1 expression also increased but only transiently. However, at DIV14, BDNF stably increased VGLUT1 expression, whilst VGLUT2 levels remained low. Transcription inhibition with actinomycin-D or α-amanitine, and translation inhibition with emetine or anisomycin, fully blocked BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed that BDNF stimulation upregulates the number, integrated density and intensity of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 puncta in neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV7, indicating that the neurotrophin also affects the subcellular distribution of the transporter in developing neurons. Increased VGLUT1 somatic signals were also found 3 h after stimulation with BDNF, further suggesting an increased de novo transcription and translation. BDNF regulation of VGLUT expression was specifically mediated by BDNF, as no effect was found upon application of IGF-1 or bFGF, which activate other receptor tyrosine kinases. Moreover, inhibition of TrkB receptors with K252a and PLCγ signaling with U-73122 precluded BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Hippocampal neurons express both isoforms during

  3. Resistance Responses of Potato to Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi under Varying Abiotic Phosphorus Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, D A; Knowles, N R

    1992-09-01

    In mycorrhizal symbioses, susceptibility of a host plant to infection by fungi is influenced by environmental factors, especially the availability of soil phosphorus. This study describes morphological and biochemical details of interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus and potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Russet Burbank) plants, with a particular focus on the physiological basis for P-induced resistance of roots to infection. Root infection by the VAM fungus Glomus fasciculatum ([Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) was extensive for plants grown with low abiotic P supply, and plant biomass accumulation was enhanced by the symbiosis. The capacity of excised roots from P-deficient plants to produce ethylene in the presence or absence of exogenous 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) was markedly reduced by VAM infection. This apparent inhibition of ACC oxidase (ACC(ox)) activity was localized to areas containing infected roots, as demonstrated in split-root studies. Furthermore, leachate from VAM roots contained a potent water-soluble inhibitor of ethylene generation from exogenous ACC by nonmycorrhizal (NM) roots. The leachate from VAM-infected roots had a higher concentration of phenolics, relative to that from NM roots. Moreover, the rates of ethylene formation and phenolic concentration in leachates from VAM roots were inversely correlated, suggesting that this inhibitor may be of a phenolic nature. The specific activity of extracellular peroxidase recovered in root leachates was not stimulated by VAM infection, although activity on a fresh weight basis was significantly enhanced, reflecting the fact that VAM roots had higher protein content than NM roots. Polyphenol oxidase activity of roots did not differ between NM and VAM roots. These results characterize the low resistance response of P-deficient plants to VAM infection. When plants were grown with higher abiotic P supply, the relative benefit of the VAM symbiosis

  4. Influence of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Response of Potato to Phosphorus Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, DAJ.; Knowles, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus (Glomus fasciculatum [Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants during the development of P deficiency were characterized. Nonmycorrhizal (NM) plants grown for 63 d with low abiotic P supply (0.5 mM) produced 34, 52, and 73% less root, shoot, and tuber dry matter, respectively, than plants grown with high P (2.5 mM). The total leaf area and the leaf area:plant dry weight ratio of low-P plants were substantially lower than those of high-P plants. Moreover, a lower shoot:root dry weight ratio and tuber:plant dry weight ratio in low-P plants than in high-P plants characterized a major effect of P deficiency stress on dry matter partitioning. In addition to a slower rate of growth, low-P plants accumulated nonreducing sugars and nitrate. Furthermore, root respiration and leaf nitrate reductase activity were lower in low-P plants than in high-P plants. Low abiotic P supply also induced physiological changes that contributed to the greater efficiency of P acquisition by low-P plants than by high-P plants. For example, allocation of dry matter and P to root growth was less restricted by P deficiency stress than to shoot and tuber growth. Also, the specific activities of root acid phosphatases and vanadate-sensitive microsomal ATPases were enhanced in P-deficient plants. The establishment of a VAM symbiosis by low-P plants was essential for efficient P acquisition, and a greater root infection level for P-stressed plants indicated increased compatibility to the VAM fungus. By 63 d after planting, low-P VAM plants had recovered 42% more of the available soil P than low-P NM plants. However, the VAM fungus only partially alleviated P deficiency stress and did not completely compensate for inadequate abiotic P supply. Although the specific activities of acid phosphatases and microsomal ATPases were only marginally influenced by VAM

  5. Whole genome phylogenies for multiple Drosophila species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Arun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of organisms using traditional phylogenetic methods may suffer from inaccurate sequence alignment. An alternative approach, particularly effective when whole genome sequences are available, is to employ methods that don’t use explicit sequence alignments. We extend a novel phylogenetic method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD to reconstruct the phylogeny of 12 sequenced Drosophila species. SVD analysis provides accurate comparisons for a high fraction of sequences within whole genomes without the prior identification of orthologs or homologous sites. With this method all protein sequences are converted to peptide frequency vectors within a matrix that is decomposed to provide simplified vector representations for each protein of the genome in a reduced dimensional space. These vectors are summed together to provide a vector representation for each species, and the angle between these vectors provides distance measures that are used to construct species trees. Results An unfiltered whole genome analysis (193,622 predicted proteins strongly supports the currently accepted phylogeny for 12 Drosophila species at higher dimensions except for the generally accepted but difficult to discern sister relationship between D. erecta and D. yakuba. Also, in accordance with previous studies, many sequences appear to support alternative phylogenies. In this case, we observed grouping of D. erecta with D. sechellia when approximately 55% to 95% of the proteins were removed using a filter based on projection values or by reducing resolution by using fewer dimensions. Similar results were obtained when just the melanogaster subgroup was analyzed. Conclusions These results indicate that using our novel phylogenetic method, it is possible to consult and interpret all predicted protein sequences within multiple whole genomes to produce accurate phylogenetic estimations of relatedness between

  6. Developing a Drosophila Model of Schwannomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    processed for ChIP as described above. Cell culture and dsRNA S2 cells were cultured at 25°C in Schneider’s insect medium (Sigma; 10% fetal bovine serum...destroy pathogens. In Drosophila, circulating blood cells called hemocytes phagocytose bacteria, fungi, and parasitic wasp eggs [28]. RBF1 and dCAP-D3...hTERT-RPE-1 cells were grown in Dulbecco’sModified Essential Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% penicillin

  7. The intimate genetics of Drosophila fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppin, Benjamin; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Horard, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    The union of haploid gametes at fertilization initiates the formation of the diploid zygote in sexually reproducing animals. This founding event of embryogenesis includes several fascinating cellular and nuclear processes, such as sperm–egg cellular interactions, sperm chromatin remodelling, centrosome formation or pronuclear migration. In comparison with other aspects of development, the exploration of animal fertilization at the functional level has remained so far relatively limited, even in classical model organisms. Here, we have reviewed our current knowledge of fertilization in Drosophila melanogaster, with a special emphasis on the genes involved in the complex transformation of the fertilizing sperm nucleus into a replicated set of paternal chromosomes. PMID:26246493

  8. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  9. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Ilka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. Results We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p -4. Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that the

  10. Sexual Communication in the Drosophila Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Wicker-Thomas, Claude

    2014-06-18

    In insects, sexual behavior depends on chemical and non-chemical cues that might play an important role in sexual isolation. In this review, we present current knowledge about sexual behavior in the Drosophila genus. We describe courtship and signals involved in sexual communication, with a special focus on sex pheromones. We examine the role of cuticular hydrocarbons as sex pheromones, their implication in sexual isolation, and their evolution. Finally, we discuss the roles of male cuticular non-hydrocarbon pheromones that act after mating: cis-vaccenyl acetate, developing on its controversial role in courtship behavior and long-chain acetyldienylacetates and triacylglycerides, which act as anti-aphrodisiacs in mated females.

  11. Research resources for Drosophila: the expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kathleen A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Gelbart, William M

    2005-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been the subject of research into central questions about biological mechanisms for almost a century. The experimental tools and resources that are available or under development for D. melanogaster and its related species, particularly those for genomic analysis, are truly outstanding. Here we review three types of resource that have been developed for D. melanogaster research: databases and other sources of information, biological materials and experimental services. These resources are there to be exploited and we hope that this guide will encourage new uses for D. melanogaster information, materials and services, both by those new to flies and by experienced D. melanogaster researchers.

  12. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  13. Crystal structure of enolase from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Congcong; Xu, Baokui; Liu, Xueyan; Zhang, Zhen; Su, Zhongliang

    2017-04-01

    Enolase is an important enzyme in glycolysis and various biological processes. Its dysfunction is closely associated with diseases. Here, the enolase from Drosophila melanogaster (DmENO) was purified and crystallized. A crystal of DmENO diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group R32. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Like most enolases, DmENO forms a homodimer with conserved residues in the dimer interface. DmENO possesses an open conformation in this structure and contains conserved elements for catalytic activity. This work provides a structural basis for further functional and evolutionary studies of enolase.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical...... of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7 pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only...... the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid...

  15. The grain size dependency of vesicular particle shapes strongly affects the drag of particles. First results from microtomography investigations of Campi Flegrei fallout deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Daniela; Dioguardi, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    Acknowledging the grain size dependency of shape is important in volcanology, in particular when dealing with tephra produced and emplaced during and after explosive volcanic eruptions. A systematic measurement of the tridimensional shape of vesicular pyroclasts of Campi Flegrei fallout deposits (Agnano-Monte Spina, Astroni 6 and Averno 2 eruptions) varying in size from 8.00 to 0.016 mm has been carried out by means of X-Ray Microtomography. Data show that particle shape changes with size, especially for juvenile vesicular clasts, since it is dependent on the distribution and size of vesicles that contour the external clast outline. Two drag laws that include sphericity in the formula were used for estimating the dependency of settling velocity on shape. Results demonstrate that it is not appropriate to assume a size-independent shape for vesicular particles, in contrast with the approach commonly employed when simulating the ash dispersion in the atmosphere.

  16. Antidepressant stimulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis does not require monoamine reuptake inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboukhatwa Marwa A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that diverse antidepressant agents increase the cellular production of the nucleolipid CDP-diacylglycerol and its synthetic derivative, phosphatidylinositol, in depression-relevant brain regions. Pharmacological blockade of downstream phosphatidylinositide signaling disrupted the behavioral antidepressant effects in rats. However, the nucleolipid responses were resistant to inhibition by serotonin receptor antagonists, even though antidepressant-facilitated inositol phosphate accumulation was blocked. Could the neurochemical effects be additional to the known effects of the drugs on monoamine transmitter transporters? To examine this question, we tested selected agents in serotonin-depleted brain tissues, in PC12 cells devoid of serotonin transporters, and on the enzymatic activity of brain CDP-diacylglycerol synthase - the enzyme that catalyzes the physiological synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol. Results Imipramine, paroxetine, and maprotiline concentration-dependently increased the levels of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositides in PC12 cells. Rat forebrain tissues depleted of serotonin by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine showed responses to imipramine or maprotiline that were comparable to respective responses from saline-injected controls. With fluoxetine, nucleolipid responses in the serotonin-depleted cortex or hippocampus were significantly reduced, but not abolished. Each drug significantly increased the enzymatic activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase following incubations with cortical or hippocampal brain tissues. Conclusion Antidepressants probably induce the activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase leading to increased production of CDP-diacylglycerol and facilitation of downstream phosphatidylinositol synthesis. Phosphatidylinositol-dependent signaling cascades exert diverse salutary effects in neural cells, including facilitation of BDNF signaling and neurogenesis. Hence

  17. The monoamine oxidase inhibition properties of selected structural analogues of methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delport, Anzelle; Harvey, Brian H.; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2017-01-01

    The thionine dye, methylene blue (MB), is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, a property that may, at least in part, mediate its antidepressant effects in humans and animals. The central inhibition of MAO-A by MB has also been linked to serotonin toxicity (ST) which may arise when MB is used in combination with serotonergic drugs. Structural analogues and the principal metabolite of MB, azure B, have also been reported to inhibit the MAO enzymes, with all compounds exhibiting specificity for the MAO-A isoform. To expand on the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of MAO inhibition by MB analogues, the present study investigates the human MAO inhibition properties of five MB analogues: neutral red, Nile blue, new methylene blue, cresyl violet and 1,9-dimethyl methylene blue. Similar to MB, these analogues also are specific MAO-A inhibitors with cresyl violet (IC 50 = 0.0037 μM), Nile blue (IC 50 = 0.0077 μM) and 1,9-dimethyl methylene blue (IC 50 = 0.018 μM) exhibiting higher potency inhibition compared to MB (IC 50 = 0.07 μM). Nile blue also represents a potent MAO-B inhibitor with an IC 50 value of 0.012 μM. From the results it may be concluded that non-thionine MB analogues (e.g. cresyl violet and Nile blue) also may exhibit potent MAO inhibition, a property which should be considered when using these compounds in pharmacological studies. Benzophenoxazines such as cresyl violet and Nile blue are, similar to phenothiazines (e.g. MB), representative of high potency MAO-A inhibitors with a potential risk of ST. - Highlights: • MB analogues, cresyl violet and Nile blue, are high potency MAO-A inhibitors. • Nile blue also represents a potent MAO-B inhibitor. • Potent MAO-A inhibition should alert to potential serotonin toxicity.

  18. A multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binde, C D; Tvete, I F; Gåsemyr, J; Natvig, B; Klemp, M

    2018-05-30

    To the best of our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews or meta-analyses that compare rasagiline, selegiline and safinamide. Therefore, we aimed to perform a drug class review comparing all available monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors in a multiple treatment comparison. We performed a systematic literature search to identify randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of MAO-B inhibitors in patients with Parkinson's disease. MAO-B inhibitors were evaluated either as monotherapy or in combination with levodopa or dopamine agonists. Endpoints of interest were change in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and serious adverse events. We estimated the relative effect of each MAO-B inhibitor versus the comparator drug by creating three networks of direct and indirect comparisons. For each of the networks, we considered a joint model. The systematic literature search and study selection process identified 27 publications eligible for our three network analyses. We found the relative effects of rasagiline, safinamide and selegiline treatment given alone and compared to placebo in a model without explanatory variables to be 1.560 (1.409, 1.734), 1.449 (0.873, 2.413) and 1.532 (1.337, 1.757) respectively. We also found all MAO-B inhibitors to be efficient when given together with levodopa. When ranking the MAO-B inhibitors given in combination with levodopa, selegiline was the most effective and rasagiline was the second best. All of the included MAO-B inhibitors were effective compared to placebo when given as monotherapy. Combination therapy with MAO-B inhibitors and levodopa showed that all three MAO-B inhibitors were effective compared to placebo, but selegiline was the most effective drug. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. The effect of diabetes mellitus on the morphology and physiology of monoamine oxidase in the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeghate, Ernest; Parvez, Hasan

    2004-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an ubiquitous, non-soluble, membrane-bound enzyme, located in the outer membrane of mitochondria. MAO consists of two subtypes, MAO-A and MAO-B, depending on their substrates and sensitivity to inhibitors. MAO consists of two units joined together by a disulphide bond. The two units of MAO and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) form a polymer in the outer membrane of mitochondria. The function of MAO-A is highly dependent on the lipid constituent of mitochondrial membrane, whereas the function of MAO-B does not depend on the lipid status of mitochondrial membrane. Hydrogen peroxide and ammonia are generated during MAO-induced metabolism of its substrates. MAO and its substrates are present in both the exocrine as well as the endocrine parts of the pancreas. In the islet of Langerhans, MAO-A is observed in about 50% of the cells, whereas MAO-B is less abundant and located mainly in the periphery of pancreatic islets. MAO-B is also demonstrated in centroacinar cells and in pancreatic ducts. Electron microscopy studies suggest that MAO is co-localised with insulin in secretory granules of pancreatic beta cells. Pharmacologically, beta-2-adrenoreceptors agonists such as terbutaline can stimulate MAO activity. In contrast, cholinergic muscarinic stimulation does not affect islet MAO activity. MAO activity in pancreatic tissue is significantly reduced in diabetes. This decrease in MAO activity is associated with an increase in pancreatic tissue levels of adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NA). Studies on the level of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid of pancreatic tissues suggest that serotonin level is also increased in diabetics. Many studies show that MAO inhibits insulin secretion. However, some of its substrates including, serotonin, adrenaline and noradrenaline have been shown to stimulate insulin secretion. In conclusion, the activity and subcellular localisation of MAO suggests that MAO may play an important role in pancreatic beta cell

  20. In Vitro Effects of Cognitives and Nootropics on Mitochondrial Respiration and Monoamine Oxidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2017-10-01

    Impairment of mitochondrial metabolism, particularly the electron transport chain (ETC), as well as increased oxidative stress might play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some effects of drugs used for symptomatic AD treatment may be related to their direct action on mitochondrial function. In vitro effects of pharmacologically different cognitives (galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine, 7-MEOTA, memantine) and nootropic drugs (latrepirdine, piracetam) were investigated on selected mitochondrial parameters: activities of ETC complexes I, II + III, and IV, citrate synthase, monoamine oxidase (MAO), oxygen consumption rate, and hydrogen peroxide production of pig brain mitochondria. Complex I activity was decreased by galantamine, donepezil, and memantine; complex II + III activity was increased by galantamine. None of the tested drugs caused significant changes in the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, even at high concentrations. Except galantamine, all tested drugs were selective MAO-A inhibitors. Latrepirdine, donepezil, and 7-MEOTA were found to be the most potent MAO-A inhibitors. Succinate-induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production was not significantly affected by the drugs tested. The direct effect of cognitives and nootropics used in the treatment of AD on mitochondrial respiration is relatively small. The safest drugs in terms of disturbing mitochondrial function appear to be piracetam and rivastigmine. The MAO-A inhibition by cognitives and nootropics may also participate in mitochondrial neuroprotection. The results support the future research aimed at measuring the effects of currently used drugs or newly synthesized drugs on mitochondrial functioning in order to understand their mechanism of action.

  1. Monoamine involvement in the antidepressant-like effect induced by P2 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Cassiano R A F; Rodrigues, Murilo; Casarotto, Plínio C; Pereira, Vítor S; Crestani, Carlos C; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2017-12-01

    Depression is a common mental disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Available monoaminergic antidepressants are far from ideal since they show delayed onset of action and are ineffective in approximately 40% of patients, thus indicating the need of new and more effective drugs. ATP signaling through P2 receptors seems to play an important role in neuropathological mechanisms involved in depression, since their pharmacological or genetic inactivation induce antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test (FST). However, the mechanisms involved in these effects are not completely understood. The present work investigated monoamine involvement in the antidepressant-like effect induced by non-specific P2 receptor antagonist (PPADS) administration. First, the effects of combining sub-effective doses of PPADS with sub-effective doses of fluoxetine (FLX, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) or reboxetine (RBX, selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor) were investigated in mice submitted to FST. Significant antidepressant-like effect was observed when subeffective doses of PPADS was combined with subeffective doses of either FLX or RBX, with no significant locomotor changes. Next, the effects of depleting serotonin and noradrenaline levels, by means of PCPA (p-Chlorophenylalanine) or DSP-4 (N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride) pretreatment, respectively, was investigated. Both, PCPA and DSP-4 pretreatment partially attenuated PPADS-induced effects in FST, without inducing relevant locomotor changes. Our results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of PPADS involves modulation of serotonin and noradrenaline levels in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of monoamines in the actions of established and "novel" antidepressant agents: a critical review.

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    Millan, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    Monoaminergic pathways are highly responsive to aversive stimuli and play a crucial role in the control of affect, cognition, endocrine secretion, chronobiotic rhythms, appetite, and motor function, all of which are profoundly disrupted in depressive states. Accordingly, a perturbation of monoaminergic transmission is implicated in the aetiology of depressive disorders, and all clinically available antidepressants increase corticolimbic availability of monoamines. However, their limited efficacy, delayed onset of action, and undesirable side effects underlie ongoing efforts to identify improved therapeutic agents. Sequencing the human genome has raised the hope not only of better symptomatic control of depression, but even of the prevention or cure of depressive states. In the pursuit of these goals, there is currently a tendency to focus on selective ligands of "novel" nonmonoaminergic targets. However, certain classes of novel agent (such as neurokinin(1) receptor antagonists) indirectly modulate the activity of monoaminergic networks. Others may act "downstream" of them, converging onto common cellular substrates controlling gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. Further, by analogy to the broad-based actions of currently employed drugs, multitarget agents may be better adapted than selective agents to the management of depression-a complex disorder with hereditary, developmental, and environmental origins. It is, thus, important to continue the creative exploration of clinically validated and innovative monoaminergic strategies within a multitarget framework. In this light, drugs combining monoaminergic and nonmonoaminergic mechanisms of action may be of particular interest. The present article provides a critical overview of monoaminergic strategies for the treatment of depressive states, both established and under development, and discusses interactions of novel "nonmonoaminergic" antidepressants with monoaminergic mechanisms.

  3. NMDARs Mediate the Role of Monoamine Oxidase A in Pathological Aggression

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    Bortolato, Marco; Godar, Sean C.; Melis, Miriam; Soggiu, Alessio; Roncada, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Flore, Giovanna; Chen, Kevin; Frau, Roberto; Urbani, Andrea; Castelli, M. Paola; Devoto, Paola; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence shows that monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), the key enzyme catalyzing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) degradation, is a primary factor in the pathophysiology of antisocial and aggressive behavior. Accordingly, male MAO A-deficient humans and mice exhibit an extreme predisposition to aggressive outbursts in response to stress. As NMDARs regulate the emotional reactivity to social and environmental stimuli, we hypothesized their involvement in the modulation of aggression mediated by MAO A. In comparison with WT male mice, MAO A KO counterparts exhibited increases in 5-HT and NE levels across all brain regions, but no difference in glutamate concentrations and NMDAR binding. Notably, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of MAO A KO mice exhibited higher expression of NR2A and NR2B, as well as lower levels of glycosylated NR1 subunits. In line with these changes, the current amplitude and decay time of NMDARs in PFC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the currents of these receptors were hypersensitive to the action of the antagonists of the NMDAR complex (dizocilpine), as well as NR2A (PEAQX) and NR2B (Ro 25–6981) subunits. Notably, systemic administration of these agents selectively countered the enhanced aggression in MAO A KO mice, at doses that did not inherently affect motor activity. Our findings suggest that the role of MAO A in pathological aggression may be mediated by changes in NMDAR subunit composition in the PFC, and point to a critical function of this receptor in the molecular bases of antisocial personality. PMID:22723698

  4. Carnosine: effect on aging-induced increase in brain regional monoamine oxidase-A activity.

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    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-03-01

    Aging is a natural biological process associated with several neurological disorders along with the biochemical changes in brain. Aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of carnosine (0.5-2.5μg/kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) on aging-induced changes in brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity with its kinetic parameters. The results of the present study are: (1) The brain regional mitochondrial MAO-A activity and their kinetic parameters (except in Km of pons-medulla) were significantly increased with the increase of age (4-24 months), (2) Aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity including its Vmax were attenuated with higher dosages of carnosine (1.0-2.5μg/kg/day) and restored toward the activity that observed in young, though its lower dosage (0.5μg/kg/day) were ineffective in these brain regional MAO-A activity, (3) Carnosine at higher dosage in young rats, unlike aged rats significantly inhibited all the brain regional MAO-A activity by reducing their only Vmax excepting cerebral cortex, where Km was also significantly enhanced. These results suggest that carnosine attenuated the aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity by attenuating its kinetic parameters and restored toward the results of MAO-A activity that observed in corresponding brain regions of young rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and in vitro Evaluation of 2-heteroarylidene-1-tetralone Derivatives as Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

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    Amakali, Klaudia T; Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2018-05-14

    The present study investigates the human monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition properties of a series of twelve 2-heteroarylidene-1-tetralone derivatives. Also included are related cyclohexylmethylidene, cyclopentylmethylidene and benzylidene substituted 1-tetralones. These compounds are related to the 2-benzylidene-1-indanone class of compounds which has previously been shown to inhibit the MAOs, with specificity for the MAO-B isoform. The target compounds were synthesised by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation between 7-methoxy-1-tetralone or 1-tetralone, and various aldehydes, under acid (hydrochloric acid) or base (potassium hydroxide) catalysis. The results of the MAO inhibition studies showed that the 2-heteroarylidene-1-tetralone and related derivatives are in most instances more selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform compared to MAO-A. (2E)-2-Benzylidene-7-methoxy-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2 H)-one (IC 50 =0.707 μM) was found to be the most potent MAO-B inhibitor, while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor was (2E)-2-[(2-chloropyridin-3-yl)methylidene]-7-methoxy-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2 H)-one (IC 50 =1.37 μM). The effect of the heteroaromatic substituent on MAO-B inhibition activity, in decreasing order was found to be: cyclohexyl, phenyl>thiophene>pyridine, furane, pyrrole, cyclopentyl. This study concludes that, although some 2-heteroarylidene-1-tetralone derivatives are good potency MAO inhibitors, in general their inhibition potencies, particularly for MAO-B, are lower than structurally related chalcones and 1-indanone derivatives that were previously studied. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

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    Charles V. Vorhees

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P4–28. Within each litter two males and two females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle, 50, or 100 mg/kg Mn by gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water. Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic, and sex.

  7. Monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms and enzyme activity associated with risk of gout in Taiwan aborigines.

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    Tu, Hung-Pin; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Wang, Shu-Jung; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lea, Rod A; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Chiang, Hung-Che; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Lin, Gau-Tyan; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2010-02-01

    Taiwanese aborigines have a high prevalence of hyperuricemia and gout. Uric acid levels and urate excretion have correlated with dopamine-induced glomerular filtration response. MAOs represent one of the major renal dopamine metabolic pathways. We aimed to identify the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA, Xp11.3) gene variants and MAO-A enzyme activity associated with gout risk. This study was to investigate the association between gout and the MAOA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs5953210, rs2283725, and rs1137070 as well as between gout and the COMT SNPs rs4680 Val158Met for 374 gout cases and 604 controls. MAO-A activity was also measured. All three MAOA SNPs were significantly associated with gout. A synonymous MAOA SNP, rs1137070 Asp470Asp, located in exon 14, was associated with the risk of having gout (P = 4.0 x 10(-5), adjusted odds ratio 1.46, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.11-1.91). We also showed that, when compared to individuals with the MAOA GAT haplotype, carriers of the AGC haplotype had a 1.67-fold (95% CI: 1.28-2.17) higher risk of gout. Moreover, we found that MAOA enzyme activity correlated positively with hyperuricemia and gout (P for trend = 2.00 x 10(-3) vs. normal control). We also found that MAOA enzyme activity by rs1137070 allele was associated with hyperuricemia and gout (P for trend = 1.53 x 10(-6) vs. wild-type allele). Thus, our results show that some MAOA alleles, which have a higher enzyme activity, predispose to the development of gout.

  8. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain.

  9. Genetic effect of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB gene on ASD associated behavior phenotypes

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    Deepak Verma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a male predominance, behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder which is characterized by impairment in social communication and restricted and repetitive activities. Abnormalities in serotoninergic function play a major role in ASD pathophysiology. Monoamine oxidases, encoded by two X-chromosomal genes MAOA and MAOB regulate the serotonergic function by the degradation of serotonin and other biological amines. Therefore, the objective of present study is to investigate genetic correlation of MAOB markers with the severity of specific behavioral traits as scored by Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS has been examined as quantitative trait (QT analysis using IBM-SPSS program. A total of 225 ASD patients (190 male and 35 female were recruited after psychometric evaluation done by DSM-IV-TR/DSM-5 criteria and assessment by CARS. Genotyping carried by PCR/RFLP/sequencing methods, and population were found in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The outcome of the QT analysis indicating the increased score in overall CARS were associated with G and C allele of MAOB marker rs3027449 (p-value: 0.03 and rs1040399 (p-value: 0.01, respectively in male ASD children. In addition to this, major alleles of studied polymorphisms of gene were found to be statistically associated with the higher impairment in social communication domain only in male ASD children. Overall outcome of the study suggests likely involvement of MAOB with ASD in a gender-specific manner with the severity in behavior phenotypes. Considering the cumulative impact of these markers in regulating the severity of the behavioral symptoms of ASD, it is likely that MAOB gene is associated with the disorder.

  10. Monoamine oxidase A polymorphism moderates stability of attention problems and susceptibility to life stress during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohsel, K; Bianchi, V; Mascheretti, S; Hohm, E; Schmidt, M H; Esser, G; Brandeis, D; Banaschewski, T; Nobile, M; Laucht, M

    2015-11-01

    Attention problems affect a substantial number of children and adolescents and are predictive of academic underachievement and lower global adaptive functioning. Considerable variability has been observed with regard to the individual development of attention problems over time. In particular, the period of adolescence is characterized by substantial maturation of executive functioning including attentional processing, with the influence of genetic and environmental factors on individual trajectories not yet well understood. In the present investigation, we evaluated whether the monoamine oxidase A functional promoter polymorphism, MAOA-LPR, plays a role in determining continuity of parent-rated attention problems during adolescence. At the same time, a potential effect of severe life events (SLEs) was taken into account. A multi-group path analysis was used in a sample of 234 adolescents (149 males, 85 females) who took part in an epidemiological cohort study at the ages of 11 and 15 years. Attention problems during early adolescence were found to be a strong predictor of attention problems in middle adolescence. However, in carriers of the MAOA-LPR low-activity variant (MAOA-L), stability was found to be significantly higher than in carriers of the high-activity variant (MAOA-H). Additionally, only in MAOA-L carriers did SLEs during adolescence significantly impact on attention problems at the age of 15 years, implying a possible gene × environment interaction. To conclude, we found evidence that attention problems during adolescence in carriers of the MAOA-L allele are particularly stable and malleable to life stressors. The present results underline the usefulness of applying a more dynamic GxE perspective. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. [Study on psychoprophylaxis and monoamines neurotransmitter of patients with burning mouth syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Li, B; Gu, F; Yue, Y; Huang, Y; Chen, Q; Zeng, G; Xia, J

    2001-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic ache disease, usually occurring in middle aged and old women. This study sought to understand the psychopathologic aspect and monoamines neurotransmitters in the plasma of the patients with BMS. Thirty cases were selected (26 females, 4 males); 30 normal control subjects were similar to the BMS cases on age and sex. All subjects were required to complete the Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ), and the Self-report Symptom Inventory, Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) questionnaire. In case a subject's L (lie) score exceeded 50, she (he) would be removed from the test. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the subject under restine conditions with a fast in the morning to examine norepinephrine and epinephrine contents by high efficient liquid chromatography. Chi-square test, analysis of variance and t'-test were performed. The BMS group had higher scores of nervousness (N) and poikilergasia (P) and lower score of extro/introversion (E) as compared with the control (P < 0.05). The personality types in BMS group were focused on introversion and instability, but in the control group the types were focused on extroversion and stability (P < 0.05). The scores of 9 emotional factors of BMS group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05), which indicated that the BMS patients had suffered from serial psychic disorders. The level of plasma norepinephrine in the BMS patients was higher than that of the control (P < 0.01). The personality of BMS patients raised body response to harmful stimulations, and obvious psychic disorders in the patient may cause the functional disorders in central and sympathetic nervous systems, which may be associated with BMS' occurrence.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3',4'-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4'-dimethylaminorex (4,4'-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors' attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4'-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4'-DMAR and trans-4,4'-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4'-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4'-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The monoaminergic pathways and inhibition of monoamine transporters interfere with the antidepressive-like behavior of ketamine

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    Glauce Socorro de Barros Viana

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine (KET, a NMDA receptor antagonist, has been studied for its rapid and efficacious antidepressant effect, even for the treatment-resistant depression. Although depression is a major cause of disability worldwide, the treatment can be feasible, affordable and cost-effective, decreasing the population health burden. We evaluated the antidepressive-like effects of KET and its actions on monoamine contents (DA and its metabolites, as well as 5-HT and on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. In addition DAT and SERT (DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively were also assessed. Male Swiss mice were divided into Control and KET-treated groups. The animals were acutely treated with KET (2, 5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p. and subjected to the forced swimming test, for evaluation of the antidepressive-like behavior. Imipramine and fluoxetine were used as references. The results showed that KET decreased dose-dependently the immobility time and shortly after the test, the animals were euthanized for striatal dissections and monoamine determinations. In addition, the brain (striata, hippocampi and prefrontal cortices was immunohistochemically processed for TH, DAT and SERT. KET at its higher dose increased DA and its metabolites (DOPAC and HVA and mainly 5-HT contents, in mice striata, effects associated with increases in TH and decreases in DAT immunoreactivities. Furthermore, reductions in SERT immunoreactivities were observed in the striatum and hippocampus. The results indicate that KET antidepressive-like effect probably involves, among other factors, monoaminergic pathways, as suggested by the increased striatal TH immunoreactivity and reduced brain DA (DAT and 5-HT (SERT transporters. Keywords: Ketamine, Antidepressive effect, Dopaminergic neurotransmission, Serotonergic neurotransmission, Monoamine transporters

  14. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii.

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    Kendra B Sewall

    Full Text Available Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM, because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA, because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  15. Quinolinic Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Potential Multi-target Compounds for Neurodegeneration: Monoamine Oxidase and Cholinesterase Inhibition.

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    Khan, Nehal A; Khan, Imtiaz; Abid, Syed M A; Zaib, Sumera; Ibrar, Aliya; Andleeb, Hina; Hameed, Shahid; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a debilitating and progressive disorder, is among the most challenging and devastating neurodegenerative diseases predominantly affecting the people over 60 years of age. To confront PD, an advanced and operational strategy is to design single chemical functionality able to control more than one target instantaneously. In this endeavor, for the exploration of new and efficient inhibitors of Parkinson's disease, we synthesized a series of quinoline carboxylic acids (3a-j) and evaluated their in vitro monoamine oxidase and cholinesterase inhibitory activities. The molecular docking and in silico studies of the most potent inhibitors were performed to identify the probable binding modes in the active site of the monoamine oxidase enzymes. Moreover, molecular properties were calculated to evaluate the druglikeness of the compounds. The biological evaluation results revealed that the tested compounds were highly potent against monoamine oxidase (A & B), 3c targeted both the isoforms of MAO with IC50 values of 0.51 ± 0.12 and 0.51 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. The tested compounds also demonstrated high and completely selective inhibitory action against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with IC50 values ranging from 4.36 to 89.24 µM. Among the examined derivatives, 3i was recognized as the most potent inhibitor of AChE with an IC50 value of 4.36 ± 0.12 ±µM. The compounds appear to be promising inhibitors and could be used for the future development of drugs targeting neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Interorgan Communication Pathways in Physiology: Focus on Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droujinine, Ilia A; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-11-23

    Studies in mammals and Drosophila have demonstrated the existence and significance of secreted factors involved in communication between distal organs. In this review, primarily focusing on Drosophila, we examine the known interorgan communication factors and their functions, physiological inducers, and integration in regulating physiology. Moreover, we describe how organ-sensing screens in Drosophila can systematically identify novel conserved interorgan communication factors. Finally, we discuss how interorgan communication enabled and evolved as a result of specialization of organs. Together, we anticipate that future studies will establish a model for metazoan interorgan communication network (ICN) and how it is deregulated in disease.

  17. Monoamine Oxidase A Gene Methylation and Its Role in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: First Evidence from the South Eastern Europe (SEE)-PTSD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Christiane; Wolf, Christiane; Schiele, Miriam A; Feric Bojic, Elma; Kucukalic, Sabina; Sabic Dzananovic, Emina; Goci Uka, Aferdita; Hoxha, Blerina; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete; Haxhibeqiri, Shpend; Kravic, Nermina; Muminovic Umihanic, Mirnesa; Cima Franc, Ana; Jaksic, Nenad; Babic, Romana; Pavlovic, Marko; Warrings, Bodo; Bravo Mehmedbasic, Alma; Rudan, Dusko; Aukst-Margetic, Branka; Kucukalic, Abdulah; Marjanovic, Damir; Babic, Dragan; Bozina, Nada; Jakovljevic, Miro; Sinanovic, Osman; Avdibegovic, Esmina; Agani, Ferid; Dzubur-Kulenovic, Alma; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2018-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is characterized by an overactive noradrenergic system conferring core posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms such as hyperarousal and reexperiencing. Monoamine oxidase A is one of the key enzymes mediating the turnover of noradrenaline. Here, DNA methylation of the monoamine oxidase A gene exonI/intronI region was investigated for the first time regarding its role in posttraumatic stress disorder risk and severity. Monoamine oxidase A methylation was analyzed via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-treated DNA extracted from blood cells in a total sample of N=652 (441 male) patients with current posttraumatic stress disorder, patients with remitted posttraumatic stress disorder, and healthy probands (comparison group) recruited at 5 centers in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, and the Republic of Kosovo. Posttraumatic stress disorder severity was measured by means of the Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale and its respective subscores representing distinct symptom clusters. In the male, but not the female sample, patients with current posttraumatic stress disorder displayed hypermethylation of 3 CpGs (CpG3=43656362; CpG12=43656514; CpG13=43656553, GRCh38.p2 Assembly) as compared with remitted Posttraumatic Stress Disorder patients and healthy probands. Symptom severity (Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale scores) in male patients with current posttraumatic stress disorder significantly correlated with monoamine oxidase A methylation. This applied particularly to symptom clusters related to reexperiencing of trauma (cluster B) and hyperarousal (cluster D). The present findings suggest monoamine oxidase A gene hypermethylation, potentially resulting in enhanced noradrenergic signalling, as a disease status and severity marker of current posttraumatic stress disorder in males. If replicated, monoamine oxidase A hypermethylation might serve as a surrogate marker of a hyperadrenergic subtype of

  18. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

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    Fei Shen

    Full Text Available Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid

  19. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  20. Didelphis marsupialis como un reservorio potencial u hospedero amplificador del virus de la estomatitis vesicular, serotipo new jersey en Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Arboleda

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad viral, aguda
    y autolimitante que afecta principalmente bovinos, equinos y
    porcinos. Es producida por el virus de estomatitis vesicular (VEV, serotipos New Jersey (VEV-NJ e Indiana (VEV-IN, que son los as importantes epidemiológicamente (1. Los estudios serológicos demuestran que VEV-NJ y VEV-IN infectan en forma natural una gran variedad de animales silvestres, que están posiblemente implicados en la  coepizootiología de la EV, como hospederos portadores, mplificadores o reservorios (2.

    La zarigüeya (Didelphis marsupialis es un buen candidato
    para cumplir esta función, debido a que es la especie silvestre
    mayormente capturada en zonas enzoóticas; presenta altos
    porcentajes de infección natural (3, resiste la antropización y
    además, su comportamiento le permite interactuar con
    diferentes poblaciones de vectores u otros reservorios en los
    bosques y servir como fuente de infección para las especies
    domésticas susceptibles.