WorldWideScience

Sample records for drives metastatic prostate

  1. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P

  2. Emerging Therapies in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Daniel W; Morgans, Alicia K

    2018-04-11

    In the last decade, there have been multiple landmark therapeutic advances for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, both in the castration-resistant and hormone-sensitive setting. In this review, we highlight recent progress and ongoing trials for metastatic prostate cancer, including advances in chemotherapy, androgen receptor-directed therapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy. Several landmark studies for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer demonstrated improvement in overall survival with the addition of docetaxel chemotherapy or abiraterone acetate to standard androgen deprivation therapy. A single-arm phase 2 study of the PARP inhibitor olaparib demonstrated high response rates and more favorable progression-free and overall survival for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and DNA repair defects treated with olaparib compared with men without DNA repair defects. Multiple ongoing clinical trials are investigating novel hormonal therapies and combinations of chemotherapy, targeted small molecules, immunotherapy, and radiopharmaceuticals. Progress continues to be made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, and ongoing clinical trials continue to investigate novel agents and approaches to treatment.

  3. Multiple urinary bladder masses from metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Choo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma that manifested with multiple exophytic intravesical masses, mimicking a multifocal primary bladder tumor. Biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated palliatively with external beam radiotherapy to prevent possible symptoms from local tumor progression. This case illustrates that when a patient with known prostate cancer presents with multifocal bladder tumors, the possibility of metastatic prostate cancer should be considered.

  4. Alpha Particle Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality among men in western countries. Although nearly 85% of patients present with localised disease, up to 40% will eventually develop metastatic disease during the course of illness. Of men dying from prostate cancer, more than 90% have bone metastases many with no other significant metastatic sites. Symptoms related to bone metastases and skeletal related events (SREs) account for the major cause of morbidity in these patients. Bone-seeking radionuclides have been used in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases for many years. The first bone seeking radionuclide drug approved by the FDA was Strontium-89. Other agents have also been used including Samarium-153 EDTMP, Rhenium-186 (-188)-HEDP. These radionuclides are all emit shortrange therapeutic beta radiation with bone marrow as the dose limiting toxicity. There is strong clinical trial evidence of benefit for these radionuclides in reducing pain in advanced prostate cancer; however, none of the drugs has been shown to improve survival, albeit none of the clinical trials were powered to detect differences in survival

  5. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Slovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit.

  6. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer...Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate

  7. Characterization of KRAS Rearrangements in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Shankar, Sunita; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Ateeq, Bushra; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Jing, Xiaojun; Robinson, Daniel; Cao, Qi; Prensner, John R.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Wang, Rui; Fries, Daniel F.; Han, Bo; Asangani, Irfan A.; Cao, Xuhong; Li, Yong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Pflueger, Dorothee; Gopalan, Anuradha; Reuter, Victor E.; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative genomics approach called Amplification Breakpoint Ranking and Assembly (ABRA) analysis, we nominated KRAS as a gene fusion with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2L3 in the DU145 cell line, originally derived from prostate cancer metastasis to the brain. Interestingly, analysis of tissues revealed that 2 of 62 metastatic prostate cancers harbored aberrations at the KRAS locus. In DU145 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS produces a fusion protein, specific knock-down of which, attenuates cell invasion and xenograft growth. Ectopic expression of the UBE2L3-KRAS fusion protein exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and RWPE prostate epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In NIH 3T3 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS attenuates MEK/ERK signaling, commonly engaged by oncogenic mutant KRAS, and instead signals via AKT and p38 MAPK pathways. This is the first report of a gene fusion involving Ras family suggesting that this aberration may drive metastatic progression in a rare subset of prostate cancers. PMID:22140652

  8. Metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma penis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Santiago Caicedo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe a case report of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to penis due to shortage reports of similar cases to perform a literature review. Methods: We identified a case of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma, who during de the course of a cystoscopy at Hospital Universitario San Jose (Third-level Public Hospital in Popayan, Colombia a suspicious nodule of malignancy was observed in the penis. We described the clinical case in order to proceed to a literature search for the discussion. Results: 72-year-old patient diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma Gleason Score 4+5=9, treated with bilateral orchiectomy and a suspicious nodule of malignancy incidentally observed in the penis, currently undergoing palliative care with Karnofsky score of 30 points. Conclusion: cutaneous metastases are rare; indicate longstanding disease and poor prognosis.

  9. Prostate cancer metastasis-driving genes: hurdles and potential approaches in their identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ting Chiang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Metastasis is thought to result from changes in the expression of specific metastasis-driving genes in nonmetastatic prostate cancer tissue, leading to a cascade of activated downstream genes that set the metastatic process in motion. Such genes could potentially serve as effective therapeutic targets for improved management of the disease. They could be identified by comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of patient-derived metastatic and nonmetastatic prostate cancer tissues to pinpoint genes showing altered expression, followed by determining whether silencing of such genes can lead to inhibition of metastatic properties. Various hurdles encountered in this approach are discussed, including (i the need for clinically relevant, nonmetastatic and metastatic prostate cancer tissues such as xenografts of patients' prostate cancers developed via subrenal capsule grafting technology and (ii limitations in the currently available methodology for identification of master regulatory genes.

  10. MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR METASTATIC PROSTATE ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of molecular markers of metastasing and prognosis in prostate cancer remains an urgent task. In this study, we investigated the relationship of gene expression heparanase-1 (HPSE1 and D-glucuronil C5-epimerase (GLCE with early disease relapse and metastasis of a 2,5−3 years after diagnosis. It was shown that the ratio of the expression levels of genes HPSE1/GLCE > 1 may serve as a prognostic relapse marker and trends of the tumour to metastasis. The data obtained suggest to use this option as a molecular marker for the diagnostics of metastatic process and the disease prognosis.

  11. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibition (ARPI) but eventually develops into lethal castration resistance prostate cancer ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0553 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin Gleave...Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin Gleave 5d

  12. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; pmolecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in this higher-risk population. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  14. Cytoreductive surgery for men with metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Katelaris

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This data supports recent findings demonstrating that radical prostatectomy for metastatic prostate cancer is feasible. Further studies are needed to explore the role of cytoreductive surgery with regards to the potential oncological benefit.

  15. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland and infundibulum can be involved in a variety of medical conditions, including infiltrative diseases, fungal infections, tuberculosis, and primary and metastatic tumors. Metastases to the pituitary gland are absolutely rare, and they are generally secondary to pulmonary carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The posterior lobe involvement may explain why patients with pituitary metastases frequently present with diabetes insipidus. We are presenting a case report of a 78-year-old male patient who had metastatic prostate with sudden onset of polyuria and persistent thirst. He had no electrolyte imbalance except mild hypernatremia. The MRI scan of the brain yielded a suspicious area in pituitary gland. A pituitary stalk metastasis was found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of pituitary. Water deprivation test was compatible with DI. A clinical response to nasal vasopressin was achieved and laboratory results revealed central diabetes insipidus. As a result, the intrasellar and suprasellar masses decreased in size, and urinary output accordingly decreased.

  16. Association of Gleason Risk Groups with Metastatic Sites in Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostate cancer is the second most common non cutaneous male malignancy worldwide. Gleason composite score is used for risk classification. The most common site of metastasis in prostate cancer is the bone among others. The site and number of metastasis affect overall survival. The ability to predict the metastatic site ...

  17. Enzalutamide for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K; Al Basiouni Al Masri, Hiba S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate current literature on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enzalutamide (XTANDI®) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data sources Literature search was done through PubMed using the terms enzalutamide, MDV3100, abiraterone, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data from FDA product labels were also used. Study selection and data extraction Recent and relevant studies were included in the review. Collected clinical trials were screened and evaluated. Data synthesis Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor with high selectivity and affinity to the AR. It was approved by the FDA to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in patients previously treated with docetaxel, after a Phase III trial (AFFIRM) that showed a 4.8-month survival benefit in this population. Recently, the FDA expanded the approval of enzalutamide as first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who did not receive chemotherapy. Moreover, enzalutamide is shown to be associated with an acceptable safety profile. Conclusion Enzalutamide has been shown to be both safe and effective in improving overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer postchemotherapy with docetaxel and as a first line treatment before initiation of chemotherapy. However, additional studies and head-to-head trials are needed. PMID:25945058

  18. Intrahepatic portal hypertension secondary to metastatic carcinoma of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attila, Tan; Datta, Milton W; Sudakoff, Gary; Abu-Hajir, Majed; Massey, Benson T

    2007-02-01

    While the liver is a common site of metastasis, tumor metastases are not a common cause of portal hypertension. We report a case of a patient with symptomatic portal hypertension due to diffuse metastatic prostate carcinoma infiltration of liver parenchyma that was not appreciated with routine imaging.

  19. Abiraterone in metastatic prostate cancer without previous chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, Charles J.; Smith, Matthew R.; de Bono, Johann S.; Molina, Arturo; Logothetis, Christopher J.; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mainwaring, Paul; Piulats, Josep M.; Ng, Siobhan; Carles, Joan; Mulders, Peter F. A.; Basch, Ethan; Small, Eric J.; Saad, Fred; Schrijvers, Dirk; van Poppel, Hendrik; Mukherjee, Som D.; Suttmann, Henrik; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Flaig, Thomas W.; George, Daniel J.; Yu, Evan Y.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Pantuck, Allan; Winquist, Eric; Higano, Celestia S.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Park, Youn; Kheoh, Thian; Griffin, Thomas; Scher, Howard I.; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Boyce, A.; Costello, A.; Davis, I.; Ganju, V.; Horvath, L.; Lynch, R.; Marx, G.; Parnis, F.; Shapiro, J.; Singhal, N.; Slancar, M.; van Hazel, G.; Wong, S.; Yip, D.; Carpentier, P.; Luyten, D.; de Reijke, T.

    2013-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy. We evaluated this agent in patients who had not received previous chemotherapy. In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned

  20. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  1. Metastatic Breast Carcinoma to the Prostate Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E. Kapp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the male breast is an uncommon event with metastases to the breast occurring even less frequently. Prostate carcinoma has been reported as the most frequent primary to metastasize to the breast; however, the reverse has not been previously reported. Herein, we present, for the first time, a case of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the prostate gland. Prostate needle core biopsy revealed infiltrative nests of neoplastic epithelioid cells, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC to be positive for GATA3 and ER and negative for PSA and P501S. A prostate cocktail by IHC study demonstrated lack of basal cells (p63 and CK903 and no expression of P501S. The patient’s previous breast needle core biopsy showed strong ER positivity and negative staining for PR and HER2. Similar to the prostate, the breast was negative for CK5/6, p63, and p40. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis and comparing histology and IHC to prior known malignancies in the setting of atypical presentation or rare tumors.

  2. Cytoreductive prostatectomy in metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Joachim Aidt; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy on oncological outcome in patients with prostate cancer and limited number of bone metastases is unclear. Data from cancer registries, multi-institutional databases and a single institutional case-control study indicate a possible benefit of combi......The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy on oncological outcome in patients with prostate cancer and limited number of bone metastases is unclear. Data from cancer registries, multi-institutional databases and a single institutional case-control study indicate a possible benefit...

  3. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  4. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  5. Metastatic prostate cancer in the modern era of PSA screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Fontenot Jr

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction To characterize initial presentation and PSA screening status in a contemporary cohort of men treated for metastatic prostate cancer at our institution. Materials and methods We reviewed records of 160 men treated for metastatic prostate cancer between 2008-2014 and assessed initial presentation, categorizing patients into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 presented with localized disease and received treatment. These men suffered biochemical recurrence late (>1 year or earlier (<1 year, respectively, and developed metastases. Groups 3 and 4 had asymptomatic and symptomatic metastases at the outset of their diagnosis. Patients with a first PSA at age 55 or younger were considered to have guideline-directed screening. Results Complete records were available on 157 men for initial presentation and 155 men for PSA screening. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 included 27 (17%, 7 (5%, 69 (44% and 54 (34% patients, respectively. Twenty (13% patients received guideline-directed PSA screening, 5/155 (3% patients presented with metastases prior to age 55 with their first PSA, and 130/155 (84% had their first PSA after age 55, of which 122/130 (94% had metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion Despite widespread screening, most men treated for metastatic prostate cancer at our institution presented with metastases rather than progressed after definitive treatment. Furthermore, 25 (16% patients received guideline-directed PSA screening at or before age 55. These data highlight that, despite mass screening efforts, patients treated for incurable disease at our institution may not have been a result of a failed screening test, but a failure to be screened.

  6. Metastatic prostate cancer in the modern era of PSA screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Philip A.; Nehra, Avinash; Parker, William; Wyre, Hadley; Mirza, Moben; Duchene, David A.; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey; Thrasher, James Brantley; Veldhuizen, Peter Van; Lee, Eugene K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction To characterize initial presentation and PSA screening status in a contemporary cohort of men treated for metastatic prostate cancer at our institution. Materials and methods We reviewed records of 160 men treated for metastatic prostate cancer between 2008-2014 and assessed initial presentation, categorizing patients into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 presented with localized disease and received treatment. These men suffered biochemical recurrence late (>1 year) or earlier (<1 year), respectively, and developed metastases. Groups 3 and 4 had asymptomatic and symptomatic metastases at the outset of their diagnosis. Patients with a first PSA at age 55 or younger were considered to have guideline-directed screening. Results Complete records were available on 157 men for initial presentation and 155 men for PSA screening. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 included 27 (17%), 7 (5%), 69 (44%) and 54 (34%) patients, respectively. Twenty (13%) patients received guideline-directed PSA screening, 5/155 (3%) patients presented with metastases prior to age 55 with their first PSA, and 130/155 (84%) had their first PSA after age 55, of which 122/130 (94%) had metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion Despite widespread screening, most men treated for metastatic prostate cancer at our institution presented with metastases rather than progressed after definitive treatment. Furthermore, 25 (16%) patients received guideline-directed PSA screening at or before age 55. These data highlight that, despite mass screening efforts, patients treated for incurable disease at our institution may not have been a result of a failed screening test, but a failure to be screened. PMID:28338310

  7. Abiraterone plus Prednisone in Metastatic, Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Tran, NamPhuong; Fein, Luis; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Rodriguez-Antolin, Alfredo; Alekseev, Boris Y; Özgüroğlu, Mustafa; Ye, Dingwei; Feyerabend, Susan; Protheroe, Andrew; De Porre, Peter; Kheoh, Thian; Park, Youn C; Todd, Mary B; Chi, Kim N

    2017-07-27

    Abiraterone acetate, a drug that blocks endogenous androgen synthesis, plus prednisone is indicated for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone with androgen-deprivation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed, metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 1199 patients to receive either androgen-deprivation therapy plus abiraterone acetate (1000 mg daily, given once daily as four 250-mg tablets) plus prednisone (5 mg daily) (the abiraterone group) or androgen-deprivation therapy plus dual placebos (the placebo group). The two primary end points were overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival. After a median follow-up of 30.4 months at a planned interim analysis (after 406 patients had died), the median overall survival was significantly longer in the abiraterone group than in the placebo group (not reached vs. 34.7 months) (hazard ratio for death, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51 to 0.76; P<0.001). The median length of radiographic progression-free survival was 33.0 months in the abiraterone group and 14.8 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.55; P<0.001). Significantly better outcomes in all secondary end points were observed in the abiraterone group, including the time until pain progression, next subsequent therapy for prostate cancer, initiation of chemotherapy, and prostate-specific antigen progression (P<0.001 for all comparisons), along with next symptomatic skeletal events (P=0.009). These findings led to the unanimous recommendation by the independent data and safety monitoring committee that the trial be unblinded and crossover be allowed for patients in the placebo group to receive abiraterone. Rates of grade 3 hypertension and hypokalemia were higher in the abiraterone group. The addition of abiraterone

  8. Surgical management of prostate cancer metastatic to the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J; Fox, Benjamin D; Sciubba, Daniel M; Suki, Dima; Tu, Shi Ming; Kuban, Deborah; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Rhines, Laurence D; Rao, Ganesh

    2009-05-01

    Significant improvements in neurological function and pain relief are the benefits of aggressive surgical management of spinal metastatic disease. However, there is limited literature regarding the management of tumors with specific histological features. In this study, a series of patients undergoing spinal surgery for metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed to identify predictors of survival and functional outcome. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who were treated with surgery for prostate cancer metastases to the spine between 1993 and 2005 at a single institution. Particular attention was given to initial presentation, operative management, clinical and neurological outcomes, and factors associated with complications and overall survival. Forty-four patients underwent a total of 47 procedures. The median age at spinal metastasis was 66 years (range 50-84 years). Twenty-four patients had received previous external-beam radiation to the site of spinal involvement, with a median dose of 70 Gy (range 30-74 Gy). Frankel scores on discharge were significantly improved when compared with preoperative scores (p = 0.001). Preoperatively, 32 patients (73%) were walking and 33 (75%) were continent. On discharge, 36 (86%) of 42 patients were walking, and 37 (88%) of 42 were continent. Preoperatively, 40 patients (91%) were taking narcotics, with a median morphine equivalent dose of 21.5 mg/day, and 28 patients (64%) were taking steroids, with a median dose of 16 mg/day. At discharge, the median postoperative morphine equivalent dose was 12 mg/day, and the median steroid dose was 0 mg/day (p or = 65 years at the time of surgery was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (p = 0.005). In selected patients with prostate cancer metastases to the spine, aggressive surgical decompression and spinal reconstruction is a useful treatment option. The results show that on average, neurological outcome is improved and use of analgesics

  9. Immunohistochemical staining of precursor forms of prostate-specific antigen (proPSA) in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Anil V; Marlow, Cameron; Demarzo, Angelo M; Mikolajczyk, Stephen D; Rittenhouse, Harry G; Veltri, Robert W; Chan, Theresa Y

    2006-10-01

    Precursors of prostate-specific antigen (proPSA) have been previously shown to be more concentrated in prostate cancer tissue. This study characterizes the immunohistochemical staining (IHS) of proPSA forms in metastatic prostate cancer compared with prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). A tissue microarray, consisting of 74 cases of metastatic prostate carcinoma and control tissues, was used. IHS, using monoclonal antibodies against proPSA with a truncated proleader peptide containing 2 amino acids ([-2]pPSA), native ([-5/-7]pPSA), PSA, and PAP, was analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies were specific for both benign and malignant prostatic glandular tissue. IHS with [-5/-7]pPSA showed the least number of cases with negative staining (3%), and the most number of cases with moderate or strong staining (76%). In the 60 cases where all 4 stains could be evaluated, none of them were negative for proPSA and positive for PSA or PAP, and all 7 cases that were negative for both PSA and PAP showed IHS to proPSA. [-5/-7]pPSA (native proPSA) may be a better marker than PSA and PAP in characterizing metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, with most of the cases showing positivity for the marker. Even cases that were negative for PSA and PAP, were reactive for proPSA. Such enhanced detection is particularly important in poorly differentiated carcinomas involving metastatic sites where prostate carcinoma is a consideration. A panel of markers, including proPSA, should be performed when metastatic prostate carcinoma is in the differential diagnosis.

  10. Benzimidazole as Novel Therapy for Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    8 4 INTRODUCTION The focus of this project is to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of benzimidazoles as a...potential anti-metastatic prostate cancer therapy. We identified benzimidazoles , a class of anti-parasitic drug, in a drug screening process for...preferential anti-tumor activity on metastatic prostate cancer cells. We have data indicate that benzimidazoles have potent anti-tumor activities

  11. Urothelial-Type adenocarcinoma of the prostate mimicking metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Adley

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma arising in urinary bladder or prostatic urethra is uncommon. When they occur, the tumor can be mistaken for metastatic lesions, especially from the colon. Here we report the fifth case of a primary urothelial-type adenocarcinoma arising in the prostate which showed enteric differentiation. The patient was a 55 year-old male whose prostatic needle core biopsy showed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was initially thought to be metastatic colon cancer. A follow-up colonoscopy was unremarkable. Subsequent prostatectomy revealed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was positive for cytokeratins 7 and 20, carcinoembryonic antigen, CDX2, and high molecular weight cytokeratin, and negative for prostate specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase and AMACR. A diagnosis of urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate was rendered. We review the literature regarding this entity, and discuss the differential diagnosis, emphasizing utility of immunohistochemistry in making the diagnosis. Finally, we speculate on the behavior of these rare tumors.

  12. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  13. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  14. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  15. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer

  16. Stable and high expression of Galectin-8 tightly controls metastatic progression of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Lucas Daniel; Pérez, Ignacio González; Kotler, Monica Lidia; Chauchereau, Anne; Laderach, Diego Jose; Compagno, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Two decades ago, Galectin-8 was described as a prostate carcinoma biomarker since it is only expressed in the neoplastic prostate, but not in the healthy tissue. To date, no biological function has been attributed to Galectin-8 that could explain this differential expression. In this study we silenced Galectin-8 in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and IGR-CaP1, and designed a pre-clinical experimental model that allows monitoring the pathology from its early steps to the long-term metastatic stages. We show for the first time that the natural and conserved expression of Gal-8 in tumour cells is responsible for the metastatic evolution of prostate cancer. In fact, Gal-8 controls the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and E-Cadherin expression, with a major impact on anoikis and homotypic aggregation of tumour cells, both being essential processes for the survival of circulating tumour cells during metastasis. While localized prostate cancer can be cured, metastatic and advanced disease remains a significant therapeutic challenge, urging for the identification of prognostic markers of the metastatic process. Collectively, our results highlight Galectin-8 as a potential target for anti-metastatic therapy against prostate cancer. PMID:28591719

  17. Beyond Seed and Soil: Understanding and Targeting Metastatic Prostate Cancer; Report From the 2016 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Goswami, Sangeeta; Ippolito, Joseph E; Priceman, Saul J; Pritchard, Colin C; Sfanos, Karen S; Subudhi, Sumit K; Simons, Jonathan W; Pienta, Kenneth J; Soule, Howard R

    2017-02-01

    The 2016 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy (CHPCA) Meeting, "Beyond Seed and Soil: Understanding and Targeting Metastatic Prostate Cancer," was held from June 23 to June 26, 2016, in Coronado, California. For the 4th year in a row, the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) hosted the CHPCA Meeting, a think tank-structured scientific conference, which focuses on a specific topic of critical unmet need on the biology and treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The 2016 CHPCA Meeting was attended by 71 investigators from prostate cancer and other fields, who discussed the biology, study methodologies, treatment strategies, and critical unmet needs concerning metastatic prostate cancer, with the ultimate goal of advancing strategies to treat and eliminate this disease. The major topics of discussion included: the molecular landscape and molecular heterogeneity of metastatic prostate cancer, the role of the metastatic microenvironment, optimizing immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer, learning from exceptional responders and non-responders, targeting DNA repair deficiency in advanced prostate cancer, developing and applying novel biomarkers and imaging techniques, and potential roles for the microbiome in prostate cancer. This article reviews the topics presented and discussions held at the CHPCA Meeting, with a focus on the unknowns and next steps needed to advance our understanding of the biology and most effective treatment strategies for metastatic prostate cancer. Prostate 77:123-144, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The role of serum osteoprotegerine in metastatic prostate cancer - a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siampanopoulou, M; El, Mantani; Moustakas, G; Haritanti, A; Gotzamani-Psarrakou, A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant neoplastic diseases in men. Early control of the disease progression contributes significantly to survival rates and patients' quality of life. Osteoprotegerin is a dimeric glycoprotein, which affects bone metabolism and inhibits osteoclastogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of osteoprotegerin in the serum of prostate cancer patients with or without skeletal metastases. The expression of serum osteoprotegerin, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, has been studied in 82 patients with locally controlled prostate cancer, in 49 patients with metastatic bone disease and in a control group of 41 healthy males. At sampling time 65/131 of included patients were newly diagnosed, while 66/131 patients were already under hormonal therapy. All eligible prostate cancer patients had histologically confirmed malignancy. Serum total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was determined by an immunoradiometric assay. We investigated the expression of osteoprotegerin in hormone-dependent and hormone-refractory prostate cancer and its relation to disease progression. Among the 131 patients with prostate cancer, higher osteoprotegerin and PSA concentrations have been observed in metastatic bone patients' sera (p cancer patients has shown a statistically significant area curve (p cancer patients (p cancer reflect the bone metastatic extent and may potentially be used in metastatic patients' follow-ups. Hippokratia 2016, 20(2): 133-138.

  19. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  20. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J

    2001-01-01

    with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203.......Castration is the most widely used form of androgen ablation employed in the treatment of metastatic (M1) prostate cancer. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy is a potential alternative treatment option for men for whom castration is unacceptable or not indicated. Of the three non...

  1. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  2. [New Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Prostate-Specific Inhibitors of Membrane Antigen for Diagnostics and Therapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, O P; German, K E; Krilov, V V; Petriev, V M; Epstein, N B

    2015-01-01

    About 10.7% cases of prostate cancer were registered in Russia in 2011 (40,000 patients). More than half of cancer cases were revealed in advanced (III-IV) stages when metastases inevitably developed quickly. Clinical problem of early diagnostics and treatment of metastatic prostate cancer is still not solved. Anatomical imaging techniques have low sensitivity and specificity for the detection of this disease. Metabolic visualization methods which use prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a marker are also ineffective. This article describes prostate-specific membrane antigens (PSMA) that are proposed as a marker for diagnostics and therapy of prostate cancer. The most promising PSMA-based radiopharmaceutical agent for diagnostics has been developed and clinically tested in the European countries. These pharmaceuticals are based on small peptide molecules modified with urea, and have the highest affinity to PSMA. Favorable phannacokinetics, rapid accumulation in the tumor and rapid excretion from the body are beneficial features of these pharmaceuticals.

  3. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Rucaparib Camsylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer With Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-20

    ATM Gene Mutation; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Castration Levels of Testosterone; Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Homologous Recombination Deficiency; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Level Greater Than or Equal to Two; PSA Progression; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma AJCC v7

  4. Annotating MYC Status in Treatment-Resistant Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer With Gallium-68 Citrate PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    which avidly binds to circulating transferrin) labeled transferrin (Tf) can detect MYC-positive prostate cancer tumors, since the transferrin receptor ...Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer with Androgen Receptor - Axis Imaging. Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0469 TITLE: Annotating MYC Status in Treatment-Resistant Metastatic Castration- Resistant Prostate Cancer With

  5. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Halin Bergström

    Full Text Available Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1. To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  6. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    DGP, maximum of eight courses, until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously day 1, gemcitabine was given day 1 and 8 in doses increasing from 600 to 1,000 mg/m(2) every third week. Patients had castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRMPC......), adequate function of liver, kidney and bone marrow; ECOG performance status...

  7. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated...

  8. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske

    2014-01-01

    , development of sustained side-effects, or abiraterone acetate becoming available in the respective country. The primary outcome was the number of adverse events arising during study treatment and within 30 days of discontinuation. Efficacy measures (time to prostate-specific antigen [PSA] progression and time......BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the final...... analysis of an early-access protocol trial that was initiated after completion of COU-AA-301 to enable worldwide preapproval access to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, early...

  9. Challenges in the sequencing of therapies for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Phillip; Parnis, Francis; Gurney, Howard

    2014-09-01

    Prior to 2010, docetaxel was the standard option for chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Today, the picture is vastly different: several additional therapies have each demonstrated a survival benefit such that we now have chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen suppressive agents (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), a cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) and radium-233 (for symptomatic bone metastases). With several other agents in the pipeline for late-stage disease, the future looks promising for mCRPC. As the available data are not able to inform as to the optimum sequencing of therapy, this remains a challenge. This paper draws on insights from published and ongoing clinical studies to provide a practical patient-focused approach to maximize the benefits of the current therapeutic armamentarium. Preliminary sequencing suggestions are made based on clinical trial criteria. But until more data become available, clinical gestalt, experience, cost and individual patient preferences will continue to drive choices. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in primary and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becich Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claudins are integral membrane proteins that are involved in forming cellular tight junctions. One member of the claudin family, claudin-3, has been shown to be overexpressed in breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer. Here we use immunohistochemistry to evaluate its expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (NAC, primary prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa, and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma (Mets. Methods Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for claudin-3, with the staining intensities subsequently quantified and statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA with subsequent Tukey tests for multiple comparisons or a nonparametric equivalent. Fifty-three cases of NAC, 17 cases of BPH, 35 cases of PIN, 107 cases of PCa, and 55 cases of Mets were analyzed in the microarrays. Results PCa and Mets had the highest absolute staining for claudin-3. Both had significantly higher staining than BPH (p Conclusions To our knowledge, this represents one of the first studies comparing the immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in PCa and NAC to specimens of PIN, BPH, and Mets. These findings provide further evidence that claudin-3 may serve as an important biomarker for prostate cancer, both primary and metastatic, but does not provide evidence that claudin-3 can be used to predict risk of metastasis.

  11. Cancer of the prostate presenting with diffuse osteolytic metastatic bone lesions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segamwenge Innocent Lule

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In the USA it is more common in African-American men than in Caucasian men. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone and the lesions appear osteoblastic on radiographs. Presentation with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions is rare. We describe an unusual presentation of metastatic prostate cancer with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions. Case presentation A 65-year-old Namibian man presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia and worsening back pains. In addition he had complaints of effort intolerance, palpitations, dysuria and mild symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. On examination he was found to be anemic, had a swollen tender right shoulder joint and spine tenderness to percussion. On digital rectal examination he had asymmetrical enlargement of the prostate which felt nodular and hard with diffuse firmness in some parts. His prostate-specific antigen was greater than 100ng/mL and he had diffuse osteolytic lesions involving the right humerus, and all vertebral, femur and pelvic bones. His screen for multiple myeloma was negative and the prostate biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. Conclusion Prostate cancer rarely presents with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating male patients with osteolytic bone lesions.

  12. Hyaluronan-Based Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Importantly, the system can target CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells through intrinsic HA-CD44 receptor interactions and deliver drugs directly to...be released by enzymatic degradation via HYAL1. Importantly, the system can target CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells through intrinsic HA-CD44...In Situ DNA Strand Break Labeling (TUNEL assay)—Tumor tissues were recovered from euthanized animals. Sections (5 μm) were cut from 10% neutral

  13. Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed in a bronchoalveolar lavage specimen: An unusual presentation of a common tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne E Moul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting as a primary lung disease is rare. We present a 52-year-old male with a 3-month history of cough, shortness of breath, and weight loss with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of a primary lung disease: Bilateral interstitial and alveolar opacities with blunting of the costophrenic angles, multiple diffuse foci of consolidations and nodules, predominantly subpleural and located in the lower lobes, and diffuse interlobular septal thickening and peribronchial thickening. The patient underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was obtained. Cytospin smears were diagnostic for a low-grade adenocarcinoma. Clinically, the patient had elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels greater than 5,000 ng/mL. Because of this, immunocytochemistry for PSA was performed which was positive, confirming the diagnosis of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. This unusual case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate first diagnosed by BAL highlights the significance of available clinical information and the use of immunocytochemistry for proper diagnosis.

  14. Multidisciplinary Intervention of Early, Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Report From the 2015 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K.; Lang, Joshua M.; Den, Robert B.; Garraway, Isla P.; Lotan, Tamara L.; Ross, Ashley E.; Stoyanova, Tanya; Cho, Steve Y.; Simons, Jonathan W.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Soule, Howard R.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND The 2015 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting, themed: “Multidisciplinary Intervention of Early, Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer,” was held in La Jolla, California from June 25 to 28, 2015. METHODS The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) sponsors an annual, invitation-only, action-tank-structured meeting on a critical topic concerning lethal prostate cancer. The 2015 meeting was attended by 71 basic, translational, and clinical investigators who discussed the current state of the field, major unmet needs, and ideas for addressing earlier diagnosis and treatment of men with lethal prostate cancer for the purpose of extending lives and making progress toward a cure. RESULTS The questions addressed at the meeting included: cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, evaluating, and targeting the microenvironment in the primary tumor, advancing biomarkers for clinical integration, new molecular imaging technologies, clinical trials, and clinical trial design in localized high-risk and oligometastatic settings, targeting the primary tumor in advanced disease, and instituting multi-modal care of high risk and oligometastatic patients. DISCUSSION This article highlights the current status, greatest unmet needs, and anticipated field changes that were discussed at the meeting toward the goal of optimizing earlier interventions to potentiate cures in high-risk and oligometastatic prostate cancer patients. PMID:26477609

  15. Prostate-specific Antigen Decline After 4 Weeks of Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rescigno, P.; Lorente, D.; Bianchini, D.; Ferraldeschi, R.; Kolinsky, M.P.; Sideris, S.; Zafeiriou, Z.; Sumanasuriya, S.; Smith, A.D.; Mehra, N.; Jayaram, A.; Perez-Lopez, R.; Mateo, J.; Parker, C.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Tunariu, N.; Reid, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of multiple new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) mandates earlier treatment switches in the absence of a response. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used to monitor treatment response, but is not validated as an

  16. Successful Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer following Chemotherapy Based on Molecular Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E. Myers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available After Taxotere fails, treatment options for metastatic prostate cancer are limited. The three drugs with FDA approval in this setting, Jevtana, Provenge and Zytiga, are associated with median survivals of less than 2 years. In part, the impact on survival is the result of low response rates, indicating a significant proportion of patients exhibiting de novo resistance to these agents. An alternate approach is to let treatment selection be governed by gene expression profiling so that the treatment is tailored to the specific patient. Here, we report a case of metastatic prostate cancer with a dramatic response to treatment selected based on molecular profiling. This patient had failed LHRH agonist, bicalutamide, Taxotere, and doxorubicin. Molecular profiling showed overexpression of the androgen receptor and he had a dramatic response of measurable disease to second-line hormonal therapy with ketoconazole, estrogen and Leukine.

  17. Bone-targeted cabazitaxel nanoparticles for metastatic prostate cancer skeletal lesions and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdowski, Andrew S; Ranjan, Amalendu; Sarker, Marjana R; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel cabazitaxel bone targeted nanoparticle (NP) system for improved drug delivery to the bone microenvironment. Nanoparticles were developed using poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cabazitaxel as the core with amino-bisphosphonate surface conjugation. Optimization of nanoparticle physiochemical properties, in vitro evaluation in prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo testing in an intraosseous model of metastatic prostate cancer was performed. This bone targeted cabazitaxel nanocarrier system showed significant reduction in tumor burden, while at the same time maintaining bone structure integrity and reducing pain in the mouse tumor limb. This bone microenvironment targeted nanoparticle system and clinically relevant approach of evaluation represents a promising advancement for treating bone metastatic cancer.

  18. Half-body irradiation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, C.G.; Bullimore, J.A.; Smith, P.J.B.; Roberts, J.B.M.

    1981-01-01

    High dose radiation therapy given as a single fraction to the upper and lower halves of the body gives effective palliation for metastatic solid tumours. This treatment modality appears to be particularly effective in tumours which may have a slow doubling time such as carcinoma of the prostate. Fifty-two patients with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate involving the skeletal system have received half-body irradiation (8 MeV X-rays at a dose rate of about 100 cGy/min). All had prior treatment with additive hormones or orchiectomy and the majority had received localised irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Significant immediate pain relief was achieved in 42 out of 52 patients (80%). This pain relief was maintained until death in 29 out of 43 patients (67%). Pain relief in responders appears to occur within 24 to 48 h of treatment. (author)

  19. Deconvoluting the Complexity of Bone Metastatic Prostate Cancer via Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    fluent in English and Spanish and have experience in IT, programming, cell culture, teaching , art, graphic design, and leadership skills. Personal...2007) Teacher programme for the translation of science into classrooms University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA (2004-2005) One-Year Academic Exchange...integrated computational modeling approach can be used to predict the temporal behavior of bone metastatic prostate cancer heterogeneous for TGFβ and

  20. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, H...

  1. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Chung, Ivy; Migliozzi, Matthew; Phan, Derek T; Wilson, Arianne M; Zetter, Bruce R; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful tool to interrogate the metastatic

  2. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra......-CSF, especially at cycle 1 and in men aged > or =75 years, is important and improves tolerability in senior adults treated with cabazitaxel....

  3. Beyond the androgen receptor II: New approaches to understanding and treating metastatic prostate cancer; Report from the 2017 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Cheng, Heather H; Abida, Wassim; Ellis, Leigh; Harshman, Lauren C; Spratt, Daniel E; Simons, Jonathan W; Pienta, Kenneth J; Soule, Howard R

    2017-11-01

    The 2017 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy (CHPCA) Meeting, "Beyond the Androgen Receptor II: New Approaches to Understanding and Treating Metastatic Prostate Cancer," was held in Carlsbad, California from June 14-17, 2017. The CHPCA is an annual scientific conference hosted by the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) that is uniquely designed to produce extensive and constructive discussions on the most urgent and impactful topics concerning research into the biology and treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The 2017 CHPCA Meeting was the 5th meeting in this annual series and was attended by 71 investigators focused on prostate cancer and a variety of other fields including breast and ovarian cancer. The discussions at the meeting were concentrated on topics areas including: mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for molecular subclasses of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the epigenetic landscape of prostate cancer, the role of DNA repair gene mutations, advancing the use of germline genetics in clinical practice, radionuclides for imaging and therapy, advances in molecular imaging, and therapeutic strategies for successful use of immunotherapy in advanced prostate cancer. This article reviews the presentations and discussions from the 2017 CHPCA Meeting in order to disseminate this knowledge and accelerate new biological understandings and advances in the treatment of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. uPAR Targeted Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 Inhibits Dissemination of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Juhl, Karina; Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is implicated in cancer invasion and metastatic development in prostate cancer and provides therefore an attractive molecular target for both imaging and therapy. In this study, we provide the first in vivo data on an antimetastatic effect...... of uPAR radionuclide targeted therapy in such lesions and show the potential of uPAR positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying small foci of metastatic cells in a mouse model of disseminating human prostate cancer. Two radiolabeled ligands were generated in high purity and specific...... value of 100 nM in a competitive binding experiment. In vivo, uPAR targeted radionuclide therapy significantly reduced the number of metastatic lesions in the disseminated metastatic prostate cancer model, when compared to vehicle and nontargeted 177Lu groups (p

  5. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: time for innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Marcello; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio; Vignani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the mainstay of advanced prostate cancer treatment. Despite initial responses, almost all patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The understanding of the biology of CRPC and the evidence that CRPC still remains driven by androgen receptor signaling led to the discovery of new therapeutic targets. In the last few years, large Phase III trials showed improvements in survival and outcomes and led to the approval of a CYP17 inhibitor (abiraterone), an androgen receptor antagonist (enzalutamide), the taxane cabazitaxel, an α-emitter (radium-223), the bone resorption-targeting drug denosumab and an immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T). This article describes the molecular mechanisms underlying castration resistance, discusses recent and ongoing trials and offers some insights into identifying the best sequence of new drugs.

  6. Metastatic prostate cancer with elevated serum levels of CEA and CA19-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dar Juang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is well known as a specific tumor marker for prostate cancer, but carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA- and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9-elevating adenocarcinomas originating in the prostate gland are rare. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 in a 78-year-old man in whom prostate cancer (T3N1M1 had been diagnosed 2 years ago and who was treated with androgen deprivation therapy. He visited the emergency department because of a loss of appetite and abdominal pain. The serum CEA and CA19-9 levels were increased to 218.9 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL and 212 ng/mL (normal, <27 ng/mL, respectively. The serum PSA level was slightly elevated (4.41 ng/mL. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple liver metastases, para-aortic lymph node enlargement, and lung metastases. A liver biopsy was performed and the specimen showed high-grade adenocarcinoma with focal positive staining for PSA. Despite chemotherapy with docetaxel, the patient died 3 months after treatment. Based on this case and a review of the literature, an aggressive variant of prostatic carcinoma with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 and a low PSA level was shown to progress rapidly with a poor prognosis.

  7. PrognosticValue of PINP,BoneAlkaline Phosphatase, CTX-I, andYKL-40 in Patients With Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Johansen, Julia S

    2006-01-01

    Prognostic value of PINP, bone alkaline phosphatase, CTX-I, and YKL-40 in patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. Prostate. 2006 Apr 1;66(5):503-13. PMID: 16372331 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]......Prognostic value of PINP, bone alkaline phosphatase, CTX-I, and YKL-40 in patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. Prostate. 2006 Apr 1;66(5):503-13. PMID: 16372331 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]...

  8. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A

    2017-01-01

    monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide......BACKGROUND: Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA...... treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant...

  9. Comparison of miRNA and gene expression profiles between metastatic and primary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaimin; Liang, Zuowen; Li, Fubiao; Wang, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify the regulatory mechanisms associated with the metastasis of prostate cancer (PC). The microRNA (miRNA/miR) microarray dataset GSE21036 and gene transcript dataset GSE21034 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following pre-processing, differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between samples from patients with primary prostate cancer (PPC) and metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) with |log 2 fold change (FC)| >1 and a false discovery rate terms (36 terms), followed by miR-494 (24 terms), miR-30d (18 terms), miR-181a (15 terms), hsa-miR-196a (8 terms), miR-708 (7 terms) and miR-486-5p (2 terms). Therefore, these miRNAs may serve roles in the metastasis of PC cells via downregulation of their corresponding target DEGs.

  10. How MMPs Impact Bone Responses to Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    bone metabolism. J Biol Chem 2006;281:33814–24. 28. Wilson TJ, Nannuru KC, Singh RK. Cathepsin G-mediated activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9...male mice. Nat Genet 2003;35:252–7. [47] Lynch CC, Hikosaka A, Acuff HB, Martin MD, Kawai N, Singh RK, et al. MMP-7 promotes prostate cancer-induced...described (15). A luciferase tagged 4T1 mammary tumor cell line (16) was kindly provided by Dr. Swati Biswas of Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology. All

  11. Management of elderly patients with prostate cancer without metastatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Akitake, Masakazu; Ikoma, Saya; Ri, Ken; Masuda, Katsuaki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the optimal management for elderly patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer (clinical stage: T1-T4N0M0), we reviewed the prognoses. From April 2000 to December 2008, we treated and followed up 175 patients aged 75 years, or older. In almost all of the patients above 79 years of age, endocrine therapy was selected. Among the 75 to 79-year-old patients, the proportion of radiation therapy, including external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-brachytherapy), as well as radical prostatectomy increased. The follow-up period for all the patients was 0 to 106 months (median, 32 months). In the low- and intermediate-risk group, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100% and 90%, respectively, and no patients with EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, and HDR-brachytherapy had biochemical failure at 34 and 46 months, respectively. In the high-risk group with 75 to 79-year-old patients, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 71.4%, 69.0% and 55.7%, respectively, while the actuarial biochemical control rate at 48 months for HDR-brachytherapy was 40.9%. In the high-risk group with patients above 79 years of age, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for endocrine therapy was 64.5%. Prostate cancer death was recognized only in 1 patient within the high-risk group, treated by endocrine therapy. In all the patients, the overall survival rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, HDR-brachytherapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100%, 100%, 76.4% and 89.5%, respectively. The actuarial biochemical control rate and overall survival rate were not significant among the management options in each risk group. However, the 75 to 79-year-old patients within the high-risk group, who were treated with

  12. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Yao; Bae, Kyungmi; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia (≥24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia (≤6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1α. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  13. A Paracrine Role for IL6 in Prostate Cancer Patients: Lack of Production by Primary or Metastatic Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Han; Zheng, Qizhi; Esopi, David; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Luo, Jun; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Drake, Charles G.; Vessella, Robert; Morrissey, Colm; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Sfanos, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Correlative human studies suggest that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) contributes to the development and/or progression of prostate cancer. However, the source of IL6 production in the prostate microenvironment in patients has yet to be determined. The cellular origin of IL6 in primary and metastatic prostate cancer was examined in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using a highly sensitive and specific chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay that underwent extensive analytical validation. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-RT-PCR) showed that benign prostate tissues often had higher expression of IL6 mRNA than matched tumor specimens. CISH analysis further indicated that both primary and metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma cells do not express IL6 mRNA. IL6 expression was highly heterogeneous across specimens and was nearly exclusively restricted to the prostate stromal compartment – including endothelial cells and macrophages among other cell types. The number of IL6-expressing cells correlated positively with the presence of acute inflammation. In metastatic disease, tumor cells were negative in all lesions examined and IL6 expression was restricted to endothelial cells within the vasculature of bone metastases. Finally, IL6 was not detected in any cells in soft tissue metastases. These data suggest that, in prostate cancer patients, paracrine rather than autocrine IL6 production is likely associated with any role for the cytokine in disease progression. PMID:26048576

  14. Impact of ethnicity on the outcome of men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Brandon; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Chen, Yu-Hui; Sridhar, Srikala S; Mitchell, Edith P; Pettaway, Curtis A; Carducci, Michael A; Nguyen, Paul L; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes are impacted by socioeconomic and biologic factors. Ethnicity plays a role in the former, but little is known about the responsiveness of metastatic PCa to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) among races. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was used to identify men who were diagnosed with distant, de novo, metastatic PCa from 2004 to 2012. Patterns of presentation, overall survival (OS), and PCa-specific mortality (PCSM) were determined for each race. E3805 clinical trial data also were retrospectively reviewed to assess outcomes of ADT and ADT plus docetaxel by race. Of all PCa diagnoses in SEER, distant, de novo, metastatic disease was diagnosed in 4.2% of non-Hispanic whites, 5.8% of Hispanic whites, 5.7% of blacks, 5.5% of Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 8.8% of American Indians/Alaska Natives (P blacks, respectively. Few Asians participated in the E3805 trial. Asian men have superior median OS and PCSM for distant, de novo, metastatic PCa than men of other race. Non-Hispanic whites and blacks who receive treatment with ADT or chemohormonal therapy have comparable outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:1536-1544. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Exaggerated venous mural hypertrophy in association with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, W.L.; Dellers, E.A.; Putong, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A 61-year-old black man presented with metastases to the right groin 5 years after 125iodine treatment for a well differentiated primary prostatic adenocarcinoma. Medium sized veins within and immediately adjacent to the neoplasm showed marked mural thickening due to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the inner circular and outer longitudinal muscles. There was no histological evidence of radiation effect in the stroma or in the tumor cells. We could find no report in the literature of such changes associated with metastatic carcinoma

  16. Treatments for Metastatic Prostate Cancer (mPC): A Review of Costing Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2017-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in Western countries. More than one third of PC patients develop metastatic disease, and the 5-year expected survival in distant disease is about 35%. During the last few years, new treatments have been launched for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We aimed to review the current literature on health economic analysis on the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer (mPC), compare the studies, summarize the findings and make the results available to administrators and decision makers. A systematic literature search was done for economic evaluations (cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-of-illness, cost-of-drug, and cost-benefit analyses). We employed the PubMed ® search engine and searched for publications published between 2012 and 2016. The terms used were "prostate cancer", "metastatic" and "cost". An initial screening of all headlines was performed, selected abstracts were analysed, and finally the full papers investigated. Study characteristics, treatment and comparator, country, type of evaluation, perspective, year of value, time horizon, efficacy data, discount rate, total costs and sensitivity analysis were analysed. The quality was assessed using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. A total of 227 publications were detected and screened, 58 selected for full-text assessment and 31 included in the final analyses. Despite the significant international literature on the treatment of mCRPC, there were only 15 studies focusing on cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). Medical treatment constituted two thirds of the selected studies. Significant costs in the treatment of mCRPC were disclosed. In the pre-docetaxel setting, both abiraterone acetate (AA) and enzalutamide were concluded beyond accepted cost/quality-adjusted life year limits. In the docetaxel refractory setting, most studies concluded that enzalutamide was cost-effective and superior to AA. In

  17. Rare incidence of tumor lysis syndrome in metastatic prostate cancer following treatment with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Sharonlin; Varma, Seema

    2018-03-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and sometimes lethal complication of cancer treatment that is comprised of a set of metabolic disturbances along with clinical manifestations. Initiating chemotherapy in bulky, rapidly proliferating tumors causes rapid cell turnover that in turn releases metabolites into circulation that give rise to metabolic derangements that can be dangerous. This syndrome is usually seen in high-grade hematological malignancies. Less commonly, tumor lysis syndrome can present in solid tumors and even rarely in genitourinary tumors. In this report, the authors describe a specific case of tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer following treatment with docetaxel.

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer: Fatal outcome following strontium-89 therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, C.; McKenzie, R.; Coupland, D.B. [Univ. of British Columbia, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    A patient with metastatic prostate cancer was found to have low-grade disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He had significant bone pain despite external-beam radiotherapy and was given {sup 89}Sr with subsequent thrombocytopenia and epistaxis. The patient died from generalized hemorrhage 36 days postinjection. Although it is not possible to establish a causal relationship between {sup 89}Sr and DIC, practitioners should be alert to complications associated with the primary disorder which might occur at a time to raise concern about the intervention. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Targeting the interleukin-11 receptor α in metastatic prostate cancer: A first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Renata; Millikan, Randall E; Christianson, Dawn R; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Giordano, Ricardo J; Hajitou, Amin; Hoang, Anh G; Wen, Sijin; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Baze, Wallace B; Marcott, Valerie D; Hawke, David H; Do, Kim-Anh; Navone, Nora M; Efstathiou, Eleni; Troncoso, Patricia; Lobb, Roy R; Logothetis, Christopher J; Arap, Wadih

    2015-07-15

    Receptors in tumor blood vessels are attractive targets for ligand-directed drug discovery and development. The authors have worked systematically to map human endothelial receptors ("vascular zip codes") within tumors through direct peptide library selection in cancer patients. Previously, they selected a ligand-binding motif to the interleukin-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Rα) in the human vasculature. The authors generated a ligand-directed, peptidomimetic drug (bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic-11 [BMTP-11]) for IL-11Rα-based human tumor vascular targeting. Preclinical studies (efficacy/toxicity) included evaluating BMTP-11 in prostate cancer xenograft models, drug localization, targeted apoptotic effects, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses, and dose-range determination, including formal (good laboratory practice) toxicity across rodent and nonhuman primate species. The initial BMTP-11 clinical development also is reported based on a single-institution, open-label, first-in-class, first-in-man trial (National Clinical Trials number NCT00872157) in patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. BMTP-11 was preclinically promising and, thus, was chosen for clinical development in patients. Limited numbers of patients who had castrate-resistant prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases were enrolled into a phase 0 trial with biology-driven endpoints. The authors demonstrated biopsy-verified localization of BMTP-11 to tumors in the bone marrow and drug-induced apoptosis in all patients. Moreover, the maximum tolerated dose was identified on a weekly schedule (20-30 mg/m(2) ). Finally, a renal dose-limiting toxicity was determined, namely, dose-dependent, reversible nephrotoxicity with proteinuria and casts involving increased serum creatinine. These biologic endpoints establish BMTP-11 as a targeted drug candidate in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Within a larger discovery context, the current findings indicate that

  20. Radiotherapy in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer: Current standards and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: The intent of this course is to review issues involved in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer and to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, the use of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with the radiation, the management of patients with regional metastases and recurrent disease following surgery and radiation. At the end of this course, participants should be able to fluently discuss management issues and strategies across the entire spectrum of non-metastatic prostate cancer. - Pre-treatment prognostic factors including clinical stage, grade, and pre-treatment PSA, will be presented and their relative value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. Strategies to be discussed include standard dose radiation, escalated dose radiation, particle radiation and the use of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy. - The process of simulation and field design will be presented, the value of CT-based treatment planning, beams-eye view design and the relative value of three-dimensional treatment planning will be discussed. - The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with this will also be presented so that what constitutes an adequate simulation and margin of treatment can be clarified. - The management of newly diagnosed patients, covering the range of low stage/low grade to locally advanced prostate cancer will be discussed. - The relative value of increasing dose, the relative value of using neo-adjuvant and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and the indications for escalated dose will be presented. - Strategies for managing post-prostatectomy patients will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant and therapeutic irradiation for biochemical failure will be presented and a strategy for management will be discussed. - How to deal with patients with residual disease post radiation will be discussed and the relative value of cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy or hormonal therapy will

  1. BET inhibitors in metastatic prostate cancer: therapeutic implications and rational drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, Mark C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2017-12-01

    The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins are epigenetic readers of acetylated histones regulating a vast network of protein expression across many different cancers. Therapeutic targeting of BET is an attractive area of clinical development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), particularly due to its putative effect on c-MYC expression and its interaction with the androgen receptor (AR). Areas covered: We speculate that a combination approach using inhibitors of BET proteins (BETi) with other targeted therapies may be required to improve the therapeutic index of BET inhibition in the management of prostate cancer. Preclinical data has identified several molecular targets that may enhance the effect of BET inhibition in the clinic. This review will summarize the known preclinical data implicating BET as an important therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer, highlight the ongoing clinical trials targeting this protein family, and speculate on rationale combination strategies using BETi together with other agents in prostate cancer. A literature search using Pubmed was performed for this review. Expert opinion: Use of BETi in the treatment of mCRPC patients may require the addition of a second novel agent.

  2. Treatment Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients With Ultra-High Prostate-Specific Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Patricia; Tonita, Jon; Woitas, Carla; Zhu Tong; Joseph, Kurian; Skarsgard, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: It is commonly believed that prostate cancer patients with very high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are unlikely to benefit from definitive local treatment, and patients with very high PSA are often underrepresented in, or excluded from, randomized clinical trials. Consequently, little is known about their optimal treatment or prognosis. We performed a registry-based analysis of management and outcome in this population of patients. Methods and Materials: Our provincial Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 to 2001. A retrospective chart review provided information on stage, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis, and treatment. In this study, ultra-high PSA was defined as PSA of ≥50 ng/ml. For a more complete perspective, treatment outcomes of patients with PSA of 20 to 49.9 ng/ml were also studied. Results: Of the 8378 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during this period, 6,449 had no known nodal or distant metastatic disease. The median follow-up of this group was 67.2 months (range, 0–192 months). A total of 1534 patients had PSA of ≥20 ng/ml. Among the 995 patients with PSA 20 to 49.9 ng/ml, 85 had radical prostatectomy (RP), and their 5- and 10-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) were 95% and 84%, respectively. The 497 patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) had 5- and 10-year CSS of 92% and 71%. For the 332 patients with PSA 50–99.9 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 81% and 55%. For the 207 patients with PSA of ≥100 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 80% and 54%. Conclusions: This is the largest series in the world on non metastatic cancer patients with ultra-high PSA at diagnosis. Even in the setting of a very high presenting PSA level, prostatectomy and radiotherapy are often associated with prolonged survival.

  3. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  4. Locoregional symptoms in patients with de novo metastatic prostate cancer: Morbidity, management, and disease outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikidou, Anna; Brureau, Laurent; Casenave, Julien; Albiges, Laurence; Di Palma, Mario; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Baumert, Hervé; Blanchard, Pierre; Bossi, Alberto; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Massard, Christophe; Fizazi, Karim; Blanchet, Pascal; Loriot, Yohann

    2015-05-01

    The paradigm change observed over the last few years in several solid tumors emphasizes the value of locoregional treatment in the presence of metastatic disease, currently ignored in de novo prostate cancer (CaP). We investigated the effect of the primary tumor that is left untreated on prostate cancer-specific morbidity and mortality, time to castration resistance, and overall survival (OS). We performed a bicentric cohort study. The overall population included de novo metastatic CaP managed at the Genito-Urinary Oncology Unit of the Gustave Roussy Institute and the Urology Clinic of the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre, France. Descriptive statistical and outcome analyses were performed in the overall cohort and also separately in the N+M0 and M+subgroups. The overall cohort included 263 patients. Approximately two-thirds of patients (64%) presented with locoregional symptoms at diagnosis, and 78% throughout the disease. Of the symptomatic patients, 59% required a locoregional procedure. Median OS of patients with locoregional symptoms at diagnosis was shorter than in those who were asymptomatic (47 vs. 86 mo, P = 0.0007); this difference was maintained in the N+M0 and M+subgroups. Median OS and time to castration resistance showed a nonsignificant trend in favor of patients undergoing a locoregional treatment at diagnosis. The presence of symptoms due to locoregional disease in de novo metastatic CaP entails significant morbidity and even mortality and requires active management. Randomized prospective trials are needed to evaluate the role of initial definite locoregional treatment in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of body composition with outcome of docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weixin; Liu, Xiandong; Chaftari, Patrick; Cruz Carreras, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Carmen; Viets-Upchurch, Jayne; Merriman, Kelly; Tu, Shi-Ming; Dalal, Shalini; Yeung, Sai-Ching J

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel, a lipophilic drug, is indicated for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. Most men with such disease would have had androgen-deprivation therapy, which decreases muscle and increases body fat. Obesity and body composition changes may influence the outcomes of docetaxel therapy. We conducted a retrospective review of 333 patients with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel at a comprehensive cancer center between October 7, 2004 and December 31, 2012. Body composition parameters were measured based on the areas of muscle and adipose tissues in the visceral and subcutaneous compartments on CT images at L3-4 levels. Dose calculations, toxicity and adverse reaction profiles, and overall survival were analyzed. Obese patients were younger at the diagnosis of prostate cancer and had a shorter duration from diagnosis to docetaxel therapy. Analysis of body composition found that a high visceral fat-to-subcutaneous fat area ratio (VSR) was associated with poor prognosis but a high visceral fat-to-muscle area ratio (VMR) and high body mass index were associated with increased duration from starting docetaxel to death, allowing such men to catch up with patients with normal body mass index in overall survival from cancer diagnosis to death. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that age ≥65 years, high VSR, abnormal serum alkaline phosphatase, and >10% reduction of initial dosage were significant predictors of shorter time between starting docetaxel and death, and that high VMR, obesity, and weekly regimens were significant predictors of longer survival after docetaxel. Obese and overweight patients may benefit more from weekly docetaxel regimens using the reference dosage of 35 mg/m2 without empirical dosage reduction.

  6. Local Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer: What is the Evidence So Far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Leonel Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Advances in technological, laboratorial, and imaging studies and new treatments available in the last decades significantly improved prostate cancer survival rates. However, this did not occur in metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa at diagnosis which, in young and fit patients, will become invariably resistant to the established treatments. Progression will lead to an impairment in patients’ quality of life and disease-related death. Methods. The authors intend to perform a literature review of the advantages of primary treatment of mPCa. Articles were retrieved and filtered for relevance from PubMed, SciELO, and ScienceDirect until March 2017. Results. Primary treatment is currently indicated only in cases of nonmetastatic PCa. Nonetheless, there might be some benefits in doing local treatment in mPCa in order to control local disease, prevent new metastasis, and improve the efficacy of chemotherapy and hormonotherapy with similar complications rate when compared to locally confined cancer. Independent factors that have a negative influence are age above 70 years, cT4 stage or high-grade disease, PSA≥20 ng/ml, and pelvic lymphadenopathies. The presence of 3 or more of these factors conditions CSS and OS is the same between patients who performed local treatment and those who did not. Metastasis degree and location number can also influence outcome. Meanwhile, patients with visceral metastases have worse results. Conclusions. There is growing evidence supporting local treatment in cases of metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis in the context of a multimodal approach. However, it should be kept in mind that most of the existing studies are retrospective and it would be important to make consistent prospective studies with well-defined patient selection criteria in order to sustain the existing data and understand the main indications to select patients and perform primary treatment in mPCa.

  7. Local Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer: What is the Evidence So Far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonel Almeida, Pedro; Jorge Pereira, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Advances in technological, laboratorial, and imaging studies and new treatments available in the last decades significantly improved prostate cancer survival rates. However, this did not occur in metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) at diagnosis which, in young and fit patients, will become invariably resistant to the established treatments. Progression will lead to an impairment in patients' quality of life and disease-related death. The authors intend to perform a literature review of the advantages of primary treatment of mPCa. Articles were retrieved and filtered for relevance from PubMed, SciELO, and ScienceDirect until March 2017. Primary treatment is currently indicated only in cases of nonmetastatic PCa. Nonetheless, there might be some benefits in doing local treatment in mPCa in order to control local disease, prevent new metastasis, and improve the efficacy of chemotherapy and hormonotherapy with similar complications rate when compared to locally confined cancer. Independent factors that have a negative influence are age above 70 years, cT4 stage or high-grade disease, PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml, and pelvic lymphadenopathies. The presence of 3 or more of these factors conditions CSS and OS is the same between patients who performed local treatment and those who did not. Metastasis degree and location number can also influence outcome. Meanwhile, patients with visceral metastases have worse results. There is growing evidence supporting local treatment in cases of metastatic prostate cancer at diagnosis in the context of a multimodal approach. However, it should be kept in mind that most of the existing studies are retrospective and it would be important to make consistent prospective studies with well-defined patient selection criteria in order to sustain the existing data and understand the main indications to select patients and perform primary treatment in mPCa.

  8. Prognostic Factors for Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Impact of Disease Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhanafy, Alshimaa Mahmoud; Zanaty, Fouad; Ibrahem, Reda; Omar, Suzan

    2018-04-27

    Background and Aim: The optimal management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has been controversial in recent years with introduction of upfront chemohormonal treatment based on results of several Western studies. This changing landscape has renewed interest in the concept “disease volume”, the focus of the present study is the Egyptian patients. Methods: Patients with hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer presenting at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt, during the period from June 2013 to May 2016, were enrolled. All received hormonal treatment. Radiologic images were evaluated and patients were stratified according to their disease volume into high or low, other clinical and pathological data that could affect survival also being collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 128 patients were included, with a median age of 70 years (53.9% ≥70). About 46% had co-morbidities, 62% having high volume disease. During the median follow up period of 28 months about half of the patients progressed and one third received chemotherapy. On univariate analysis, disease volume, performance status (PS), prostate specific antigen level (PSA) and presence of pain at presentation were identified as factors influencing overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed the independent predictor factors for survival to be PS, PSA and disease volume. The median overall survival with 27 months was high volume versus 49 with low volume disease (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% CI 1.2 - 4.4; P=0.02). Median progression free survival was 19 months in the high volume, as compared with 48 months in the low volume disease patients (hazard ratio, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.42 – 7.4; P=0.009). Conclusions: Disease volume is a reliable predictor of survival which should be incorporated with other important factors as; patient performance status and comorbidities in treatment decision-making. Creative Commons Attribution License

  9. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR) and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an abiraterone withdrawal response are presented. Future directions in the use of abiraterone, including optimal dosing strategies, the role of

  10. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  11. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  12. Tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) determinations before and during intermittent maximal androgen blockade in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kil, P. J. M.; Goldschmidt, H. M. J.; Wieggers, B. J. A.; Kariakine, O. B.; Studer, U. E.; Whelan, P.; Hetherington, J.; de Reijke, Th M.; Hoekstra, J. W.; Collette, L.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of serially measured tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) levels in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma treated with intermittent maximal androgen blockade (MAB). To determine its value with respect to predicting response to treatment and time to

  13. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of prostate in a 28-year-old male: The outcome is poor in young patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Madan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is common in older patients. Rarity in younger population limits the study of natural history and prognosis in this population. Most of the published data has reported poor outcome in younger patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Here, we report a case of prostate cancer in 28-year-old male who presented with bone metastasis. After bilateral inguinal orchidectomy, he was started on anti-androgen therapy and received palliative radiotherapy for bone metastasis. There was only a slight decrease in prostate-specific antigen (PSA level and pelvic disease post treatment. Subsequently, he was started on opioid analgesics (by World Health Organization, WHO, step ladder in view of persistent pain. The index case is being presented for its rarity and probable poor outcome in young patients and to stress on the fact that the possibility of primary prostatic adenocarcinoma should be investigated in a male presenting with bone metastasis irrespective of the age.

  14. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, Prakash; Tan, Winston W

    2010-06-24

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the median survival is about 1-2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC. Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99-16) in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin), targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100) and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results. The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, 'circulating tumor cells', have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.

  15. Slug/SNAI2 regulates cell proliferation and invasiveness of metastatic prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi Baygi, Modjtaba; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Essmann, Frank; Deezagi, Abdolkhaleg; Engers, Rainer; Goering, Wolfgang; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2010-08-01

    Many metastatic cancers recapitulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) resulting in enhanced cell motility and invasiveness. The EMT is regulated by several transcription factors, including the zinc finger protein SNAI2, also named Slug, which appears to exert additional functions during development and cancer progression. We have studied the function of SNAI2 in prostate cancer cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed strong SNAI2 expression particularly in the PC-3 and PC3-16 prostate carcinoma cell lines. Knockdown of SNAI2 by specific siRNA induced changes in EMT markers and inhibited invasion of both cell lines into a matrigel matrix. SNAI2 siRNA-treated cells did not tolerate detachment from the culture plates, likely at least in part due to downregulation of integrin alpha6beta4. SNAI2 knockdown disturbed the microtubular and actin cytoskeletons, especially severely in PC-3 cells, resulting in grossly enlarged, flattened, and sometimes multinuclear cells. Knockdown also decreased cell proliferation, with a prominent G0/G1 arrest in PC3-16. Together, our data imply that SNAI2 exerts strong effects on the cytoskeleton and adhesion of those prostate cancer cells that express it and is necessary for their proliferation and invasiveness.

  16. Treatment strategy for metastatic prostate cancer with extremely high PSA level: reconsidering the value of vintage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Amiya, Yoshiyasu; Sasaki, Makoto; Shima, Takayuki; Komiya, Akira; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Akakura, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Nakatsu, Hiroomi

    2018-05-04

    The prognostic significance of initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level for metastatic prostate cancer remains uncertain. We investigated the differences in prognosis and response to hormonal therapies of metastatic prostate cancer patients according to initial PSA levels. We analyzed 184 patients diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and divided them into three PSA level groups as follows: low (PSA progression-free survival (PFS) for first-line ADT and overall survival (OS) within each of the three groups. Furthermore, we analyzed response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AW) and alternative antiandrogen (AA) therapies after development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). No significant differences in OS were observed among the three groups (P = 0.654). Patients with high PSA levels had significantly short PFS for first-line ADT (P = 0.037). Conversely, patients in the high PSA level group had significantly longer PFS when treated with AW than those in the low PSA level group (P = 0.047). Furthermore, patients with high PSA levels had significantly longer PFS when provided with AA therapy (P = 0.049). PSA responders to AW and AA therapies had significantly longer survival after CRPC development than nonresponders (P = 0.011 and P PSA level predicted favorable response to vintage sequential ADT and AW. The current data suggest a novel aspect of extremely high PSA value as a favorable prognostic marker after development of CRPC.

  17. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were...... evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...... change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated...

  18. Hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy for metastatic spinal cord compression from newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, So; Hozumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Kiyofumi; Higashikawa, Akiro; Goto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Kondo, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Although hormonal therapy is effective for treatment of prostate cancer, its effect in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) has not been established. The objective of this study was to clarify the efficacy of conservative treatment of MSCC-induced paralysis resulting from prostate cancer for patients without a previous treatment history. We reviewed data from 38 patients with MSCC-induced paralysis from newly diagnosed prostate cancer who presented to our service between 1984 and 2010. Conservative treatment consisted of hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy (ERT). Patient demographic data, treatment details, involved spine MRI images, complications, and the course of neurologic recovery were investigated. Twenty-five patients were treated conservatively. Mean follow-up period was 36.8 months. Sixteen patients (two with Frankel B, 14 with Frankel C) were unable to walk at initial presentation. After initiating conservative treatment, 75% (12 of 16) of these patients regained the ability to walk within 1 month, 88% (14 in 16) did so within 3 months, and all non-ambulatory patients did so within 6 months. No one had morbid complications. Four patients who did not regain the ability to walk at 1 month were found to have progressed to paraplegia rapidly, and tended to have severe compression as visualized on MRI, with a delay in the start of treatment in comparison with those who did so within 1 month (21.0 vs. 7.8 days). Hormonal therapy associated with ERT is an important option for treatment of MSCC resulting from newly diagnosed prostate cancer. (author)

  19. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vishnu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC.Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16 in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin, targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100 and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results.Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, novel therapies, mechanisms of resistance, circulating tumor cells

  20. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)–based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [ 11 C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  1. Dendritic cell vaccination in combination with docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Borch, Troels Holz; Ellebaek, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Background aims  We investigated whether the addition of an autologous dendritic cell–based cancer vaccine (DCvac) induces an immune response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel.  Methods  Forty-three patients were randomized 1:1 to receive up...... twice through treatment cycles 1–4 and once through treatment cycles 5–10. Immune cell composition and antigen-specific responses were analyzed using flow cytometry, ELISpot and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) tests. Toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events...... to local reactions. Decline in myeloid-derived suppressor cells at the third treatment cycle was found to be an independent predictor of DSS.  Conclusions  The addition of DCvac was safe. Immune responses were detected in approximately half of the patients investigated....

  2. Narrative medicine in metastatic prostate cancer reveals ways to improve patient awareness & quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentis, Giuseppe De; Monari, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio; Salgarello, Matteo; Frantellizzi, Viviana; Salvi, Elisabetta; Reale, Luigi; Napolitano, Silvia; Conti, Giario; Cortesi, Enrico

    2018-06-15

    To describe the journey of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in treatment with radium-223. A multiperspective analysis was performed using narrative medicine in four Italian centers. The substantial impact of mCRPC on quality of life through all phases of the disease was described. After an initial lack of awareness of the disease or denial of its effects, symptoms of pain, fatigue and side effects often led to sadness, fear and loneliness. The majority underwent radium-223 therapy positively, restoring their quality of life and routine activities. Using narrative medicine, the importance of a patient-centered approach in the pathway of care for patients with mCRPC through all the stages of the disease was highlighted.

  3. Challenges to improved therapeutics for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer: from recent successes and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC carry poor prognosis despite the use of docetaxel-based regimens which has modest survival benefit shown by randomized clinical trials. Significant progress in the discovery of novel therapeutic agents has been made in the past few years. While sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone gained regulatory approval in 2010 and 2011, several highly promising candidates/regimens have failed in large scale clinical trials. Challenges remain to optimize the design and interpretation of clinical trial results and develop more effective strategies for mCRPC. In this review, we examined the positive and negative clinical trials in mCRPC in the past and discussed the various aspects of clinical trial design including selection of targets and appropriate outcome measures, biomarker development and implementation, and strategies for combination therapy.

  4. Docetaxel-related fatigue in men with metastatic prostate cancer: a descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, A R T; Hovey, E; Lloyd, A; Marx, G; Parente, P; Rapke, T; de Souza, P

    2017-09-01

    Fatigue is a prevalent and debilitating side effect of docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer. A better understanding of the kinetics and nature of docetaxel-related fatigue may provide a framework for intervention. This secondary analysis was performed using the MOTIF database, from a phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of modafinil (200 mg/day for 15 days) for docetaxel-related fatigue in men with metastatic prostate cancer [1]. The pattern of fatigue was analysed using the MDASI (MD Anderson Symptom Inventory) score. The impact of modafinil, cumulative docetaxel exposure, age and smoking status on fatigue kinetics were explored. Fatigue-related symptoms were assessed using the SOMA6 (fatigue and related symptoms) subset of the SPHERE (Somatic and Psychological Health Report). Mood was tracked using the short form 36 health survey questionnaire (SF-36). Across four docetaxel cycles, fatigue scores were higher in the first week and decreased over weeks two and three. Whilst men randomised to modafinil had reduced fatigue scores, cumulative docetaxel had little impact. Younger men (55-68 years) had significantly reduced fatigue scores, whereas current and ex-smokers had higher scores. There was no significant change in mood status or haemoglobin across treatment cycles. Men described both 'somnolence' and 'muscle fatigue' contributing significantly to their symptom complex. Assessment and management of docetaxel-related fatigue remains an important challenge. Given the complex, multifactorial nature of fatigue, identification through structured interview and interventions targeted to specific 'at risk' groups may be the most beneficial. Understanding the temporal pattern (kinetics) and nature of fatigue is critical to guide this process.

  5. Impact of cabazitaxel on 2-year survival and palliation of tumour-related pain in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated in the TROPIC trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, A; Oudard, S; Tombal, B

    2013-01-01

    Cabazitaxel significantly improves overall survival (OS) versus mitoxantrone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after docetaxel failure. We examined patient survival at 2 years and tumour-related pain with cabazitaxel versus mitoxantrone....

  6. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. Results: The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p≤0.05). Conclusion: A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance. PMID:26219446

  7. Profile of apalutamide in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: evidence to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Julio T; Oh, William K; Liaw, Bobby C

    2018-01-01

    Advances in therapies have led to the approval of six therapeutic agents since 2004, each demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized studies, and these have significantly improved the outlook for men facing metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). More recently, efforts have been directed at trying to effect change at earlier phases of the disease. Apalutamide (ARN-509), a second-generation androgen receptor antagonist, recently received approval in the nonmetastatic (M0) CRPC space. Similar to enzalutamide, apalutamide inhibits the binding of androgen to androgen receptor (AR), nuclear translocation of the androgen-AR complex, and binding of AR transcription complex to DNA-binding sites and transcription elements. Phase I and II trial experience demonstrates the safety and tolerability of apalutamide, as well as its efficacy in effecting prostate-specific antigen response and radiographic-free survival in CRPC. US Food and Drug Administration approval in M0 CRPC was granted following positive results from the phase III SPARTAN study, where apalutamide demonstrated significant improvements in metastasis-free survival and time to symptomatic progression as compared to placebo.

  8. Advantages and Disadvantages of Bone Protective Agents in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nine out of ten metastatic prostate cancer (PCa patients will develop osseous metastases. Of these, every second will suffer from skeletal-related events (SRE. SRE are associated with an increased risk for death, which is markedly increased in the presence of pathological fracture. Moreover, health insurance costs nearly double in the presence of SRE. Zoledronic acid and denosumab are both approved drugs for the prevention or delay of SRE in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients with osseous metastases. However, long-term treatment with one of these two drugs is associated with the development of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ. Routine inspections of the oral cavity before and during treatment are mandatory in these patients. Regarding imaging techniques, bone scintigraphy seems to be a promising tool to detect early stage MRONJ. Zoledronic acid does not reduce the incidence of SRE in hormone-sensitive PCa. First data shows 3-monthly application of zoledronic acid to be equi-effective to monthly application.

  9. Dimensions of quality of life expressed by men treated for metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J A; Wray, N; Brody, B; Ashton, C; Giesler, B; Watkins, H

    1997-10-01

    Men who pursue active treatment for metastatic prostate cancer face a choice between medical or surgical castration. While both alternatives have documented side-effects (e.g. loss of libido, breast enlargement and tenderness, hot flashes, and nausea), their psychosocial impacts are not well understood. As part of a study of patients' treatment decision making, we have sought to construct a patient-based measure of the salient disease and treatment-related qualities of life experienced by these men subsequent to treatment. Focus groups (15 with patients, two with wives) were used to develop candidate Likert scale questionnaire items representing quality of life issues that patients said were important. These items were combined with assessments of symptoms, comorbidity, and generic measures of functional status and well-being in a mail survey of patients treated at the Houston VAMC and two other Houston hospitals (n = 201, response rate = 63%). Psychometric analyses (principal components and multitrait scaling) were used to identify distinct dimensions of life quality; correlations with generic measures, and symptom reports were used in validation analyses. Qualitative analyses of focus group data identified three major domains of life quality: self-perceptions, anxiety about the effects of treatment, and concern with the process of decision making and treatment. Psychometric analyses identified nine reliable and valid indicators of prostate cancer-related quality of life: body image, sexual problems, spouse affection, spouse worry, masculinity, cancer-related self-image, cancer distress, cancer acceptance, and regret of treatment decision. Internal consistency (alpha) ranged form 0.71 to 0.90. Correlations with reference scales (e.g. MOS Mental Health Index, Profile of Mood States) and symptom status supported concurrent validity. Prostate cancer patients perceive a number of important psychosocial consequences of their treatment. These consequences are

  10. Incidental detection of prostate-specific antigen-negative metastatic prostate cancer initially presented with solitary pulmonary nodule on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, Ezgi Basak; Buyukpinarbasili, Nur; Ziyade, Sedat; Akman, Tolga; Turk, Haci Mehmet; Aydin, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    A 71-year-old male patient with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) showing slightly increased FDG uptake in this nodule. In addition, PET/CT detected hypermetabolic sclerotic bone lesions in the right second rib and 7 th thoracic vertebrae, which were interpreted as possible metastases, and mildly increased FDG uptake in the prostate gland highly suspicious of malignancy. The patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was within normal range (3.8 ng/dL). The histopathological examination of the lung nodule and right second rib lesion proved metastases from prostate cancer, then the prostate biopsy-confirmed prostate adenocarcinoma. The unique feature of this case is to emphasize the importance of performing PET/CT for solitary pulmonary nodule in detecting PSA-negative metastatic prostate cancer. This case indicated that it should be kept in mind that, even if the PSA is negative, a lung metastasis of prostate cancer may be an underlying cause in patients evaluated for solitary pulmonary nodule by FDG PET/CT

  11. Treatment of Hormone Resistance with Docetaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients: Results of a Clinical Experience at Omid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Tajvidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the most important cancers among men worldwide. Androgen ablation therapy can be used in treatment of these patients; however, most will progress to metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. In this regard, docetaxel has been approved to treat metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer in the United States. In this study, we aimed to investigate the results of this treatment modality in metastatic prostate cancer patients from Iran. Methods:We evaluated PSA response and bone pain relief in 18 metastatic prostate cancer patients who underwent treatment with docetaxel at a dose of 75 mg/m2 intravenously on the first day of treatment. The treatment was repeated every three weeks (6 cycles along with 10 mg of prednisolone. Results: Of 18 patients, 39% had >50% decline in PSA levels.There were 16% of the patients with a PSA decline of approximately 30% to 50% of the pre-treatment levels. In addition, 29% of the patients had progressive PSA levels during chemotherapy. Among them, 55% had significant pain relief. Conclusion: This research showed the effectiveness of docetaxel to decrease PSA levels in metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients from Iran. Docetaxel was also valuable in alleviation of pain in these patients. However, prospective studies should validate this approach.

  12. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  13. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  14. Budget Impact of Enzalutamide for Chemotherapy-Naïve Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Cat N; O'Day, Ken; Flanders, Scott; Oestreicher, Nina; Francis, Peter; Posta, Linda; Popelar, Breanna; Tang, Hong; Balk, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is expected to account for approximately one quarter of all new diagnoses of cancer in American men in 2015. The cost of prostate cancer care is expected to reach $15.1 billion by the year 2020, up from $11.9 billion in 2010. Given the high burden of prostate cancer, health care payers are interested in quantifying the potential budget impact of new therapies. To estimate the budget impact of enzalutamide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from a U.S. payer perspective. A model was developed to assess the budget impact of enzalutamide for treatment of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients in a hypothetical 1-million-member U.S. health plan over a 1-year time horizon. Comparators included abiraterone acetate, sipuleucel-T, radium Ra 223 dichloride, and docetaxel. Epidemiologic data, including National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) incidence rates, were used to estimate the number of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. Dosing, administration, duration of therapy, and adverse event rates were based on package inserts and pivotal studies. Drug costs were obtained from RED BOOK and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) average sales price pricing files, costs of administration and monitoring from the CMS physician fee schedule, and adverse events from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and published literature. Market shares were estimated for each comparator before and after adoption of enzalutamide. The incremental aggregate budget impact, per patient per year (PPPY), per patient per month (PPPM), and per member per month (PMPM), was calculated. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed. In a population of 115 chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients, adopting enzalutamide had an annual incremental budget impact of $510,641 ($4,426 PPPY, $369 PPPM, and $0.04 PMPM). Results were most sensitive to

  15. Extracellular vesicles for personalized therapy decision support in advanced metastatic cancers and its potential impact for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Corcoran, Niall M; Oleinikova, Irina; Jovanovic, Lidija; Ramm, Grant A; Nelson, Colleen C; Jenster, Guido; Russell, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    The use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, as liquid biopsy-derived biomarkers for cancers have been investigated. CTC enumeration using the CellSearch based platform provides an accurate insight on overall survival where higher CTC counts indicate poor prognosis for patients with advanced metastatic cancer. EVs provide information based on their lipid, protein, and nucleic acid content and can be isolated from biofluids and analyzed from a relatively small volume, providing a routine and non-invasive modality to monitor disease progression. Our pilot experiment by assessing the level of two subpopulations of small EVs, the CD9 positive and CD63 positive EVs, showed that the CD9 positive EV level is higher in plasma from patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer with detectable CTCs. These data show the potential utility of a particular EV subpopulation to serve as biomarkers for advanced metastatic prostate cancer. EVs can potentially be utilized as biomarkers to provide accurate genotypic and phenotypic information for advanced prostate cancer, where new strategies to design a more personalized therapy is currently the focus of considerable investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Clinical outcomes and nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) according to initial PSA levels in primary androgen deprivation therapy for metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Ueno, Satoru; Izumi, Kouji; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Mizokami, Atsushi; Hinotsu, Shiro; Akaza, Hideyuki; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical outcomes of metastatic prostate cancer patients and the relationship between nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and different types of primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT). This study utilized data from the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer registry, which is a large, multicenter, population-based database. A total of 2982 patients treated with PADT were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated using combined androgen blockade (CAB) and non-CAB therapies. The relationships between nadir PSA levels and PADT type according to initial serum PSA levels were also investigated. Among the 2982 enrolled patients, 2101 (70.5 %) were treated with CAB. Although CAB-treated patients had worse clinical characteristics, their probability of PFS and OS was higher compared with those treated with a non-CAB therapy. These results were due to a survival benefit with CAB in patients with an initial PSA level of 500-1000 ng/mL. Nadir PSA levels were significantly lower in CAB patients than in non-CAB patients with comparable initial serum PSA levels. A small survival benefit for CAB in metastatic prostate cancer was demonstrated in a Japanese large-scale prospective cohort study. The clinical significance of nadir PSA levels following PADT was evident, but the predictive impact of PSA nadir on OS was different between CAB and non-CAB therapy.

  17. Noninvasive Detection of AR-FL/AR-V7 as a Predictive Biomarker for Therapeutic Resistance in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    acknowledged federal support) 5. Antonarakis ES, Armstrong AJ, Dehm SM, Luo J. Androgen receptor variant-driven prostate cancer : clinical implications...Resistant Prostate Cancer abstract Purpose A splice variant of the androgen receptor , AR-V7, confers resistance to AR-targeted therapies (ATTs) but not...androgen receptor ; AR-V7, androgen receptor splice variant 7; mCRPC, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ; n/N, number of patients in that

  18. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post-chemotherapy se......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post......-chemotherapy setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four mCRPC patients with progression after abiraterone treatment following primary docetaxel therapy received enzalutamide 160 mg/day. The percentage PSA response was recorded following first line docetaxel, abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment. Fischer's exact test......, Mann-Whitney U test and linear regression model were used to test for differences in PSA response. RESULTS: All patients had a follow-up of at least 3 months. The median PSA response following 1 month of enzalutamide was -12% (range -56% to 76%), while the median best PSA response was -22% (-76% to 76...

  19. Symptoms and Impacts in Non-Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Qualitative Study Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Erin L; Moise, Pierre; Krupnick, Robert N; Downing, Jared; Meyer, Margaret; Naidoo, Shevani; Holmstrom, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    We developed a conceptual model to define key concepts associated with patients' experiences with the signs, symptoms, and impacts of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (M0-CRPC). A targeted review of peer-reviewed literature, and other publicly available information, identified and categorized symptoms and impacts related to early-stage prostate cancer. Semi-structured interviews with five clinical experts helped determine the most relevant and important concepts for patients with M0-CRPC. Qualitative interviews with 17 patients with M0-CRPC identified the most frequently experienced symptoms and impacts, and their degree of interference with patients' lives. The findings from these three lines of evidence were summarized in a conceptual model. Literature searches identified mainly urinary, intestinal, and sexual symptoms. Experts noted the symptoms most frequently mentioned by patients include erectile dysfunction, loss of sexual desire or interest, incontinence/leaking, urgency, and hot flashes. Patient interviews confirmed the high frequency of erectile dysfunction, loss of libido, urinary urgency, and incontinence. The most frequently mentioned impacts expressed by patients were the need to monitor/plan for urinary frequency, interference with/restriction of daily activities, and frustration or anxiety over diagnosis, symptoms, or treatment. Symptoms and impacts most frequently experienced by patients were typically not those with the greatest effects on their lives; rather, those with the greatest consequences were related to treatment. The leading concerns associated with M0-CRPC were related to voiding and sexual dysfunction. The most relevant symptoms and impacts expressed by patients may be a consequence of therapy rather than of the disease.

  20. Radioimmunological imaging of metastatic prostatic cancer with 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibody PAY 276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaian, R.J.; Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 25 patients with histologically proved adenocarcinoma of the prostate, whose disease was staged clinically as D2 by appropriate radiographic and nuclear medicine studies, received increasing doses of PAY 276, an antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody for radioimmunological imaging. The patients were divided into 5 groups of 5. Groups 1 through 5 received an infusion of 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg. monoclonal antibody, respectively, 1 mg. of which was labeled to 5 mCi. of 111 indium, while stable monoclonal antibody was added to achieve the desired antibody concentration. No patient had an allergic reaction, and no significant change in serial hemoglobin levels, platelet count, chemistry profile or results of urinalyses was noted. The monoclonal antibody scan visualized at least 1 lesion in 19 of 25 patients (76 per cent): 4 in groups 1 and 2, and all 15 in groups 3 to 5. With results of conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy considered definitive for metastases, monoclonal antibody scans detected 7 of 32 metastases (21.8 per cent) in group 3 (20 mg.), 31 of 58 (53.4 per cent) in group 4 (40 mg.) and 101 of 134 (75.4 per cent) in group 5 (80 mg). In group 5 the incidence of false positive and false negative scans was 2.3 per cent (3 of 132) and 24.6 per cent (33 of 134), respectively. The detection of metastatic lesions increased as the concentration of unlabeled monoclonal antibody increased. Radioimmunological imaging of prostatic cancer with antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody seems to be feasible

  1. Bicalutamide 150 mg in addition to standard care for patients with early non-metastatic prostate cancer: updated results from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Period Group-6 Study after a median follow-up period of 7.1 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Lodding, Pär

    2006-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme is evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide following standard care (radiotherapy, radical prostatectomy or watchful waiting) in patients with localized (T1-2, N0/Nx) or locally advanced (T3-4, any N; or any T, N + ) non-metastatic prostat...

  2. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Osborne, Joseph R.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Ruan, Shutian; Cheal, Sarah M.; Lyashchenko, Serge; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Reuter, Victor E.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Larson, Steven M.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. 89 Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of 89 Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by 89 Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of 89 Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of 89 Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1-14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51-89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153-317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on 89 Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were 89 Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on 89 Zr-huJ591 study, while the

  3. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Osborne, Joseph R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); O' Donoghue, Joseph A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Beylergil, Volkan; Ruan, Shutian; Cheal, Sarah M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lyashchenko, Serge [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Lewis, Jason S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Holland, Jason P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Reuter, Victor E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Loda, Massimo F. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science of Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Weber, Wolfgang A.; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Bander, Neil H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Urology, New York, NY (United States); Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1-14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51-89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153-317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on {sup 89}Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on

  4. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  5. Dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion for palliative care and pain relief in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Le, Bao T; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Tran, Hung Q; Tran, Dao M; Pham, Cu Q; Pham, Tuan D; Ha, Trung V; Bui, Nga T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (adenocarcinoma of the prostate) is the most widespread cancer in men. It causes significant suffering and mortality due to metastatic disease. The main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) includes androgen manipulation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and/or radioisotopes. However, these therapeutic approaches are considered palliative at this stage, and their significant side effects can cause further decline in patients' quality of life and increase non-cancer-related morbidity/mortality. In this study, the authors have used the infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) to treat 18 patients with MPC. The 90-day follow-up of the patients having undergone the proposed therapeutic regimen showed significant improvement in clinical symptoms, blood and biochemistry tests, and quality of life. There were no major side effects from the treatment. In searching for new and better methods for palliative treatment and pain relief, this study strongly suggested therapy with DMSO-SB infusions could provide a rational alternative to conventional treatment for patients with MPC.

  6. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  7. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Phase III Study of Cabozantinib in Previously Treated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: COMET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; De Bono, Johann; Sternberg, Cora; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Oudard, Stéphane; De Giorgi, Ugo; Krainer, Michael; Bergman, Andries; Hoelzer, Wolfgang; De Wit, Ronald; Bögemann, Martin; Saad, Fred; Cruciani, Giorgio; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine; Feyerabend, Susan; Miller, Kurt; Houédé, Nadine; Hussain, Syed; Lam, Elaine; Polikoff, Jonathan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mainwaring, Paul; Ramies, David; Hessel, Colin; Weitzman, Aaron; Fizazi, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of kinases, including MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and has shown activity in men with previously treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This blinded phase III trial compared cabozantinib with prednisone in patients with mCRPC. Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio to cabozantinib 60 mg once per day or prednisone 5 mg twice per day. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Bone scan response (BSR) at week 12 as assessed by independent review committee was the secondary end point; radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and effects on circulating tumor cells (CTCs), bone biomarkers, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs) were exploratory assessments. A total of 1,028 patients were randomly assigned to cabozantinib (n = 682) or prednisone (n = 346). Median OS was 11.0 months with cabozantinib and 9.8 months with prednisone (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.06; stratified log-rank P = .213). BSR at week 12 favored cabozantinib (42% v 3%; stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel P < .001). rPFS was improved in the cabozantinib group (median, 5.6 v 2.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.57; stratified log-rank P < .001). Cabozantinib was associated with improvements in CTC conversion, bone biomarkers, and post-random assignment incidence of SSEs but not PSA outcomes. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events and discontinuations because of adverse events were higher with cabozantinib than with prednisone (71% v 56% and 33% v 12%, respectively). Cabozantinib did not significantly improve OS compared with prednisone in heavily treated patients with mCRPC and progressive disease after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. Cabozantinib had some activity in improving BSR, rPFS, SSEs, CTC conversions, and bone biomarkers but not PSA outcomes. © 2016 by

  9. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Smith, Bryan A.; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F.; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G.; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  10. Pleuropulmonary and Lymph Node Progression after Docetaxel - Benefits from Treatment with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Segura Huerta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, there are no guidelines for a rational and more favourable sequence of treatment after docetaxel. Two drugs (cabazitaxel and abiraterone have recently been approved as second-line treatment after docetaxel failure in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, but there are no studies comparing abiraterone versus cabazitaxel. The most suitable drug is chosen based on the physician's opinion and the patient's characteristics. In patients with a good performance status who are able to receive either treatment, it would be convenient to begin with cabazitaxel and to reserve abiraterone in case there is a worsening of the general status, in consideration of abiraterone's more favourable toxicity profile. Case Report: We describe the case of a 74-year-old male with mCRPC who presented with an interesting and uncommon tumour dissemination (pleuropulmonary occurring after the first standard treatment with docetaxel. Intravenous treatment with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 and oral prednisone 10 mg continuously was initiated. The patient received a total of 8 cycles of chemotherapy. A reduction of mediastinal adenopathies and infrarenal para-aortic stable bone involvement and an absence of pleural effusion were observed. No relevant toxicity was noted. Since February 2012, a progressive PSA increase without clinical deterioration has been noted. Conclusions: The selection criteria for second- and third-line systemic treatment and the excellent response obtained with cabazitaxel in an unusual disease setting are described. The results confirm the long duration and quality of response of cabazitaxel treatment. Further therapeutic options in this group of patients are suggested.

  11. Nanodiamonds enhance therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in treating metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaam, Amanee D; Hwang, Patrick T J; Poonawalla, Aliza; Green, Hadiyah N; Jun, Ho-wook; Dean, Derrick

    2014-10-24

    Enhancing therapeutic efficacy is essential for successful treatment of chemoresistant cancers such as metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). To improve the efficacy of doxorubicin (DOX) for treating chemoresistant disease, the feasibility of using nanodiamond (ND) particles was investigated. Utilizing the pH responsive properties of ND, a novel protocol for complexing NDs and DOX was developed using a pH 8.5 coupling buffer. The DOX loading efficiency, loading on the NDs, and pH responsive release characteristics were determined utilizing UV-Visible spectroscopy. The effects of the ND-DOX on HRPC cell line PC3 were evaluated with MTS and live/dead cell viability assays. ND-DOX displayed exceptional loading efficiency (95.7%) and drug loading on NDs (23.9 wt%) with optimal release at pH 4 (80%). In comparison to treatment with DOX alone, cell death significantly increased when cells were treated with ND-DOX complexes demonstrating a 50% improvement in DOX efficacy. Of the tested treatments, ND-DOX with 2.4 μg mL(-1) DOX exhibited superior efficacy (60% cell death). ND-DOX with 1.2 μg mL(-1) DOX achieved 42% cell death, which was comparable to cell death in response to 2.4 μg mL(-1) of free DOX, suggesting that NDs aid in decreasing the DOX dose necessary to achieve a chemotherapeutic efficacy. Due to its enhanced efficacy, ND-DOX can be used to successfully treat HRPC and potentially decrease the clinical side effects of DOX.

  12. Combination of rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanxiong Ding

    Full Text Available Though prostate cancer (PCa has slow progression, the hormone refractory (HRCP and metastatic entities are substantially lethal and lack effective treatments. Transcription factor Slug is critical in regulating metastases of various tumors including PCa. Here we studied targeted therapy against Slug using combination of 3 drugs targeting 3 pathways respectively converging via Slug and further regulating PCa metastasis. Using in vitro assays we confirmed that Slug up-regulation incurred inhibition of E-cadherin that was anti-metastatic, and inhibited Bim-regulated cell apoptosis in PCa. Upstream PTEN/Akt, mTOR, Erk, and AR/Hsp90 pathways were responsible for Slug up-regulation and each of these could be targeted by rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG respectively. In 4 PCa cell lines with different traits in terms of PTEN loss and androgen sensitivity we tested the efficacy of mono- and combined therapy with the drugs. We found that metastatic capacity of the cells was maximally inhibited only when all 3 drugs were combined, due to the crosstalk between the pathways. 17-AAG decreases Slug expression via blockade of HSP90-dependent AR stability. Combination of rapamycin and CI-1040 diminishes invasiveness more potently in PCa cells that are androgen insensitive and with PTEN loss. Slug inhibited Bim-mediated apoptosis that could be rescued by mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors. Using mouse models for circulating PCa DNA quantification, we found that combination of mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors reduced circulating PCa cells in vivo significantly more potently than combination of 2 or monotherapy. Conclusively, combination of mTOR/Erk/Hsp90 inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

  13. PSMA-Based Radioligand Therapy for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The Bad Berka Experience Since 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Schuchardt, Christiane; Niepsch, Karin; Sayeg, Manal; Leshch, Yevgeniy; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Baum, Richard P

    2016-10-01

    A potential milestone in personalized nuclear medicine is theranostics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) based on molecular imaging using PET/CT with 68 Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands and molecular radiotherapy using PSMA-targeted radioligand therapy (PRLT) with 177 Lu-PSMA ligands. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT enables accurate detection of mCRPC lesions with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and provides quantitative and reproducible data that can be used to select patients for PRLT and therapeutic monitoring. Our comprehensive experience over the last 3 years using different radioligands indicates that PRLT is highly effective for the treatment of mCRPC, even in advanced cases, and potentially lends a significant benefit to overall and progression-free survival. Additionally, significant improvement in clinical symptoms and excellent palliation of pain can be achieved. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  14. Further analysis of PREVAIL: enzalutamide use in chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2014-01-01

    PREVAIL was a phase III multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), which showed remarkable improvement in co-primary endpoints with an overall 81% reduction in the risk of radiographic progression, as well as 29% reduction in the risk of death in favor of the enzalutamide arm over placebo. All secondary endpoints including time to subsequent chemotherapy initiation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression were in favor of the enzalutamide arm. The results of PREVAIL shows the utility of enzalutamide that would likely soon expand the indication to asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic men with mCRPC not previously treated with chemotherapy.

  15. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) kinetic as a prognostic factor in metastatic prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afriansyah, Andika; Hamid, Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Umbas, Rainy

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) has a poor outcome with median survival of two to five years. The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a gold standard in management of this stage.  Aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic value of PSA kinetics of patient treated with hormonal therapy related to survival from several published studies Method: Systematic review and meta-analysis was performed using literature searching in the electronic databases of MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were mPCa receiving ADT, a study analyzing Progression Free Survival (PFS), Overall Survival (OS), or Cancer Specific Survival (CSS) and prognostic factor of survival related to PSA kinetics (initial PSA, PSA nadir, and time to achieve nadir (TTN)). The exclusion criteria were metastatic castration resistant of prostate cancer (mCRPC) and non-metastatic disease. Generic inverse variance method was used to combine hazard ratio (HR) within the studies. Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.2 and a p-value PSA and PFS. In addition, there was no association between initial PSA and CSS/ OS. We found association of reduced PFS (HR 2.22; 95% CI 1.82 to 2.70) and OS/ CSS (HR 3.31; 95% CI 2.01-5.43) of patient with high PSA nadir. Shorter TTN was correlated with poor result of survival either PFS (HR 2.41; 95% CI 1.19 - 4.86) or CSS/ OS (HR 1.80; 95%CI  1.42 - 2.30) Conclusion: Initial PSA before starting ADT do not associated with survival in mPCa.  There is association of PSA nadir and TTN with survival.

  16. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    change at 6 months, according to baseline variables. Other outcome measures included urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores and statuses, and serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of ADT. Safety was assessed by recording adverse......OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3...

  17. Androgen receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms driving prostate cancer progression: Opportunities for therapeutic targeting from multiple angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, David T; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Kilari, Deepak; See, William; Nevalainen, Marja T

    2017-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment for localized cancer, prostate cancer (PC) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death for American men due to a subset of patients progressing to lethal and incurable metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Organ-confined PC is treated by surgery or radiation with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), while options for locally advanced and disseminated PC include radiation combined with ADT, or systemic treatments including chemotherapy. Progression to CRPC results from failure of ADT, which targets the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis and inhibits AR-driven proliferation and survival pathways. The exact mechanisms underlying the transition from androgen-dependent PC to CRPC remain incompletely understood. Reactivation of AR has been shown to occur in CRPC despite depletion of circulating androgens by ADT. At the same time, the presence of AR-negative cell populations in CRPC has also been identified. While AR signaling has been proposed as the primary driver of CRPC, AR-independent signaling pathways may represent additional mechanisms underlying CRPC progression. Identification of new therapeutic strategies to target both AR-positive and AR-negative PC cell populations and, thereby, AR-driven as well as non-AR-driven PC cell growth and survival mechanisms would provide a two-pronged approach to eliminate CRPC cells with potential for synthetic lethality. In this review, we provide an overview of AR-dependent and AR-independent molecular mechanisms which drive CRPC, with special emphasis on the role of the Jak2-Stat5a/b signaling pathway in promoting castrate-resistant growth of PC through both AR-dependent and AR-independent mechanisms. PMID:27741508

  18. β-catenin is required for prostate development and cooperates with Pten loss to drive invasive carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Francis

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a major cause of male death in the Western world, but few frequent genetic alterations that drive prostate cancer initiation and progression have been identified. β-Catenin is essential for many developmental processes and has been implicated in tumorigenesis in many tissues, including prostate cancer. However, expression studies on human prostate cancer samples are unclear on the role this protein plays in this disease. We have used in vivo genetic studies in the embryo and adult to extend our understanding of the role of β-Catenin in the normal and neoplastic prostate. Our gene deletion analysis revealed that prostate epithelial β-Catenin is required for embryonic prostate growth and branching but is dispensable in the normal adult organ. During development, β-Catenin controls the number of progenitors in the epithelial buds and regulates a discrete network of genes, including c-Myc and Nkx3.1. Deletion of β-Catenin in a Pten deleted model of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated it is dispensable for disease progression in this setting. Complementary overexpression experiments, through in vivo protein stabilization, showed that β-Catenin promotes the formation of squamous epithelia during prostate development, even in the absence of androgens. β-Catenin overexpression in combination with Pten loss was able to drive progression to invasive carcinoma together with squamous metaplasia. These studies demonstrate that β-Catenin is essential for prostate development and that an inherent property of high levels of this protein in prostate epithelia is to drive squamous fate differentiation. In addition, they show that β-Catenin overexpression can promote invasive prostate cancer in a clinically relevant model of this disease. These data provide novel information on cancer progression pathways that give rise to lethal prostate disease in humans.

  19. A Phase II Trial of 17-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in Patients with Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Hillman, David W.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Sheng, Shijie; Sarkar, Fazlul; Harper, Felicity; Gaskins, Melvin; Pitot, Henry C.; Tan, Winston; Ivy, S. Percy; Pili, Roberto; Carducci, Michael A.; Liu, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose 17-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic with anti-proliferative activity in several mouse xenograft models including prostate cancer models. A two-stage phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and toxicity profile of 17-AAG administered to patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Experimental Design Patients with at least one prior systemic therapy and a rising PSA were eligible. Patients received 17-AAG at a dose of 300 mg/m2 IV weekly for three out of four weeks. The primary objective was to assess the PSA response. Secondary objectives were to determine overall survival, to assess toxicity, to measure IL-6, IL-8 and maspin levels and quality of life. Results Fifteen eligible patients were enrolled. The median age was 68 years and the median PSA was 261 ng/mL. Patients received 17-AAG for a median number of 2 cycles. Severe adverse events included: grade 3 fatigue (4 pts), grade 3 lymphopenia (2 pts) and grade 3 back pain (2 pts). The median PSA progression free survival was 1.8 months (95% CI: 1.3–3.4 months). The six-month overall survival was 71% (95% CI: 52%–100%). Conclusion 17-AAG did not show any activity with regards to PSA response. Due to insufficient PSA response, enrollment was stopped at end of first stage per study design. The most significant severe toxicity was grade 3 fatigue. Further evaluation of 17-AAG at a dose of 300 mg/m2 IV weekly as a single agent in patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer who received at least one prior systemic therapy is not warranted. PMID:19047126

  20. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progre...

  1. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III Trial of Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Metastatic Chemotherapy-Naive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ipilimumab increases antitumor T-cell responses by binding to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. We evaluated treatment with ipilimumab in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer without visceral metastases. Pat...

  2. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naive Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Extended Analysis of the Phase 3 PREVAIL Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, T.M.; Armstrong, A.J.; Rathkopf, D.; Loriot, Y.; Sternberg, C.N.; Higano, C.S.; Iversen, P.; Evans, C.P.; Kim, C.S.; Kimura, G.; Miller, K.; Saad, F.; Bjartell, A.S.; Borre, M.; Mulders, P.; Tammela, T.L.; Parli, T.; Sari, S.; Os, S. van; Theeuwes, A.; Tombal, B.

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated the

  3. Metastatic prostate cancer treated by flutamide versus cyproterone acetate. Final analysis of the "European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer" (EORTC) Protocol 30892

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Fritz H.; Whelan, Peter; de Reijke, Theo M.; Kurth, Karl Heinz; Pavone-Macaluso, Michele; Mattelaer, Johan; van Velthoven, Roland F.; Debois, Muriel; Collette, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy of Flutamide (FLU) versus Cyproterone acetate (CPA) in men with metastatic prostate cancer and favourable prognostic factors. The primary endpoint of the trial was overall survival, disease specific survival, time to progression and side effects were

  4. Clinical activity and tolerability of enzalutamide (MDV3100) in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who progress after docetaxel and abiraterone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badrising, S.; Noort, V van; Oort, I.M. van; Berg, H.P. van den; Los, M.; Hamberg, P.; Coenen, J.L.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Jong, I.J. de; Kerver, E.D.; Tinteren, H. van; Bergman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide (Enz) and abiraterone acetate (AA) are hormone treatments that have a proven survival advantage in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel (Doc). Recently, limited activity of AA after Enz and of Enz after AA was

  5. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib Plus Prednisone Versus Prednisone Alone in Progressive, Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated angiogenesis-targeted sunitinib therapy in a randomized, double-blind trial of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg...

  6. Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    with meta- static prostate cancer and serum prostate- specific antigen levels of < 10 ng/mL. BJU Int. 2005; 96:303–307. 59. Davis JN, Wojno KJ...renewal in vivo. As an example, in a recent study, prostate- specific antigen (PSA)-positive (PSAþ) and PSA/lo human prostate cancer cells were...In addition, transgene inser- tion of Cre recombinase under the control of a specific pro - moter may alter the function of the endogenous locus via

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of the Metastatic PC3 and LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Seim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The bone metastasis-derived PC3 and the lymph node metastasis-derived LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines are widely studied, having been described in thousands of publications over the last four decades. Here, we report short-read whole-genome sequencing (WGS and de novo assembly of PC3 (ATCC CRL-1435 and LNCaP (clone FGC; ATCC CRL-1740 at ∼70 × coverage. A known homozygous mutation in TP53 and homozygous loss of PTEN were robustly identified in the PC3 cell line, whereas the LNCaP cell line exhibited a larger number of putative inactivating somatic point and indel mutations (and in particular a loss of stop codon events. This study also provides preliminary evidence that loss of one or both copies of the tumor suppressor Capicua (CIC contributes to primary tumor relapse and metastatic progression, potentially offering a treatment target for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Our work provides a resource for genetic, genomic, and biological studies employing two commonly-used prostate cancer cell lines.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence of the Metastatic PC3 and LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Nelson, Colleen C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2017-06-07

    The bone metastasis-derived PC3 and the lymph node metastasis-derived LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines are widely studied, having been described in thousands of publications over the last four decades. Here, we report short-read whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and de novo assembly of PC3 (ATCC CRL-1435) and LNCaP (clone FGC; ATCC CRL-1740) at ∼70 × coverage. A known homozygous mutation in TP53 and homozygous loss of PTEN were robustly identified in the PC3 cell line, whereas the LNCaP cell line exhibited a larger number of putative inactivating somatic point and indel mutations (and in particular a loss of stop codon events). This study also provides preliminary evidence that loss of one or both copies of the tumor suppressor Capicua ( CIC ) contributes to primary tumor relapse and metastatic progression, potentially offering a treatment target for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our work provides a resource for genetic, genomic, and biological studies employing two commonly-used prostate cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Seim et al.

  9. Evaluation of Tumor Viability for Primary and Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Iwamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to bone scan and computed tomography (CT, which depend on osteoblastic response to detect bone metastasis, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI may be able to directly detect viable tumors. A 75-year-old male who had progressive metastatic prostate cancer during primary androgen deprivation therapy was referred to our hospital. Although bone scan and CT showed multiple bone metastases, WB-MRI suggested nonviable bone metastasis and viable tumor of the primary lesion. Prostate needle biopsy demonstrated viable prostate cancer cells from 10 of 12 cores. In contrast, CT-guided needle biopsy from bone metastasis of the lumbar vertebra revealed no malignant cells. Based on these findings, we reasoned that viable tumor cells inducing disease progression may primarily exist in the primary lesions and not in the metastatic lesions, and combined prostate radiotherapy and systemic hormonal therapy resulted in successful clinical response and disease control. The use of WB-MRI to detect viable disease lesions may enable us to design optimal treatment strategies for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. MO-AB-BRA-05: [18F]NaF PET/CT Imaging Biomarkers in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, S; Perk, T; Lin, C; Eickhoff, J; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Choyke, P; Dahut, W; Apolo, A [National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Humm, J; Larson, S; Morris, MJ [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical use of {sup 18}F-Sodium Fluoride (NaF) PET/CT in metastatic settings often lacks technology to quantitatively measure full disease dynamics due to high tumor burden. This study assesses radiomics-based extraction of NaF PET/CT measures, including global metrics of overall burden and local metrics of disease heterogeneity, in metastatic prostate cancer for correlation to clinical outcomes. Methods: Fifty-six metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) patients had NaF PET/CT scans performed at baseline and three cycles into chemotherapy (N=16) or androgen-receptor (AR) inhibitors (N=39). A novel technology, Quantitative Total Bone Imaging (QTBI), was used for analysis. Employing hybrid PET/CT segmentation and articulated skeletal-registration, QTBI allows for response assessment of individual lesions. Various SUV metrics were extracted from each lesion (iSUV). Global metrics were extracted from composite lesion-level statistics for each patient (pSUV). Proportion of detected lesions and those with significant response (%-increase or %-decrease) was calculated for each patient based on test-retest limits for iSUV metrics. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted between imaging metrics and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Functional burden (pSUV{sub total}) assessed mid-treatment was the strongest univariate predictor of PFS (HR=2.03; p<0.0001). Various global metrics outperformed baseline clinical markers, including fraction of skeletal burden, mean uptake (pSUV{sub mean}), and heterogeneity of average lesion uptake (pSUV{sub hetero}). Of 43 patients with paired baseline/mid-treatment imaging, 40 showed heterogeneity in lesion-level response, containing populations of lesions with both increasing/decreasing metrics. Proportion of lesions with significantly increasing iSUV{sub mean} was highly predictive of clinical PFS (HR=2.0; p=0.0002). Patients exhibiting higher proportion of lesions with decreasing i

  11. A genetic variant in SLC28A3, rs56350726, is associated with progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer in a Korean population with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung Ku; Oh, Jong Jin; Kim, Yong Tae; Moon, Hong Sang; Choi, Hong Yong; Park, Seunghyun; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Yoon, Sungroh; Park, Hae Young; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2017-11-14

    Genetic variation which related with progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) during androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has not been elucidated in patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa). Therefore, we assessed the association between genetic variats in mPCa and progession to CRPC. Analysis of exome genotypes revealed that 42 SNPs were significantly associated with mPCa. The top five polymorphisms were statistically significantly associated with metastatic disease. In addition, one of these SNPs, rs56350726, was significantly associated with time to CRPC in Kaplan-Meier analysis (Log-rank test, p = 0.011). In multivariable Cox regression, rs56350726 was strongly associated with progression to CRPC (HR = 4.172 95% CI = 1.223-14.239, p = 0.023). We assessed genetic variation among 1000 patients with PCa with or without metastasis, using 242,221 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the custom HumanExome BeadChip v1.0 (Illuminam Inc.). We analyzed the time to CRPC in 110 of the 1000 patients who were treated with ADT. Genetic data were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression and odds ratios calculated as estimates of relative risk of metastasis. We identified SNPs associated with metastasis and analyzed the relationship between these SNPs and time to CRPC in mPCa. Based on a genetic variation, the five top SNPs were observed to associate with mPCa. And one (SLC28A3, rs56350726) of five SNP was found the association with the progression to CRPC in patients with mPCa.

  12. Budgetary Impact of Cabazitaxel Use After Docetaxel Treatment for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Kyle; Drea, Ed; Hudspeth, Louis; Corman, Shelby; Gao, Xin; Xue, Mei; Miao, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    With the approval of several new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), budgetary impact is a concern for health plan decision makers. Budget impact models (BIMs) are becoming a requirement in many countries as part of formulary approval or reimbursement decisions. Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane developed to overcome resistance to docetaxel and is approved for the treatment of patients with mCRPC previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. To estimate a 1-year projected budget impact of varying utilization rates of cabazitaxel as a second-line treatment for mCRPC following docetaxel, using a hypothetical U.S. private managed care plan with 1 million members. A BIM was developed to evaluate costs for currently available treatment options for patients with mCRPC previously treated with docetaxel. Treatments included in the model were cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223, with utilization rates derived from market research data. Medication costs were calculated according to published pricing benchmarks factored by dosing and duration of therapy as stated in the prescribing information for each agent. Published rates and costs of grade 3-4 adverse events were also factored into the model. In addition, the model reports budget impact under 2 scenarios. In the first base-case scenario, patient out-of-pocket costs were subtracted from the total cost of treatment. In the second scenario, all treatment costs were assumed to be paid by the plan. In a hypothetical 1 million-member health plan population, 100 patients were estimated to receive second-line treatment for mCRPC after treatment with docetaxel. Using current utilization rates for the 4 agents of interest, the base-case scenario estimated the cost of second-line treatment after docetaxel to be $6,331,704, or $0.528 per member per month (PMPM). In a scenario where cabazitaxel use increases from the base-rate case of 24% to a

  13. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a current view on drug therapy and alternative tumor cell regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gafanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common causes of death from malignant neoplasms in men in many countries around the world. Transmission of the signal in the androgenic axis of regulation is crucial for the development and progression of PC. Despite the constant dependence on androgen receptor signals in castration resistance, the use of new anti-androgenic drugs invariably leads to the stability  of the ongoing treatment. The interaction of androgen receptor and alternative (phosphoinositide-3-kinases, PI3K pathways in the regulation of cells can be one of the mechanisms of resistance to treatment. In this article, we describe current treatments for metastatic castration-resistant PC and the possible role of the PI3K pathway in the pathogenesis and progression of PC.

  14. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  15. Pharmacodynamic study of the oral hedgehog pathway inhibitor, vismodegib, in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Suzman, Daniel L; Luber, Brandon; Wang, Hao; Glavaris, Stephanie; Hughes, Robert; Sullivan, Rana; Harb, Rana; Boudadi, Karim; Paller, Channing; Eisenberger, Mario; Demarzo, Angelo; Ross, Ashely; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2016-12-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and metastatic development and may be upregulated even further in the castration-resistant state. We hypothesized that antagonism of the Hh pathway with vismodegib in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) would result in pathway engagement, inhibition and perhaps induce measurable clinical responses in patients. This is a single-arm study of oral daily vismodegib in men with mCRPC. All patients were required to have biopsies of the tumor and skin (a surrogate tissue) at baseline and after 4 weeks of therapy. Ten patients were planned for enrollment. The primary outcome was the pharmacodynamic assessment of Gli1 mRNA suppression with vismodegib in tumor tissue. Secondary outcomes included PSA response rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. Nine patients were enrolled. Gli1 mRNA was significantly suppressed by vismodegib in both tumor tissue (4/7 evaluable biopsies, 57%) and benign skin biopsies (6/8 evaluable biopsies, 75%). The median number of treatment cycles completed was three, with a median PFS of 1.9 months (95% CI 1.3, NA), and a median OS of 7.04 months (95% CI 3.4, NA). No patient achieved a PSA reduction or a measurable tumor response. Safety data were consistent with the known toxicities of vismodegib. Hh signaling, as measured by Gli1 mRNA expression in mCRPC tissues, was suppressed with vismodegib in the majority of patients. Despite this pharmacodynamic response that indicated target inhibition in some patients, there was no apparent signal of clinical activity. Vismodegib will not be developed further as monotherapy in mCRPC.

  16. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  17. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  18. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p less than or equal to 0.05). A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance.

  19. Radiation therapy of a metastatic tumour of the orbit caused by prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, F.; Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poschauko, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of metastatic carcinoma to the apex of the orbit in a 66-year old patient. Orbital metastasis occurred while the patient suffered from another metastatic activity especially in his bony structures. The orbital tumour caused rapid visual impairment because of compression of the optic nerve. The metastasis was treated by radiation therapy. With CT-scan, electrophysiological examination, visual field examination, and visual function we demonstrate the regression of the tumour. One year after therapy the tumor was no longer detectable. Visual function had recovered and visual fields were normally. Radiation therapy prolonged high quality life for our patient due to preservation of visual function. (authors)

  20. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post hoc analysis of PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A; Higano, C S; Iversen, P; Sternberg, C N; Rathkopf, D; Loriot, Y; de Bono, J; Tombal, B; Abhyankar, S; Lin, P; Krivoshik, A; Phung, D; Beer, T M

    2017-06-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide in the PREVAIL study were analyzed post hoc for rising versus nonrising PSA (empirically defined as >1.05 vs ⩽1.05 times the PSA level from 3 months earlier) at the time of radiographic progression. Clinical characteristics and disease outcomes were compared between the rising and nonrising PSA groups. Of 265 PREVAIL patients with radiographic progression and evaluable PSA levels on the enzalutamide arm, nearly one-quarter had a nonrising PSA. Median progression-free survival in this cohort was 8.3 months versus 11.1 months in the rising PSA cohort (hazard ratio 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.23); overall survival was similar between the two groups, although less than half of patients in either group were still at risk at 24 months. Baseline clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. Non-rising PSA at radiographic progression is a common phenomenon in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant on serial serum PSA measurement may more accurately identify disease progression.

  1. Epigenome-Wide Tumor DNA Methylation Profiling Identifies Novel Prognostic Biomarkers of Metastatic-Lethal Progression in Men Diagnosed with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Geybels, Milan S; Leonardson, Amy; Rubicz, Rohina; Kolb, Suzanne; Yan, Qingxiang; Klotzle, Brandy; Bibikova, Marina; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Troyer, Dean; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Wright, Jonathan L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2017-01-01

    Aside from Gleason sum, few factors accurately identify the subset of prostate cancer patients at high risk for metastatic progression. We hypothesized that epigenetic alterations could distinguish prostate tumors with life-threatening potential. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiling was performed in surgically resected primary tumor tissues from a population-based (n = 430) and a replication (n = 80) cohort of prostate cancer patients followed prospectively for at least 5 years. Metastasis was confirmed by positive bone scan, MRI, CT, or biopsy, and death certificates confirmed cause of death. AUC, partial AUC (pAUC, 95% specificity), and P value criteria were used to select differentially methylated CpG sites that robustly stratify patients with metastatic-lethal from nonrecurrent tumors, and which were complementary to Gleason sum. Forty-two CpG biomarkers stratified patients with metastatic-lethal versus nonrecurrent prostate cancer in the discovery cohort, and eight of these CpGs replicated in the validation cohort based on a significant (P prostate cancer include CpGs in five genes (ALKBH5, ATP11A, FHAD1, KLHL8, and PI15) and three intergenic regions. In the validation dataset, the AUC for Gleason sum alone (0.82) significantly increased with the addition of four individual CpGs (range, 0.86-0.89; all P epigenetic biomarkers warrant further investigation as they may improve prognostic classification of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and provide new insights on tumor aggressiveness. Clin Cancer Res; 23(1); 311-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...... at Rigshospitalet, Denmark, and compare the results with phase III trial outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Single-centre, retrospective study including consecutive patients managed on AA for more than 2-year period. Treatment consisted of 1,000mg AA and 5mg prednisone twice daily. Outcomes of interest were prostate...

  3. Snail regulates cell survival and inhibits cellular senescence in human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi Baygi, Modjtaba; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Schmitz, Ingo; Sameie, Shahram; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2010-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regarded as an important step in cancer metastasis. Snail, a master regulator of EMT, has been recently proposed to act additionally as a cell survival factor and inducer of motility. We have investigated the function of Snail (SNAI1) in prostate cancer cells by downregulating its expression via short (21-mer) interfering RNA (siRNA) and measuring the consequences on EMT markers, cell viability, death, cell cycle, senescence, attachment, and invasivity. Of eight carcinoma cell lines, the prostate carcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 showed the highest and moderate expression of SNAI1 mRNA, respectively, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Long-term knockdown of Snail induced a severe decline in cell numbers in LNCaP and PC-3 and caspase activity was accordingly enhanced in both cell lines. In addition, suppression of Snail expression induced senescence in LNCaP cells. SNAI1-siRNA-treated cells did not tolerate detachment from the extracellular matrix, probably due to downregulation of integrin α6. Expression of E-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin was also affected. Invasiveness of PC-3 cells was not significantly diminished by Snail knockdown. Our data suggest that Snail acts primarily as a survival factor and inhibitor of cellular senescence in prostate cancer cell lines. We therefore propose that Snail can act as early driver of prostate cancer progression.

  4. Orofacial pain and numb chin syndrome as the presenting symptoms of a metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaver A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with orofacial pain as the presenting symptom caused by a mandibular metastasis from a previously undiagnosed cancer of the prostate. This possibility should be considered in the differential diagnosis of male patients presenting with orofacial pain.

  5. Cranial nerve palsies in metastatic prostate cancer--results of base of skull radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Norman, Andrew R.; McNair, Helen; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the rate of response to palliative external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy/5 or 30 Gy/10 fractions) to the base of skull in 32 prostate cancer patients with cranial nerve dysfunction. Sixteen patients (50%; 95% CI, 34-66%) had a useful response to therapy. The median survival post-therapy was 3 months

  6. Whole body MRI (WB-MRI) assessment of metastatic spread in prostate cancer: Therapeutic perspectives on targeted management of oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Ahmed; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Pasoglou, Vasiliki; Padhani, Anwar; Michoux, Nicolas; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Tombal, Bertrand; Lecouvet, Frédéric E

    2016-08-01

    To determine the proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients with oligometastatic disease (≤3 synchronous lesions) using whole body magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-MRI/DWI). To determine the proportion of patients with nodal disease confined within currently accepted target areas for extended lymph node dissection (eLND) and pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Two radiologists reviewed WB-MRI/DWI studies in 96 consecutive newly diagnosed metastatic PCa patients; 46 patients with newly diagnosed castration naive PCa (mHNPC) and 50 patients with first appearance of metastasis during monitoring for non-metastatic castration resistant PCa (M0 to mCRPC). The distribution of metastatic deposits was assessed and the proportions of patients with oligometastatic disease and with LN metastases located within eLND and EBRT targets were determined. Twenty-eight percent of mHNPC and 50% of mCPRC entered the metastatic disease with ≤3 sites. Bone metastases (BM) were identified in 68.8% patients; 71.7% of mHNPC and 66% mCRPC patients. Most commonly involved areas were iliac bones and lumbar spine. Enlarged lymph nodes (LN) were detected in 68.7% of patients; 69.6% of mHNPC and 68.0% of mCRPC. Most commonly involved areas were para-aortic, inter-aortico-cava, and external iliac areas. BM and LN were detected concomitantly in 41% of mHNPC and 34% of mCRPC. Visceral metastases were detected in 6.7%. Metastatic disease was confined to LN located within the accepted boundaries of eLND or pelvic EBRT target areas in only ≤25% and ≤30% of patients, respectively. Non-invasive mapping of metastatic landing sites in PCa using WB-MRI/DWI shows that 28% of the mHNPC patients, and 52% of the mCRPC can be classified as oligometastatic, thus challenging the concept of metastatic targeted therapy. More than two thirds of metastatic patients have LN located outside the usually recommended targets of eLND and pelvic EBRT. Prophylactic or salvage

  7. Phase IIa Clinical Trial of Trans-1-Amino-3-18F-Fluoro- Cyclobutane Carboxylic Acid in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: We performed a phase IIa clinical trial of trans-1-amino-3-18Ffluoro-cyclobutane carboxylic acid (anti-18F-FACBC, a synthetic amino acid analog for PET, in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Methods: The study subjects consisted of 10 untreated prostate cancer patients having lymph node and/or bone metastasis. Five patients underwent whole-body PET 5 and 30 min after intravenous injection of anti-18F-FACBC. The other five patients underwent 60 min dynamic PET of the pelvis. Safety assessment was performed before and 24 h after injection. PET/CT images were assessed visually, and time courses of anti-18F-FACBC uptake were evaluated from dynamic imaging. Results: Two mild adverse events were observed and resolved without treatment. All 10 patients showed increased accumulation of anti-18F-FACBC in the primary prostate lesion. CT revealed five enlarged lymph nodes indicating metastasis, and all showed increased uptake. Additionally, anti-18F-FACBC PET delineated unenlarged lymph nodes as hot spots. Anti-18F-FACBC PET demonstrated metastatic bone lesions, similar to conventional imaging. In one of two patients with lung metastasis, some lesions showed increased uptake. Regarding the time course, increased uptake of anti-18F-FACBC in the lesion was demonstrated immediately after injection, followed by gradual washout. Conclusion: The results of this phase IIa clinical trial indicated the safety of anti-18F-FACBC in patients with prostate cancer and the potential of anti-18F-FACBC PET to delineate primary prostate lesions and metastatic lesions. This clinical trial was registered as JapicCTI-101326.

  8. Clinical outcomes and survival surrogacy studies of prostate-specific antigen declines following enzalutamide in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew J; Saad, Fred; Phung, De; Dmuchowski, Carl; Shore, Neal D; Fizazi, Karim; Hirmand, Mohammad; Forer, David; Scher, Howard I; Bono, Johann De

    2017-06-15

    In the AFFIRM trial, enzalutamide significantly increased overall survival (OS) for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after chemotherapy versus placebo and significantly decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. The goal of this post hoc analysis was to associate levels of PSA decline from baseline after enzalutamide with clinical outcomes in the postchemotherapy mCRPC setting. Men in the AFFIRM trial (n = 1199) were grouped by maximal PSA decline in the first 90 days of treatment. Kaplan-Meier estimates evaluated the association of defined PSA changes from baseline with OS, progression-free survival (PFS), radiographic PFS (rPFS), and pain response. Each PSA decline category was assessed for OS surrogacy using Prentice criteria, proportion of treatment effect explained (PTE), and proportion of variation explained. Men treated with enzalutamide had improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.63; P 19.0; P .20). PSA declines of any, ≥30%, and ≥50% following enzalutamide were associated with greater clinical and pain response and improvements in PFS and OS. Surrogacy of PSA decline for OS was not fully established, possibly due to lack of PSA declines with placebo, and discordant results between PSA and imaging responses over time, and because some declines were not durable due to rapid resistance development. However, a lack of PSA decline by 90 days following enzalutamide treatment was a poor prognosis indicator in this setting. Conclusions from sensitivity analyses of maximal PSA decline from baseline over the entire treatment period are consistent with PSA declines restricted to the first 90 days. Cancer 2017;123:2303-2311. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  9. Epigenetic Regulation in Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Katia; Farran-Matas, Sonia; Martinez-Tebar, Adrian; Aytes, Alvaro

    2018-01-01

    An important number of newly identified molecular alterations in prostate cancer affect gene encoding master regulators of chromatin biology epigenetic regulation. This review will provide an updated view of the key epigenetic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer progression, therapy resistance, and potential actionable mechanisms and biomarkers. Key players in chromatin biology and epigenetic master regulators has been recently described to be crucially altered in metastatic CRPC and tumors that progress to AR independency. As such, epigenetic dysregulation represents a driving mechanism in the reprograming of prostate cancer cells as they lose AR-imposed identity. Chromatin integrity and accessibility for transcriptional regulation are key features altered in cancer progression, and particularly relevant in nuclear hormone receptor-driven tumors like prostate cancer. Understanding how chromatin remodeling dictates prostate development and how its deregulation contributes to prostate cancer onset and progression may improve risk stratification and treatment selection for prostate cancer patients.

  10. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartor A Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone, or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR

  11. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    . The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...

  12. MYC RNAi-Pt Combination Nanotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    are the accomplishments for each subtask. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanotechnology , nanoparticle, siRNA delivery, platinum, MYC, prostate cancer, drug...determination of the efficacy of select NPs in the B13MYC/Cre|Ptenfl/fl engineered PCa mouse model. This project is directed by an interdisciplinary...JHU), and two co-investigators (Dr. Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian from JHU and Dr. Jinjun Shi from BWH/HMS). 3 2. KEYWORDS Nanotechnology

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate and metastatic medullary compression. A retrospective study of 22 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Kvist, E; Hjortberg, P

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of 709 patients with prostatic cancer was carried out. Twenty-two developed medullary cord compression (an incidence of 3%). All but two of the 22 patients were treated by radiation and 10 had additional hormonal treatment. Ten had some benefit from the treatment, but only 2...... of 19 regained their ability to walk. The need for immediate diagnosis and treatment is stressed....

  14. Early versus delayed hormonal treatment in locally advanced or asymptomatic metastatic prostatic cancer patient dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezioso, Domenico; Iacono, Fabrizio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Ruffo, Antonio; Russo, Nicola; Illiano, Ester

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the effectiveness of hormonal treatment (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists and/or antiandrogens) as an early or as a deferred intervention for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) and/or asymptomatic metastasis. Systematic review of trials published in 1950-2007. Sources included MEDLINE and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Eligible trials included adults with a history of LAPC who are not suitable for curative local treatment of prostate cancer. We retrieved 22 articles for detailed review, of which 8 met inclusion criteria. The Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group suggested that delaying hormonal therapy did not compromise overall survival and that many of the patients died of causes other than prostate cancer. In European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30846 trial, the median survival for delayed endocrine treatment was 6.1 year, and for immediate treatment 7.6 year, the HR for survival on delayed versus immediate treatment was 1.23 (95 % CI 0.88-1.71), indicating a 23 % nonsignificant trend in favour of early treatment. In EORTC 30891, the immediate androgen deprivation resulted in a modest but statistically significant increase in overall survival. The protocol SAKK 08/88 showed the lack of any major advantage of immediate compared with deferred hormonal treatment regarding quality of life or overall survival. The early intervention with hormonal treatment for patients with LAPC provides important reductions in all-cause mortality, prostate cancer-specific mortality, overall progression, and distant progression compared with deferring their use until standard care has failed to halt the disease.

  15. The Cambridge Prognostic Groups for improved prediction of disease mortality at diagnosis in primary non-metastatic prostate cancer: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanapragasam, V J; Bratt, O; Muir, K; Lee, L S; Huang, H H; Stattin, P; Lophatananon, A

    2018-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to validate a new five-tiered prognostic classification system to better discriminate cancer-specific mortality in men diagnosed with primary non-metastatic prostate cancer. We applied a recently described five-strata model, the Cambridge Prognostic Groups (CPGs 1-5), in two international cohorts and tested prognostic performance against the current standard three-strata classification of low-, intermediate- or high-risk disease. Diagnostic clinico-pathological data for men obtained from the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) and the Singapore Health Study were used. The main outcome measure was prostate cancer mortality (PCM) stratified by age group and treatment modality. The PCBaSe cohort included 72,337 men, of whom 7162 died of prostate cancer. The CPG model successfully classified men with different risks of PCM with competing risk regression confirming significant intergroup distinction (p study of nearly 75,000 men confirms that the CPG five-tiered prognostic model has superior discrimination compared to the three-tiered model in predicting prostate cancer death across different age and treatment groups. Crucially, it identifies distinct sub-groups of men within the old intermediate-risk and high-risk criteria who have very different prognostic outcomes. We therefore propose adoption of the CPG model as a simple-to-use but more accurate prognostic stratification tool to help guide management for men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

  16. Quantitative analysis of plasma cell-free DNA and its DNA integrity in patients with metastatic prostate cancer using ALU sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, A.; Sweify, K.M.; Nofal, N.; El-Fayoumy, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer affecting men, it accounts for 29% of all male cancer and 11% of all male cancer related death. DNA is normally released from an apoptotic source which generates small fragments of cell-free DNA, whereas cancer patients have cell-free circulating DNA that originated from necrosis, autophagy, or mitotic catastrophe, which produce large fragments. Aim of work: Differentiate the cell free DNA levels (cfDNA) and its integrity in prostate cancer patients and control group composed of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and healthy persons. Methodology: cf-DNA levels were quantified by real-time PCR amplification in prostate cancer patients ( n = 50), (BPH) benign prostate hyperplasia ( n = 25) and healthy controls ( n = 30) using two sets of ALU gene (product size of 115 bp and 247-bp) and its integrity was calculated as a ratio of qPCR results of 247 bp ALU over 115 bp ALU. Results: Highly significant levels of cf-DNA and its integrity in PC patients compared to BPH. Twenty-eight (56%) patients with prostate cancer had bone metastasis. ALU115 qpcr is superior to the other markers in discriminating metastatic patients with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 86.4% and (AUC = 0.981) Conclusion: ALU115 qpcr could be used as a valuable biomarker helping in identifying high risk patients, indicating early spread of tumor cells as a potential seed for future metastases

  17. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years......-resistant prostate cancer. Overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) were coprimary end points. Subgroup analysis of men aged ≥75 years (elderly) and men aged ... who received enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor, in the phase III PREVAIL trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: PREVAIL was a randomised, double-blind, multinational study of oral enzalutamide 160 mg/day (N = 872) versus placebo (N = 845) in chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration...

  18. Repeated PSMA-targeting radioligand therapy of metastatic prostate cancer with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Zechmann, Christian; Mier, Walter; Spohn, Fabian; Debus, Nils; Kratochwil, Clemens [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Thomas [Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John [Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Citigroup Biomedical Imaging Center, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Meyer Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting radioligand therapy (RLT) was introduced in 2011. The first report described the antitumor and side effects of a single dose. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate toxicity and antitumor activity after single and repetitive therapies. Thirty-four men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received PSMA-RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Twenty-three patients received a second, and three patients a third dose, timed at PSA progression after an initial response to the preceding therapy. The applied doses were separated in three groups: <3.5, 3.5-5.0 and >5.0 GBq. Antitumor and side-effects were analyzed by blood samples and other clinical data. Follow-up was conducted for up to 5 years. The best therapeutic effect was achieved by the first therapy. A PSA decline of ≥50% was achieved in 70.6% of the patients. The second and third therapies were significantly less effective. There was neither an association between the applied activity and PSA response or the time-to-progression. Hematologic toxicities were less prevalent but presented in a higher percentage of patients with increasing number of therapies. After hematologic toxicities, xerostomia was the second most frequent side effect and presented more often and with higher intensity after the second or third therapy. The first dose of RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 presented with low side effects and could significantly reduce the tumor burden in a majority of patients. The second and third therapies were less effective and presented with more frequent and more intense side effects, especially hematologic toxicities and xerostomia. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear joint models for individual dynamic prediction of risk of death using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo: application to metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Desmée

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint models of longitudinal and time-to-event data are increasingly used to perform individual dynamic prediction of a risk of event. However the difficulty to perform inference in nonlinear models and to calculate the distribution of individual parameters has long limited this approach to linear mixed-effect models for the longitudinal part. Here we use a Bayesian algorithm and a nonlinear joint model to calculate individual dynamic predictions. We apply this approach to predict the risk of death in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients with frequent Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA measurements. Methods A joint model is built using a large population of 400 mCRPC patients where PSA kinetics is described by a biexponential function and the hazard function is a PSA-dependent function. Using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm implemented in Stan software and the estimated population parameters in this population as priors, the a posteriori distribution of the hazard function is computed for a new patient knowing his PSA measurements until a given landmark time. Time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC and Brier score are derived to assess discrimination and calibration of the model predictions, first on 200 simulated patients and then on 196 real patients that are not included to build the model. Results Satisfying coverage probabilities of Monte Carlo prediction intervals are obtained for longitudinal and hazard functions. Individual dynamic predictions provide good predictive performances for landmark times larger than 12 months and horizon time of up to 18 months for both simulated and real data. Conclusions As nonlinear joint models can characterize the kinetics of biomarkers and their link with a time-to-event, this approach could be useful to improve patient’s follow-up and the early detection of most at risk patients.

  20. Impact of body mass index on clinico-pathological parameters and outcome in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.A.; EL-Tanni, H.; Ghanem, H.M.; El Saify, A.M.; Al-Zahrani, A.S.; EL-Khatib, H.M.; Mohammed, A.A.; Farooq, M.U.; EL-Shentenawy, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and clinico pathological parameters of metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) and its impact on survival. Method During the study period, 71 MPC patients were eligible. Patients with BMI < 25.0 kg/m2 were categorized as level I and patients with BMI ⩾ 25.0 kg/m2 were categorized as level II. Demographic features and survival rates were evaluated by the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional models. Results 31 patients belonged to level I while the rest belonged to level II with insignificant higher median follow-up duration in level II; ρ=0.5. In terms of age, metastasis, serum level of albumin, prostatic specific antigen, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and Gleason score, there was no significant difference between the two levels. The cumulative survival probability in the 12th, 24th and 36th month in level I vs; level II was; 86.7%, 68.7%, 64.1% vs; 74.4%, 67.7%, 55.1%, respectively with 7 patients dead in level I compared to 14 patients dead in level II denoting a higher PC-specific death rate in the level II group. In univariate and multivariate analysis, poor prognosis was associated with increasing AKP (HR = 1.0005, 95% CI, p = 0.03; HR=1.001, 95% CI, ρ=0.03) respectively, while better prognosis was associated with no visceral metastasis (HR = 0.09, 95% CI, ρ=0.000; HR = 0.04, 95% CI, ρ=0.000) and increasing albumin levels (HR = 0.17, 95% CI, ρ=0.000; HR = 0.15, 95% CI, ρ=0.000) respectively. In multivariate analysis only, patients belonging to level I were associated with better prognosis (HR = 0.17, 95% CI, ρ=0.02). Conclusion BMI is dependent on prognostic factors in patients with MPC

  1. Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostatitis Overview Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized gland situated directly below the bladder in ... produces fluid (semen) that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostatitis often causes painful or difficult urination. Other symptoms ...

  2. Docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: cost of care in Medicare and commercial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, A; Bui, C; Fitch, K; Sawhney, T Goss; Brown, B; Flanders, S; Balk, M; Deangelis, J; Chambers, J

    2017-06-01

    To estimate the healthcare costs and characteristics of docetaxel chemotherapy episodes of care for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study used the Medicare 5% sample and MarketScan Commercial (2010-2013) claims data sets to identify men with mCRPC and initial episodes of docetaxel treatment. Docetaxel episodes included docetaxel claim costs from the first claim until 30 days after the last claim, with earlier termination for death, insurance disenrollment, or the end of a 24-month look-forward period from initial docetaxel index date. Docetaxel drug claim costs were adjusted for 2011 generic docetaxel introduction, while other costs were adjusted to 2015 values using the national average annual unit cost increase. This study identified 281 Medicare-insured and 155 commercially insured men, with 325 and 172 docetaxel episodes, respectively. The average number of cycles (unique docetaxel infusion days) per episode was 6.9 for Medicare and 6.3 for commercial cohorts. The average cost per episode was $28,792 for Medicare and $67,958 for commercial cohorts, with docetaxel drug costs contributing $2,588 and $13,169 per episode, respectively. The average cost per episode on docetaxel infusion days was $8,577 (30%) for Medicare and $28,412 (42%) for commercial. Non-docetaxel infusion day costs included $7,074 (25%) for infused or injected drugs for Medicare, $10,838 (16%) for commercial cohorts, and $6,875 (24%) and $9,324 (14%) for inpatient admissions, respectively. The applicability is only to the metastatic castration-resistance clinical setting, rather than the metastatic hormone-sensitive setting, and the lack of data on the cost effectiveness of different sequencing strategies of a range of systemic therapies including enzalutamide, abiraterone, radium-223, and taxane chemotherapy. The majority of docetaxel episode costs in Medicare and commercial mCRPC populations were non-docetaxel drug costs. Future research should evaluate

  3. Delayed response after repeated {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar, Kambiz; Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Boegeman, Martin [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany); Yordanova, Anna; Essler, Markus; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Eveslage, Maria [University Hospital Muenster, Institute for Biostatistics, Muenster (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Radioligand therapy (RLT) using Lutetium-177 labeled PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA) ligand is a new therapeutic option for salvage therapy in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze response in patients receiving 3 cycles of Lu-PSMA. Seventy-one patients (median age: 72 years; range 44-87) received 3 cycles of RLT with Lu-PSMA (mean administered activity: 6.016 ± 0.543 GBq) every 8 weeks. Response was evaluated using serum PSA levels and a PSA decline ≥50% was considered as biochemical response. Additionally, any PSA decline after the first cycle was evaluated for further therapy effects after the second and third cycle. A total of 213 cycles were performed in 71 patients. Data for response and adverse events were available for all patients. A PSA decline ≥50% and some PSA decline occurred in 56% and 66% of the patients. Of 30 patients with a PSA response after the first cycle, 28 remained responders and 12/41 of non-responders responded to further therapy cycles. RLT with Lu-177-PSMA-617 shows respectable response rates. In this retrospective analysis, a relevant number of patients showed a delayed response, even if they did not respond to the first cycle of the therapy. (orig.)

  4. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  5. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A report from the PETRUS prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-08-23

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs.Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients.

  6. Androgen Receptor Deregulation Drives Bromodomain-Mediated Chromatin Alterations in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Urbanucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Global changes in chromatin accessibility may drive cancer progression by reprogramming transcription factor (TF binding. In addition, histone acetylation readers such as bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4 have been shown to associate with these TFs and contribute to aggressive cancers including prostate cancer (PC. Here, we show that chromatin accessibility defines castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We show that the deregulation of androgen receptor (AR expression is a driver of chromatin relaxation and that AR/androgen-regulated bromodomain-containing proteins (BRDs mediate this effect. We also report that BRDs are overexpressed in CRPCs and that ATAD2 and BRD2 have prognostic value. Finally, we developed gene stratification signature (BROMO-10 for bromodomain response and PC prognostication, to inform current and future trials with drugs targeting these processes. Our findings provide a compelling rational for combination therapy targeting bromodomains in selected patients in which BRD-mediated TF binding is enhanced or modified as cancer progresses.

  7. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J

    2015-01-01

    prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, patient characteristics, and progression-free survival, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were performed. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We identified 137 patients who prior to enzalutamide had progressed following a median...... of eight cycles of docetaxel and seven courses of abiraterone. The median time on enzalutamide was 3.2 mo; median OS from the time patients started enzalutamide was 8.3 mo (95% confidence interval, 6.8-9.8). Only 45 (38%) and 22 (18%) patients had PSA declines (unconfirmed) >30% and 50%, respectively....... Patients who had more than 30% or 50% falls in PSA had improved survival compared with patients who had no such PSA fall (11.4 mo vs 7.1 mo; p=0.001 and 12.6 vs 7.4 mo; p=0.007, respectively). Poor performance status and low haemoglobin was negatively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: Median OS...

  8. Disease volume and distribution as drivers of treatment decisions in metastatic prostate cancer: From chemohormonal therapy to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Ronak; Cheung, Patrick; Zukotynski, Katherine; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis of men with metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer (CSPC) depends on both the distribution and extent of metastases, among other things. Patients with low-volume or oligometastatic disease have improved survival compared with those with high-volume metastases. While chemohormonal therapy is the new standard of care for men with high-volume metastatic CSPC, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a promising treatment option with low toxicity for the management of oligometastatic CSPC. Our review summarizes the current evidence on the role of SABR in oligometastatic prostate cancer. SABR shows control rates of metastases ranging from 88% to 100% at 6 months to 3 years, and progression-free survival commonly reported as >50% for the first 12 months. In addition, SABR may allow androgen-deprivation therapy to be delayed by more than 2 years in selected patients, minimizing the chronic side effects associated with such therapy. However, much still needs to be learned before SABR can be implemented as standard treatment for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging of bioluminescent LNCaP-luc-M6 tumors: a new animal model for the study of metastatic human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatena, Caroline D; Hepner, Mischa A; Oei, Yoko A; Dusich, Joan M; Yu, Shang-Fan; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R; Jenkins, Darlene E

    2004-05-15

    Animal experiments examining hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer using the human LNCaP cell line have been limited to endpoint analyses. To permit longitudinal studies, we generated a luciferase-expressing cell line and used bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to non-invasively monitor the in vivo growth of primary LNCaP tumors and metastasis. LNCaP.FGC cells were transfected to constitutively express firefly luciferase. LNCaP-luc-M6 cells were tested for bioluminescent signal intensity and hormone responsiveness in vitro. The cells were implanted in subcutaneous and orthotopic sites in SCID-bg mice and imaged over time. The LNCaP-luc-M6 cells formed subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors in SCID-bg mice, and nearly all tumor-bearing animals developed pulmonary metastases. Early detection and temporal growth of primary tumors and metastatic lesions was successfully monitored by BLI. The LNCaP-luc-M6 cell line is a bioluminescent, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell line applicable for BLI studies to non-invasively monitor subcutaneous and orthotopic prostate tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yong; Carrio, Ignasi; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Fanti, Stefano; Ilhan, Harun; Mommsen, Caroline; Nitzsche, Egbert; Sundram, Francis; Vogel, Wouter; Oyen, Wim; Lewington, Val

    2017-01-01

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  11. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); Carrio, Ignasi [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); De Vincentis, Giuseppe [Policlinico Umberto I University Hospital Rome, Rome (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Mommsen, Caroline [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nitzsche, Egbert [Canton Hospital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Sundram, Francis [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Lewington, Val [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  12. Randomised study of Casodex 50 MG monotherapy vs orchidectomy in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The Scandinavian Casodex Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tveter, K; Varenhorst, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Casodex (ICI 176,334), a new, once-daily, selective antiandrogen, given as 50 mg monotherapy, was compared with orchidectomy in a randomised, multicentre, open study in 376 patients with metastatic prostate cancer. At 3 months, PSA was reduced by 86% in the Casodex group and by 96......% in the orchidectomy group. Treatment failed in 51 patients in the orchidectomy group and 66 showed a subjective response. Treatment failed in 86 patients treated with Casodex and 40 patients showed a subjective response. Patients treated with Casodex maintained their sexual interest better than those...

  13. Predictors of Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity and Treatment Outcomes in Elderly Versus Younger Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    records from 421 consecutive patients treated with first-line docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) and low-dose prednisolone from 2007 to 2013 at Herlev University Hospital were reviewed. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, and the Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 guidelines were...... used to evaluate treatment-related toxicity and efficacy. Logistic and Cox regression models were used to predict toxicity and survival. RESULTS: Age ≥ 75 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.33), baseline levels of hemoglobin (OR, 0.89), and previous metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC; OR, 1...

  14. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Extended Analysis of the Phase 3 PREVAIL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; Higano, Celestia S; Iversen, Peter; Evans, Christopher P; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Miller, Kurt; Saad, Fred; Bjartell, Anders S; Borre, Michael; Mulders, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo L; Parli, Teresa; Sari, Suha; van Os, Steve; Theeuwes, Ad; Tombal, Bertrand

    2017-02-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide up to the prespecified number of deaths in the final analysis, which included an additional 20 mo of follow-up for investigator-assessed rPFS, 9 mo of follow-up for OS, and 4 mo of follow-up for safety. Enzalutamide reduced the risk of radiographic progression or death by 68% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.37; pPREVAIL provides more complete assessment of the clinical benefit of enzalutamide. PREVAIL is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01212991. According to data from longer follow-up, enzalutamide continued to provide benefit over placebo in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metronomic Treatment with Low-Dose Trofosfamide Leads to a Long-Term Remission in a Patient with Docetaxel-Refractory Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Greiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients refractory to androgen withdrawal and docetaxel therapy is currently discouraging and new therapeutic approaches are vastly needed. Here, we report a long-term remission over one year in a 68-year-old patient with metastatic docetaxel-refractory prostate cancer employing low-dose trofosfamide. The patient suffered from distant failure with several bone lesions and lymph node metastases depicted by a (11 C-Choline positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT. After initiation of trofosfamide 100 mg taken orally once a day we observed a steadily decreasing PSA value from initial 46.6 down to 2.1 g/l. The Choline-PET/CT was repeated after 10 months of continuous therapy and demonstrated a partial remission of the bone lesions and a regression of all involved lymph nodes but one. Taken together we found an astonishing and durable activity of the alkylating agent trofosfamide given in a metronomic fashion. We rate the side effects as low and state an excellent therapeutic ratio of this drug in our patient.

  16. Semaphorin 3 C drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasiveness, and stem-like characteristics in prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kevin J; Hui, Daniel H F; Lee, Wilson W; Dong, Mingshu; Tombe, Tabitha; Jiao, Ivy Z F; Khosravi, Shahram; Takeuchi, Ario; Peacock, James W; Ivanova, Larissa; Moskalev, Igor; Gleave, Martin E; Buttyan, Ralph; Cox, Michael E; Ong, Christopher J

    2017-09-13

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is among the most commonly-occurring cancers worldwide and a leader in cancer-related deaths. Local non-invasive PCa is highly treatable but limited treatment options exist for those with locally-advanced and metastatic forms of the disease underscoring the need to identify mechanisms mediating PCa progression. The semaphorins are a large grouping of membrane-associated or secreted signalling proteins whose normal roles reside in embryogenesis and neuronal development. In this context, semaphorins help establish chemotactic gradients and direct cell movement. Various semaphorin family members have been found to be up- and down-regulated in a number of cancers. One family member, Semaphorin 3 C (SEMA3C), has been implicated in prostate, breast, ovarian, gastric, lung, and pancreatic cancer as well as glioblastoma. Given SEMA3C's roles in development and its augmented expression in PCa, we hypothesized that SEMA3C promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem-like phenotypes in prostate cells. In the present study we show that ectopic expression of SEMA3C in RWPE-1 promotes the upregulation of EMT and stem markers, heightened sphere-formation, and cell plasticity. In addition, we show that SEMA3C promotes migration and invasion in vitro and cell dissemination in vivo.

  17. 177Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic 68 Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. 177 Lu

  18. Impact of body composition parameters on clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, Samantha J; Power, Derek G; Murphy, Kevin P; McDermott, Ray; Griffin, Brendan T; Lim, Marvin; Daly, Louise; MacEneaney, Peter; O' Sullivan, Kathleen; Prado, Carla M; Ryan, Aoife M

    2016-06-01

    Body composition may influence clinical outcomes of certain chemotherapeutic agents. We examined the prognostic significance of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue on docetaxel toxicity and overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). A retrospective review of patients medical records with mCRPC, treated with docetaxel was conducted. Body composition parameters (skeletal muscle mass, muscle attenuation [MA], visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue) were measured at L3 by computed tomography (CT) and defined using previously established cut points. Toxicity profile was assessed after 3 cycles of the drug and graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (version 4). Overall survival was analysed. Overall 63 patients, mean age 69 years (SD 8.3), were included. Sarcopenia was present in 47% (n = 30) and of these 26.7% (8/30) were sarcopenic obese. Common toxicities (all grades) observed included fatigue (80.9%), pain (46%), and constipation (34.9%). DLT occurred in 22 (34.9%) patients; of these 10 patients (15.8%) experienced dose reductions and 12 patients (19%) experienced dose terminations. Measurements of adiposity were not predictive of DLT, however 59.1% patients who had a combination of both sarcopenia and low MA experienced DLT compared to 29.3% of patients without sarcopenia and low MA (p = 0.021). Skeletal muscle index and MA were significantly lower in patients who experienced neutropenia (grade I-II) (46.5 cm 2 /m 2 vs. 51.2 cm 2 /m 2 , p = 0.005) compared to their counterparts (24.6 HU vs. 32.2 HU, p = 0.044). Neither sarcopenia nor sarcopenic obesity was associated with overall survival. In multivariate analysis, BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 (HR: 0.349, CI: 0.156-0.782, p = 0.010) was a significant predictor of longer overall survival and both visceral fat index ≥ median 58.7 cm 2 /m 2 (HR: 2.266 CI: 1.066-4.814, p = 0.033) and anaemia (HR: 2.81, CI: 1.297-6.091, p

  19. Dosimetry for {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617: a new radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delker, Andreas; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Brunegraf, Anika; Gosewisch, Astrid; Gildehaus, Franz Josef; Bartenstein, Peter; Boening, Guido [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Kratochwil, Clemens; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Tritschler, Stefan; Stief, Christian Georg [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Dosimetry is critical to achieve the optimal therapeutic effect of radioligand therapy (RLT) with limited side effects. Our aim was to perform image-based absorbed dose calculation for the new PSMA ligand {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 in support of its use for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Whole-body planar images and SPECT/CT images of the abdomen were acquired in five patients (mean age 68 years) for during two treatment cycles at approximately 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after administration of 3.6 GBq (range 3.4 to 3.9 GBq) {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617. Quantitative 3D SPECT OSEM reconstruction was performed with corrections for photon scatter, photon attenuation and detector blurring. A camera-specific calibration factor derived from phantom measurements was used for quantitation. Absorbed doses were calculated for various organs from the images using a combination of linear approximation, exponential fit, and target-specific S values, in accordance with the MIRD scheme. Absorbed doses to bone marrow were estimated from planar and SPECT images and with consideration of the blood sampling method according to the EANM guidelines. The average (± SD) absorbed doses per cycle were 2.2 ± 0.6 Gy for the kidneys (0.6 Gy/GBq), 5.1 ± 1.8 Gy for the salivary glands (1.4 Gy/GBq), 0.4 ± 0.2 Gy for the liver (0.1 Gy/GBq), 0.4 ± 0.1 Gy for the spleen (0.1 Gy/GBq), and 44 ± 19 mGy for the bone marrow (0.012 Gy/GBq). The organ absorbed doses did not differ significantly between cycles. The critical absorbed dose reported for the kidneys (23 Gy) was not reached in any patient. At 24 h there was increased uptake in the colon with 50 - 70 % overlap to the kidneys on planar images. Absorbed doses for tumour lesions ranged between 1.2 and 47.5 Gy (13.1 Gy/GBq) per cycle. The salivary glands and kidneys showed high, but not critical, absorbed doses after RLT with {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617. We suggest that {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 is suitable for radiotherapy, offering tumour

  20. The effect of local control on metastatic dissemination in carcinoma of the prostate: Long-term results in patients treated with 125I implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuks, Z.; Leibel, S.A.; Wallner, K.E.; Begg, C.B.; Fair, W.R.; Anderson, L.L.; Hilaris, B.S.; Whitmore, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    The study evaluates the effect of the locally recurring tumor on the incidence of metastatic disease in early stage carcinoma of the prostate. The probability of distant metastases was studied in 679 patients with Stage B-C/N0 carcinoma of the prostate treated at MSKCC between 1970 and 1985 (median follow-up of 97 months). Patients were staged with pelvic lymph node dissection and treated with retropubic 125I implantation. The actuarial distant metastases free survival (DMFS) for patients at risk at 15 years after initial therapy was 37%. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis of covariates affecting the metastatic outcome showed that local failure, used in the model as a time dependent variable, was the most significant covariate, although stage, grade, and implant volume were also found to be independent variables. The relative risk of metastatic spread subsequent to local failure was 4-fold increased compared to the risk without evidence of local relapse. The 15-year actuarial DMFS in 351 patients with local control was 77% compared to 24% in 328 patients who developed local relapses (p less than 0.00001). The relation of distant spread to the local outcome was observed regardless of stage, grade, or implant dose. Even stage B1/N0-Grade I patient with local control showed a 15-year actuarial DMFS of 82%, compared to 22% in patients with local relapse (p less than 0.00001). The median local relapse-free survival (LRFS) in the 268 patients with local recurrences who did not receive hormonal therapy before distant metastases were detected was 51 months, compared to a median of 71 months for DMFS in the same patients (p less than 0.001), consistent with the possibility that distant dissemination may develop secondary to local failure

  1. Chemohormonal Therapy in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Survival Analysis of the Randomized Phase III E3805 CHAARTED Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chen, Yu-Hui; Carducci, Michael A; Liu, Glenn; Jarrard, David F; Hahn, Noah M; Shevrin, Daniel H; Dreicer, Robert; Hussain, Maha; Eisenberger, Mario; Kohli, Manish; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Picus, Joel; Cooney, Matthew M; Garcia, Jorge A; DiPaola, Robert S; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2018-04-10

    Purpose Docetaxel added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly increases the longevity of some patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Herein, we present the outcomes of the CHAARTED (Chemohormonal Therapy Versus Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in Prostate Cancer) trial with more mature follow-up and focus on tumor volume. Patients and Methods In this phase III study, 790 patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer were equally randomly assigned to receive either ADT in combination with docetaxel 75 mg/m 2 for up to six cycles or ADT alone. The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS). Additional analyses of the prospectively defined low- and high-volume disease subgroups were performed. High-volume disease was defined as presence of visceral metastases and/or ≥ four bone metastases with at least one outside of the vertebral column and pelvis. Results At a median follow-up of 53.7 months, the median OS was 57.6 months for the chemohormonal therapy arm versus 47.2 months for ADT alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.89; P = .0018). For patients with high-volume disease (n = 513), the median OS was 51.2 months with chemohormonal therapy versus 34.4 months with ADT alone (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.79; P OS benefit was observed (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.55; P = .86). Conclusion The clinical benefit from chemohormonal therapy in prolonging OS was confirmed for patients with high-volume disease; however, for patients with low-volume disease, no OS benefit was discerned.

  2. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  3. Prediction of overall survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: development of a prognostic model through a crowdsourced challenge with open clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinney, Justin; Wang, Tao; Laajala, Teemu D; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Bare, J Christopher; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Khan, Suleiman A; Peddinti, Gopal; Airola, Antti; Pahikkala, Tapio; Mirtti, Tuomas; Yu, Thomas; Bot, Brian M; Shen, Liji; Abdallah, Kald; Norman, Thea; Friend, Stephen; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Soule, Howard; Sweeney, Christopher J; Ryan, Charles J; Scher, Howard I; Sartor, Oliver; Xie, Yang; Aittokallio, Tero; Zhou, Fang Liz; Costello, James C

    2017-01-01

    Improvements to prognostic models in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have the potential to augment clinical trial design and guide treatment strategies. In partnership with Project Data Sphere, a not-for-profit initiative allowing data from cancer clinical trials to be shared broadly with researchers, we designed an open-data, crowdsourced, DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) challenge to not only identify a better prognostic model for prediction of survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer but also engage a community of international data scientists to study this disease. Data from the comparator arms of four phase 3 clinical trials in first-line metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were obtained from Project Data Sphere, comprising 476 patients treated with docetaxel and prednisone from the ASCENT2 trial, 526 patients treated with docetaxel, prednisone, and placebo in the MAINSAIL trial, 598 patients treated with docetaxel, prednisone or prednisolone, and placebo in the VENICE trial, and 470 patients treated with docetaxel and placebo in the ENTHUSE 33 trial. Datasets consisting of more than 150 clinical variables were curated centrally, including demographics, laboratory values, medical history, lesion sites, and previous treatments. Data from ASCENT2, MAINSAIL, and VENICE were released publicly to be used as training data to predict the outcome of interest-namely, overall survival. Clinical data were also released for ENTHUSE 33, but data for outcome variables (overall survival and event status) were hidden from the challenge participants so that ENTHUSE 33 could be used for independent validation. Methods were evaluated using the integrated time-dependent area under the curve (iAUC). The reference model, based on eight clinical variables and a penalised Cox proportional-hazards model, was used to compare method performance. Further validation was done using data from a

  4. Prognostic and predictive value of intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte E; Brasso, Klaus; Iversen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of different forms of the urokinase receptor, uPAR, in serum from prostate cancer (PC) patients.......The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of different forms of the urokinase receptor, uPAR, in serum from prostate cancer (PC) patients....

  5. Cell-autonomous intracellular androgen receptor signaling drives the growth of human prostate cancer initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Donald J; D'Antonio, Jason; Gurel, Bora; Antony, Lizamma; Demarzo, Angelo M; Isaacs, John T

    2010-01-01

    The lethality of prostate cancer is due to the continuous growth of cancer initiating cells (CICs) which are often stimulated by androgen receptor (AR) signaling. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for such AR-mediated growth stimulation are not fully understood. Such mechanisms may involve cancer cell-dependent induction of tumor stromal cells to produce paracrine growth factors or could involve cancer cell autonomous autocrine and/or intracellular AR signaling pathways. We utilized clinical samples, animal models and a series of AR-positive human prostate cancer cell lines to evaluate AR-mediated growth stimulation of prostate CICs. The present studies document that stromal AR expression is not required for prostate cancer growth, since tumor stroma surrounding AR-positive human prostate cancer metastases (N = 127) are characteristically AR-negative. This lack of a requirement for AR expression in tumor stromal cells is also documented by the fact that human AR-positive prostate cancer cells grow equally well when xenografted in wild-type versus AR-null nude mice. AR-dependent growth stimulation was documented to involve secretion, extracellular binding, and signaling by autocrine growth factors. Orthotopic xenograft animal studies documented that the cellautonomous autocrine growth factors which stimulate prostate CIC growth are not the andromedins secreted by normal prostate stromal cells. Such cell autonomous and extracellular autocrine signaling is necessary but not sufficient for the optimal growth of prostate CICs based upon the response to anti-androgen plus/or minus preconditioned media. AR-induced growth stimulation of human prostate CICs requires AR-dependent intracellular pathways. The identification of such AR-dependent intracellular pathways offers new leads for the development of effective therapies for prostate cancer. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Whole-genome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Prostate Cancer Identify New Genetic Alterations Driving Disease Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Shancheng; Wei, Gong-Hong; Liu, Dongbing

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global disparities in prostate cancer (PCa) incidence highlight the urgent need to identify genomic abnormalities in prostate tumors in different ethnic populations including Asian men. OBJECTIVE: To systematically explore the genomic complexity and define disease-driven genetic......-scale and comprehensive genomic data of prostate cancer from Asian population. Identification of these genetic alterations may help advance prostate cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment....... alterations in PCa. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The study sequenced whole-genome and transcriptome of tumor-benign paired tissues from 65 treatment-naive Chinese PCa patients. Subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 293 PCa-relevant genes was performed in another cohort of 145 prostate tumors. OUTCOME...

  7. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1

  8. Radiographic Progression-Free Survival as a Clinically Meaningful End Point in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The PREVAIL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana E; Beer, Tomasz M; Loriot, Yohann; Higano, Celestia S; Armstrong, Andrew J; Sternberg, Cora N; de Bono, Johann S; Tombal, Bertrand; Parli, Teresa; Bhattacharya, Suman; Phung, De; Krivoshik, Andrew; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Michael J

    2018-05-01

    Drug development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has been limited by a lack of clinically relevant trial end points short of overall survival (OS). Radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) as defined by the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) is a candidate end point that represents a clinically meaningful benefit to patients. To demonstrate the robustness of the PCWG2 definition and to examine the relationship between rPFS and OS. PREVAIL was a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multinational study that enrolled 1717 chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer from September 2010 through September 2012. The data were analyzed in November 2016. Patients were randomized 1:1 to enzalutamide 160 mg or placebo until confirmed radiographic disease progression or a skeletal-related event and initiation of either cytotoxic chemotherapy or an investigational agent for prostate cancer treatment. Sensitivity analyses (SAs) of investigator-assessed rPFS were performed using the final rPFS data cutoff (May 6, 2012; 439 events; SA1) and the interim OS data cutoff (September 16, 2013; 540 events; SA2). Additional SAs using investigator-assessed rPFS from the final rPFS data cutoff assessed the impact of skeletal-related events (SA3), clinical progression (SA4), a confirmatory scan for soft-tissue disease progression (SA5), and all deaths regardless of time after study drug discontinuation (SA6). Correlations between investigator-assessed rPFS (SA2) and OS were calculated using Spearman ρ and Kendall τ via Clayton copula. In the 1717 men (mean age, 72.0 [range, 43.0-93.0] years in enzalutamide arm and 71.0 [range, 42.0-93.0] years in placebo arm), enzalutamide significantly reduced risk of radiographic progression or death in all SAs, with hazard ratios of 0.22 (SA1; 95% CI, 0.18-0.27), 0.31 (SA2; 95% CI, 0.27-0.35), 0.21 (SA3; 95% CI, 0.18-0.26), 0.21 (SA4; 95% CI, 0.17-0.26), 0

  9. Effect of Visceral Disease Site on Outcomes in Patients With Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Treated With Enzalutamide in the PREVAIL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alumkal, Joshi J; Chowdhury, Simon; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; de Bono, Johann S; Tombal, Bertrand; Carles, Joan; Flaig, Thomas W; Dorff, Tanya B; Phung, De; Forer, David; Noonberg, Sarah B; Mansbach, Hank; Beer, Tomasz M; Higano, Celestia S

    2017-10-01

    The Multinational Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Efficacy and Safety Study of Oral MDV3100 in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Progressive Metastatic Prostate Cancer Who Have Failed Androgen Deprivation Therapy (PREVAIL) trial was unique as it included patients with visceral disease. This analysis was designed to describe outcomes for the subgroup of men from PREVAIL with specific sites of visceral disease to help clinicians understand how these patients responded to enzalutamide prior to chemotherapy. Prespecified analyses examined the coprimary endpoints of radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) only. All other efficacy analyses were post hoc. The visceral subgroup was divided into liver or lung subsets. Patients with both liver and lung metastases were included in the liver subset. Of the 1717 patients in PREVAIL, 204 (12%) had visceral metastases at screening (liver only or liver/lung metastases, n = 74; lung only metastases, n = 130). In patients with liver metastases, enzalutamide was associated with an improvement in rPFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.90) but not OS (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.57-1.87). In patients with lung metastases only, the HR for rPFS (0.14; 95% CI, 0.06-0.36) and the HR for OS (0.59; 95% CI, 0.33-1.06) favored enzalutamide over placebo. Patients with liver metastases had worse outcomes than those with lung metastases, regardless of treatment. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in patients with visceral disease. Enzalutamide is an active first-line treatment option for men with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and visceral disease. Patients with lung-only disease fared better than patients with liver disease, regardless of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of repeated cycles of radioligand therapy using [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 on renal function in patients with hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanova, Anna; Becker, Anja; Eppard, Elisabeth; Kuerpig, Stefan; Essler, Markus; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Fisang, Christian [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany); Feldmann, Georg [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Internal Medicine, MED3, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 is a well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. However, because of the mainly renal excretion of the tracer, the kidneys are one of the most limiting organs. The purpose of this study was to examine the post-therapeutic changes in renal function over time and to identify risk factors for developing renal toxicity. We also tested the reliability of markers for renal function monitoring. Fifty-five patients with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer treated with at least three cycles of [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 were investigated. Renal function was assessed through laboratory tests (creatinine, GFR, cystatin C) and Tc-99 m-MAG3 measurements. Adverse events were classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v4.0. To identify risk factors for renal toxicity, we used Pearson's correlation coefficient and the corresponding p values. None of the 55 patients experienced severe nephrotoxicity (grade 3/4). In 14 patients (25%), we observed increased creatinine levels of CTC 1 or 2 . There were 16 cases of increased GFR (grade 1/2). At the baseline, only 14 patients had elevated cystatin C. However, post-therapeutic cystatin C was elevated in 32 patients (58%). A significant effect on renal function was found for age (p = 0.049), hypertension (p = 0.001) and pre-existing kidney disease (p = 0.001). The most reliable predictive markers of nephrotoxicity were TER-MAG3 and cystatin C. Renal toxicity in patients treated with [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 was low. There was no (sub)acute grade 3 or 4 nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  11. Transcription-Based Molecular Imaging and Gene Therapy for Castration-resistant and Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Translational Models

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ziyue

    2013-01-01

    The advanced stage of prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death for American men. Novel, effective treatment options and more cancer-specific diagnostic tools are urgently needed to facilitate patient management. Here, we explored the construction and application of an array of gene-based molecular imaging and therapeutic vectors in a variety of clinically relevant settings. These vectors exploit prostate cancer-specific promoters to control the transcription of imag...

  12. High-Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor From Men with Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    to previously-reported unselected populations suggesting that this may be used as a prognostic marker for aggressive disease in the future. Finally...although an ETV1 fusion was detected). Importantly, paired prostate cancer specimens—particularly those representing primary and distant metastases—are...two-sided Fisher’s exact test p=0.25) (8). These findings support TP53 alterations as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer, in addition to their

  13. Skeletal-related events significantly impact health-related quality of life in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: data from PREVAIL and AFFIRM trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, F; Ivanescu, C; Phung, D; Loriot, Y; Abhyankar, S; Beer, T M; Tombal, B; Holmstrom, S

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the impact of skeletal-related events (SREs) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in phase III trials of enzalutamide versus placebo. Patients with mCRPC experiencing at least one SRE during AFFIRM and PREVAIL were assessed for trajectory-adjusted mean change in HRQoL by first SRE using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P; AFFIRM, three domains, and PREVAIL, nine domains) and EQ-5D (PREVAIL) instruments. First SREs caused HRQoL deterioration in both trials. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact, with clinically meaningful reductions in seven of nine FACT-P domains in PREVAIL and all three in AFFIRM (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) change in FACT-P total score -16.95 (-26.47, -7.44) and -9.69 (-16.10, -3.27), respectively). In PREVAIL, first SREs caused clinically meaningful declines in EQ-5D utility index, irrespective of category; spinal cord compression had the largest impact (mean (95% CI) change -0.24 (-0.39, -0.08)). In AFFIRM, FACT-P and FACT-General total scores showed clinically meaningful declines after radiation/surgery to bone. SREs were associated with clinically meaningful functional declines in the daily lives of patients with mCRPC. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact on HRQoL.

  14. Optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy following radiation therapy in intermediate- or high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Frederico; Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto Novis de; Sasse, Andre Deeke, E-mail: sasse@cevon.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Objectives: to investigate current evidence on the optimal duration of adjuvant hormone deprivation for prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases. Data from randomized trials comparing different durations of hormone blockade was collected for pooled analysis. Overall survival, disease-free survival, disease-specific survival and toxicity were the outcomes of interest. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects model. Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria. For overall survival, the pooled data from the studies demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for longer hormone deprivation (Hazard Ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.96). A statistically significant benefit was also found for disease-free survival (Hazard Ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.89), and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.85). Studies with longer blockade duration arm demonstrated greater benefit. Toxicity was low, with no increase in cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Longer duration of androgen deprivation combined to radiotherapy prolongs OS, DFS and DSS in patients with intermediate and high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer. However, this evidence is based on trials using older radiation techniques, and further research of combination of androgen deprivation and new RT technologies may be warranted. (author)

  15. The Gαh-PLCδ1 signaling axis drives metastatic progression in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shang-Pen; Liu, Pei-Yao; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Chen, Chi-Long; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Tsai, Yu-Hui; Lin, Yuan-Feng

    2017-06-02

    Distant metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) to other organs, e.g., the lungs, has been correlated with poor survival rates among breast cancer patients. Therefore, the identification of useful therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis or even inhibit tumor growth of TNBC is urgently needed. Gαh is a novel GTP-binding protein and known as an inactive form of calcium-dependent tissue transglutaminase. However, the functional consequences of transamidating and G-protein activities of tissue transglutaminase in promoting cancer metastasis are still controversial. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to estimate the prognostic values of Gαh and PLCδ1 by utilizing public databases and performing immunohistochemical staining experiments. Cell-based invasion assays and in vivo lung colony-forming and orthotropic lung metastasis models were established to evaluate the effectiveness of interrupting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between Gαh and PLCδ1 in inhibiting the invasive ability and metastatic potential of TNBC cells. Here, we showed that the increased level of cytosolic, not extracellular, Gαh is a poor prognostic marker in breast cancer patients and correlates with the metastatic evolution of TNBC cells. Moreover, clinicopathological analyses revealed that the combined signature of high Gαh/PLCδ1 levels indicates worse prognosis in patients with breast cancer and correlates with lymph node metastasis of ER-negative breast cancer. Blocking the PPI of the Gαh/PLCδ1 complex by synthetically myristoylated PLCδ1 peptide corresponding to the Gαh-binding interface appeared to significantly suppress cellular invasiveness in vitro and inhibit lung metastatic colonies of TNBC cells in vivo. This study establishes Gαh/PLCδ1 as a poor prognostic factor for patients with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers, including TNBCs, and provides therapeutic value by targeting the PPI of the Gαh/PLCδ1 complex to combat the metastatic progression

  16. Enzalutamide in Japanese patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A post-hoc analysis of the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Go; Yonese, Junji; Fukagai, Takashi; Kamba, Tomomi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nozawa, Masahiro; Mansbach, Hank; Theeuwes, Ad; Beer, Tomasz M; Tombal, Bertrand; Ueda, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients. This was a post-hoc analysis of the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing on androgen deprivation therapy were randomized one-to-one to 160 mg/day oral enzalutamide or placebo until discontinuation on radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent antineoplastic therapy. Coprimary end-points were centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary end-points were investigator-assessed radiographic progression-free survival, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen progression, prostate-specific antigen response (≥50% decline) and time to skeletal-related event. Of 1717 patients, 61 were enrolled in Japan (enzalutamide, n = 28; placebo, n = 33); hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of 0.30 for centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (0.03-2.95), 0.59 for overall survival (0.20-1.8), 0.46 for time to chemotherapy (0.22-0.96) and 0.36 for time to prostate-specific antigen progression (0.17-0.75) showed the treatment benefit of enzalutamide over the placebo. Prostate-specific antigen responses were observed in 60.7% of enzalutamide-treated men versus 21.2% of placebo-treated men. Plasma concentrations of enzalutamide were higher in Japanese patients: the geometric mean ratio of Japanese/non-Japanese patients was 1.126 (90% confidence interval 1.018-1.245) at 13 weeks. Treatment-related adverse events grade ≥3 occurred in 3.6% of enzalutamide- and 6.1% of placebo-treated Japanese patients. Treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall results from PREVAIL. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Urology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on

  17. Nuclear-specific AR-V7 Protein Localization is Necessary to Guide Treatment Selection in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Howard I; Graf, Ryon P; Schreiber, Nicole A; McLaughlin, Brigit; Lu, David; Louw, Jessica; Danila, Daniel C; Dugan, Lyndsey; Johnson, Ann; Heller, Glenn; Fleisher, Martin; Dittamore, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) expressing AR-V7 protein localized to the nucleus (nuclear-specific) identify metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients with improved overall survival (OS) on taxane therapy relative to the androgen receptor signaling inhibitors (ARSi) abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and apalutamide. To evaluate if expanding the positivity criteria to include both nuclear and cytoplasmic AR-V7 localization ("nuclear-agnostic") identifies more patients who would benefit from a taxane over an ARSi. The study used a cross-sectional cohort. Between December 2012 and March 2015, 193 pretherapy blood samples, 191 of which were evaluable, were collected and processed from 161 unique mCRPC patients before starting a new line of systemic therapy for disease progression at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The association between two AR-V7 scoring criteria, post-therapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) change (PTPC) and OS following ARSi or taxane treatment, was explored. One criterion required nuclear-specific AR-V7 localization, and the other required an AR-V7 signal but was agnostic to protein localization in CTCs. Correlation of AR-V7 status to PTPC and OS was investigated. Relationships with survival were analyzed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analyses. A total of 34 (18%) samples were AR-V7-positive using nuclear-specific criteria, and 56 (29%) were AR-V7-positive using nuclear-agnostic criteria. Following ARSi treatment, none of the 16 nuclear-specific AR-V7-positive samples and six of the 32 (19%) nuclear-agnostic AR-V7-positive samples had ≥50% PTPC at 12 weeks. The strongest baseline factor influencing OS was the interaction between the presence of nuclear-specific AR-V7-positive CTCs and treatment with a taxane (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.078-0.79; p=0.019). This interaction was not significant when nuclear-agnostic criteria were used. To reliably inform treatment selection

  18. RANKL/RANK/OPG cytokine receptor system: mRNA expression pattern in BPH, primary and metastatic prostate cancer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Frank; König, Frank; Lebentrau, Steffen; Jandrig, Burkhard; Krause, Hans; Strenziok, Romy; Schostak, Martin

    2018-02-01

    The cytokine system RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand), its receptor RANK and the antagonist OPG (osteoprotegerin) play a critical role in bone turnover. Our investigation was conducted to describe the gene expression at primary tumour site in prostate cancer patients and correlate the results with Gleason Score and PSA level. Seventy-one samples were obtained from prostate cancer patients at the time of radical prostatectomy and palliative prostate resection (n = 71). Patients with benign prostate hyperplasia served as controls (n = 60). We performed real-time RT-PCR after microdissection of the samples. The mRNA expression of RANK was highest in tumour tissue from patients with bone metastases (p BPH or locally confined tumours, also shown in clinical subgroups distinguished by Gleason Score (BPH tissue but did not exceed as much as in the tumour tissue. We demonstrated that RANK, RANKL and OPG are directly expressed by prostate cancer cells at the primary tumour site and showed a clear correlation with Gleason Score, serum PSA level and advanced disease. In BPH, mRNA expression is also detectable, but RANK expression does not exceed as much as compared to tumour tissue.

  19. Custirsen in combination with docetaxel and prednisone for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (SYNERGY trial): a phase 3, multicentre, open-label, randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Higano, Celestia S; Blumenstein, Brent; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Reeves, James; Feyerabend, Susan; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Merseburger, Axel S; Stenzl, Arnulf; Bergman, Andries M; Mukherjee, Som D; Zalewski, Pawel; Saad, Fred; Jacobs, Cindy; Gleave, Martin; de Bono, Johann S

    2017-04-01

    Clusterin is a chaperone protein associated with treatment resistance and upregulated by apoptotic stressors such as chemotherapy. Custirsen is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits clusterin production. The aim of the SYNERGY trial was to investigate the effect of custirsen in combination with docetaxel and prednisone on overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. SYNERGY was a phase 3, multicentre, open-label, randomised trial set at 134 study centres in 12 countries. Patients were eligible for participation if they had: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and had received no previous chemotherapy; prostate-specific antigen greater than 5 ng/mL; and a Karnofsky performance score of 70% or higher. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 centrally to either the docetaxel, prednisone, and custirsen combination or docetaxel and prednisone alone. Patients were not masked to treatment allocation. Randomisation was stratified by opioid use for cancer-related pain and radiographic evidence of progression. All patients received docetaxel 75 mg/m 2 intravenously with 5 mg of prednisone orally twice daily. Patients assigned docetaxel, prednisone, and custirsen received weekly doses of custirsen 640 mg intravenously after three loading doses of 640 mg. The primary endpoint was overall survival analysed in the intention-to-treat population. Patients who received at least one study dose were included in the safety analysis set. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01188187. The trial is completed and final analyses are reported here. Between Dec 10, 2010, and Nov 7, 2012, 1022 patients were enrolled to the trial, of whom 510 were assigned docetaxel, prednisone, and custirsen and 512 were allocated docetaxel and prednisone. No difference in overall survival was recorded between the two groups (median survival 23·4 months [95% CI 20·9-24·8] with docetaxel, prednisone, and custirsen vs

  20. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer -- Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Per Olov; Ala-Opas, Martti; Brekkan, Einar

    2002-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, interest in parenteral estrogen therapy for prostate cancer was renewed when it was found that it influenced liver metabolism only marginally and had very few cardiovascular side-effects. In this study high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) was compared to combined...

  1. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, P.O.; Damber, J.E.; Hagerman, I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events...

  2. Two Domains of Vimentin Are Expressed on the Surface of Lymph Node, Bone and Brain Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lines along with the Putative Stem Cell Marker Proteins CD44 and CD133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Nicole F. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maurer, Jochen [Sanford-Burnham, Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Sheng, Huiming [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Bensussan, Armand [INSERM U976, Hôpital Saint Louis, F-75475 Paris (France); Department of Immunology, Dermatology and Oncology, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMRS976 F-75475 Paris (France); Maricic, Igor; Kumar, Vipin [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Laboratory of Autoimmunity, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Braciak, Todd A., E-mail: tbraciak@tpims.org [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2011-07-13

    Vimentin was originally identified as an intermediate filament protein present only as an intracellular component in many cell types. However, this protein has now been detected on the surface of a number of different cancer cell types in a punctate distribution pattern. Increased vimentin expression has been indicated as an important step in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required for the metastasis of prostate cancer. Here, using two vimentin-specific monoclonal antibodies (SC5 and V9 directed against the coil one rod domain and the C-terminus of the vimentin protein, respectively), we examined whether either of these domains would be displayed on the surface of three commonly studied prostate cancer cell lines isolated from different sites of metastases. Confocal analysis of LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines (derived from lymph node, bone or brain prostate metastases, respectively) demonstrated that both domains of vimentin are present on the surface of these metastatic cancer cell types. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that vimentin expression was readily detected along with CD44 expression but only a small subpopulation of prostate cancer cells expressed vimentin and the putative stem cell marker CD133 along with CD44. Finally, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) nanoparticles that target vimentin could bind and internalize into tested prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that at least two domains of vimentin are present on the surface of metastatic prostate cancer cells and suggest that vimentin could provide a useful target for nanoparticle- or antibody- cancer therapeutic agents directed against highly invasive cancer and/or stem cells.

  3. Toward Maximizing Immunotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer – Rationale for Combinatorial Approaches Using Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovin, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is particularly suited for active immunotherapy because of the expression of a distinctive number of antigens which are overexpressed on prostate cancer cells and cell lines. There is evidence in this disease that tumors promote immune tolerance starting early in the disease course. As such, chemotherapy, by suppressing tumors and activating immune system homeostatic mechanisms, may help overcome this tumor-induced immune tolerance. Sipuleucel-T which has recently been approved in the US, is an autologous cellular product immunotherapy that induces immune activity likely through activation of dendritic cells. This was associated with a survival benefit in the absence of significant toxicity. However, a post hoc analysis of phase III trial participants found a substantial survival benefit to receiving docetaxel some months after sipuleucel-T. However, another phase III immunotherapy trial combining a prostate cancer therapeutic vaccine GVAX plus docetaxel versus standard docetaxel therapy in advanced prostate cancer, observed a lower overall survival with the vaccine regimen. These trials highlight major unresolved questions concerning the optimum choice, dosing, and timing of chemotherapy relative to active immunotherapy and the overall merits of considering this approach. The ideal treatment approach remains unclear; advances in biomarker validation and trial design may likely improve our ability to assess biologic benefit irrespective of the development of true antitumor immunity.

  4. Toward Maximizing Immunotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer – Rationale for Combinatorial Approaches Using Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovin, Susan R., E-mail: slovins@mskcc.org [Genitourinary Oncology Service, Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers, Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Prostate cancer is particularly suited for active immunotherapy because of the expression of a distinctive number of antigens which are overexpressed on prostate cancer cells and cell lines. There is evidence in this disease that tumors promote immune tolerance starting early in the disease course. As such, chemotherapy, by suppressing tumors and activating immune system homeostatic mechanisms, may help overcome this tumor-induced immune tolerance. Sipuleucel-T which has recently been approved in the US, is an autologous cellular product immunotherapy that induces immune activity likely through activation of dendritic cells. This was associated with a survival benefit in the absence of significant toxicity. However, a post hoc analysis of phase III trial participants found a substantial survival benefit to receiving docetaxel some months after sipuleucel-T. However, another phase III immunotherapy trial combining a prostate cancer therapeutic vaccine GVAX plus docetaxel versus standard docetaxel therapy in advanced prostate cancer, observed a lower overall survival with the vaccine regimen. These trials highlight major unresolved questions concerning the optimum choice, dosing, and timing of chemotherapy relative to active immunotherapy and the overall merits of considering this approach. The ideal treatment approach remains unclear; advances in biomarker validation and trial design may likely improve our ability to assess biologic benefit irrespective of the development of true antitumor immunity.

  5. Novel Junction-specific and Quantifiable In Situ Detection of AR-V7 and its Clinical Correlates in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yezi; Sharp, Adam; Anderson, Courtney M; Silberstein, John L; Taylor, Maritza; Lu, Changxue; Zhao, Pei; De Marzo, Angelo M; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Wang, Mindy; Wu, Xingyong; Luo, Yuling; Su, Nan; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Welti, Jonathan; Park, Emily; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Coleman, Ilsa; Morrissey, Colm; Plymate, Stephen R; Nelson, Peter S; de Bono, Johann S; Luo, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been implicated in resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Tissue- or cell-based in situ detection of AR-V7, however, has been limited by lack of specificity. To address current limitations in precision measurement of AR-V7 by developing a novel junction-specific AR-V7 RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) assay compatible with automated quantification. We designed a RISH method to visualize single splice junctions in cells and tissue. Using the validated assay for junction-specific detection of the full-length AR (AR-FL) and AR-V7, we generated quantitative data, blinded to clinical data, for 63 prostate tumor biopsies. We evaluated clinical correlates of AR-FL/AR-V7 measurements, including association with prostate-specific antigen progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and clinical and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS), in a subset of patients starting treatment with abiraterone or enzalutamide following biopsy. Quantitative AR-FL/AR-V7 data were generated from 56 of the 63 (88.9%) biopsy specimens examined, of which 44 were mCRPC biopsies. Positive AR-V7 signals were detected in 34.1% (15/44) mCRPC specimens, all of which also co-expressed AR-FL. The median AR-V7/AR-FL ratio was 11.9% (range 2.7-30.3%). Positive detection of AR-V7 was correlated with indicators of high disease burden at baseline. Among the 25 CRPC biopsies collected before treatment with abiraterone or enzalutamide, positive AR-V7 detection, but not higher AR-FL, was significantly associated with shorter PSA-PFS (hazard ratio 2.789, 95% confidence interval 1.12-6.95; p=0.0081). We report for the first time a RISH method for highly specific and quantifiable detection of splice junctions, allowing further characterization of AR-V7 and its clinical significance. Higher AR-V7 levels detected and quantified using a novel method were associated with poorer response to

  6. Subsequent Chemotherapy and Treatment Patterns After Abiraterone Acetate in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Post Hoc Analysis of COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bono, Johann S; Smith, Matthew R; Saad, Fred; Rathkopf, Dana E; Mulders, Peter F A; Small, Eric J; Shore, Neal D; Fizazi, Karim; De Porre, Peter; Kheoh, Thian; Li, Jinhui; Todd, Mary B; Ryan, Charles J; Flaig, Thomas W

    2017-04-01

    Treatment patterns for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have changed substantially in the last few years. In trial COU-AA-302 (chemotherapy-naïve men with mCRPC), abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA) significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) when compared to placebo plus prednisone (P). This post hoc analysis investigated clinical responses to docetaxel as first subsequent therapy (FST) among patients who progressed following protocol-specified treatment with AA, and characterized subsequent treatment patterns among older (≥75 yr) and younger (AA arm received subsequent treatment with one or more agents approved for mCRPC. Efficacy analysis was performed for patients for whom baseline and at least one post-baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values were available. Baseline and at least one post-baseline PSA values were available for 100 AA patients who received docetaxel as FST. While acknowledging the limitations of post hoc analyses, 40% (40/100) of these patients had an unconfirmed ≥50% PSA decline with first subsequent docetaxel therapy, and 27% (27/100) had a confirmed ≥50% PSA decline. The median docetaxel treatment duration among these 100 patients was 4.2 mo. Docetaxel was the most common FST among older and younger patients from each treatment arm. However, 43% (79/185) of older patients who progressed on AA received no subsequent therapy for mCRPC, compared with 17% (60/361) of younger patients. Patients with mCRPC who progress with AA treatment may still derive benefit from subsequent docetaxel therapy. These data support further assessment of treatment patterns following AA treatment for mCRPC, particularly among older patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00887198. Treatment patterns for advanced prostate cancer have changed substantially in the last few years. This additional analysis provides evidence of clinical benefit for subsequent chemotherapy in men with advanced

  7. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Valta, Maija; Seppänen, Jani; Tarkkonen, Kati; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Härkönen, Pirkko

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig) and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p < 0.05) and inhibited metastasis to iliac and sacral lymph nodes. In addition, tumor volumes were smaller in the VEGFR3-Ig-treated group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Transfection of PC-3 cells with the VEGF-C gene led to a high level of 29/31 kD VEGF-C expression in PC-3 cells. The size of orthotopic and subcutaneous PC-3/VEGF-C tumors was significantly greater than that of PC-3/mock tumors (both p < 0.001). Interestingly, while most orthotopic PC-3 and PC-3/mock tumors grown for 4 weeks metastasized to prostate-draining lymph nodes, orthotopic PC-3/VEGF-C tumors primarily metastasized to the lungs. PC-3/VEGF-C tumors showed highly angiogenic morphology with an increased density of blood capillaries compared with PC-3/mock tumors (p < 0.001). The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites

  8. The PREVAIL Study: Primary Outcomes by Site and Extent of Baseline Disease for Enzalutamide-treated Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher P; Higano, Celestia S; Keane, Thomas; Andriole, Gerald; Saad, Fred; Iversen, Peter; Miller, Kurt; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Armstrong, Andrew J; Sternberg, Cora N; Loriot, Yohann; de Bono, Johann; Noonberg, Sarah B; Mansbach, Hank; Bhattacharya, Suman; Perabo, Frank; Beer, Tomasz M; Tombal, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly improved overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) versus placebo in the PREVAIL trial of men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. To assess the effects of enzalutamide versus placebo in patients from PREVAIL based on site and extent of baseline disease. One thousand seven hundred and seventeen asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients were randomized to enzalutamide (n=872) or placebo (n=845). Subgroup analyses included nonvisceral (only bone and/or nodal; n=1513), visceral (lung and/or liver; n=204), low-volume bone disease (1 in patients with visceral disease (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.55-1.23). Enzalutamide was well tolerated in patients with or without visceral disease. Enzalutamide provided clinically significant benefits in men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with or without visceral disease, low- or high-volume bone disease, or lymph node only disease. Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-including those with or without visceral disease or widespread bone disease-benefitted from enzalutamide, an active well-tolerated therapy. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone on the pharmacokinetics of dextromethorphan and theophylline in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, K N; Tolcher, A; Lee, P; Rosen, P J; Kollmannsberger, C K; Papadopoulos, K P; Patnaik, A; Molina, A; Jiao, J; Pankras, C; Kaiser, B; Bernard, A; Tran, N; Acharya, M

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone on the pharmacokinetics of dextromethorphan HBr (CYP2D6 substrate) and theophylline (CYP1A2 substrate) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Men with progressive metastatic mCRPC who failed gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy and ≥1 lines of chemotherapy were enrolled. Patients received two doses of dextromethorphan HBr-30 mg (n = 18; group A) or theophylline-100 mg (n = 16; group B) under fasting conditions; one dose on cycle 1, day -8, and the other dose on cycle 1, day 8. Only patients with extensive CYP2D6 metabolizing status were assigned to group A. All patients received continuous daily oral abiraterone acetate (1,000 mg) plus prednisone (10 mg) starting on cycle 1, day 1. Coadministration of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone increased the systemic exposure of dextromethorphan by approximately 100%. Ratios of geometric means for maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) (275.36%) and area under plasma concentration-time curves from time 0 to 24 h (AUC(24h)) (268.14%) of dextromethorphan were outside the bioequivalence limit. The pharmacokinetics of theophylline was unaltered following coadministration of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone. Ratios of geometric means [C(max); 102.36% and AUC(24h); 108.03%] of theophylline exposure parameters were within the bioequivalence limit. The safety profile of abiraterone acetate was consistent with reported toxicities. Abiraterone acetate plus prednisone increased the exposure of dextromethorphan, suggesting a need for caution when coadministrating with known CYP2D6 substrates. The pharmacokinetics of theophylline was unaffected when coadministered with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone.

  10. Stroma-induced Jagged1 expression drives PC3 prostate cancer cell migration; disparate effects of RIP-generated proteolytic fragments on cell behaviour and Notch signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delury, Craig, E-mail: c.delury@lancaster.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Hart, Claire, E-mail: claire.hart@manchester.ac.uk [Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Paterson Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Brown, Mick, E-mail: michael.brown@ics.manchester.ac.uk [Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Paterson Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Clarke, Noel, E-mail: noel.clarke@christie.nhs.uk [Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Paterson Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Parkin, Edward, E-mail: e.parkin@lancaster.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-25

    The Notch ligand Jagged1 is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) which yields a soluble ectodomain (sJag) and a soluble Jagged1 intracellular domain (JICD). The full-length Jagged1 protein enhances prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation and is highly expressed in metastatic cells. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms by which Jagged1 or its RIP-generated fragments might promote PCa bone metastasis. In the current study we show that bone marrow stroma (BMS) induces Jagged1 expression in bone metastatic prostate cancer PC3 cells and that this enhanced expression is mechanistically linked to the promotion of cell migration. We also show that RIP-generated Jagged1 fragments exert disparate effects on PC3 cell behaviour and Notch signaling. In conclusion, the expression of both the full-length ligand and its RIP-generated fragments must be considered in tandem when attempting to regulate Jagged1 as a possible PCa therapy. - Highlights: • Bone marrow stroma induces Jagged1 expression in prostate cancer (PCa) PC3 cells. • This enhanced expression of full-length Jagged1 is required for PC3 cell migration. • Proteolytic fragments of Jagged1 exert disparate effects on PC3 cell behaviour. • Effects of fragments on cell behaviour do not correlate with Notch signaling. • Effects of Jagged1 and its fragments on PCa metastasis likely to be complex.

  11. Exoftalmo unilateral por metástase orbitária de carcinoma de próstata Unilateral exophthalmos secondary to orbital metastatic carcinoma of the prostate: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Corrêa Barbosa

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de exoftalmo ou proptose unilateral direita, causado por metástase orbitária de carcinoma da próstata em paciente negro, na 6.ª década de vida, com evolução de 9 meses. O exame neuro-ocular revelou acentuada diminuição da agudeza visual, perturbação para visão de cores, perda da convergência, diminuição dos reflexos à luz e acomodação e restrição dos movimentos oculares. O paciente apresentava discreta disbasia esquerda por metástase no fêmur. Exames laboratoriais, radiológicos e a biópsia confirmaram a etiologia carcinomatosa da manifestação ocular.A case of right unilateral exophthalmos secondary to metastatic carcinoma of the prostate, in a 68 years old negro patient in which the ocular manifestation lasted 9 months is reported The extrinsic movements of the eye were limited. Pupils reacted slightly to light and accommodation. There was no ocular convergence. The vision of the right eye was blurred and there was mild color vision. The prostate was found to be petrous by touch specially in the right portion. The laboratory findings pointed to a prostatic carcinoma. Bone X-rays were strongly suggestive of metastatic tumour. The histological examination of the orbital tumour showed prostatic tumour cells.

  12. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans with Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Figure 2: PC cell soluble factors confer transcriptional upregulation of DHT converting enzymes by patient derived ADMSCs (pASCs...associated exosomes. Stem Cells, 2014. 32(4): p. 983-97. 30. Mathur, A., et al., Subverting ER-stress towards apoptosis by nelfinavir and curcumin coexposure...and curcumin coexposure augments docetaxel efficacy in castration resistant prostate cancer cells. PLoS One, 2014. 9(8): p. e103109. 29. Datta, A., et

  13. The PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in men with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Post hoc analysis of Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choung-Soo; Theeuwes, Ad; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-05-01

    This post hoc analysis evaluated treatment effects, safety, and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Korean patients in the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed on androgen deprivation therapy received 160 mg/d oral enzalutamide or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation due to radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent therapy. Coprimary end points were centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included investigator-assessed rPFS, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, PSA response (≥50% decline), and time to skeletal-related event. Of 1,717 total patients, 78 patients were enrolled in Korea (enzalutamide, n=40; placebo, n=38). Hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for enzalutamide versus placebo were 0.23 (0.02-2.24) for centrally assessed rPFS, 0.77 (0.28-2.15) for OS, 0.21 (0.08-0.51) for time to chemotherapy, and 0.31 (0.17-0.56) for time to PSA progression. A PSA response was observed in 70.0% of enzalutamide-treated and 10.5% of placebo-treated Korean patients. Adverse events of grade ≥3 occurred in 33% of enzalutamide-treated and 11% of placebo-treated Korean patients, with median treatment durations of 13.0 and 5.1 months, respectively. At 13 weeks, the plasma concentration of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide was similar in Korean and non-Korean patients (geometric mean ratio, 1.04; 90% confidence interval, 0.97-1.10). In Korean patients, treatment effects and safety of enzalutamide were consistent with those observed in the overall PREVAIL study population (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01212991).

  14. An analysis of leukapheresis and central venous catheter use in the randomized, placebo controlled, phase 3 IMPACT trial of Sipuleucel-T for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Robert C; Polcari, Anthony J; Shore, Neil D; Price, Thomas H; Sims, Robert B; Maher, Johnathan C; Whitmore, James B; Corman, John M

    2013-02-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy. We review the safety of the leukapheresis procedure required for sipuleucel-T preparation and complications related to venous catheter use in the randomized, placebo controlled phase 3 IMPACT (IMmunotherapy for ProstAte Cancer Trial) study (NCT 00065442). A total of 512 patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients were scheduled to undergo 3 standard 1.5 to 2.0 blood volume leukapheresis procedures at 2-week intervals. Leukapheresis related adverse events and those related to venous catheter use were reviewed. Immune cell counts were examined throughout the treatment course. Of 512 enrolled patients 506 underwent 1 or more leukapheresis procedures and were included in this analysis. Adverse events were comparable between the sipuleucel-T and control arms. Leukapheresis related adverse events were primarily associated with transient hypocalcemia (39.3%). Most leukapheresis related adverse events (97%) were of mild/moderate intensity. Median white blood cell count and absolute monocyte and lymphocyte counts were stable and within normal ranges throughout the treatment course. Of all patients 23.3% had a central venous catheter placed primarily for leukapheresis. Patients with vs without a central venous catheter had a higher risk of infection potentially related to catheter use (11.9% vs 1.3%, p nervous system (5.9% vs 2.1%, p = 0.06). Adverse events related to leukapheresis are manageable and quickly reversible. The majority of patients can undergo leukapheresis without a central venous catheter. Central venous catheters are associated with an increased risk of infections and venous vascular events. Peripheral intravenous access should be used when feasible. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PSA response to cabazitaxel is associated with improved progression-free survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: the non-interventional QoLiTime study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerer, Peter; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Keller, Martin; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and progression-free and overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with cabazitaxel. Men with mCRPC receiving cabazitaxel (25 mg/m 2 , every 3 weeks) plus oral prednis(ol)one (10 mg/day) were enrolled in the non-interventional, prospective QoLiTime study. Main outcome measures were progression-free survival and overall survival, in all patients and in those who showed a ≥ 50 or a ≥ 30% decrease in PSA relative to baseline after four cycles of cabazitaxel, as well as quality-of-life parameters. Of the 527 men (median age 72 years), 266 received ≥ 4 cycles of cabazitaxel and had PSA response data. After four cycles, 34.6% of men achieved a PSA decrease ≥ 50% and 49.6% a decrease ≥ 30%. Median progression-free survival was 7.7 (95% CI 6.2, 9.5) months, and overall survival was 19.5 (95% CI 16.0, 30.9) months, corresponding to 1-year event rates of 39.4 and 78.8%, respectively. Median progression-free survival was longer in PSA responders versus non-responders (15.7 vs 5.5 months at 50% cut-off; 15.7 vs 5.3 months for 30% cut-off; both P PSA response after four cycles of cabazitaxel is associated with improved progression-free survival in men with mCRPC treated with cabazitaxel plus prednis(ol)one.

  16. Comparison of Timed Automata with Discrete Event Simulation for Modeling of Biomarker-Based Treatment Decisions: An Illustration for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Koen; Schivo, Stefano; Mehra, Niven; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Langerak, Rom; de Bono, Johann S; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2017-12-01

    With the advent of personalized medicine, the field of health economic modeling is being challenged and the use of patient-level dynamic modeling techniques might be required. To illustrate the usability of two such techniques, timed automata (TA) and discrete event simulation (DES), for modeling personalized treatment decisions. An early health technology assessment on the use of circulating tumor cells, compared with prostate-specific antigen and bone scintigraphy, to inform treatment decisions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was performed. Both modeling techniques were assessed quantitatively, in terms of intermediate outcomes (e.g., overtreatment) and health economic outcomes (e.g., net monetary benefit). Qualitatively, among others, model structure, agent interactions, data management (i.e., importing and exporting data), and model transparency were assessed. Both models yielded realistic and similar intermediate and health economic outcomes. Overtreatment was reduced by 6.99 and 7.02 weeks by applying circulating tumor cell as a response marker at a net monetary benefit of -€1033 and -€1104 for the TA model and the DES model, respectively. Software-specific differences were observed regarding data management features and the support for statistical distributions, which were considered better for the DES software. Regarding method-specific differences, interactions were modeled more straightforward using TA, benefiting from its compositional model structure. Both techniques prove suitable for modeling personalized treatment decisions, although DES would be preferred given the current software-specific limitations of TA. When these limitations are resolved, TA would be an interesting modeling alternative if interactions are key or its compositional structure is useful to manage multi-agent complex problems. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2, thereby preventing AR ubiquitination and protein degradation. Consequently, HOTAIR expression is sufficient to induce androgen-independent AR activation and drive the AR-mediated transcriptional program in the absence of androgen. Functionally, HOTAIR overexpression increases, whereas HOTAIR knockdown decreases, prostate cancer cell growth and invasion. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence of lncRNAs as drivers of androgen-independent AR activity and CRPC progression, and they support the potential of lncRNAs as therapeutic targets.

  18. Budgetary impact on a U.S. health plan adopting abiraterone acetate plus prednisone for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Sonja; Ellis, Lorie; Wu, Ying; Hutchins, Valerie; Linnehan, John E; Senbetta, Mekré

    2013-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, received FDA approval in 2011 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients who have received prior chemotherapy containing docetaxel. To estimate the projected budgetary impact of adopting abiraterone for mCRPC patients from a U.S. health plan perspective. A decision analytic model compared mCRPC treatment cost before and after abiraterone acetate adoption based on a hypothetical 1,000,000-member plan. Plan mCRPC prevalence was derived from prostate cancer incidence reported in U.S. epidemiology statistics and disease progression data from published trials. Market shares for comparator mCRPC treatments (prednisone alone; cabazitaxel + prednisone; mitoxantrone + prednisone; docetaxel retreatment + prednisone) were derived from market research simulation. Abiraterone + prednisone uptake (8% - scenario 1 to 55% - scenario 3) was based on assumptions for illustrative purposes. Treatment costs were computed using prescribing information, treatment duration from phase III trials, and drug costs considering common U.S. cost listing and reimbursement schemes. Prevalence and costs of managing treatment-related toxicities were estimated from literature, treatment guidelines, and expert clinical opinion. The model evaluated the perspectives of a commercial payer with no Medicare beneficiaries and a commercial payer with a subset of Medicare beneficiaries. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess changing input values. In each modeled scenario, 57 patients with prior docetaxel therapy received treatment for mCRPC. For the commercial perspective, the incremental per-member-per-month (PMPM) cost attributable to abiraterone ranged from $0.0019 in scenario 1 to $0.0133 in scenario 3. For the commercial/Medicare perspective, the incremental PMPM ranged from $0.0026 in scenario 1 to $0.0176 in scenario 3. The average incremental PMPM cost over 3 scenarios is $0.0112. When testing key sensitivity

  19. Antitumour Activity and Safety of Enzalutamide in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Abiraterone Acetate Plus Prednisone for ≥24 weeks in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bono, Johann S; Chowdhury, Simon; Feyerabend, Susan; Elliott, Tony; Grande, Enrique; Melhem-Bertrandt, Amal; Baron, Benoit; Hirmand, Mohammad; Werbrouck, Patrick; Fizazi, Karim

    2018-07-01

    Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate plus prednisone, which target the androgen receptor axis, have expanded the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Retrospective analyses suggest some cross-resistance between these two drugs when used sequentially, but robust, prospective studies have not yet been reported. To fulfil a regulatory postregistration commitment by evaluating the efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who progressed following abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. Multicentre, single-arm, open-label study, enrolled patients with progressing mCRPC after ≥24 wk of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. All patients maintained castration therapy during the trial. Prior chemotherapy was allowed but not required. Patients received enzalutamide 160mg/d orally. The primary endpoint was radiographic progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints were overall survival, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, and time-to-PSA progression. Safety data were also assessed. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to descriptively analyse time-to-event endpoints. Overall, 214 patients received enzalutamide treatment, 145 of whom were chemotherapy-naïve. Median radiographic progression-free survival was 8.1 mo (95% confidence interval: 6.1-8.3); median overall survival had not been reached. Unconfirmed PSA response rate was 27% (48 of 181). Median time-to-PSA progression was 5.7 mo (95% confidence interval: 5.6-5.8). The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were fatigue (32%), decreased appetite (25%), asthenia (18%), back pain (17%), and arthralgia (16%). No seizures were reported. Enzalutamide showed antitumour activity in some patients with mCRPC who had previously progressed following ≥24 wk of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. Patients with mCRPC who progressed on previous abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment, with or without prior chemotherapy

  20. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results from PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J; Higano, C S; Iversen, P; Flaig, T W; Forer, D; Parli, T; Phung, D; Tombal, B; Beer, T M; Sternberg, C N

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years who received enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor, in the phase III PREVAIL trial. PREVAIL was a randomised, double-blind, multinational study of oral enzalutamide 160 mg/day (N = 872) versus placebo (N = 845) in chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) were coprimary end points. Subgroup analysis of men aged ≥75 years (elderly) and men aged PREVAIL, median treatment duration was 16.6 and 5.0 months in the enzalutamide and placebo arms, respectively. In the elderly subgroup, OS was greater with enzalutamide than with placebo [32.4 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 27.7-not yet reached] versus 25.1 months (95% CI 22.6-28.0); hazard ratio (HR) = 0.61 (95% CI 0.47-0.79); P = 0.0001], as was rPFS [not yet reached (95% CI 12.3-not yet reached) versus 3.7 months (95% CI 3.6-5.3); HR = 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.24); P < 0.0001]. Irrespective of treatment assignment, incidence of AEs was similar between the two age groups, except for an overall higher incidence of falls among elderly patients than younger patients [84/609 (13.8%) versus 62/1106 (5.6%)] and among elderly patients receiving enzalutamide than those receiving placebo [61/317 (19.2%) versus 23/292 (7.9%)]. Elderly men benefited from treatment with enzalutamide in terms of OS and rPFS. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in the elderly subgroup and those aged <75 years. Age and enzalutamide treatment were associated with a higher incidence of falls. NCT01212991, ClinicalTrials.gov. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For

  1. Targeted α-Therapy of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer with 225Ac-PSMA-617: Swimmer-Plot Analysis Suggests Efficacy Regarding Duration of Tumor Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Rathke, Hendrik; Hohenfellner, Markus; Giesel, Frederik L; Haberkorn, Uwe; Morgenstern, Alfred

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to identify the first indicators of efficacy for 225 Ac-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-617 therapy in a retrospectively analyzed group of patients. Methods: Forty patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were selected for treatment with three 100 kBq/kg cycles of 225 Ac-PSMA-617 at 2-mo intervals. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and blood cell count were measured every 4 wk. PSMA PET/CT or PSMA SPECT/CT were used for baseline staging and imaging follow-up at month 6. Follow-up included the duration of PSA response and radiologic progression-free survival at month 6. Patient histories were reviewed for the duration of previous treatment lines, and a swimmer plot was used to intraindividually compare the duration of tumor control by PSMA therapy versus prior treatment modalities. Results: Thirty-one of 40 patients were treated per protocol. Five patients discontinued treatment because of nonresponse, and 4 because of xerostomia. Of the 38 patients surviving at least 8 wk, 24 (63%) had a PSA decline of more than 50%, and 33 (87%) had a PSA response of any degree. The median duration of tumor control under 225 Ac-PSMA-617 last-line therapy was 9.0 mo; 5 patients had an enduring response of more than 2 y. Because all patients had advanced disease, this result compares favorably with the tumor control rates associated with earlier-phase disease; the most common preceding first-, second-, third-, and fourth-line therapies were abiraterone (median duration 10.0 mo), docetaxel (6.5 mo), enzalutamide (6.5 mo), and cabazitaxel (6.0 mo), respectively. Conclusion: A positive response for surrogate parameters demonstrates remarkable antitumor activity for 225 Ac-PSMA-617. Swimmer-plot analysis indicates a promising duration of tumor control, especially considering the unfavorable prognostic profile of the selected advanced-stage patients. Xerostomia was the main reason patients discontinued therapy or refused

  2. Controversies and consensus in the innovation access for cancer therapy in the European countries: on the subject of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudard, S; Courbon, F

    2017-02-01

    Innovative cancer therapies and advances in drug development have created new hopes for patients and health providers. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the discrepancies in the assessment of the magnitude of benefit of four new drugs (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223 dichloride) for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The comparison was done among three European countries (UK, Germany and France) and Canada, according to the statement of each country and to the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale. Whereas those drugs are authorized by the European Medical Agency, one can observed that clear discrepancies in the magnitude of benefit assessment exist between selected countries, as well as between national pricing evaluation agencies and ESMO. However, price setting and reimbursement decisions remain national responsibility with differences in assessment of the medical value of new treatment across countries, leading to a heterogeneous accessibility to cancer treatments. In conclusion, several procedures have to be implemented to overcome the patchwork of administrative assessments. Among them, the assessment of medical value should be based on independent statements of learned societies, and the harmonization of access to cancer therapy in Europe has to be driven by a common European reimbursement and pricing policy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Biological Characterization and Clinical Utilization of Metastatic ProstateCancer Associated lincRNA SchLAP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    verifying the PCR products using the University of Michigan Sequencing Core facility. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) 5′ and 3′ RACE was...amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) in two prostate cancer cell lines VCaP and MDA-PCa-2b that express PCAT14 at high levels (Supplementary Figure 1B and C). Our...sections derived from a patient radical prostatectomy specimen with Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 disease. q-PCR analysis on cDNA from frozen tissues derived

  4. High susceptibility of metastatic cells derived from human prostate and colon cancer cells to TRAIL and sensitization of TRAIL-insensitive primary cells to TRAIL by 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Won

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor recurrence and metastasis develop as a result of tumors' acquisition of anti-apoptotic mechanisms and therefore, it is necessary to develop novel effective therapeutics against metastatic cancers. In this study, we showed the differential TRAIL responsiveness of human prostate adenocarcinoma PC3 and human colon carcinoma KM12 cells and their respective highly metastatic PC3-MM2 and KM12L4A sublines and investigated the mechanism underlying high susceptibility of human metastatic cancer cells to TRAIL. Results PC3-MM2 and KM12L4A cells with high level of c-Myc and DNA-PKcs were more susceptible to TRAIL than their poorly metastatic primary PC3 and KM12 cells, which was associated with down-regulation of c-FLIPL/S and Mcl-1 and up-regulation of the TRAIL receptor DR5 but not DR4 in both metastatic cells. Moreover, high susceptibility of these metastatic cells to TRAIL was resulted from TRAIL-induced potent activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 in comparison with their primary cells, which led to cleavage and down-regulation of DNA-PKcs. Knockdown of c-Myc gene in TRAIL-treated PC3-MM2 cells prevented the increase of DR5 cell surface expression, caspase activation and DNA-PKcs cleavage and attenuated the apoptotic effects of TRAIL. Moreover, the suppression of DNA-PKcs level with siRNA in the cells induced the up-regulation of DR5 and active caspase-8, -9, and -3. We also found that 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzaldehyde (DMNB, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK, potentiated TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in relatively TRAIL-insensitive PC3 and KM12 cells and therefore functioned as a TRAIL sensitizer. Conclusion This study showed the positive relationship between c-Myc expression in highly metastatic human prostate and colon cancer cells and susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and therefore indicated that TRAIL might be used as an effective therapeutic modality for advanced metastatic cancers overexpressing c-Myc and

  5. Factors driving inequality in prostate cancer survival: a population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richéal M Burns

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: As cancer control strategies have become more successful, issues around survival have become increasingly important to researchers and policy makers. The aim of this study was to examine the role of a range of clinical and socio-demographic variables in explaining variations in survival after a prostate cancer diagnosis, paying particular attention to the role of healthcare provider(s i.e. private versus public status. METHODS: Data were extracted from the National Cancer Registry Ireland, for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1998-2009 (N = 26,183. A series of multivariate Cox and logistic regression models were used to examine the role of healthcare provider and socio-economic status (area-based deprivation on survival, controlling for age, stage, Gleason grade, marital status and region of residence. Survival was based on all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Older individuals who were treated in a private care setting were more likely to have survived than those who had not, when other factors were controlled for. Differences were evident with respect to marital status, region of residence, clinical stage and Gleason grade. The effect of socio-economic status was modified by healthcare provider, such that risk of death was higher in those men of lower socio-economic status treated by public, but not private providers in the Cox models. The logistic models revealed a socio-economic gradient in risk of death overall; the gradient was larger for those treated by public providers compared to those treated by private providers when controlling for a range of other confounding factors. CONCLUSION: The role of healthcare provider and socio-economic status in survival of men with prostate cancer may give rise to concerns that warrant further investigation.

  6. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Expression in Disseminated Tumor Cells and Micrometastasis in Bone Marrow of Patients with Nonmetastatic and Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Theoretical Considerations and Clinical Implications—An Immunocytochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is important in the dissemination and invasion of tumor cells and activates angiogenesis. We present an immunocytochemical study of MMP-2 expression in circulating prostate cells (CPCs, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs, and micrometastasis (mM in bone marrow of men with prostate cancer. Methods and Patients. Tumor cells were identified with anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent processing with anti-MMP-2, its expression was compared with Gleason score, concordance of expression, and metastatic and nonmetastatic disease. Results. 215 men participated, CPCs were detected in 62.7%, DTCs in 62.2%, and mM in 71.4% in nonmetastatic cancer; in metastatic cancer all had CPCs, DTCs, and mM detected. All CPCs and DTCs expressed MMP-2; in mM MMP-2 expression was positively associated with increasing Gleason score. MMP-2 expression in CPCs and DTCs showed concordance. In low grade tumors, mM and surrounding stromal cells were MMP-2 negative, with variable expression in high grade tumors; in metastatic disease, both mM and stromal cells were MMP-2 positive. Conclusions. CPCs and DTCs are different from mM, with inhibition of MMP-2 expression in mM of low grade tumors. With disease progression, MMP-2 expression increases in both mM and surrounding stromal cells, with implications for the use of bisphosphonates or MMP-2 inhibitors.

  7. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütje, Susanne; Blex, Sebastian; Gomez, Benedikt; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Wetter, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss. Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76-148 MBq) and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77-320 min) after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min). Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean) within a spherical volume of interest (VOI). Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5-1 (excellent-insufficient). Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95%) patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4-6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min. In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum while SUVmax and SUVmean do not change

  8. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Lütje

    Full Text Available The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss.Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76-148 MBq and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77-320 min after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min. Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean within a spherical volume of interest (VOI. Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5-1 (excellent-insufficient.Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95% patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4-6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min.In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum while SUVmax and SUVmean do not change

  9. Quality of Life in Second-Line Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using Cabazitaxel or Other Therapies After Previous Docetaxel Chemotherapy: Swiss Observational Treatment Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Frank; Rothschild, Sacha I; Betticher, Daniel; Caspar, Clemens; Morant, Rudolf; Popescu, Razvan; Rauch, Daniel; Huber, Urs; Zenhäusern, Reinhard; Rentsch, Cyrill; Cathomas, Richard

    2017-08-24

    The aim was to evaluate quality of life (QoL), pain, and fatigue in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with different regimens after first-line docetaxel, as well as disease progression. Patients with mCRPC having received first-line chemotherapy with docetaxel were eligible. Second-line treatment choice was at the discretion of the local investigator. All patients had regular assessments of QoL with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire, of fatigue with the Brief Fatigue Inventory, and of pain with the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form. The primary end point was QoL maintenance defined as having a maximum decrease in 2 functional domains of the FACT-P. One hundred thirty-eight patients were included in 36 oncology centers across Switzerland. QoL analysis was available for all patients (59 who received cabazitaxel; 79 who received other therapy [OT] including 75 who received abiraterone). No significant differences for any of the end points were found between groups. A numerically higher number of patients had QoL maintenance with OT (25 of 79 patients, 32%) compared with cabazitaxel (8 of 59 patients, 14%). QoL improvement was found in 20% of patients (12 of 59) who received cabazitaxel and 24% (19 of 79) who received OT. Mean FACT-P score did not change in a clinically relevant manner over time in either group. Pain was present in 70% of patients (96 of 138), and a pain response to treatment was noted in 22% (13 of 59) who received cabazitaxel and 29% (23 of 79) who received OT. A similar but minor improvement of fatigue was noted in both groups. Some degree of QoL decrease was seen in most patients regardless of second-line treatment. No significant differences in QoL parameters between cabazitaxel or other second line treatments were found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Third-line treatment and 177Lu-PSMA radioligand therapy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edler von Eyben, Finn; Roviello, Giandomenico; Kiljunen, Timo; Kairemo, Kalevi; Joensuu, Timo; Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene

    2018-01-01

    There is a controversy as to the relative efficacy of 177 Lu prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) radioligand therapy (RLT) and third-line treatment for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The aim of our systematic review was to elucidate whether 177 Lu-PSMA RLT and third-line treatment have similar effects and adverse effects (PROSPERO ID CRD42017067743). The review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Searches in Pubmed and Embase selected articles up to September 2017. A search in ClinicalTrials.gov indicated ongoing studies. The meta-analysis used the random-effects model. Twelve studies including 669 patients reported 177 Lu-PSMA RLT. Overall, 43% of the patients had a maximum decline of PSA of ≥50% following treatment with 177 Lu-PSMA RLT. The treatment with 177 Lu-PSMA-617 and 177 Lu-PSMA for imaging and therapy (I and T) had mainly transient adverse effects. Sixteen studies including 1338 patients reported third-line treatment. Overall, 21% of the patients had a best decline of PSA of ≥50% following third-line treatment. After third-line treatment with enzalutamide and cabazitaxel, adverse effects caused discontinuation of treatment for 10% to 23% of the patients. 177 Lu-PSMA RLT gave a best PSA decline ≥50% more often than third-line treatment (mean 44% versus 22%, p = 0.0002, t test). 177 Lu-PSMA RLT gave objective remission more often than third-line treatment (overall 31 of 109 patients versus 43 of 275 patients, p = 0.004, χ 2 test). Median survival was longer after 177 Lu-PSMA RLT than after third-line treatment, but the difference was not statistically significant (mean 14 months versus 12 months, p = 0.32, t test). Adverse effects caused discontinuation of treatment more often for third-line treatment than for 177 Lu-PSMA RLT (22 of 66 patients versus 0 of 469 patients, p < 0.001, χ 2 test). As for patients with mCRPC, treatment with 177 Lu

  11. Third-line treatment and {sup 177}Lu-PSMA radioligand therapy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler von Eyben, Finn [Center of Tobacco Control Research, Odense (Denmark); Roviello, Giandomenico [San Donato Hospital, Department of Oncology, Medical Oncology Unit, Arezzo (Italy); University of Trieste, Department Medical, Surgery, and Health Sciences, Trieste (Italy); Kiljunen, Timo; Kairemo, Kalevi; Joensuu, Timo [Docrates Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene [University Hospital Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2018-03-15

    There is a controversy as to the relative efficacy of {sup 177}Lu prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) radioligand therapy (RLT) and third-line treatment for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The aim of our systematic review was to elucidate whether {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT and third-line treatment have similar effects and adverse effects (PROSPERO ID CRD42017067743). The review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Searches in Pubmed and Embase selected articles up to September 2017. A search in ClinicalTrials.gov indicated ongoing studies. The meta-analysis used the random-effects model. Twelve studies including 669 patients reported {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT. Overall, 43% of the patients had a maximum decline of PSA of ≥50% following treatment with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT. The treatment with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 and {sup 177}Lu-PSMA for imaging and therapy (I and T) had mainly transient adverse effects. Sixteen studies including 1338 patients reported third-line treatment. Overall, 21% of the patients had a best decline of PSA of ≥50% following third-line treatment. After third-line treatment with enzalutamide and cabazitaxel, adverse effects caused discontinuation of treatment for 10% to 23% of the patients. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT gave a best PSA decline ≥50% more often than third-line treatment (mean 44% versus 22%, p = 0.0002, t test). {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT gave objective remission more often than third-line treatment (overall 31 of 109 patients versus 43 of 275 patients, p = 0.004, χ{sup 2} test). Median survival was longer after {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT than after third-line treatment, but the difference was not statistically significant (mean 14 months versus 12 months, p = 0.32, t test). Adverse effects caused discontinuation of treatment more often for third-line treatment than for {sup 177}Lu-PSMA RLT (22 of 66 patients versus 0 of 469 patients, p < 0.001, χ{sup 2

  12. PSMA targeted radioligandtherapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy, abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. A retrospective analysis of overall survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar, K.; Schaefers, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Boegemann, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany); Yordanova, A.; Essler, M.; Ahmadzadehfar, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Eveslage, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Muenster (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    Our aim was to evaluate overall survival and parameters prognosticating longer survival in a large and homogeneous group of patients treated with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy with heavily pretreated advanced metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. A total of 104 patients were treated with 351 cycles of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) changes after the first cycle of therapy were documented prior to a second cycle. Patients were followed-up for overall survival (OS). Any PSA decline, PSA decline ≥50%, initial PSA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), visceral metastases and cumulative injected activity were analyzed and evaluated according to OS. Multivariable analysis with parameters with a p-value ≤0.05 in univariate analysis was performed, additionally adjusting for age and presence of visceral metastases. A total of 51 patients (49%) died during the observation period. The majority of patients (97%) presented with bone metastases, 77% with lymph node metastases and 32% with visceral metastases. All patients were treated with at least one line of chemotherapy. Either abiraterone or enzalutamide had been given in 100% of the patients. Any PSA decline occurred in 70 (67%) and a PSA decline ≥50% in 34 (33%) of patients after the first cycle. The median OS was 56.0 weeks (95%CI: 50.5-61.5). Initial PSA decline ≥50%, initial LDH, visceral metastases, second line chemotherapy or prior radium-223 did not have an effect on survival, whereas any initial PSA decline, initial ALP <220 U/L and cumulative injected activity ≥18.8 GBq were associated with a longer survival. A step-by-step analysis revealed a PSA decline ≥20.87% as the most noticeable cut-off prognosticating longer survival, which remained an independent prognosticator of improved OS in the multivariate analysis. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 RLT is a new effective therapeutic and seems to prolong survival in patients with advanced m

  13. A comparison of the palliative effects of strontium-89 and external beam radiotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quilty, P.M.; Kirk, D.; Bolger, J.J.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Mason, M.D.; Lewington, V.J.; Reed, N.S.E.; Russell, J.M.; Yardley, J.

    1994-01-01

    From 1988 to 1991, 284 patients with prostatic cancer and painful bone metastases were treated with either radiotherapy or strontium-89 (200 MBq). Patients were first stratified according to suitability for local or hemibody radiotherapy, then randomly allocated that form of treatment or strontium-89 (i.v. injection). After 4,8 and 12 weeks pain sites were mapped, toxicity monitored, and all additional palliative treatments recorded. There was no significant difference in median survival (after >80% had died); 33 weeks following strontium 8 9 and 28 weeks following radiotherapy (p=0.1). All treatments provided effective pain relief; improvement was sustained to 3 months in 63.6% after hemibody radiotherapy compared with 66.1% after strontium-89, and in 61% after local radiotherapy compared with 65.9% in the comparable strontium 8 9 group. Fewer patients reported new pain sites after strontium-89 than after local or hemibody radiotherapy (p < 0.05). Radiotherapy to a new site was required by 12 patients in the local radiotherapy group compared with 2 after strontium-89 (p < 0.01), although there was no significant difference between hemibody radiotherapy (6 patients) and strontium-89 (9 patients) in this respect. Platelets and leukocytes fell by an average 30-40% after strontium-89 but sequelae were uncommon, and other symptoms rare

  14. The Role of the Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio for Survival Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Treated with Abiraterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Boegemann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the prognostic capability of baseline neutrophil-to-lymphocyte-ratio (NLR and NLR-change under Abiraterone in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The impact of baseline NLR and change after eight weeks of treatment on progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and Cox-regression. 79 men with baseline NLR <5 and 17 with NLR >5 were analyzed. In baseline analysis of PFS NLR >5 was associated with non-significantly shorter median PFS (five versus 10 months (HR: 1.6 (95%CI:0.9–2.8; p = 0.11. After multivariate adjustment (MVA, ECOG > 0–1, baseline LDH>upper limit of normal (UNL and presence of visceral metastases were independent prognosticators. For OS, NLR >5 was associated with shorter survival (seven versus 19 months (HR: 2.3 (95%CI:1.3–4.0; p < 0.01. In MVA, ECOG > 0–1 and baseline LDH > UNL remained independent prognosticators. After 8 weeks of Abiraterone NLR-change to <5 prognosticated worse PFS (five versus 12 months (HR: 4.1 (95%CI:1.1–15.8; p = 0.04. MVA showed a trend towards worse PFS for NLR-change to <5 (p = 0.11. NLR-change to <5 led to non-significant shorter median OS (seven versus 16 months (HR: 2.3 (95%CI:0.7–7.1; p = 0.15. MVA showed non-significant difference for OS. We concluded baseline NLR <5 is associated with improved survival. In contrast, in patients with baseline NLR >5, NLR-change to <5 after eight weeks of Abiraterone was associated with worse survival and should be interpreted carefully.

  15. Systemic therapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer:American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C; Frame, James N; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Virgo, Katherine S

    2014-10-20

    To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 ((223)Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or (223)Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate optimal sequences or

  16. Clinical outcomes and survival surrogacy studies of prostate‐specific antigen declines following enzalutamide in men with metastatic castration‐resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Phung, De; Dmuchowski, Carl; Shore, Neal D.; Fizazi, Karim; Hirmand, Mohammad; Forer, David; Scher, Howard I.; Bono, Johann De

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the AFFIRM trial, enzalutamide significantly increased overall survival (OS) for men with metastatic castration‐resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after chemotherapy versus placebo and significantly decreased prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) levels. The goal of this post hoc analysis was to associate levels of PSA decline from baseline after enzalutamide with clinical outcomes in the postchemotherapy mCRPC setting. METHODS Men in the AFFIRM trial (n = 1199) were grouped by maximal PSA decline in the first 90 days of treatment. Kaplan‐Meier estimates evaluated the association of defined PSA changes from baseline with OS, progression‐free survival (PFS), radiographic PFS (rPFS), and pain response. Each PSA decline category was assessed for OS surrogacy using Prentice criteria, proportion of treatment effect explained (PTE), and proportion of variation explained. RESULTS Men treated with enzalutamide had improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.63; P 19.0; P .20). CONCLUSIONS PSA declines of any, ≥30%, and ≥50% following enzalutamide were associated with greater clinical and pain response and improvements in PFS and OS. Surrogacy of PSA decline for OS was not fully established, possibly due to lack of PSA declines with placebo, and discordant results between PSA and imaging responses over time, and because some declines were not durable due to rapid resistance development. However, a lack of PSA decline by 90 days following enzalutamide treatment was a poor prognosis indicator in this setting. Conclusions from sensitivity analyses of maximal PSA decline from baseline over the entire treatment period are consistent with PSA declines restricted to the first 90 days. Cancer 2017;123:2303–2311. © 2017 American Cancer Society. PMID:28171710

  17. Prognostic value of 18F-choline PET/CT metabolic parameters in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with abiraterone or enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroli, Paola; Fantini, Lorenzo; Celli, Monica; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Rossi, Lorena [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials Unit, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy); Bianchi, Emanuela [Infermi Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Rimini (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    The role of 18F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has been firmly established in recent years. We analyzed the prognostic value of functional parameters such as mean standardized uptake volume (SUVmean), maximum standardized uptake volume (SUVmax), metabolic total volume (MTV; the volume of interest consisting of all spatially connected voxels within a fixed threshold of 40% of the SUVmax), and total lesion activity (TLA: the product of MTV and mean standardized uptake value) estimated with FCH-PET/CT in mCRPC patients in progression after docetaxel and treated with new antiandrogen receptor therapies, abiraterone or enzalutamide. We retrospectively studied 94 mCRPC patients, mean age 74 years (range 42-90), previously treated with docetaxel who were treated with either abiraterone (n = 52) or enzalutamide (n = 42). An FCH-PET/CT was performed at baseline, and patients were evaluated on a monthly basis for serological PSA response and every 3 months for radiological response. We measured MTV, SUVmean, SUVmax and TLA for each lesion and analyzed the sum of MTV (SMTV), SUVmean (SSUVmean), SUVmax (SSUVmax) and TLA (STLA) values for a maximum of 20 lesions. Univariate analysis was used to correlate these data with PFS and OS. We observed a median SMTV of 130 cm{sup 3}, median SSUVmax of 106.5 and a median STLA of 495,070. All of these parameters were significant for PFS and OS in univariate analysis, while only STLA was significant for PFS and OS in multivariate analysis after adjusting for lesion and age (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Baseline PSA values maintained a certain reliability for OS (p = 0.034). Semiquantitative parameters of FCH-PET/CT play a prognostic role in mCRCP patients treated with abiraterone or enzalutamide. (orig.)

  18. Randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III trial of sunitinib plus prednisone versus prednisone alone in progressive, metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Sengeløv, Lisa; Saad, Fred; Houede, Nadine; Ostler, Peter; Stenzl, Arnulf; Daugaard, Gedske; Jones, Robert; Laestadius, Fredrik; Ullèn, Anders; Bahl, Amit; Castellano, Daniel; Gschwend, Juergen; Maurina, Tristan; Chow Maneval, Edna; Wang, Shaw-Ling; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Paolini, Jolanda; Chen, Isan

    2014-01-10

    We evaluated angiogenesis-targeted sunitinib therapy in a randomized, double-blind trial of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg/d continuously or placebo. Patients also received oral prednisone 5 mg twice daily. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS). Two interim analyses were planned. Overall, 873 patients were randomly assigned to receive sunitinib (n = 584) or placebo (n = 289). The independent data monitoring committee stopped the study for futility after the second interim analysis. After a median overall follow-up of 8.7 months, median OS was 13.1 months and 11.8 months for sunitinib and placebo, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.914; 95% CI, 0.762 to 1.097; stratified log-rank test, P = .168). PFS was significantly improved in the sunitinib arm (median 5.6 v 4.1 months; HR, 0.725; 95% CI, 0.591 to 0.890; stratified log-rank test, P < .001). Toxicity and rates of discontinuations because of adverse events (AEs; 27% v 7%) were greater with sunitinib than placebo. The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 AEs were fatigue (9% v 1%), asthenia (8% v 2%), and hand-foot syndrome (7% v 0%). Frequent treatment-emergent grade 3/4 hematologic abnormalities were lymphopenia (20% v 11%), anemia (9% v 8%), and neutropenia (6% v < 1%). The addition of sunitinib to prednisone did not improve OS compared with placebo in docetaxel-refractory mCRPC. The role of antiangiogenic therapy in mCRPC remains investigational.

  19. Preliminary study of the specific endothelin a receptor antagonist zibotentan in combination with docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Payne, Heather; Miller, Kurt; de Bono, Johann S; Stephenson, Joe; Burris, Howard A; Nathan, Faith; Taboada, Maria; Morris, Thomas; Hubner, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    This two-part study assessed the safety and tolerability of combined treatment with zibotentan (ZD4054), a specific endothelin A receptor antagonist, plus docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Part A was an open-label, dose-finding phase to determine the safety and toxicity profile of zibotentan in combination with docetaxel. Patients received once-daily oral zibotentan 10 mg (initial cohort) or 15 mg in combination with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) (administered on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) for up to 10 cycles. Part B was a double-blind phase which evaluated the safety and preliminary activity of zibotentan plus docetaxel. Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive zibotentan (at the highest tolerated dose identified in part A) plus docetaxel or placebo plus docetaxel. Six patients were enrolled in part A (n  = 3, zibotentan 10 mg; n = 3, zibotentan 15 mg). No dose-limiting toxicity was observed, thus zibotentan 15 mg in combination with docetaxel was evaluated in part B (n = 20, zibotentan plus docetaxel; n = 11, placebo plus docetaxel). CTCAE grade ≥3, most commonly neutropenia or leucopenia, were reported in 10 (50%) and nine (82%) patients in the zibotentan and placebo groups, respectively. One (17%) patient receiving placebo achieved complete response, two (22%) patients receiving zibotentan achieved partial response and stable disease occurred in six (67%) and three (50%) patients receiving zibotentan and placebo, respectively. The tolerability of zibotentan plus docetaxel was consistent with the known profiles of each drug. Sufficient preliminary activity was seen with this combination to merit continued development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Final quality of life and safety data for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel in the UK Early Access Programme (EAP) (NCT01254279).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Amit; Masson, Susan; Malik, Zafar; Birtle, Alison J; Sundar, Santhanam; Jones, Rob J; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Kumar, Satish; Bottomley, David; Lydon, Anna; Chowdhury, Simon; Wylie, James; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-12-01

    To compile the safety profile and quality of life (QoL) data for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with cabazitaxel in the UK Early Access Programme (UK EAP). A total of 112 patients participated at 12 UK cancer centres. All had mCRPC with disease progression during or after docetaxel. Patients received cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks with prednisolone 10 mg daily for up to 10 cycles. Safety assessments were performed before each cycle and QoL was recorded at alternate cycles using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire and visual analogue scale (VAS). The safety profile was compiled after completion of the UK EAP and QoL measures were analysed to record trends. No formal statistical analysis was carried out. The incidences of neutropenic sepsis (6.3%), grade 3 and 4 diarrhoea (4.5%) and grade 3 and 4 cardiac toxicity (0%) were low. Neutropenic sepsis episodes, though low, occurred only in patients who did not receive prophylactic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. There were trends towards improved VAS and EQ-5D-3L pain scores during treatment. The UK EAP experience indicates that cabazitaxel might improve QoL in mCRPC and represents an advance and a useful addition to the armamentarium of treatment for patients whose disease has progressed during or after docetaxel. In view of the potential toxicity, careful patient selection is important. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G; Scher, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 to enhance antitumour immunity. Our aim was to assess the use of ipilimumab after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel...... chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in which men with at least one bone metastasis from castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel treatment were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive bone-directed radiotherapy (8 Gy in one...... fraction) followed by either ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Non-progressing patients could continue to receive ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg or placebo as maintenance therapy every 3 months until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effect, or death. Patients were randomly...

  2. PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN A Clue for the Prostatic Origin of Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    MANABE, Toshiaki; TSUKAYAMA, Chotatsu; YAMAGUCHI, Masae; YAMASHITA, Koshi

    1983-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen is a recently purified glycoprotein which is present only in the prostatic gland. In order to confirm the usefulness of this protein in isolating prostatic carcinomas from socalled metastatic carcinomas of unknown primary site, we immunohistochemically studied 19 non-neoplastic prostatic tissue, 18 primary carcinomas of the prostate, and 32 non-prostatic adenocarcinomas. From our study, we concluded that PSA is highly specific for the prostatic carcinomas. The ab...

  3. [Screening of phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid microdomains 1 (PAG1) by cDNA microarray and influence of overexpression of PAG1 on biologic behavior of human metastatic prostatic cancer cell line in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-juan; Wang, Yue-wei; Xie, Zhi-gang; You, Jiang-feng; Wang, Jie-liang; Cui, Xiang-lin; Pei, Fei; Zheng, Jie

    2010-02-01

    To screen for novel gene(s) associated with tumor metastasis, and to investigate the effect of overexpression of phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid microdomains 1 (PAG1) on the biological behaviors of human prostatic cancer cell line PC-3M-1E8 in vitro. Four cDNA microarrays were constructed using cDNA library of prostatic cancer cells PC-3M-1E8 (high metastatic potential), PC-3M-2B4 (low metastatic potential), lung cancer cells PG-BE1 (high metastatic potential)and PG-LH7 (low metastatic potential)to screen genes which were differentially expressed according to their different metastatic properties. From a battery of differentially expressed genes, PAG1, which was markedly downregulated in both high metastatic sublines of PC-3M and PG was chosen for further investigation. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to confirm the gene expression of PAG1 at mRNA and protein levels. Full-length coding sequence of human PAG1 was subcloned into plasmid pcDNA3.0 and the recombinant plasmids were stably transfected into PC-3M-1E8. The cell proliferation ability, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis rates and invasive ability were detected by MTT, and in addition, soft agar colony formation, flow cytometry analysis and matrigel invasion assay using Boyden chamber were also carried out respectively. All experiments contained pcDNA3.0-PAG1-transfected clones, vector transfected clones and non-transfected parental cells. A total of 327 differentially expressed genes were obtained between the high and low metastatic sublines of PC-3M cells, including 123 upregulated and 204 downregulated genes in PC-3M-1E8. A total of 281 genes, including 167 upregulated and 114 downregulated genes were obtained in PG-BE1 cells. Nine genes were simultaneously downregulated and 8 genes were upregulated in both high metastatic cell lines of PC-3M and PG. The expression of PAG1 at mRNA and protein level were decreased in the high metastatic subline PC-3M-1

  4. IGF-Regulated Genes in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Charles

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesized that genes that are differentially expressed as a result of the decreased IGF-I receptor gene expression seen in metastatic prostate cancer contribute to prostate cancer progression...

  5. IGF-Regulated Genes in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Charles T., Jr

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that genes that are differentially expressed as a result of the decreased IGF-I receptor gene expression seen in metastatic prostate cancer contribute to prostate cancer progression...

  6. Preliminary results on response assessment using {sup 68}Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT in patients with metastatic prostate cancer undergoing docetaxel chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Anna Katharina [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Julius Maximilians University Medical Centre of Wuerzburg, Department of Urology and Paediatric Urology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rauscher, Isabel; Kroenke, Markus; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Luther, Sophia; Heck, Matthias M.; Horn, Thomas; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Maurer, Tobias [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles (United States)

    2018-04-15

    To investigate the value of {sup 68}Ga-HBED-CC PSMA ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA) PET/CT for response assessment in metastatic castration-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCSPC and mCRPC) during docetaxel chemotherapy. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT was performed in seven mCSPC patients before and after six cycles of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy and in 16 mCRPC patients before and after three cycles of palliative docetaxel chemotherapy. Radiographic treatment response was evaluated separately on the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET and CT datasets. Changes in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmean) were assessed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis using the PERCIST scoring system with slight modification. Treatment response was defined as absence of any PSMA uptake in all target lesions on posttreatment PET (complete response, CR) or a decrease in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (partial response, PR). The appearance of a new PET-positive lesion or an increase in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (progressive disease, PD) indicated nonresponse. A moderate change in summed SUVmean (between -30% and +30%) without a change in the number of target lesions was defined as stable disease (SD). For treatment response assessment on CT, RECIST1.1 criteria were used. Radiographic responses on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET [RR(PET)] and on CT [RR(CT)] were compared and correlated with biochemical response (BR). A decrease in serum PSA level of ≥50% was defined as biochemical PR. Biochemical PR was found in six of seven patients with mCSPC (86%, 95% confidence interval 42% to 99.6%). The concordance rate was higher between BR and RR(PET) than between BR and RR(CT) (6/7 vs. 3/6 patients). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET and CT were concordant in only three patients (50%, 12% to 88%). In mCRPC patients, biochemical PR was found in six of 16 patients (38%, 15% to 65%). Outcome prediction was concordant between BR and RR(PET) in nine of 16 patients (56%), and between BR and RR(CT) in only four of 12 patients (33%) with target

  7. Preliminary results on response assessment using 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT in patients with metastatic prostate cancer undergoing docetaxel chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Anna Katharina; Rauscher, Isabel; Kroenke, Markus; Schwaiger, Markus; Haller, Bernhard; Luther, Sophia; Heck, Matthias M.; Horn, Thomas; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the value of 68 Ga-HBED-CC PSMA ( 68 Ga-PSMA) PET/CT for response assessment in metastatic castration-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCSPC and mCRPC) during docetaxel chemotherapy. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT was performed in seven mCSPC patients before and after six cycles of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy and in 16 mCRPC patients before and after three cycles of palliative docetaxel chemotherapy. Radiographic treatment response was evaluated separately on the 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT datasets. Changes in 68 Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmean) were assessed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis using the PERCIST scoring system with slight modification. Treatment response was defined as absence of any PSMA uptake in all target lesions on posttreatment PET (complete response, CR) or a decrease in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (partial response, PR). The appearance of a new PET-positive lesion or an increase in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (progressive disease, PD) indicated nonresponse. A moderate change in summed SUVmean (between -30% and +30%) without a change in the number of target lesions was defined as stable disease (SD). For treatment response assessment on CT, RECIST1.1 criteria were used. Radiographic responses on 68 Ga-PSMA PET [RR(PET)] and on CT [RR(CT)] were compared and correlated with biochemical response (BR). A decrease in serum PSA level of ≥50% was defined as biochemical PR. Biochemical PR was found in six of seven patients with mCSPC (86%, 95% confidence interval 42% to 99.6%). The concordance rate was higher between BR and RR(PET) than between BR and RR(CT) (6/7 vs. 3/6 patients). 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT were concordant in only three patients (50%, 12% to 88%). In mCRPC patients, biochemical PR was found in six of 16 patients (38%, 15% to 65%). Outcome prediction was concordant between BR and RR(PET) in nine of 16 patients (56%), and between BR and RR(CT) in only four of 12 patients (33%) with target lesions on CT. 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT

  8. Cost per median overall survival month associated with abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide for treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Dominic; Queener, Marykay; Lefebvre, Patrick; Ellis, Lorie A

    2016-08-01

    To calculate costs per median overall survival (OS) month in chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA + P) or enzalutamide. Median treatment duration and median OS data from published Phase 3 clinical trials and prescribing information were used to calculate costs per median OS month based on wholesale acquisition costs (WACs) for patients with mCRPC treated with AA + P or enzalutamide. Sensitivity analyses were performed to understand how variations in treatment duration and treatment-related monitoring recommendations influenced cost per median OS month. Cost-effectiveness estimates of other Phase 3 trial outcomes were also explored: cost per month of chemotherapy avoided and per median radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) month. The results demonstrated that AA + P has a lower cost per median OS month than enzalutamide ($3231 vs 4512; 28% reduction), based on the following assumptions: median treatment duration of 14 months for AA + P and 18 months for enzalutamide, median OS of 34.7 months for AA + P and 35.3 months for enzalutamide, and WAC per 30-day supply of $8007.17 for AA + P vs $8847.98 for enzalutamide. Sensitivity analyses showed that accounting for recommended treatment-related monitoring costs or assuming identical treatment durations for AA + P and enzalutamide (18 months) resulted in costs per median OS month 8-27% lower for AA + P than for enzalutamide. Costs per month of chemotherapy avoided were $4448 for AA + P and $5688 for enzalutamide, while costs per month to achieve median rPFS were $6794 for AA + P and $7963 for enzalutamide. This cost-effectiveness analysis demonstrated that costs per median OS month, along with costs of other Phase 3 trial outcomes, were lower for AA + P than for enzalutamide. The findings were robust to sensitivity analyses. These results have important implications

  9. Clinical benefit of bone-targeted radiometabolic therapy with 153Sm-EDTMP combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Sergio; Pastina, Ilaria; Cianci, Claudia; Orlandini, Cinzia; Chioni, Aldo; Di Donato, Samantha; Boni, Giuseppe; Genovesi, Dario; Grosso, Mariano; AlSharif, Abedallatif; Mariani, Giuliano; Francesca, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases are responsible for most of the morbidity associated with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). 153 Sm-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate ( 153 Sm-EDTMP) has been approved for palliation of painful skeletal metastases. We retrospectively investigated the possible synergistic effect on survival of 153 Sm-EDTMP (given to HRPC patients for bone pain palliation) and chemotherapy. Forty-five HRPC patients were evaluated, with a median age of 71 years. The number of metastatic bone sites was ≤10 in 25 patients and >10 in 20 patients. Median serum PSA was 224 ng/ml. Bone pain was mild in 6 patients, moderate in 16, severe in 22 and intolerable in 1. Fifteen patients were only treated with 153 Sm-EDTMP (group A), while 30 patients also received chemotherapy (estramustine phosphate or mitoxantrone plus prednisone) at variable times: between 3 and 5 months after 153 Sm-EDTMP (14 patients, group B) or within 1 month after 153 Sm-EDTMP (16 patients, group C). Haematological toxicities observed after either regimen were in general mild, consistent with common observations after either 153 Sm-EDTMP or chemotherapy, and without any additive adverse effects in the patients receiving both 153 Sm-EDTMP and chemotherapy. Bone pain palliation to some degree was induced by 153 Sm-EDTMP in 32/45 patients (71.1%), the proportion of patients with a favourable clinical response being significantly higher in group C than in group A (87.5% vs 53.3%, p = 0.0388). Also in terms of biochemical response (serum PSA levels), patients of group C performed significantly better than patients of group A (p = 0.0235). Overall median survival from the time of administration of 153 Sm-EDTMP was 15 months in the total cohort of 45 patients, and was significantly longer in group C than in either group B (30 months vs 11 months, p = 0.023) or group A (30 months vs 10 months, p = 0.008). The results of this study confirm that 153 Sm-EDTMP is effective in terms of pain relief and

  10. Phase I/II clinical trial of dendritic-cell based immunotherapy (DCVAC/PCa) combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podrazil, Michal; Horvath, Rudolf; Becht, Etienne; Rozkova, Daniela; Bilkova, Pavla; Sochorova, Klara; Hromadkova, Hana; Kayserova, Jana; Vavrova, Katerina; Lastovicka, Jan; Vrabcova, Petra; Kubackova, Katerina; Gasova, Zdenka; Jarolim, Ladislav; Babjuk, Marek; Spisek, Radek; Bartunkova, Jirina; Fucikova, Jitka

    2015-07-20

    We conducted an open-label, single-arm Phase I/II clinical trial in metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients eligible for docetaxel combined with treatment with autologous mature dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells (DCVAC/PCa). The primary and secondary endpoints were safety and immune responses, respectively. Overall survival (OS), followed as a part of the safety evaluation, was compared to the predicted OS according to the Halabi and MSKCC nomograms. Twenty-five patients with progressive mCRPC were enrolled. Treatment comprised of initial 7 days administration of metronomic cyclophosphamide 50 mg p.o. DCVAC/PCa treatment consisted of a median twelve doses of 1 × 107 dendritic cells per dose injected s.c. (Aldara creme was applied at the site of injection) during a one-year period. The initial 2 doses of DCVAC/PCa were administered at a 2-week interval, followed by the administration of docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and prednisone (5 mg twice daily) given every 3 weeks until toxicity or intolerance was observed. The DCVAC/PCa was then injected every 6 weeks up to the maximum number of doses manufactured from one leukapheresis. No serious DCVAC/PCa-related adverse events have been reported. The median OS was 19 months, whereas the predicted median OS was 11.8 months with the Halabi nomogram and 13 months with the MSKCC nomogram. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients had a lower risk of death compared with both MSKCC (Hazard Ratio 0.26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.51) and Halabi (Hazard Ratio 0.33, 95% CI: 0.17-0.63) predictions. We observed a significant decrease in Tregs in the peripheral blood. The long-term administration of DCVAC/PCa led to the induction and maintenance of PSA specific T cells. We did not identify any immunological parameter that significantly correlated with better OS. In patients with mCRPC, the combined chemoimmunotherapy with DCVAC/PCa and docetaxel was safe and resulted in longer than expected survival. Concomitant chemotherapy

  11. {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, BR Ambedkar Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Seth, Amlesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic{sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity

  12. Clinical Outcomes from Androgen Signaling-directed Therapy after Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Post Hoc Analysis of COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew R; Saad, Fred; Rathkopf, Dana E; Mulders, Peter F A; de Bono, Johann S; Small, Eric J; Shore, Neal D; Fizazi, Karim; Kheoh, Thian; Li, Jinhui; De Porre, Peter; Todd, Mary B; Yu, Margaret K; Ryan, Charles J

    2017-07-01

    In the COU-AA-302 trial, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly increased overall survival for patients with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Limited information exists regarding response to subsequent androgen signaling-directed therapies following abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in patients with mCRPC. We investigated clinical outcomes associated with subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (55 patients) and enzalutamide (33 patients) in a post hoc analysis of COU-AA-302. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was assessed. Median time to PSA progression was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The PSA response rate (≥50% PSA decline, unconfirmed) was 44% and 67%, respectively. The median time to PSA progression was 3.9 mo (range 2.6-not estimable) for subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone and 2.8 mo (range 1.8-not estimable) for subsequent enzalutamide. The majority of patients (68%) received intervening chemotherapy before subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide. While acknowledging the limitations of post hoc analyses and high censoring (>75%) in both treatment groups, these results suggest that subsequent therapy with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide for patients who progressed on abiraterone acetate is associated with limited clinical benefit. This analysis showed limited clinical benefit for subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer following initial treatment with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone. This analysis does not support prioritization of subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide following initial therapy with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. On cribriform prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kweldam, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis general aim of the thesis is to study the clinical relevance, interobserver reproducibility, and genetics of cribriform growth in prostate cancer. More specifically, the aims and outline of this thesis are • To study the metastatic potential of modified Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer in radical prostatectomies. (Chapter 2) • To examine the prognostic value of individual Gleason grade 4 patterns in prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy and diagnostic biopsy specimens...

  14. The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William G; Demarzo, Angelo M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the π-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of

  15. Rare Presentation of Prostate Cancer Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma with Generalized Lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Tsai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer typically metastasizes to bones and regional lymph nodes. Generalized lymphadenopathy is a rare manifestation of metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of prostate cancer in a 65-year-old male with initial presentation of generalized lymphadenopathy and no urinary symptoms. Lymph node biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma, and immunohistochemical staining was positive for prostate-specific antigen (PSA compatible with a prostatic origin. Directed biopsy confirmed that the tumor originated in the prostate. Therefore, the prostate should be considered a possible origin of metastatic adenocarcinoma in men, and presentations consistent with generalized lymphadenopathy cannot exclude a diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  16. Abiraterone Acetate for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Naïve Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of an NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, Bram L T; Riemsma, Rob; Tomini, Florian; van Asselt, Thea; Deshpande, Sohan; Duffy, Steven; Armstrong, Nigel; Severens, Johan L; Kleijnen, Jos; Joore, Manuela A

    2017-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited Janssen, the company manufacturing abiraterone acetate (AA; tradename Zytiga ® ), to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of AA in combination with prednisone/prednisolone (AAP) compared with watchful waiting (i.e. best supportive care [BSC]) for chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Maastricht University Medical Center, was commissioned as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper presents a summary of the company submission (CS), the ERG report, subsequent addenda, and the development of the NICE guidance for the use of this drug in England and Wales by the Appraisal Committee (AC). The ERG produced a critical review of the clinical and cost effectiveness of AAP based on the CS. An important question in this appraisal was, according to the ERG, whether AAP followed by docetaxel is more effective than BSC followed by docetaxel. In the COU-AA-302 trial, 239 of 546 (43.8 %) AAP patients and 304 of 542 (56.1 %) BSC patients received docetaxel as subsequent therapy, following AA or placebo. The results for this specific group of patients were not presented in the CS; therefore, the ERG asked the company to provide these data in the clarification letter; however, these data were presented as commercial-in-confidence and cannot therefore be reported here. The ERG's critical assessment of the company's economic evaluation highlighted a number of concerns, including (a) not using the intention-to-treat (ITT) population; (b) inconsistencies in estimating prediction equations; (c) not fully incorporating the impact of adverse events; (d) incorrectly incorporating the new patient access scheme (PAS); and (e) the assumption that AA non-compliance leads to recoverable drug costs. Although some of these issues were adjusted in the ERG base case, the ERG could not estimate

  17. Aflibercept versus placebo in combination with docetaxel and prednisone for treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (VENICE): a phase 3, double-blind randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Ian F; Fizazi, Karim; Ivanov, Sergey; Karlsson, Camilla Thellenberg; Fléchon, Aude; Skoneczna, Iwona; Orlandi, Francisco; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Matveev, Vsevolod; Bavbek, Sevil; Gil, Thierry; Viana, Luciano; Arén, Osvaldo; Karyakin, Oleg; Elliott, Tony; Birtle, Alison; Magherini, Emmanuelle; Hatteville, Laurence; Petrylak, Daniel; Tombal, Bertrand; Rosenthal, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Docetaxel plus prednisone is standard first-line chemotherapy for men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Aflibercept is a recombinant human fusion protein that binds A and B isoforms of VEGF and placental growth factor, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. We assessed whether the addition of aflibercept to docetaxel and prednisone would improve overall survival in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer compared with the addition of placebo to docetaxel and prednisone. VENICE was a phase 3, multicentre, randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel group study done in 31 countries (187 sites). Men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, adequate organ function, and no prior chemotherapy were treated with docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks) and oral prednisone (5 mg twice daily) and randomly allocated (1:1) to receive aflibercept (6 mg/kg) or placebo, intravenously, every 3 weeks. Treatment allocation was done centrally via an interactive voice response system, using a computer-generated sequence with a permuted-block size of four and stratified according Eastern Co-operative Group performance status (0-1 vs 2). Patients, investigators, and other individuals responsible for study conduct and data analysis were masked to treatment assignment. Aflibercept or placebo vials were supplied in identical boxes. The primary endpoint was overall survival using intention-to-treat analysis. This is the primary analysis of the completed trial. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00519285 FINDINGS: Between Aug 17, 2007, and Feb 11, 2010, 1224 men were randomly allocated to treatment: 612 to each group. At final analysis, median follow-up was 35 months (IQR 29-41) and 873 men had died. Median overall survival was 22·1 months (95·6% CI 20·3-24·1) in the aflibercept group and 21·2 months (19·6-23·8) in the placebo group (stratified hazard ratio 0·94, 95·6% CI 0·82-1·08; p=0·38). We

  18. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Archana; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  19. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  20. Regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor via a BET-dependent enhancer drives antiandrogen resistance in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel; Wang, Ping; Wongvipat, John; Karthaus, Wouter R; Abida, Wassim; Armenia, Joshua; Rockowitz, Shira; Drier, Yotam; Bernstein, Bradley E; Long, Henry W; Freedman, Matthew L; Arora, Vivek K; Zheng, Deyou; Sawyers, Charles L

    2017-09-11

    In prostate cancer, resistance to the antiandrogen enzalutamide (Enz) can occur through bypass of androgen receptor (AR) blockade by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In contrast to fixed genomic alterations, here we show that GR-mediated antiandrogen resistance is adaptive and reversible due to regulation of GR expression by a tissue-specific enhancer. GR expression is silenced in prostate cancer by a combination of AR binding and EZH2-mediated repression at the GR locus, but is restored in advanced prostate cancers upon reversion of both repressive signals. Remarkably, BET bromodomain inhibition resensitizes drug-resistant tumors to Enz by selectively impairing the GR signaling axis via this enhancer. In addition to revealing an underlying molecular mechanism of GR-driven drug resistance, these data suggest that inhibitors of broadly active chromatin-readers could have utility in nuanced clinical contexts of acquired drug resistance with a more favorable therapeutic index.

  1. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling promotes metastatic prostate cancer through microRNA-96-mediated downregulation of the tumor suppressor ETV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Siu, Man Kit; Tsai, Hong-Yuan; Yin, Juan Juan; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Yen-Nien

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that ETV6 serves as a tumor suppressor; however, its molecular regulation and cellular functions remain unclear. We used prostate cancer as a model system and demonstrated a molecular mechanism in which ETV6 can be regulated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through microRNA-96 (miR-96)-mediated downregulation. In addition, EGFR acts as a transcriptional coactivator that binds to the promoter of primary miR-96 and transcriptionally regulates miR-96 levels. We analyzed two sets of clinical prostate cancer samples, confirmed association patterns that were consistent with the EGFR-miR-96-ETV6 signaling model and demonstrated that the reduced ETV6 levels were associated with malignant prostate cancer. Based on results derived from multiple approaches, we identified the biological functions of ETV6 as a tumor suppressor that inhibits proliferation and metastasis in prostate cancer. We present a molecular mechanism in which EGFR activation leads to the induction of miR-96 expression and suppression of ETV6, which contributes to prostate cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry D

    2008-01-01

    We have recently found that CDK5 is active in prostate cancer cell lines and in almost all human metastatic prostate cancers, and inhibition of CDK5 activity resulted in reduction of spontaneous metastases by 79...

  4. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    We have recently found that CDK5 is active in prostate cancer cell lines and in almost all human metastatic prostate cancers, and inhibition of CDK5 activity resulted in reduction of spontaneous metastases by 79...

  5. Early growth inhibition is followed by increased metastatic disease with vitamin D (calcitriol treatment in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebusola Alagbala Ajibade

    Full Text Available The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW, were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg, or QW (50 µg/kg were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p. 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW. However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086, and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467. By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823. Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20-25 weeks-of-age(p = 0.0003. Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis.

  6. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  7. Cabazitaxel for Hormone-Relapsed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Previously Treated With a Docetaxel-Containing Regimen: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Benjamin; Pandor, Abdullah; Stevenson, Matt; Hamilton, Jean; Chambers, Duncan; Clowes, Mark; Graham, John; Kumar, M Satish

    2017-04-01

    As part of its single technology appraisal (STA) process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures cabazitaxel (Jevtana ® , Sanofi, UK) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of cabazitaxel for treatment of patients with metastatic hormone-relapsed prostate cancer (mHRPC) previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology based upon the company's submission to NICE. Clinical evidence for cabazitaxel was derived from a multinational randomised open-label phase III trial (TROPIC) of cabazitaxel plus prednisone or prednisolone compared with mitoxantrone plus prednisone or prednisolone, which was assumed to represent best supportive care. The NICE final scope identified a further three comparators: abiraterone in combination with prednisone or prednisolone; enzalutamide; and radium-223 dichloride for the subgroup of people with bone metastasis only (no visceral metastasis). The company did not consider radium-223 dichloride to be a relevant comparator. Neither abiraterone nor enzalutamide has been directly compared in a trial with cabazitaxel. Instead, clinical evidence was synthesised within a network meta-analysis (NMA). Results from TROPIC showed that cabazitaxel was associated with a statistically significant improvement in both overall survival and progression-free survival compared with mitoxantrone. Results from a random-effects NMA, as conducted by the company and updated by the ERG, indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the three active treatments for both overall survival and progression-free survival. Utility data were not collected as part of the TROPIC trial, and

  8. Interleukin-30: A novel microenvironmental hallmark of prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men worldwide. We have recently discovered that IL-30 shapes the microenvironment of prostate cancer and tumor-draining lymph nodes to favor tumor progression. IL-30 supports tumor growth in vitro, and IL-30 expression in prostate cancer patients is associated with high tumor grade and metastatic stage of disease. Thus, IL-30 may constitute a valuable target for modern therapeutic approaches to hamper prostate cancer progression.

  9. The flare in alkaline phosphatase activity post-orchidectomy predicts which patient may benefit from early chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelger, Rob C. M.; Lycklama A Nijeholt, Guus A. B.; Zwinderman, Aielko H.; Hamdy, Neveen A. T.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A flare in serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity post-orchidectomy has been shown to be of negative prognostic value for progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a flare in ALP may help identify patients in

  10. A phase 2 study of high-activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant in progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer metastatic to bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, J.M. [Queen' s University Belfast/Belfast City Hospital, Department of Oncology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Norman, A.R. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Computing, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McCready, V.R.; Flux, G.; Buffa, F.M. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Johnson, B. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Bob Champion Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Coffey, J.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.A.; Parker, C.C.; Dearnaley, D.P. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Academic Unit of Urology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Cook, G. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Treleaven, J. [Royal Marsden Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Haematology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-15

    We investigated the potential for improvement in disease control by use of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) to permit administration of high activities of {sup 186}Re-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in patients with progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Eligible patients had progressive HRPC metastatic to bone, good performance status and minimal soft tissue disease. Patients received 5,000 MBq of {sup 186}Re-HEDP i.v., followed 14 days later by PBSCT. Response was assessed using PSA, survival, pain scores and quality of life. Thirty-eight patients with a median age of 67 years (range 50-77) and a median PSA of 57 ng/ml (range 4-3,628) received a median activity of 4,978 MBq {sup 186}Re-HEDP (range 4,770-5,100 MBq). The most serious toxicity was short-lived grade 3 thrombocytopenia in 8 (21%) patients. The median survival of the group is 21 months (95%CI 18-24 months) with Kaplan-Meier estimated 1- and 2-year survival rates of 83% and 40% respectively. Thirty-one patients (81%, 95% CI 66-90%) had stable or reduced PSA levels 3 months post therapy while 11 (29%, 95% CI 15-49%) had PSA reductions of >50% lasting >4 weeks. Quality of life measures were stable or improved in 27 (66%) at 3 months. We have shown that it is feasible and safe to deliver high-activity radioisotope therapy with PBSCT to men with metastatic HRPC. Response rates and survival data are encouraging; however, further research is needed to define optimal role of this treatment approach. (orig.)

  11. Analytical Validation and Clinical Qualification of a New Immunohistochemical Assay for Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-7 Protein Expression in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, Jonathan; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Sharp, Adam; Sun, Shihua; Lorente, David; Riisnaes, Ruth; Figueiredo, Ines; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; de Bono, Johann S; Plymate, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7) has been implicated in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. To develop a validated assay for detection of AR-V7 protein in tumour tissue and determine its expression and clinical significance as patients progress from hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (HSPC) to CRPC. Following monoclonal antibody generation and validation, we retrospectively identified patients who had HSPC and CRPC tissue available for AR-V7 immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Nuclear AR-V7 expression was determined using IHC H score (HS) data. The change in nuclear AR-V7 expression from HSPC to CRPC and the association between nuclear AR-V7 expression and overall survival (OS) was determined. Nuclear AR-V7 expression was significantly lower in HSPC (median HS 50, interquartile range [IQR] 17.5-90) compared to CRPC (HS 135, IQR 80-157.5; pprostate cancer. A higher level of AR-V7 identifies a group of patients who respond less well to certain prostate cancer treatments and live for a shorter period of time. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Circulating tumor cell counts are prognostic of overall survival in SWOG S0421: a phase III trial of docetaxel with or without atrasentan for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldkorn, Amir; Ely, Benjamin; Quinn, David I; Tangen, Catherine M; Fink, Louis M; Xu, Tong; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J; Agarwal, Neeraj; Carducci, Michael A; Monk, J Paul; Datar, Ram H; Garzotto, Mark; Mack, Philip C; Lara, Primo; Higano, Celestia S; Hussain, Maha; Thompson, Ian Murchie; Cote, Richard J; Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2014-04-10

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration has not been prospectively validated in standard first-line docetaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We assessed the prognostic value of CTCs for overall survival (OS) and disease response in S0421, a phase III trial of docetaxel plus prednisone with or without atrasentan. CTCs were enumerated at baseline (day 0) and before cycle two (day 21) using CellSearch. Baseline counts and changes in counts from day 0 to 21 were evaluated for association with OS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and RECIST response using Cox regression as well as receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) analysis, and regression trees. Median day-0 CTC count was five cells per 7.5 mL, and CTCs < versus ≥ five per 7.5 mL were significantly associated with baseline PSA, bone pain, liver disease, hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, and subsequent PSA and RECIST response. Median OS was 26 months for < five versus 13 months for ≥ five CTCs per 7.5 mL at day 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.74 [adjusting for covariates]). ROC curves had higher areas under the curve for day-0 CTCs than for PSA, and IDI analysis showed that adding day-0 CTCs to baseline PSA and other covariates increased predictive accuracy for survival by 8% to 10%. Regression trees yielded new prognostic subgroups, and rising CTC count from day 0 to 21 was associated with shorter OS (HR, 2.55). These data validate the prognostic utility of CTC enumeration in a large docetaxel-based prospective cohort. Baseline CTC counts were prognostic, and rising CTCs at 3 weeks heralded significantly worse OS, potentially serving as an early metric to help redirect and optimize therapy in this clinical setting.

  13. A randomised comparison of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg versus placebo as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care for early non-metastatic prostate cancer. First report from the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group Study No. 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tammela, T L J; Vaage, S

    2002-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg ('Casodex'(1)) as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with early (T1b-T4, any N, M0) prostate cancer....

  14. Post hoc analysis of Japanese patients from the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy-naive, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-updated results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Go; Ueda, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    A post hoc analysis of interim results from PREVAIL, a Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, demonstrated that the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients were generally consistent with those of the overall population. A recent longer term analysis of PREVAIL demonstrated continued benefit of enzalutamide treatment over placebo. Here, we report results from a post hoc analysis of Japanese patients enrolled in PREVAIL at the prespecified number of deaths for the final analysis. In Japanese patients, enzalutamide reduced the risk of death by 35% (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-1.51) and the risk of investigator-assessed radiographic progression or death by 60% (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.90). These results show that treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients in the final analysis of PREVAIL continued to be generally consistent with those of the overall population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Post hoc analysis of Japanese patients from the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy-naive, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer—updated results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A post hoc analysis of interim results from PREVAIL, a Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, demonstrated that the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients were generally consistent with those of the overall population. A recent longer term analysis of PREVAIL demonstrated continued benefit of enzalutamide treatment over placebo. Here, we report results from a post hoc analysis of Japanese patients enrolled in PREVAIL at the prespecified number of deaths for the final analysis. In Japanese patients, enzalutamide reduced the risk of death by 35% (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.28–1.51) and the risk of investigator-assessed radiographic progression or death by 60% (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–0.90). These results show that treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients in the final analysis of PREVAIL continued to be generally consistent with those of the overall population. PMID:28003320

  16. Early diagnosis of prostate cancer in the Western Cape | Heyns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Early stage prostate cancer does not cause symptoms, and even metastatic disease may exist for years without causing symptoms or signs. Whereas early stage prostate cancer can be cured with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, the prognosis of patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer is ...

  17. Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—Preliminary Results of the Response Evaluation Using F-18-Fluoride PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome after Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 treatment of patients with skeletal metastases of castration resistant prostate cancer using whole-body 18F-Fluoride PET/CT. Sodium 18F-fluoride [18F]-NaF PET/CT was performed prior the treatment of 223RaCl2, after the first cycle and after the sixth cycle. The skeletal metastases were analyzed quantitatively using modified PET response evaluation PERCIST criteria. The patients were also analyzed for S-PSA. All ten patients responded in [18F]-NaF scans after 6 cycles, but interim analysis after the 1st cycle did not give additional information about the outcome. The S-PSA decrease correlated with [18F]-NaF response, only 1 patient demonstrated progressive disease, i.e., >25% increase in S-PSA values during 223RaCl2. Our results (although preliminary suggest that 18F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in the follow-up of castration resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases.

  18. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with osseous metastases in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Parritz, D.E.; Lamb, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy was used to diagnose osseous metastasis of prostatic adenocarcinoma in a 10-year-old dog with neck pain and ataxia and a large, sensitive prostate gland. Although radiography revealed a normal spine, prostatic fluid cytologic and ultrasonographic findings were compatible with prostatitis or neoplasia. Scintigraphic hot spots were seen in the axial skeleton, ribs, pelvis, humerus, and femur and corresponded to sites of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma

  19. Exosomes from bulk and stem cells from human prostate cancer have a differential microRNA content that contributes cooperatively over local and pre-metastatic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Catherine A; Andahur, Eliana I; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Castellón, Enrique A; Fullá, Juan A; Ramos, Christian G; Triviño, Juan C

    2016-01-26

    The different prostate cancer (PCa) cell populations (bulk and cancer stem cells, CSCs) release exosomes that contain miRNAs that could modify the local or premetastatic niche. The analysis of the differential expression of miRNAs in exosomes allows evaluating the differential biological effect of both populations on the niche, and the identification of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Five PCa primary cell cultures were established to originate bulk and CSCs cultures. From them, exosomes were purified by precipitation for miRNAs extraction to perform a comparative profile of miRNAs by next generation sequencing in an Illumina platform. 1839 miRNAs were identified in the exosomes. Of these 990 were known miRNAs, from which only 19 were significantly differentially expressed: 6 were overexpressed in CSCs and 13 in bulk cells exosomes. miR-100-5p and miR-21-5p were the most abundant miRNAs. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed miRNAs are highly related with PCa carcinogenesis, fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration, and angiogenesis. Besides, miRNAs from bulk cells affects osteoblast differentiation. Later, their effect was evaluated in normal prostate fibroblasts (WPMY-1) where transfection with miR-100-5p, miR-21-5p and miR-139-5p increased the expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9 and -13 and RANKL and fibroblast migration. The higher effect was achieved with miR21 transfection. As conclusion, miRNAs have a differential pattern between PCa bulk and CSCs exosomes that act collaboratively in PCa progression and metastasis. The most abundant miRNAs in PCa exosomes are interesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. Overall survival and response pattern of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer to multiple cycles of radioligand therapy using [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Wegen, Simone; Yordanova, Anna; Kuerpig, Stefan; Eppard, Elisabeth; Wei, Xiao; Schlenkhoff, Carl; Essler, Markus [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Hauser, Stefan [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Up to 30% of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) do not show any response to the first cycle of radioligand therapy (RLT) with [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA). We evaluated patient response to the second and third cycles of RLT in patients that underwent at least three cycles. The second aim of this study was to calculate the median overall survival (OS) of responders and non-responders after the first cycle and after all three cycles of RLT. CRPC patients were treated with Lu-PSMA, with a median interval of 8 weeks between each cycle. The tumour marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was used as the marker for response evaluation. Fifty-two patients underwent a total of 190 cycles of RLT (3-6 cycles per patient). Of these, 80.8% showed a decline in PSA 2 months after the first cycle, with 44.2% showing a PSA decline of ≥50%. When compared to baseline PSA, 73.1% showed a PSA decline after the third cycle. 50% of patients that did not show any response to the first cycle also did not respond to the second and third cycles. The median OS was 60 weeks in all patients. The median OS was significantly longer for patients that showed any PSA decline after the first cycle compared to patients without PSA decline (68 vs. 33 weeks). There was a significant difference in median OS between responders and non-responders for a change in PSA after the third cycle compared to baseline PSA. Patients with a positive response to RLT, regardless of the rate of decline, had a significantly longer median OS. Of the patients that did not show any response to the first cycle, 50% responded to the second or third cycles. (orig.)

  1. Overall survival and response pattern of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer to multiple cycles of radioligand therapy using [177Lu]Lu-PSMA-617.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Wegen, Simone; Yordanova, Anna; Fimmers, Rolf; Kürpig, Stefan; Eppard, Elisabeth; Wei, Xiao; Schlenkhoff, Carl; Hauser, Stefan; Essler, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Up to 30% of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) do not show any response to the first cycle of radioligand therapy (RLT) with [ 177 Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA). We evaluated patient response to the second and third cycles of RLT in patients that underwent at least three cycles. The second aim of this study was to calculate the median overall survival (OS) of responders and non-responders after the first cycle and after all three cycles of RLT. CRPC patients were treated with Lu-PSMA, with a median interval of 8 weeks between each cycle. The tumour marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was used as the marker for response evaluation. Fifty-two patients underwent a total of 190 cycles of RLT (3-6 cycles per patient). Of these, 80.8% showed a decline in PSA 2 months after the first cycle, with 44.2% showing a PSA decline of ≥50%. When compared to baseline PSA, 73.1% showed a PSA decline after the third cycle. 50% of patients that did not show any response to the first cycle also did not respond to the second and third cycles. The median OS was 60 weeks in all patients. The median OS was significantly longer for patients that showed any PSA decline after the first cycle compared to patients without PSA decline (68 vs. 33 weeks). There was a significant difference in median OS between responders and non-responders for a change in PSA after the third cycle compared to baseline PSA. Patients with a positive response to RLT, regardless of the rate of decline, had a significantly longer median OS. Of the patients that did not show any response to the first cycle, 50% responded to the second or third cycles.

  2. The association between health-related quality-of-life scores and clinical outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: Exploratory analyses of AFFIRM and PREVAIL studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Miller, Kurt; Tombal, Bertrand; Cella, David; Phung, De; Holmstrom, Stefan; Ivanescu, Cristina; Skaltsa, Konstantina; Naidoo, Shevani

    2017-12-01

    Our exploratory analysis examined the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (baseline and change over time) and clinical outcomes (overall survival [OS]/radiographic progression-free survival [rPFS]) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). HRQoL, OS and rPFS were assessed in phase III trials comparing enzalutamide with placebo in chemotherapy-naïve (PREVAIL; NCT01212991) or post-chemotherapy (AFFIRM; NCT00974311) mCRPC. HRQoL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P). Multivariate analyses evaluated the prognostic significance of baseline and time-dependent scores after adjusting for treatment and clinical/demographic variables. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) represented the hazard of rPFS or OS per minimally important difference (MID) score change in HRQoL variables. In baseline and time-dependent multivariate analyses, OS was independently associated with multiple HRQoL measures across both studies. In time-dependent analyses, a 10-point (upper bound of MID range) increase (improvement) in FACT-P total score was associated with reductions in mortality risk of 19% in AFFIRM (HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.78-0.84]) and 21% in PREVAIL (HR 0.79 [0.76-0.83]). For baseline analyses, a 10-point increase in FACT-P total score was associated with reductions in mortality risk of 12% (HR 0.88 [0.84-0.93]) and 10% (HR 0.90 [0.86-0.95]) in AFFIRM and PREVAIL, respectively. rPFS was associated with a subset of HRQoL domains in both studies. Several baseline HRQoL domains were prognostic for rPFS and OS in patients with mCRPC, and this association was maintained during treatment, indicating that changes in HRQoL are informative for patients' expected survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Post hoc analyses of East Asian patients from the randomized placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choung Soo; Choi, Young Deuk; Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Hyun Moo; Ueda, Takeshi; Yonese, Junji; Fukagai, Takashi; Chiong, Edmund; Lau, Weber; Abhyankar, Sarang; Theeuwes, Ad; Tombal, Bertrand; Beer, Tomasz M; Kimura, Go

    2017-07-01

    Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor that acts on different steps in the AR signaling pathway. In PREVAIL, an international, phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, enzalutamide significantly reduced the risk of radiographic progression by 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; P PREVAIL trial, we performed a post hoc analysis of the Japanese, Korean, and Singaporean patients. PREVAIL enrolled patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who had progressed on androgen deprivation therapy. During the study, patients received enzalutamide (160 mg/d) or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation because of radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent therapy. Centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) were coprimary endpoints. The secondary endpoints of the PREVAIL trial were investigator-assessed rPFS, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, and PSA response (≥50% decline). Of 1717 patients, 148 patients were enrolled at sites in East Asia (enzalutamide 73, placebo 75). Treatment effect of enzalutamide versus placebo was consistent with that for the overall population as indicated by the HRs (95% confidence interval) of 0.38 (0.10-1.44) for centrally assessed rPFS, 0.59 (0.29-1.23) for OS, 0.33 (0.19-0.60) for time to chemotherapy, and 0.32 (0.20-0.50) for time to PSA progression. In East Asian patients, PSA responses were observed in 68.5% and 14.7% of enzalutamide- and placebo-treated patients, respectively. The enzalutamide plasma concentration ratio (East Asian:non-Asian patients) was 1.12 (90% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20) at 13 weeks. Treatment-related adverse events grade ≥ 3 occurred in 1.4% and 2.7% of enzalutamide- and placebo-treated East Asian patients, respectively. Treatment effects and safety of enzalutamide in East Asian

  4. Comparison of Alternative Androgen Receptor-axis-targeted Agent (ARATA) and Docetaxel as Second-line Therapy for Patients With Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer With Progression After Initial ARATA in Real-world Clinical Practice in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideaki; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Aki, Ryota; Matsushita, Yuto; Tamura, Keita; Motoyama, Daisuke; Ito, Toshiki; Otsuka, Atsushi

    2018-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the oncologic outcomes of patients receiving second-line therapy against metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The present study included 222 consecutive mCRPC patients with progression during initial androgen receptor-axis-targeted agent (ARATA) therapy with either abiraterone acetate (AA) or enzalutamide (Enz). Of these 222 patients, 108 subsequently received an alternative ARATA (AA-to-Enz, n = 49; Enz-to-AA, n = 59) and 114 received docetaxel (DTX; AA-to-DTX, n = 54; Enz-to-DTX, n = 60). The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in the 114 patients receiving DTX was significantly greater than that in the 108 patients receiving ARATA. However, no significant differences were found in the remaining parameters between the 2 groups. The PSA response rate, PSA progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) during second-line therapy in the DTX group (n = 114) were significantly superior to those for the ARATA group (n = 108; PSA response rate, 42.1% vs. 21.3%; median PSA PFS, 7.2 vs. 4.2 months; median OS, 17.5 vs. 14.5 months). Similar trends were confirmed by comparing these outcomes among 4 therapy groups, with significant differences (PSA response rate, Enz-to-AA vs. AA-to-DTX and Enz-to-AA vs. Enz-to-DTX; PSA PFS, AA-to-Enz vs. Enz-to-AA, AA-to-Enz vs. AA-to-DTX, Enz-to-AA vs. AA-to-DTX, and Enz-to-AA vs. Enz-to-DTX; and OS, Enz-to-AA vs. AA-to-DTX and Enz-to-AA vs. Enz-to-DTX). Furthermore, the introduction of DTX was independently associated with improved PSA PFS, but not OS, on multivariate analysis. Favorable oncologic outcomes can be expected with DTX treatment, rather than with alternative ARATA, for mCRPC patients after failure of an initial ARATA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between patient-reported outcomes and clinical outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post hoc analysis of COU-AA-301 and COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, D; Traina, S; Li, T; Johnson, K; Ho, K F; Molina, A; Shore, N D

    2018-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to assess benefit-risk in drug development. The relationship between PROs and clinical outcomes is not well understood. We aim to elucidate the relationships between changes in PRO measures and clinical outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated relationships between changes in self-reported fatigue, pain, functional well-being (FWB), physical well-being (PWB) and prostate cancer-specific symptoms with overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) after 6 and 12 months of treatment in COU-AA-301 (N = 1195) or COU-AA-302 (N = 1088). Eligible COU-AA-301 patients had progressed after docetaxel and had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) ≤ 2. Eligible COU-AA-302 patients had no prior chemotherapy and ECOG PS 0 or 1. Patients were treated with abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/day) plus prednisone (10 mg/day) or prednisone alone daily. Association between self-reported fatigue, pain and functional status, and OS and/or rPFS, using pooled data regardless of treatment, was assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression modeled time to death or radiographic progression. In COU-AA-301 patients, PRO improvements were associated with longer OS and longer time to radiographic progression versus worsening or stable PROs (P AA-302 patients, worsening PROs were associated with higher likelihood of radiographic progression (P ≤ 0.025) compared with improved or stable PROs. In multivariate models, worsening PWB remained associated with worse rPFS. The 12-month analysis confirmed the 6-month results. PROs are significantly associated with clinically relevant time-to-event efficacy outcomes in clinical trials and may complement and help predict traditional clinical practice methods for monitoring patients for disease progression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for

  6. The Integrin-Regulated Kinase PYK-2: A Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edlund, Magnus

    2001-01-01

    ...) . A number of promising therapeutic targets for androgen-independent and metastatic prostate cancers are contained within the signaling cascades downstream of the ECM-binding Integrin molecules...

  7. Non-Coding RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling and Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2015-12-04

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer frequently relapses from therapy and inevitably progresses to a bone-metastatic status with no cure. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has the potential to lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for type of prostate cancer with poor prognosis. Progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by aberrant androgen receptor (AR) expression and persistent AR signaling activity. Alterations in metabolic activity regulated by oncogenic pathways, such as c-Myc, were found to promote prostate cancer growth during the development of CRPC. Non-coding RNAs represent a diverse family of regulatory transcripts that drive tumorigenesis of prostate cancer and various other cancers by their hyperactivity or diminished function. A number of studies have examined differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in each stage of prostate cancer. Herein, we highlight the emerging impacts of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs linked to reactivation of the AR signaling axis and reprogramming of the cellular metabolism in prostate cancer. The translational implications of non-coding RNA research for developing new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for CRPC are also discussed.

  8. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nogueira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC. This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA, the prostate volume (PSA density, and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time. The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  9. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC). This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA), the prostate volume (PSA density), and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time). The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  10. Comparison of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT with [18F]NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer patients prior to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Svirydenka, Anna; Fritz, Josef; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nilica, Bernhard; Decristoforo, Clemens; Haubner, Roland; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Buxbaum, Sabine; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2018-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer (PC) patients scheduled for radionuclide therapy in comparison to [ 18 F]sodium fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT. Sixteen metastatic PC patients with known skeletal metastases, who underwent both 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT and 18 F-NaF PET/CT for assessment of metastatic burden prior to radionuclide therapy, were analysed retrospectively. The performance of both tracers was calculated on a lesion-based comparison. Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic bone lesions on 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was measured with maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) and compared to background activity of normal bone. In addition, SUV max values of PET-positive bone lesions were analysed with respect to morphologic characteristics on CT. Bone metastases were either confirmed by CT or follow-up PET scan. In contrast to 468 PET-positive lesions suggestive of bone metastases on 18 F-NaF PET, only 351 of the lesions were also judged positive on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET (75.0%). Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic skeletal lesions was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET compared to 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET, showing a median SUV max of 27.0 and 6.0, respectively (p PET, with a median SUV max of 1.0 in comparison to 2.7 on 18 F-NaF PET; however, tumour to background ratio was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET (9.8 versus 5.9 on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET; p = 0.042). Based on morphologic lesion characterisation on CT, 18 F-NaF PET revealed median SUV max values of 23.6 for osteosclerotic, 35.0 for osteolytic, and 19.0 for lesions not visible on CT, whereas on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET median SUV max values of 5.0 in osteosclerotic, 29.5 in osteolytic, and 7.5 in lesions not seen on CT were measured. Intensity of tracer accumulation between 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was significantly higher in osteosclerotic (p

  11. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material

  12. Prostate cancer metastasis to the mandible: case report | Parkins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostate cancer is recognised to be the commonest type of malignancy in the male in many parts of the world. Prostate cancer has a propensity to metastasize to bone, however metastasis to the jaw is uncommon and indeed among metastatic tumours of the jaws which are a rarity, only about 9% originate from a prostatic ...

  13. Frequent Loss of Cystatin E/M Expression Implicated in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pulukuri, Sai Murali Krishna; Gorantla, Bharathi; Knost, James A.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2009-01-01

    Cystatin E/M (CST6) is a natural inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Recent studies have shown that experimental manipulation of CST6 expression alters the metastatic behavior of human breast cancer cells. However, the association of CST6 with prostate cancer invasion and progression is remains unclear. Here, we show that CST6 is robustly expressed in normal human prostate epithelium while its expression is downregulated in metastatic prostate cell lines and prostate tumor tissues. Tre...

  14. External validation and newly development of a nomogram to predict overall survival of abiraterone-treated, castration-resistant patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jie Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiraterone acetate is approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC; however, its effects vary. An accurate prediction model to identify patient groups that will benefit from abiraterone treatment is therefore urgently required. The Chi model exhibits a good profile for risk classification, although its utility for the chemotherapy-naive group is unclear. This study aimed to externally validate the Chi model and develop a new nomogram to predict overall survival (OS. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 110 patients. Patients were distributed among good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups, according to the Chi model. The good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups had a sample size of 59 (53.6%, 34 (30.9%, and 17 (15.5% in our dataset, and a median OS of 48.4, 29.1, and 10.5 months, respectively. The C-index of external validation of Chi model was 0.726. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified low hemoglobin concentrations (<110 g l−1, liver metastasis, and a short time interval from androgen deprivation therapy to abiraterone initiation (<36 months as predictors of OS. Accordingly, a new nomogram was developed with a C-index equal to 0.757 (95% CI, 0.678–0.836. In conclusion, the Chi model predicted the prognosis of abiraterone-treated, chemotherapy-naive patients with mCRPC, and we developed a new nomogram to predict the overall survival of this group of patients with less parameters.

  15. Prostate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the exact cause of your prostate problem. Prostatitis The cause of prostatitis depends on whether you ... prostate problem in men older than age 50. Prostatitis If you have a UTI, you may be ...

  16. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  17. MANAGEMENT AND SURVIVAL IN ADVANCED PROSTATE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-05-05

    May 5, 2000 ... Patients: Fifty nine patients with advanced cancer of prostate (extra prostatic locally advanced and metastatic ... Conclusion: Survival in the undifferentiated and poorly differentiated prostrate cancer. Gleasons grades 4 and 5 .... with its pulsatile release from the hypothalamus and desensitises the pituitary ...

  18. Effect of enzalutamide on health-related quality of life, pain, and skeletal-related events in asymptomatic and minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (PREVAIL): results from a randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriot, Yohann; Miller, Kurt; Sternberg, Cora N; Fizazi, Karim; De Bono, Johann S; Chowdhury, Simon; Higano, Celestia S; Noonberg, Sarah; Holmstrom, Stefan; Mansbach, Harry; Perabo, Frank G; Phung, De; Ivanescu, Cristina; Skaltsa, Konstantina; Beer, Tomasz M; Tombal, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Enzalutamide significantly increased overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival compared with placebo in the PREVAIL trial of asymptomatic and minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We report the effect of enzalutamide on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain, and skeletal-related events observed during this trial. In this phase 3, double-blind trial, patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive enzalutamide 160 mg/day (n=872) or placebo (n=845) orally. HRQoL was assessed at baseline and during treatment using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and EQ-5D questionnaires. Pain status was assessed at screening, baseline, week 13, and week 25 with the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF). The primary analysis of HRQoL data used a mixed-effects model to test the difference between least square means change from baseline at week 61. We assessed change from baseline, percentage improvement, and time to deterioration in HRQoL and pain, the proportion of patients with a skeletal-related event, and time to first skeletal-related event. Analysis was done on the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01212991. Median treatment duration was 16·6 months (IQR 10·1-21·1) in the enzalutamide group and 4·6 months (2·8-9·7) in the placebo group. The mixed-effects model analyses showed significant treatment differences in change from baseline to week 61 with enzalutamide compared with placebo for most FACT-P endpoints and EQ-5D visual analogue scale. Median time to deterioration in FACT-P total score was 11·3 months (95% CI 11·1-13·9) in the enzalutamide group and 5·6 months (5·5-5·6) in the placebo groups (hazard ratio [HR] 0·62 [95% CI 0·54-0·72]; p<0·0001). A significantly greater proportion of patients in the enzalutamide group than in the placebo group reported clinically meaningful

  19. PTP1B Deficiency Enables the Ability of a High-Fat Diet to Drive the Invasive Character of PTEN-Deficient Prostate Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, David P; Uetani, Noriko; Vinette, Valérie; Lessard, Laurent; Aubry, Isabelle; Migon, Eva; Sirois, Jacinthe; Haigh, Jody J; Bégin, Louis R; Trotman, Lloyd C; Paquet, Marilène; Tremblay, Michel L

    2016-06-01

    Diet affects the risk and progression of prostate cancer, but the interplay between diet and genetic alterations in this disease is not understood. Here we present genetic evidence in the mouse showing that prostate cancer progression driven by loss of the tumor suppressor Pten is mainly unresponsive to a high-fat diet (HFD), but that coordinate loss of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn1 (encoding PTP1B) enables a highly invasive disease. Prostate cancer in Pten(-/-)Ptpn1(-/-) mice was characterized by increased cell proliferation and Akt activation, interpreted to reflect a heightened sensitivity to IGF-1 stimulation upon HFD feeding. Prostate-specific overexpression of PTP1B was not sufficient to initiate prostate cancer, arguing that it acted as a diet-dependent modifier of prostate cancer development in Pten(-/-) mice. Our findings offer a preclinical rationale to investigate the anticancer effects of PTP1B inhibitors currently being studied clinically for diabetes treatment as a new modality for management of prostate cancer. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3130-5. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Health-related quality of life effects of enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an in-depth post hoc analysis of EQ-5D data from the PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Nancy; Herdman, Michael; Pavesi, Marco; Phung, De; Naidoo, Shevani; Beer, Tomasz M; Tombal, Bertrand; Loriot, Yohann; Ivanescu, Cristina; Parli, Teresa; Balk, Mark; Holmstrom, Stefan

    2017-06-23

    The effect of enzalutamide on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the PREVAIL trial in chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was analyzed using the generic EQ-5D instrument. Patients received oral enzalutamide 160 mg/day (n = 872) or placebo (n = 845). EQ-5D index and EQ-5D visual analogue scale (EQ-5D VAS) scores were evaluated at baseline, week 13, and every 12 weeks until week 61 due to sample size reduction thereafter. Changes on individual dimensions were assessed, and Paretian Classification of Health Change (PCHC) and time-to-event analyses were conducted. With enzalutamide, EQ-5D index and EQ-5D VAS scores declined more slowly versus placebo and time to diverge from full health was prolonged. Average decline in EQ-5D index (-0.042 vs. -0.070; P < .0001) and EQ-5D VAS (-1.3 vs. -4.4; P < .0001) was significantly smaller with enzalutamide. There were significant (P < .05) between-group differences favoring enzalutamide in Pain/Discomfort to week 37, Anxiety/Depression at week 13, and Usual Activities at week 25, but no significant differences for Mobility and Self-care. The PCHC analysis showed more enzalutamide patients reporting improvement than placebo patients at weeks 13, 25, and 49 (all P < .05) and week 37 (P = .0512). Enzalutamide was superior (P ≤ .0003) to placebo for time to diverge from full health and time to first deterioration on Pain/Discomfort and Anxiety/Depression dimensions. This in-depth post hoc analysis showed that enzalutamide delayed HRQoL deterioration and had beneficial effects on several HRQoL domains, including Pain/Discomfort and the proportion of patients in full health, compared with placebo, and may help to support future analyses of this type. NCT01212991.

  1. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV...

  2. Patient-derived Hormone-naive Prostate Cancer Xenograft Models Reveal Growth Factor Receptor Bound Protein 10 as an Androgen Receptor-repressed Gene Driving the Development of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jun; Ci, Xinpei; Xue, Hui; Wu, Rebecca; Dong, Xin; Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; He, Haiqing; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Fang; Qu, Sifeng; Zhang, Fan; Haegert, Anne M; Gout, Peter W; Zoubeidi, Amina; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin E; Lin, Dong; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2018-06-01

    Although androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in controlling growth of hormone-naive prostate cancers (HNPCs) in patients, currently incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) inevitably develops. To identify CRPC driver genes that may provide new targets to enhance CRPC therapy. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of HNPCs that develop CRPC following host castration were examined for changes in expression of genes at various time points after castration using transcriptome profiling analysis; particular attention was given to pre-CRPC changes in expression indicative of genes acting as potential CRPC drivers. The functionality of a potential CRPC driver was validated via its knockdown in cultured prostate cancer cells; its clinical relevance was established using data from prostate cancer patient databases. Eighty genes were found to be significantly upregulated at the CRPC stage, while seven of them also showed elevated expression prior to CRPC development. Among the latter, growth factor receptor bound protein 10 (GRB10) was the most significantly and consistently upregulated gene. Moreover, elevated GRB10 expression in clinical prostate cancer samples correlated with more aggressive tumor types and poorer patient treatment outcome. GRB10 knockdown markedly reduced prostate cancer cell proliferation and activity of AKT, a well-established CRPC mediator. A positive correlation between AKT activity and GRB10 expression was also found in clinical cohorts. GRB10 acts as a driver of CRPC and sensitizes androgen receptor pathway inhibitors, and hence GRB10 targeting provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the disease. Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major problem in the management of the disease. Using state-of-the-art patient-derived hormone-naive prostate cancer xenograft models, we found and validated the growth factor receptor bound protein 10 gene as a driver of CRPC, indicating that it may be used as a

  3. Research of bone metastases in prostate cancer: scintigraphy and radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibel, I.; Monteiro, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper analyses the results of bone scan and radiologic study of the bones on the search of metastases of prostate cancer seen in the last two years. In 44 patients with prostatic cancer the diagnostic of metastatic disease was made by the 99m Tc scan in 52%, and by the metastatic radiologic survey in only 25%. (author)

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  6. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    .... We also proposed to examine the role of CDK5 activity in growth of prostate cancer metastatic to bone, using PC3 based bioluminescent cell clones, and to explore the potential for CDK5 inhibition...

  7. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Cotter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field.

  8. Detection of Lipid-Rich Prostate Circulating Tumour Cells with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Ranjana; Chao, Olivia; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Goodman, Oscar B; Le, Thuc T

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) are an important indicator of metastasis and associated with a poor prognosis. Detection sensitivity and specificity of CTC in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patient remain a technical challenge. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was employed to examine the lipid content of CTC isolated from the peripheral blood of metastatic prostate cancer patients. CARS microscopy was also employed to evaluate lipid uptake and mobilization kinetics of a metastatic human prostate cancer cell line. One hundred CTC from eight metastatic prostate cancer patients exhibited strong CARS signal which arose from intracellular lipid. In contrast, leukocytes exhibited weak CARS signal which arose mostly from cellular membrane. On average, CARS signal intensity of prostate CTC was 7-fold higher than that of leukocytes (P<0.0000001). When incubated with human plasma, C4-2 metastatic human prostate cancer cells exhibited rapid lipid uptake kinetics and slow lipid mobilization kinetics. Higher expression of lipid transport proteins in C4-2 cells compared to non-transformed RWPE-1 and non-malignant BPH-1 prostate epithelial cells further indicated strong affinity for lipid of metastatic prostate cancer cells. Intracellular lipid could serve as a biomarker for prostate CTC which could be sensitively detected with CARS microscopy in a label-free manner. Strong affinity for lipid by metastatic prostate cancer cells could be used to improve detection sensitivity and therapeutic targeting of prostate CTC

  9. Generalized Lymphadenopathy: Unusual Presentation of Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized lymphadenopathy is a rare manifestation of metastatic prostate cancer. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old male patient with supraclavicular, mediastinal, hilar, and retroperitoneal and inguinal lymphadenopathy, which suggested the diagnosis of lymphoma. There were no urinary symptoms. A biopsy of the inguinal lymph node was compatible with adenocarcinoma, whose prostatic origin was shown by immunohistochemical staining with PSA. The origin of the primary tumor was confirmed by directed prostate biopsy. We emphasize that a suspicion of prostate cancer in men with adenocarcinoma of undetermined origin is important for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-4 and Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    difference between the two FGFR-4 variants? Achondroplasia ( dwarfism ) is caused by a similar mutation in FGFR-3 (Gly380 to Arg380). Increased FGFR-3...US men, with approximately 230,000 new cases and 29,000 deaths in 2004 [1]. Prostate cancer deaths are a result of metastatic disease and treatment of...such metastatic disease is one of the major therapeutic challenges in prostate cancer treatment . Many studies have been focused on identification of

  11. Brain metastasis from prostate small cell carcinoma: not to be neglected.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Verhagen, W.I.M.; Wauters, C.A.P.; Lindert, E.J. van

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic brain metastases from prostatic carcinoma are rare (0.05% to 0.5%). CASE REPORT: A 70-year-old man presented with a homonymous hemianopsia due to brain metastatic prostatic carcinoma shortly before becoming symptomatic of prostatic disease. CT and MRI of the brain showed a

  12. The Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  13. The Multifaceted Roles of STAT3 Signaling in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Thaper, Daksh; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2014-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 governs essential functions of epithelial and hematopoietic cells that are often dysregulated in cancer. While the role for STAT3 in promoting the progression of many solid and hematopoietic malignancies is well established, this review will focus on the importance of STAT3 in prostate cancer progression to the incurable metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Indeed, STAT3 integrates different signaling pathways involved in the reactivation of androgen receptor pathway, stem like cells and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition that drive progression to mCRPC. As equally important, STAT3 regulates interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment as well as immune cell activation. This makes it a major factor in facilitating prostate cancer escape from detection of the immune response, promoting an immunosuppressive environment that allows growth and metastasis. Based on the multifaceted nature of STAT3 signaling in the progression to mCRPC, the promise of STAT3 as a therapeutic target to prevent prostate cancer progression and the variety of STAT3 inhibitors used in cancer therapies is discussed

  14. Hormone-refractory prostate cancer and the skeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, Vidija

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the UK. Androgen ablation with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRH agonists) alone, or in combination with anti-androgens is the standard treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, despite maximal

  15. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  16. Intratumoral conversion of adrenal androgen precursors drives androgen receptor-activated cell growth in prostate cancer more potently than de novo steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Jinpei; Hofland, Johannes; Erkens-Schulze, Sigrun; Dits, Natasja F J; Steenbergen, Jacobie; Jenster, Guido; Homma, Yukio; de Jong, Frank H; van Weerden, Wytske M

    2013-11-01

    Despite an initial response to hormonal therapy, patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) almost always progress to castration-resistant disease (CRPC). Although serum testosterone (T) is reduced by androgen deprivation therapy, intratumoral T levels in CRPC are comparable to those in prostate tissue of eugonadal men. These levels could originate from intratumoral conversion of adrenal androgens and/or from de novo steroid synthesis. However, the relative contribution of de novo steroidogenesis to AR-driven cell growth is unknown. The relative contribution of androgen biosynthetic pathways to activate androgen receptor (AR)-regulated cell growth and expression of PSA, FKBP5, and TMPRSS2 was studied at physiologically relevant levels of adrenal androgen precursors and intermediates of de novo androgen biosynthesis in human prostate cancer cell lines, PC346C, VCaP, and LNCaP. In PC346C and VCaP, responses to pregnenolone and progesterone were absent or minimal, while large effects of adrenal androgen precursors were found. VCaP CRPC clones overexpressing CYP17A1 did not acquire an increased ability to use pregnenolone or progesterone to activate AR. In contrast, all precursors stimulated growth and gene expression in LNCaP cells, presumably resulting from the mutated AR in these cells. Our data indicate that at physiological levels of T precursors PC cells can generally convert adrenal androgens, while de novo steroidogenesis is not generally possible in PC cells and is not able to support AR transactivation and PC growth. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  18. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. Prostatic Adenocarcinoma with Concurrent Sertoli Cell Tumor in a Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    A case of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma with concurrent Sertoli cell tumor is presented in an old, miniature Schnauzer dog. The prostatic neoplasm was highly anaplastic and had metastasized widely. Clinical signs were compatible with increased estrogen production. It is interesting to note that the prostatic carcinoma, usually considered to be androgen dependent, developed and metastasized, despite the presence of apparently increased estrogen levels. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7340923

  2. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  3. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    -weighted images is replaced by low signal intensity mass. MRI and CT have approximately equal accuracy in detecting lymphadenopathy. Both of these techniques rely on lymph node size to assess whether tumor may be present. Nodes larger than 1.0 cm are considered to be suspicious for metastatic disease. MRI had been reported to have a sensitivity of 69% and an accuracy of 95%. The advantage of MRI over CT is the lack of need of iodinated contrast, and the ability to better evaluate bone marrow involvement. Despite these advantages, tumor in normal size lymph nodes cannot be detected with MRI. Only recently, has MRI been used together with clinical data including PSA, clinical stage and Gleason score to predict clinically unsuspected extra prostatic cancer. The addition of endorectal MRI correctly predicted the presence of seminal vesicle invasion (5 of 7 - 71%) and estracapsular extension (7 of 26 - 27%) in patients who would have been missed based upon PSA and Gleason score alone

  4. Paradoxical expression of E-cadherin in prostatic bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, A A; Freemont, A J; Clarke, N W; George, N J

    1999-12-01

    To determine whether the calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is expressed in metastatic deposits of prostate cancer in bone. Ten bone biopsies containing metastatic deposits of untreated prostatic cancer were obtained and immunohistochemically stained for E-cadherin with the monoclonal antibody HECD-1, using the streptavidin-biotin complex technique. Benign prostatic tissue was used as the control. Of the 10 specimens, nine showed positive expression of E-cadherin, graded as strong in four. E-cadherin expression was strongest in well-differentiated metastases and decreased with increasing tumour grade. In some specimens there were mixed patterns of expression. E-cadherin is strongly expressed in prostatic bone metastases and the degree of expression appears to reflect local tumour grade. This suggests that loss of E-cadherin expression may not be critically linked to metastatic potential.

  5. Evolving perspectives of the role of novel agents in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Kalmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer presents an intriguing clinical challenge, with a subtle interaction between hormone-responsive and refractory tumor cell elements. The treatment of advanced prostate carcinoma, which had remained stagnant for several decades following the understanding of the link between androgenic stimulation and carcinogenesis, has now started to make steady headway with chemotherapy and targeted approaches. Metastatic prostate cancer is almost always treated with initial androgen deprivation, in various forms. However, despite such treatment androgen-independent prostate cancer cells eventually emerge and progress to threaten life. The therapeutic objectives for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer are to maintain the quality of life and prolong survival. The out-dated nihilistic dogma of deferring chemotherapy until the most advanced stages in advanced prostate cancer is now falling by the wayside with the development of newer effective, tolerable agents.

  6. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, Mark F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion. (paper)

  7. On the biophysics of cathodal galvanotaxis in rat prostate cancer cells: Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borys, Przemysław

    2012-06-01

    Rat prostate cancer cells have been previously investigated using two cell lines: a highly metastatic one (Mat-Ly-Lu) and a nonmetastatic one (AT-2). It turns out that the highly metastatic Mat-Ly-Lu cells exhibit a phenomenon of cathodal galvanotaxis in an electric field which can be blocked by interrupting the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) activity. The VGSC activity is postulated to be characteristic for metastatic cells and seems to be a reasonable driving force for motile behavior. However, the classical theory of cellular motion depends on calcium ions rather than sodium ions. The current research provides a theoretical connection between cellular sodium inflow and cathodal galvanotaxis of Mat-Ly-Lu cells. Electrical repulsion of intracellular calcium ions by entering sodium ions is proposed after depolarization starting from the cathodal side. The disturbance in the calcium distribution may then drive actin polymerization and myosin contraction. The presented modeling is done within a continuous one-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation framework.

  8. GC-MS-Based Endometabolome Analysis Differentiates Prostate Cancer from Normal Prostate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Lima

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is an important health problem worldwide. Diagnosis and management of PCa is very complex because the detection of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA has several drawbacks. Metabolomics brings promise for cancer biomarker discovery and for better understanding PCa biochemistry. In this study, a gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS based metabolomic profiling of PCa cell lines was performed. The cell lines include 22RV1 and LNCaP from PCa with androgen receptor (AR expression, DU145 and PC3 (which lack AR expression, and one normal prostate cell line (PNT2. Regarding the metastatic potential, PC3 is from an adenocarcinoma grade IV with high metastatic potential, DU145 has a moderate metastatic potential, and LNCaP has a low metastatic potential. Using multivariate analysis, alterations in levels of several intracellular metabolites were detected, disclosing the capability of the endometabolome to discriminate all PCa cell lines from the normal prostate cell line. Discriminant metabolites included amino acids, fatty acids, steroids, and sugars. Six stood out for the separation of all the studied PCa cell lines from the normal prostate cell line: ethanolamine, lactic acid, β-Alanine, L-valine, L-leucine, and L-tyrosine.

  9. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  10. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  11. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  12. Pre-metastatic niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peinado, Héctor; Zhang, Haiying; Matei, Irina R.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that organs of future metastasis are not passive receivers of circulating tumour cells, but are instead selectively and actively modified by the primary tumour before metastatic spread has even occurred. Sowing the 'seeds' of metastasis requires the action of tumour......-secreted factors and tumour-shed extracellular vesicles that enable the 'soil' at distant metastatic sites to encourage the outgrowth of incoming cancer cells. In this Review, we summarize the main processes and new mechanisms involved in the formation of the pre-metastatic niche....

  13. Prostate-specific antigen-activated thapsigargin prodrug as targeted therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Jakobsen, Carsten M; Janssen, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Standard anti-proliferative chemotherapy is relatively ineffective against slowly proliferating androgen-independent prostate cancer cells within metastatic sites. In contrast, the lipophilic cytotoxin thapsigargin, which causes apoptosis by disrupting intracellular free Ca2+ levels, is effective...... against both proliferative and quiescent (i.e., G0-arrested) cells. However, thapsigargin's mechanism of action indicates that it is unlikely to be selective for cancer cells or prostate cells....

  14. About the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us About the Prostate Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors Prostate Cancer Prevention ... that connects to the anus. Ultrasound of the prostate Prostate Zones The prostate is divided into several ...

  15. Epigenetics-related genes in prostate cancer: expression profile in prostate cancer tissues, androgen-sensitive and -insensitive cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Ochsenfahrt, Jacqueline; Fuchs, Kerstin; Wernert, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes have been suggested to drive prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to identify novel epigenetics-related genes in PCa tissues, and to examine their expression in metastatic PCa cell lines. We analyzed the expression of epigenetics-related genes via a clustering analysis based on gene function in moderately and poorly differentiated PCa glands compared to normal glands of the peripheral zone (prostate proper) from PCa patients using Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarrays. Our analysis identified 12 epigenetics-related genes with a more than 2-fold increase or decrease in expression and a p-value epigenetics-related genes that we identified in primary PCa tissues may provide further insight into the role that epigenetic changes play in PCa. Moreover, some of the genes that we identified may play important roles in primary PCa and metastasis, in primary PCa only, or in metastasis only. Follow-up studies are required to investigate the functional role and the role that the expression of these genes play in the outcome and progression of PCa using tissue microarrays.

  16. Sodium Iodide Symporter Gene Transfer for Imaging and Ablation of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jhiang, Sissy M

    2005-01-01

    .... The specific aims of this project are to: (1) confirm metastatic progression to distant lymph nodes and lungs following subcutaneous inoculation of rats with MATLyLu prostatic adenocarcinoma cells expressing hNIS; (2...

  17. Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Lymph Node Metastasis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Datta, Kaustubh

    2007-01-01

    .... Again, the cancer will often progress to an androgen refractory (independent), metastatic stage. Recent reports have suggested that the expression of VEGF-C is directly correlated with lymph node dissemination in prostate cancer...

  18. Prostate carcinoma: current diagnostic strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzschild, Monica Maria Agata Stiepcich; Ferraz, Maria Lucia Cardoso Gomes; Oliveira, Jose Marcelo Amatuzzi; Andriolo, Adagmar

    2001-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second cause of cancer death in men in the Western world. Despite progress in the treatment of advanced disease, it is recognized that the only possibility of reduction in prostate cancer death is nearly diagnosis when the disease is localized. In the present study our aim was to review the current strategy for diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a valuable tumor marker and has demonstrated effectiveness in detecting prostate carcinoma, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and disclosing disease recurrence. However, alternative methods are been proposed just as the free to total PSA ratio, PSA density, PSA velocity, which could improve the diagnostic sensibility and the specificity. Image diagnostic methods include transrectal ultra sound, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance image, and bone cintigraphy. The ultra sound is the best approach to guide the prostate biopsy and, together with the magnetic resonance is still useful for loco regional graduation. Computerized tomography as magnetic resonance image can be used for identification of linfonodal involvement. Bone cintigraphy is the best method for the identification of metastatic disease. (author)

  19. Molecular biology of prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Timothy C.; Sehgal, I.; Timme, T.L.; Rn, C.; Yang, G.; Park, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Prostate cancer is now the most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men (Boring C.C. et al, CA 44:7-26, 1994). As with other forms of cancer, prostate cancer is a multistep disease process that involves the acquisition of multiple genetic alternations (Armitage P and Doll K, Br J Cancer 8:1-12, 1954). For prostate cancer, alternations in specific dominantly acting oncogenes including ras and myc and tumor suppressor genes including p53 and Rb have been reported. However, a simple phenotype-genotype correlation for prostate cancer progression may not be readily accessible because prostate cancer demonstrates remarkable genetic heterogeneity. Recent clinical data indicate that this heterogeneity exists both among the multiple cancer foci as well as within individual cancer foci. Furthermore, based on chromosomal analysis, it has been suggested that metastases do not necessarily seed from the largest index cancer focus at the primary site. Such observations imply that abrupt changes in gene expression may trigger metastatic behavior in relatively small cohorts of malignant cells present at the local site. This pattern of progression may result from compromised function of specific 'control' genes which could affect the activity of multiple downstream genes involved in specific pathways of malignant progression. Such a mechanistic framework involving networks of gene expression could explain the acquisition of the complex metastatic phenotype. Using the mouse prostate reconstitution (MPR) model system (Thompson et al, Cell 56:917-930, 1989) we demonstrated that progression of experimental prostate cancer to metastasis was invariably associated with functional inactivation of p53 (Thompson el al, Oncogene 10:869-879, 1995). Southern blotting analyses revealed that metastases do not necessarily originate from the most abundant clone in the primary carcinoma. Furthermore, the role of p53 as a potential metastasis suppressor

  20. Management Options in Advanced Prostate Cancer: What is the Role for Sipuleucel-T?

    OpenAIRE

    Bitting, Rhonda L.; Armstrong, Andrew J.; George, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Most prostate cancer-related deaths occur in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until recently, only therapy with docetaxel and prednisone has been shown to prolong survival in men with metastatic CRPC. With the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approvals of sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate, all based on improvement in overall survival, the landscape for management of men with metastatic CRPC has dramatically changed. In this review ...

  1. Prostatitis - nonbacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBP; Prostatodynia; Pelvic pain syndrome; CPPS; Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis; Chronic genitourinary pain ... Possible causes of nonbacterial prostatitis include: A past ... common types of bacteria Irritation caused by a backup of urine ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  4. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  5. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to guide the biopsy to specific regions of the prostate gland. When the examination is ... is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time ...

  10. Bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  12. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  13. Combination immunotherapy with prostate GVAX and ipilimumab: safety and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Dev; Van Veldhuizen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Evaluation of: van den Eertwegh AJ, Versluis J, van den Berg HP et al. Combined immunotherapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a Phase 1 dose-escalation trial. Lancet Oncol. 13(5), 509 – 517 (2012). A significant interest in the development of therapeutic cancer vaccines over the last decade has led to an improvement in overall survival of cancer patients in several clinical trials. As a result, two active immunotherapy agents, sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab, have been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively. GVAX(®) cellular vaccine (Cell Genesysis, Inc., CA, USA) is another active immunotherapy agent targeting prostate cancer and it has been well studied in various clinical trials. The current publication, by van den Eertwegh et al., demonstrated a combination of two active immunotherapy approaches, using GVAX and ipilimumab for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. While GVAX is designed to amplify the antitumor response specific to prostate cancer cells, ipilimumab contributes to T-cell activation. Thus, the authors presented the possibility of augmenting antitumor T-cell activity in two different ways. They successfully demonstrated a tolerable dose and safety profile of ipilimumab in combination with GVAX for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, further studies of such immunotherapy combinations and detailed analysis of their immunological effects are needed to observe clinical benefit.

  14. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A.; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I.; Guo, Qiu Q.; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E.; Durfee, Paul N.; MacMillan, Connor D.; Townson, Jason L.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chambers, Ann F.; Chin, Joseph L.; Leong, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles released by prostate cancer present in seminal fluid, urine, and blood may represent a non-invasive means to identify and prioritize patients with intermediate risk and high risk of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that enumeration of circulating prostate microparticles (PMPs), a type of extracellular vesicle (EV), can identify patients with Gleason Score≥4+4 prostate cancer (PCa) in a manner independent of PSA. Patients and Methods Plasmas from healthy volunteers, benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, and PCa patients with various Gleason score patterns were analyzed for PMPs. We used nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate PMPs which were defined as submicron events (100-1000nm) immunoreactive to anti-PSMA mAb when compared to isotype control labeled samples. Levels of PMPs (counts/μL of plasma) were also compared to CellSearch CTC Subclasses in various PCa metastatic disease subtypes (treatment naïve, castration resistant prostate cancer) and in serially collected plasma sets from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Results PMP levels in plasma as enumerated by nanoscale flow cytometry are effective in distinguishing PCa patients with Gleason Score≥8 disease, a high-risk prognostic factor, from patients with Gleason Score≤7 PCa, which carries an intermediate risk of PCa recurrence. PMP levels were independent of PSA and significantly decreased after surgical resection of the prostate, demonstrating its prognostic potential for clinical follow-up. CTC subclasses did not decrease after prostatectomy and were not effective in distinguishing localized PCa patients from metastatic PCa patients. Conclusions PMP enumeration was able to identify patients with Gleason Score ≥8 PCa but not patients with Gleason Score 4+3 PCa, but offers greater confidence than CTC counts in identifying patients with metastatic prostate cancer. CTC Subclass analysis was also not effective for post-prostatectomy follow up and for

  15. Definition of molecular determinants of prostate cancer cell bone extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Steven R; Hays, Danielle L; Yazawa, Erika M; Opperman, Matthew; Walley, Kempland C; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Burdick, Monica M; Gillard, Bryan M; Moser, Michael T; Pantel, Klaus; Foster, Barbara A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2013-01-15

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, but transit of malignant cells across the bone marrow endothelium (BMEC) remains a poorly understood step in metastasis. Prostate cancer cells roll on E-selectin(+) BMEC through E-selectin ligand-binding interactions under shear flow, and prostate cancer cells exhibit firm adhesion to BMEC via β1, β4, and αVβ3 integrins in static assays. However, whether these discrete prostate cancer cell-BMEC adhesive contacts culminate in cooperative, step-wise transendothelial migration into bone is not known. Here, we describe how metastatic prostate cancer cells breach BMEC monolayers in a step-wise fashion under physiologic hemodynamic flow. Prostate cancer cells tethered and rolled on BMEC and then firmly adhered to and traversed BMEC via sequential dependence on E-selectin ligands and β1 and αVβ3 integrins. Expression analysis in human metastatic prostate cancer tissue revealed that β1 was markedly upregulated compared with expression of other β subunits. Prostate cancer cell breaching was regulated by Rac1 and Rap1 GTPases and, notably, did not require exogenous chemokines as β1, αVβ3, Rac1, and Rap1 were constitutively active. In homing studies, prostate cancer cell trafficking to murine femurs was dependent on E-selectin ligand, β1 integrin, and Rac1. Moreover, eliminating E-selectin ligand-synthesizing α1,3 fucosyltransferases in transgenic adenoma of mouse prostate mice dramatically reduced prostate cancer incidence. These results unify the requirement for E-selectin ligands, α1,3 fucosyltransferases, β1 and αVβ3 integrins, and Rac/Rap1 GTPases in mediating prostate cancer cell homing and entry into bone and offer new insight into the role of α1,3 fucosylation in prostate cancer development.

  16. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5.5-year-old male presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques on his scalp and pubic region of 2 months′ duration. He was having productive cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, anorexia and weight loss and receiving antitubercular treatment for these symptoms for last 3 months. Clinical diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic disease was made. Chest x-ray revealed multiple coin shaped shadows on both sides with pleural effusion. Routine investigations were normal except for anemia and hyperuricemia. Biopsy of skin nodules showed features of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Features and significance of cutaneous metastases are discussed.

  17. Intracardiac Metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man who visited Samsung Medical Center reported experiencing palpitation for 2 weeks. He had undergone excision of a mass in the right buttock due to rhabdomyosarcoma 7 years prior to this visit. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a pedunculated mass in the left ventricle, which was thought to be a vegetation of infective endocarditis, metastasis of the primary tumor, or thrombus. He underwent removal of the cardiac tumor, and the pathologic report was metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Thus, here, we report a rare case of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma in the left ventricle.

  18. Drive Stands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Systems Laboratory (ESL)houses numerous electrically driven drive stands. A drive stand consists of an electric motor driving a gearbox and a mounting...

  19. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  20. Transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase (TMPAP interacts with snapin and deficient mice develop prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana B Quintero

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP. The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP(-/- with C57BL/6J background. The PAP(-/- mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  1. The p53 codon 72 polymorphism and association to prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... the bones and lymph nodes. This is called metastatic prostate cancer. Many studies indicate that environ- mental and genetic factors such as p53 gene play a ... genotoxic stimulus, triggering the expression of several genes that affect DNA .... cervical cancer, breast cancer, colorectal and prostate cancer.

  2. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths among men in the western countries. Here, we report that human RecQL4 helicase, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of cancer-prone Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, is highly elevated in metastatic prostate cancer c...

  3. Ureteral Metastasis from Prostatic Carcinoma with an Associated Ureteral Stone: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chu Liu

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral metastasis is rare, and only a few cases of ureteral metastasis from prostatic carcinoma have been reported. We present a case of ureteral metastasis from prostatic carcinoma that was also associated with a ureteral stone. To our knowledge, this is the second case with a ureteral stone at the site of the metastatic lesion.

  4. Prostate cancer revealed by skin metastasis: A case report in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K. Tengue

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... Abstract. Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in Togo. Most patients present with advanced and metastatic disease. Skin metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare and it occurs late and often with a poor prognosis. We report a case in a 52-year-old Togolese man where the ...

  5. Prostate cancer revealed by skin metastasis: A case report in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in Togo. Most patients present with advanced and metastatic disease. Skin metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare and it occurs late and often with a poor prognosis. We report a case in a 52-year-old Togolese man where the skin lesions reveal the ...

  6. Multi cranial nerve palsies as the presenting features of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.M.; Wynne, C.J.; Cowan, I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cranial nerve palsies have previously been reported in metastatic prostate carcinoma, usually occurring late in the course of the disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man whose diagnosis of prostate cancer was made following investigation of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  7. Metastatic melanoma of mesentery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, M. S.; Ali, S.A.; Shirazi, B.; Shamim, M.

    2004-01-01

    A case of malignant melanoma metastatic to small bowel mesentery in an old female is reported. Her primary malignant melanoma of nasal mucosa was already treated. She presented with intestinal obstruction, underwent surgical excision of the tumour and was tumour-free postoperatively. (author)

  8. Overexpression of vimentin in canine prostatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, M M P; Rema, A; Gärtner, F

    2011-01-01

    Canine prostatic tumours exhibit similarities to those of man and may represent a useful model system to explore the mechanisms of cancer progression. Tumour progression to malignancy requires a change from an epithelial phenotype to a fibroblastic or mesenchymal phenotype. Vimentin expression...... is associated with the invasive phenotype of human prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to characterize immunohistochemically the expression of vimentin by canine prostatic carcinomas. Primary carcinomas and metastatic tumour foci both showed vimentin expression. This finding suggests...... that the acquisition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype in canine prostatic carcinoma may be characterized by the presence of mesenchymal intermediate filament (vimentin) that could lead to a higher likelihood of metastasis....

  9. Punctuated evolution of prostate cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Sylvan C; Prandi, Davide; Lawrence, Michael S; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Romanel, Alessandro; Drier, Yotam; Park, Kyung; Kitabayashi, Naoki; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Van Allen, Eliezer; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sboner, Andrea; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Soong, T David; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Tewari, Ashutosh; Beltran, Himisha; Onofrio, Robert C; Boysen, Gunther; Guiducci, Candace; Barbieri, Christopher E; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H; Winckler, Wendy; Cipicchio, Michelle; Ardlie, Kristin; Kantoff, Philip W; Berger, Michael F; Gabriel, Stacey B; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S; Elemento, Olivier; Getz, Gad; Demichelis, Francesca; Rubin, Mark A; Garraway, Levi A

    2013-04-25

    The analysis of exonic DNA from prostate cancers has identified recurrently mutated genes, but the spectrum of genome-wide alterations has not been profiled extensively in this disease. We sequenced the genomes of 57 prostate tumors and matched normal tissues to characterize somatic alterations and to study how they accumulate during oncogenesis and progression. By modeling the genesis of genomic rearrangements, we identified abundant DNA translocations and deletions that arise in a highly interdependent manner. This phenomenon, which we term "chromoplexy," frequently accounts for the dysregulation of prostate cancer genes and appears to disrupt multiple cancer genes coordinately. Our modeling suggests that chromoplexy may induce considerable genomic derangement over relatively few events in prostate cancer and other neoplasms, supporting a model of punctuated cancer evolution. By characterizing the clonal hierarchy of genomic lesions in prostate tumors, we charted a path of oncogenic events along which chromoplexy may drive prostate carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  11. Dementia & Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have to give up driving. Many people associate driving with self-reliance and freedom; the loss of driving privileges ... familiar roads and avoid long distances. Avoid heavy traffic and heavily traveled roads. Avoid driving at night and in bad weather. Reduce the ...

  12. GP140/CDCPI in the Development of Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    localization of Gp140 to the plasma membrane of prostate epithelial cells is decreased or lost in PIN, invasive and metastatic prostate cancers when...Matrigel (BD Biosciences, Franklin Lakes, NJ) at 2000 cells per well. Spheroid structures were extracted and expanded in regu- lar tissue culture, and...cell surface (Figure 2A). Some surface-negative cells express E-cadherin in the cytoplasm. Cells were cultured in Matrigel, and spheroid structures

  13. Multifunctional PSCA antibody fragments for PET and optical prostate cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    that recognize PSCA (prostate stem cell antigen), a cell surface protein highly expressed in prostate cancer. These engineered antibody fragments...operatively. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell - surface marker overexpressed in primary and metastatic cancers1. In vivo administration of...REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT

  14. Epigenetic Machinery Regulates Alternative Splicing of Androgen Receptor (AR) Gene in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    resistant prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zhi-Ping Liu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75390 REPORT DATE...NUMBER gene in castration-resistant prostate cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Zhi-Ping Liu 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) since PCa depends on androgen for

  15. MiR-203 controls proliferation, migration and invasive potential of prostate cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viticchiè, Giuditta; Lena, Anna Maria; Latina, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancers show a slow progression from a local lesion (primary tumor) to a metastatic and hormone-resistant phenotype. After an initial step of hyperplasia, in a high percentage of cases a neoplastic transformation event occurs that, less frequently, is followed by epithelial to mesenchymal...... cell lines compared to normal epithelial prostatic cells. Overexpression of miR-203 in brain or bone metastatic prostate cell lines (DU145 and PC3) is sufficient to induce a mesenchymal to epithelial transition with inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasiveness. We have identified CKAP2...

  16. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  17. A case report of prostate cancer metastasis to the stomach resembling undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Takuto; Kitagawa, Yoshiyasu; Hara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Taketo

    2017-08-07

    Occurrence of metastatic cancer to the stomach is rare, particularly in patients with prostate cancer. Gastric metastasis generally presents as a solitary and submucosal lesion with a central depression. We describe a case of gastric metastasis arising from prostate cancer, which is almost indistinguishable from the undifferentiated-type gastric cancer. A definitive diagnosis was not made until endoscopic resection. On performing both conventional and magnifying endoscopies, the lesion appeared to be slightly depressed and discolored area and it could not be distinguished from undifferentiated early gastric cancer. Biopsy from the lesion was negative for immunohistochemical staining of prostate-specific antigen, a sensitive and specific marker for prostate cancer. Thus, false initial diagnosis of an early primary gastric cancer was made and endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Pathological findings from the resected specimen aroused suspicion of a metastatic lesion. Consequently, immunostaining was performed. The lesion was positive for prostate-specific acid phosphatase and negative for prostate-specific antigen, cytokeratin 7, and cytokeratin 20. Accordingly, the final diagnosis was a metastatic gastric lesion originating from prostate cancer. In this patient, the definitive diagnosis as a metastatic lesion was difficult due to its unusual endoscopic appearance and the negative stain for prostate-specific antigen. We postulate that both of these are consequences of hormonal therapy against prostate cancer.

  18. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T.; Livermore, Karen E.; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I.; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Robson, Craig N.; Leung, Hing Y.; Harries, Lorna W.; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G.; Elliott, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, being significantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression. PMID:26452038

  19. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  20. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  2. Prostate specific membrane antigen- a target for imaging and therapy with radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer continues to represent a major health problem, and yet there is no effective treatment available for advanced metastatic disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve the outcome. Because prostate specific...... membrane antigen (PSMA), a transmembrane protein, is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and its expression is further increased in poorly differentiated, metastatic, and hormone-refractory carcinomas, it is a very attractive target. Molecules targeting PSMA can be labelled with radionuclides...... to become both diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. The use of PSMA binding agents, labelled with diagnostic and therapeutic radio-isotopes, opens up the potential for a new era of personalized management of metastatic prostate cancer....

  3. Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hochster, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer, though already metastatic, may still be curable through multi-modality approaches, which require combined planning between medical and surgical oncologists. Retrospective surgical series have historically shown 5-year survival or “cures” for 30% to 50% of patients with solitary or a few resectable liver metastases. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting has been poorly defined. A recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study randomize...

  4. Phenotypic Plasticity, Bet-Hedging, and Androgen Independence in Prostate Cancer: Role of Non-Genetic Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Kumar Jolly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that genetic mutations can drive drug resistance and lead to tumor relapse. Here, we focus on alternate mechanisms—those without mutations, such as phenotypic plasticity and stochastic cell-to-cell variability that can also evade drug attacks by giving rise to drug-tolerant persisters. The phenomenon of persistence has been well-studied in bacteria and has also recently garnered attention in cancer. We draw a parallel between bacterial persistence and resistance against androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer (PCa, the primary standard care for metastatic disease. We illustrate how phenotypic plasticity and consequent mutation-independent or non-genetic heterogeneity possibly driven by protein conformational dynamics can stochastically give rise to androgen independence in PCa, and suggest that dynamic phenotypic plasticity should be considered in devising therapeutic dosing strategies designed to treat and manage PCa.

  5. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  6. A randomised, phase II study of repeated rhenium-188-HEDP combined with docetaxel and prednisone versus docetaxel and prednisone alone in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone; the Taxium II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meander Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Medical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oprea-Lager, Daniela E.; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, H.P. van den [Tergooi Medical Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Los, Maartje [St Antonius Hospital Utrecht, Department of Medical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beeker, Aart [Spaarne Gasthuis, Department of Medical Oncology, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Jonker, Marianne A. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Verheul, Henk M.W.; Eertwegh, Alfons J.M. van den [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    Rhenium-188-HEDP is a beta-emitting radiopharmaceutical used for palliation of metastatic bone pain. We investigated whether the addition of rhenium-188-HEDP to docetaxel/prednisone improved efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with CRPC. Patients with progressive CRPC and osteoblastic bone metastases were randomised for first-line docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly plus prednisone with or without 2 injections of rhenium-188-HEDP after the third (40 MBq/kg) and after the sixth (20 MBq/kg) cycle of docetaxel. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), defined as either PSA, radiographic or clinical progression. Patients were stratified by extent of bone metastases and hospital. Forty-two patients were randomised for standard treatment and 46 patients for combination therapy. Median number of cycles of docetaxel was 9 in the control group and 8 in the experimental group. Median follow-up was 18.4 months. Two patients from the experimental group did not start treatment after randomisation. In the intention to treat analysis no differences in PFS, survival and PSA became apparent between the two groups. In an exploratory per-protocol analysis median overall survival was significantly longer in the experimental group (33.8 months (95%CI 31.75-35.85)) than in the control group (21.0 months (95%CI 13.61-28.39); p 0.012). Also median PFS in patients with a baseline phosphatase >220U/L was significantly better with combination treatment (9.0 months (95%CI 3.92-14.08) versus 6.2 months (95%CI 3.08-9.32); log rank p 0.005). As expected, thrombocytopenia (grade I/II) was reported more frequently in the experimental group (25% versus 0%). Combined treatment with rhenium-188-HEDP and docetaxel did not prolong PFS in patients with CRPC. The observed survival benefit in the per-protocol analysis warrants further studies in the combined treatment of chemotherapy and radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  7. Distracted driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including maps) The Dangers of Talking on the Phone While Driving You are four times more likely to get ... of reach. If you are caught using a phone while driving, you may risk a ticket or fine. Most ...

  8. Distracted Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and increased awareness of distracted driving using radio advertisements, news stories, and similar media. After the projects ... available at www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov . Distracted Driving Enforcement – TV Ads (Paid). For re-tagging, go to: www. ...

  9. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an example of a transrectal transducer (probe). A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, which measures the amount of PSA in the blood, may be administered to determine if a patient is at high risk for ... of the prostate gland. When the examination is complete, you may ...

  11. Phase I/II trials of {sup 186}Re-HEDP in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post-hoc analysis of the impact of administered activity and dosimetry on survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis-Bacelar, Ana M.; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Divoli, Antigoni; Flux, Glenn D. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P.; Johnson, Bernadette [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, London (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); McCready, V.R. [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brighton (United Kingdom); Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the role of patient-specific dosimetry as a predictive marker of survival and as a potential tool for individualised molecular radiotherapy treatment planning of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer, and to assess whether higher administered levels of activity are associated with a survival benefit. Clinical data from 57 patients who received 2.5-5.1 GBq of {sup 186}Re-HEDP as part of NIH-funded phase I/II clinical trials were analysed. Whole-body and SPECT-based absorbed doses to the whole body and bone lesions were calculated for 22 patients receiving 5 GBq. The patient mean absorbed dose was defined as the mean of all bone lesion-absorbed doses in any given patient. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, Cox's proportional hazards model and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for overall survival (OS) and correlation analyses. A statistically significantly longer OS was associated with administered activities above 3.5 GBq in the 57 patients (20.1 vs 7.1 months, hazard ratio: 0.39, 95 % CI: 0.10-0.58, P = 0.002). A total of 379 bone lesions were identified in 22 patients. The mean of the patient mean absorbed dose was 19 (±6) Gy and the mean of the whole-body absorbed dose was 0.33 (±0.11) Gy for the 22 patients. The patient mean absorbed dose (r = 0.65, P = 0.001) and the whole-body absorbed dose (r = 0.63, P = 0.002) showed a positive correlation with disease volume. Significant differences in OS were observed for the univariate group analyses according to disease volume as measured from SPECT imaging of {sup 186}Re-HEDP (P = 0.03) and patient mean absorbed dose (P = 0.01), whilst only the disease volume remained significant in a multivariable analysis (P = 0.004). This study demonstrated that higher administered activities led to prolonged survival and that for a fixed administered activity, the whole-body and patient mean absorbed doses correlated with the extent of disease, which, in turn, correlated

  12. Prostate specific antigen in the diagnosis and treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. III. Radiation treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamey, T.A.; Kabalin, J.N.; Ferrari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Serum prostate specific antigen was determined (Yang polyclonal radioimmunoassay) in 183 men after radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A total of 163 men had received 7,000 rad external beam radiotherapy and 20 had been implanted with iodine-125 seeds. Only 11 per cent of these 183 patients had undetectable prostate specific antigen levels at a mean interval of 5 years since completion of radiotherapy. Prostate specific antigen levels after radiotherapy were directly related to initial clinical stage and Gleason score before treatment. Multiple prostate specific antigen determinations were performed with time in 124 of 183 patients. During year 1 after radiotherapy prostate specific antigen levels were decreasing in 82 per cent of the patients but only 8 per cent continued to decrease beyond year 1. Of 80 patients observed greater than 1 year after completion of radiotherapy 51 per cent had increasing values and 41 per cent had stable values. Increasing prostate specific antigen values after radiotherapy were correlated with progression to metastastic disease and residual cancer on prostate biopsy. Total serum acid phosphatase levels were poorly related to prostate specific antigen levels, were less effective in discriminating patients with metastatic disease and provided no additional information beyond that provided by prostate specific antigen

  13. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  14. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, Louise M.; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-01-01

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  15. Electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    ENERGY CONVERSION IN ELECTRIC DRIVESElectric Drives: A DefinitionApplication Range of Electric DrivesEnergy Savings Pay Off RapidlyGlobal Energy Savings Through PEC DrivesMotor/Mechanical Load MatchMotion/Time Profile MatchLoad Dynamics and StabilityMultiquadrant OperationPerformance IndexesProblemsELECTRIC MOTORS FOR DRIVESElectric Drives: A Typical ConfigurationElectric Motors for DrivesDC Brush MotorsConventional AC MotorsPower Electronic Converter Dependent MotorsEnergy Conversion in Electric Motors/GeneratorsPOWER ELECTRONIC CONVERTERS (PECs) FOR DRIVESPower Electronic Switches (PESs)The

  16. SFMBT2 (Scm-like with four mbt domains 2) negatively regulates cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Shin, Jee Yoon; Lee, Kwanghyun; Hong, Soon Ki; Oh, Sangtaek; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Won Sun; Ju, Bong Gun

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men. In this study, we found that expression level of SFMBT2 is altered during prostate cancer progression and has been associated with the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. The expression level of SFMBT2 is high in poorly metastatic prostate cancer cells compared to highly metastatic prostate cancer cells. We also found that SFMBT2 knockdown elevates MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-26 expression, leading to increased cell migration and invasion in LNCaP and VCaP cells. SFMBT2 interacts with YY1, RNF2, N-CoR and HDAC1/3, as well as repressive histone marks such as H3K9me2, H4K20me2, and H2AK119Ub which are associated with transcriptional repression. In addition, SFMBT2 knockdown decreased KAI1 gene expression through up-regulation of N-CoR gene expression. Expression of SFMBT2 in prostate cancer was strongly associated with clinicopathological features. Patients having higher Gleason score (≥ 8) had substantially lower SFMBT2 expression than patients with lower Gleason score. Moreover, tail vein or intraprostatic injection of SFMBT2 knockdown LNCaP cells induced metastasis. Taken together, our findings suggest that regulation of SFMBT2 may provide a new therapeutic strategy to control prostate cancer metastasis as well as being a potential biomarker of metastatic prostate cancer.

  17. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  18. Mechanical Entrapment Is Insufficient and Intercellular Adhesion Is Essential for Metastatic Cell Arrest in Distant Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Glinskii

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we challenge a common perception that tumor embolism is a size-limited event of mechanical arrest, occurring in the first capillary bed encountered by blood-borne metastatic cells. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical entrapment alone, in the absence of tumor cell adhesion to blood vessel walls, is not sufficient for metastatic cell arrest in target organ microvasculature. The in vivo metastatic deposit formation assay was used to assess the number and location of fluorescently labeled tumor cells lodged in selected organs and tissues following intravenous inoculation. We report that a significant fraction of breast and prostate cancer cells escapes arrest in a lung capillary bed and lodges successfully in other organs and tissues. Monoclonal antibodies and carbohydrate-based compounds (anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen antibody, anti-galectin-3 antibody, modified citrus pectin, and lactulosyl-L-leucine, targeting specifically β-galactoside-mediated tumor-endothelial cell adhesive interactions, inhibited by >90% the in vivo formation of breast and prostate carcinoma metastatic deposits in mouse lung and bones. Our results indicate that metastatic cell arrest in target organ microvessels is not a consequence of mechanical trapping, but is supported predominantly by intercellular adhesive interactions mediated by cancer-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich glycoantigen and β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3. Efficient blocking of β-galactoside-mediated adhesion precludes malignant cell lodging in target organs.

  19. Integrative Genome Comparison of Primary and Metastatic Melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Wu, Min; Scott, Kenneth L.; Kwong, Lawrence N.; Xiao, Yonghong; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Granter, Scott R.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Golub, Todd; Duncan, Lyn M.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Brennan, Cameron; Chin, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    A cardinal feature of malignant melanoma is its metastatic propensity. An incomplete view of the genetic events driving metastatic progression has been a major barrier to rational development of effective therapeutics and prognostic diagnostics for melanoma patients. In this study, we conducted global genomic characterization of primary and metastatic melanomas to examine the genomic landscape associated with metastatic progression. In addition to uncovering three genomic subclasses of metastastic melanomas, we delineated 39 focal and recurrent regions of amplification and deletions, many of which encompassed resident genes that have not been implicated in cancer or metastasis. To identify progression-associated metastasis gene candidates, we applied a statistical approach, Integrative Genome Comparison (IGC), to define 32 genomic regions of interest that were significantly altered in metastatic relative to primary melanomas, encompassing 30 resident genes with statistically significant expression deregulation. Functional assays on a subset of these candidates, including MET, ASPM, AKAP9, IMP3, PRKCA, RPA3, and SCAP2, validated their pro-invasion activities in human melanoma cells. Validity of the IGC approach was further reinforced by tissue microarray analysis of Survivin showing significant increased protein expression in thick versus thin primary cutaneous melanomas, and a progression correlation with lymph node metastases. Together, these functional validation results and correlative analysis of human tissues support the thesis that integrated genomic and pathological analyses of staged melanomas provide a productive entry point for discovery of melanoma metastases genes. PMID:20520718

  20. Significance of pretreatment cardiovascular morbidity as a risk factor during treatment with parenteral oestrogen or combined androgen deprivation of 915 patients with metastasized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Robert; Damber, Jan Erik; Hagerman, Inger

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate prognostic risk factors for cardiovascular events during treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients with high-dose parenteral polyoestradiol phosphate (PEP, Estradurin®) or combined androgen deprivation (CAD) with special emphasis on pretreatment cardiovascular...

  1. Large Oncosomes: A Novel Liquid Biopsy for Genetic Profiling in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles...Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0397 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dolores Di...biopsy” changing the landscape of precision medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer , Extracellular Vesicles

  2. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  3. Differences in clinical outcome between docetaxel and abiraterone acetate as the first-line treatment in chemo-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with or without the ineligible clinical factors of the COU-AA-302 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Darren M C; Chan, Kuen; Lee, Siu H; Chan, Tim W; Sze, Henry; Lee, Eric K C; Lam, Daisy; Chan, Michelle F T

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of abiraterone acetate (AA) versus docetaxel (T) as first-line treatment in chemo-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients with or without the ineligible factors of the COU-AA-302 study (presence of visceral metastases, symptomatic disease, and/or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥ 2). The clinical records of chemo-naïve mCRPC patients who received AA in six public oncology centers or T in two of these centers between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed. The survival time was compared among four subgroups of patients: those with ineligible factors administered AA (Group Ineligible-AA) or T (Group Ineligible-T), and those without ineligible factors and administered AA (Group Eligible-AA) or T (Group Eligible-T). During the study period, we identified 115 mCRPC patients who received AA or T, among whom 29, 36, 29, and 21 patients were classified as Groups Ineligible-AA, Ineligible-T, Eligible-AA, and Eligible-T, respectively. Both Group Ineligible-AA and Group Eligible-AA had significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) and similar overall survival (OS) as Group Ineligible-T and Group Eligible-T (Ineligible, PFS: 6.3 vs. 5.9 months, P  = 0.0234, OS: 7.8 vs. 15.7 months, P  = 0.1601; Eligible, PFS: 9.8 vs. 5.6 months, P  = 0.0437, OS: 20.5 vs. 18.2 months, P  = 0.7820). Compared to T, AA treatment resulted in longer PFS and similar OS in chemo-naïve mCRPC patients, irrespective of the presence of ineligible factors, suggesting that the initial treatment by AA may still be beneficial to those with the aforementioned ineligible factors.

  4. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  5. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Noyola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  6. Pile Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the rectum. The images are obtained from different angles to get the best view of the prostate ... RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  10. Enlarged prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for drugs that may make your symptoms worse : SAW PALMETTO Many herbs have been tried for treating an enlarged prostate. Many men use saw palmetto to ease symptoms. Some studies have shown that ...

  11. Prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... give the cells a grade called a Gleason score . This helps predict how fast the cancer will ... TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB) Images Male reproductive anatomy References Babayan RK, Katz MH. Biopsy prophylaxis, ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate ... physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. Rarely, a small ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  19. Prostatitis - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tender scrotum The provider may perform a digital rectal exam to examine your prostate. During this exam, ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... phased array) receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the prostate ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum into the prostate gland which is situated right in front of the rectum. top of page ... creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames of the moving pictures are ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe sends and receives sound waves through the wall of the rectum into the prostate gland which ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  10. Prostate carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, A.; Chauveinc, L.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.; Solignac, S.; Timbert, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Ammor, A.; Bonnetain, F.; Brenier, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Crevoisier, R. de; Tucker, S.; Dong, L.; Cheung, R.; Kuban, D.; Azria, D.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Ailleres, N.; Allaw, A.; Serre, A.; Fenoglietto, P.; Hay, M.H.; Thezenas, S.; Dubois, J.B.; Pommier, P.; Perol, D.; Lagrange, J.L.; Richaud, P.; Brune, D.; Le Prise, E.; Azria, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Chabaud, S.; Carrie, C.; Bosset, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Maingon, P.; Ammor, A.; Crehangen, G.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Keros, L.; Bernier, V.; Aletti, P.; Wolf, D.; Marchesia, V.; Noel, A.; Artignan, X.; Fourneret, P.; Bacconier, M.; Shestaeva, O.; Pasquier, D.; Descotes, J.L.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Burette, R.; Corbusier, A.; Germeau, F.; Crevoisier, R. de; Dong, L.; Bonnen, M.; Cheung, R.; Tucker, S.; Kuban, D.; Crevoisier, R. de; Melancon, A.; Kuban, D.; Cheung, R.; Dong, L.; Peignaux, K.; Brenier, J.P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Ammor, A.; Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Molines, J.C.; Berland, E.; Cornulier, J. de; Coulet-Parpillon, A.; Cohard, C.; Picone, M.; Fourneret, P.; Artignan, X.; Daanen, V.; Gastaldo, J.; Bolla, M.; Collomb, D.; Dusserre, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Troccaz, J.; Giraud, J.Y.; Quero, L.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Desgrandschamps, F.; Maylin, C.; Boccon-Gibod, L.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Tallet, A.; Simonian, M.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Serment, G.

    2005-01-01

    Some short communications on the prostate carcinoma are given here. The impact of pelvic irradiation, conformation with intensity modulation, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy reduction of side effects, imaging, doses escalation are such subjects studied and reported. (N.C.)

  11. The rate of 99m Tc-MDP uptake in metastatic bone lesions before and after 89m Sr therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Joseane Fonseca; Braga, Francisco J.H.N.

    1996-01-01

    The rate of 99m Tc-MDP uptake is studied in metastatic bone lesions, before and after 89m Sr therapy. Eight hopeless patients (age between 56 and 74) presenting disseminated carcinoma of the prostate are evaluated. No hormonal therapy and a limited radiotherapy were considered. It is concluded that therapeutical doses of 89m Sr reduces MDP uptake

  12. Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor, an Emerging Biomarker Regulating Inflammation and Prostate Cancer Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Siwko, S; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent among men in developed countries, but a significant proportion of detected cancers remain indolent, never progressing into aggressive carcinomas. This highlights the need to develop refined biomarkers that can distinguish between indolent and potentially dangerous cases. The prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR, or OR51E2) is an olfactory receptor family member with highly specific expression in human prostate epithelium that is highly overexpressed in PIN and prostate cancer. PSGR has been functionally implicated in prostate cancer cell invasiveness, suggesting a potential role in the transition to metastatic PCa. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing PSGR in the prostate were reported to develop an acute inflammatory response followed by emergence of low grade PIN, whereas mice with compound PSGR overexpression and loss of PTEN exhibited accelerated formation of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma. This article will review recent PSGR findings with a focus on its role as a potential prostate cancer biomarker and regulator of prostate cancer invasion and inflammation.

  13. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  14. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  15. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  16. BPH and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Saiful; Catto, James

    2014-04-01

    With the exclusion of non-melanomatous skin malignancy, prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most prevalent cancer in men globally. It has been reported that the majority of men will develop benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by the time they reach their 60s. Together, these prostatic diseases have a significant morbidity and mortality affecting over a billion men throughout the world. The risk of developing prostate cancer of men suffering BPH is one that has resulted in a healthy debate amongst the urological community. Here, we try to address this conundrum with clinical and basic science evidence. Data from an online search and contemporary data presented at international urological congresses was reviewed. BPH and PCa can be linked together at a molecular and cellular level on genetic, hormonal, and inflammatory platforms suggesting that these prostatic diseases have common pathophysiological driving factors. Epidemiological studies are weighted towards the presence of BPH having a greater risk for a man to develop PCa in his lifetime; however, a conclusion of causality cannot be confidently stated. The future workload healthcare practitioners will face regarding BPH, and PCa will substantially increase. Further basic science and large epidemiological studies using a global cohort of men are required prior to the urological community confidently counseling their patients with BPH with regards to their PCa risk.

  17. BPH and prostate cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Miah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With the exclusion of non-melanomatous skin malignancy, prostate cancer (PCa is the second most prevalent cancer in men globally. It has been reported that the majority of men will develop benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH by the time they reach their 60s. Together, these prostatic diseases have a significant morbidity and mortality affecting over a billion men throughout the world. The risk of developing prostate cancer of men suffering BPH is one that has resulted in a healthy debate amongst the urological community. Here, we try to address this conundrum with clinical and basic science evidence. Materials and Methods: Data from an online search and contemporary data presented at international urological congresses was reviewed. Results: BPH and PCa can be linked together at a molecular and cellular level on genetic, hormonal, and inflammatory platforms suggesting that these prostatic diseases have common pathophysiological driving factors. Epidemiological studies are weighted towards the presence of BPH having a greater risk for a man to develop PCa in his lifetime; however, a conclusion of causality cannot be confidently stated. Conclusion: The future workload healthcare practitioners will face regarding BPH, and PCa will substantially increase. Further basic science and large epidemiological studies using a global cohort of men are required prior to the urological community confidently counseling their patients with BPH with regards to their PCa risk.

  18. Palliative prostate radiotherapy for symptomatic advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Omar S.; Thanvi, Narottam; Ferguson, Catherine J.; Kirkbride, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the results for the use of short-course palliative radiotherapy to the prostate for localised symptoms. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients were identified from radiotherapy records between 2003 and 2007. Data were collected retrospectively on patients' demographics, radiotherapy details and response. Symptoms and toxicity were scored, retrospectively, according to the following scale: 0 = no symptoms, 1 = mild symptoms, 2 = moderate symptoms, and 3 = severe symptoms. Results: All the 58 patients had advanced prostate carcinoma. The median age at radiotherapy was 76.6 years (range 54-91). Fifty-six patients (97%) had hormone refractory disease. Twenty-seven patients (47%) had evidence of metastatic disease. 20Gy in 5 fractions was the most commonly used fractionation. The most frequent baseline symptom was haematuria (54%). Eighty-nine percent (31/35) of the patients had a complete or partial resolution of symptoms at 4 months. Response rates for individual symptoms (including unknown responses) were: rectal symptoms (75%), pelvic pain (69%), urinary obstruction (54%) and haematuria (42%). A >50% reduction in PSA occurred in five patients. Toxicity was mild to moderate only and was self-limiting. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy to the prostate gland for local symptoms appears to be an effective means of palliation with minimal toxic side effects. Prospective studies are now required to assess its benefits in more detail.

  19. Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, H P; Petashnick, D E; To, K W; Woodcome, H A

    1994-04-15

    Reports of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection in adults with underlying medical conditions have been increasing. Ocular infection with this organism is unusual. Metastatic endophthalmitis in adults caused by this organism has been reported rarely and has only been associated with endocarditis. We encountered two cases of Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis in adults who did not have endocarditis. These cases reflect the increasing incidence of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection with its varying manifestations. Additionally, they emphasize the importance of considering this pathogen as a cause of metastatic endophthalmitis in adults with predisposing illnesses.

  20. Profiling Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron A. Wade; Natasha Kyprianou

    2018-01-01

    The major challenge in the treatment of patients with advanced lethal prostate cancer is therapeutic resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and chemotherapy. Overriding this resistance requires understanding of the driving mechanisms of the tumor microenvironment, not just the androgen receptor (AR)-signaling cascade, that facilitate therapeutic resistance in order to identify new drug targets. The tumor microenvironment enables key signaling pathways promoting cancer cell survival ...

  1. Cáncer de próstata metastásico asociado a valores bajos de antígeno prostático específico Metastatic prostate cancer associated with low levels of prostate-specific antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Diaz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta el caso de un paciente de 67 años que presenta dolor en el glúteo derecho que se irradia hacia los muslos afectando la bipedestación y la marcha. Con tiempo de enfermedad de cuatro meses, asociado con la disminución de 15 kg de peso; se realizaron exámenes de imágenes donde se encontró un proceso infiltrativo de hueso sacro. La biopsia se informó como lesión de tejido óseo infiltrado por adenocarcinoma poco diferenciado. La evaluación urológica clínica, a pesar del valor del antígeno prostático específico (PSA total: 4,62 mg/dL, encontró una lesión nodular menor a un centímetro en el examen de tacto rectal. La biopsia de próstata evidenció un adenocarcinoma pobremente diferenciado (score de Gleason: 8. La gammagrafía ósea mostró lesiones activas relacionadas con metástasis en tercio medio de clavícula derecha, hueso sacro y región púbica derecha.A case was reported of a 67-year-old patient with right buttock pain radiating to the thighs and affecting his bipedalism and gait. With four months into the disease and a weight loss of 15 kilos, the patient underwent imaging tests which showed sacrum infiltration. The biopsy diagnosis was injury of bone tissue infiltrated by poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The rectal examination performed as part of the clinical urologic examination revealed a nodular lesion of less than one centimeter, despite the level of prostate-specific antigen (total PSA: 4.62 mg/dL. The prostate biopsy evidenced a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (Gleason score: 8. The bone scan showed active lesions associated with metastasis in the middle third of the right clavicle, the sacrum and the right pubic region.

  2. The role of cannabinoids in prostate cancer: Basic science perspective and potential clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a global public health problem, and it is the most common cancer in American men and the second cause for cancer-related death. Experimental evidence shows that prostate tissue possesses cannabinoid receptors and their stimulation results in anti-androgenic effects. To review currently relevant findings related to effects of cannabinoid receptors in prostate cancer. PubMed search utilizing the terms "cannabis," "cannabinoids," "prostate cancer," and "cancer pain management," giving preference to most recent publications was done. Articles identified were screened for their relevance to the field of prostate cancer and interest to both urologist and pain specialists. Prostate cancer cells possess increased expression of both cannabinoid 1 and 2 receptors, and stimulation of these results in decrease in cell viability, increased apoptosis, and decreased androgen receptor expression and prostate-specific antigen excretion. It would be of interest to conduct clinical studies utilizing cannabinoids for patients with metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage not only of its beneficial effects on prostate cancer but also of their analgesic properties for bone metastatic cancer pain.

  3. Src: marker or actor of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eVlaeminck-Guillem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient’s life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolen prostate cancers in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a prostate cancer is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in prostate cancer aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in prostate cancer. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways (including androgen receptor, TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK and ERK …, and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in prostate cancer initiation in coordination with the androgen receptor. The aim of this review is to gather data that explores the links between the Src kinase family and prostate cancer progression and aggressiveness.

  4. Prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis: differential diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lima Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a very rare condition; however, it may express as a typical benign prostatic hyperplasia or a simulating prostatic adenocarcinoma. This case report presents PCM mimicking prostatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this paper is to call the general physician's attention to this important differential diagnosis.

  5. Prostate cancer and radiation therapy--the message conveyed by serum prostate-specific antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Pollack, Alan; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a powerful pretreatment prognosticator and a sensitive post-treatment outcome measure for clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy. Today, the pretreatment serum PSA level appears to supersede both grade and T-stage as a determinant of outcome. This study was undertaken to attempt a reconciliation between the old (pre-PSA) and the new (PSA) data-in particular to address the question of why stage and grade apparently play so little role in this PSA era. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of two cohorts of men with T1-T4, N0, or NX, M0 prostate cancer, one group (648 patients) treated and followed in the pre-PSA era (1966-1988), another group (707 patients) treated and followed in the PSA era (1987-1993)--who received definitive radiation as their only initial treatment. The patterns of relapse and prognostic factors for these groups were compared and contrasted using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the relapse patterns in the pre-PSA series were: local in 109 (17%), nodal in 17 (3%), and distant metastatic in 186 (29%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 13 and 26%, respectively. Local recurrence was only weakly predictable, Gleason grade being the only significant, albeit weak, covariate. Metastatic failure, however, was highly significantly and meaningfully correlated with Gleason grade and T-stage. Because metastasis was the most common adverse end point in this series, overall freedom from progression also correlated with grade and stage. At a median follow-up of 31 months, the patterns of failure in the PSA series were: local in 77 (11%), nodal in 3 (< 1%), and distant metastatic in 24 (3%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 30 and 6%, respectively. Local recurrence was highly and meaningfully correlated with pretreatment PSA level, which was the only significant determinant of this end

  6. Prostate cancer and radiation therapy--the message conveyed by serum prostate-specific antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a powerful pretreatment prognosticator and a sensitive post-treatment outcome measure for clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy. Today, the pretreatment serum PSA level appears to supersede both grade and T-stage as a determinant of outcome. This study was undertaken to attempt a reconciliation between the old (pre-PSA) and the new (PSA) data-in particular to address the question of why stage and grade apparently play so little role in this PSA era. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of two cohorts of men with T1-T4, N0, or NX, M0 prostate cancer, one group (648 patients) treated and followed in the pre-PSA era (1966-1988), another group (707 patients) treated and followed in the PSA era (1987-1993)--who received definitive radiation as their only initial treatment. The patterns of relapse and prognostic factors for these groups were compared and contrasted using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the relapse patterns in the pre-PSA series were: local in 109 (17%), nodal in 17 (3%), and distant metastatic in 186 (29%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 13 and 26%, respectively. Local recurrence was only weakly predictable, Gleason grade being the only significant, albeit weak, covariate. Metastatic failure, however, was highly significantly and meaningfully correlated with Gleason grade and T-stage. Because metastasis was the most common adverse end point in this series, overall freedom from progression also correlated with grade and stage. At a median follow-up of 31 months, the patterns of failure in the PSA series were: local in 77 (11%), nodal in 3 (< 1%), and distant metastatic in 24 (3%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 30 and 6%, respectively. Local recurrence was highly and meaningfully correlated with pretreatment PSA level, which was the only significant determinant of this end

  7. Transmembrane Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (TMPAP) Interacts with Snapin and Deficient Mice Develop Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Ileana B.; Herrala, Annakaisa M.; Araujo, César L.; Pulkka, Anitta E.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ovaska, Kristian; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Ruuth, Maija K.; Soini, Ylermi; Sormunen, Raija T.; Khirug, Leonard; Vihko, Pirkko T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP) and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP). The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP−/−) with C57BL/6J background. The PAP−/− mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells) and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:24039861

  8. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  9. A completely calcified prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic calcification and prostatic calculus formation is commonly seen in adult population with chronic prostatitis, however, gross prostatic calcification which involves more than 3 cm2 of the gland is quite rare. We are presenting here one such case in which almost whole glandular prostate was converted into stone which is never reported so far.

  10. Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get the Facts What Works: Strategies to Increase Car Seat and Booster Seat ... narcotics. 3 That’s one percent of the 111 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. ...

  11. Recent Advances in Prostate Cancer Treatment and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Nevedomskaya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel drugs, drug sequences and combinations have improved the outcome of prostate cancer in recent years. The latest approvals include abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and apalutamide which target androgen receptor (AR signaling, radium-223 dichloride for reduction of bone metastases, sipuleucel-T immunotherapy and taxane-based chemotherapy. Adding abiraterone acetate to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in order to achieve complete androgen blockade has proven highly beneficial for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer and metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC. Also, ADT together with docetaxel treatment showed significant benefit in mHSPC. Ongoing clinical trials for different subgroups of prostate cancer patients include the evaluation of the second-generation AR antagonists enzalutamide, apalutamide and darolutamide, of inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K pathway, of inhibitors of DNA damage response, of targeted alpha therapy and of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA targeting approaches. Advanced clinical studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown limited benefits in prostate cancer and more trials are needed to demonstrate efficacy. The identification of improved, personalized treatments will be much supported by the major progress recently made in the molecular characterization of early- and late-stage prostate cancer using “omics” technologies. This has already led to novel classifications of prostate tumors based on gene expression profiles and mutation status, and should greatly help in the choice of novel targeted therapies best tailored to the needs of patients.

  12. Loss of PDEF, a prostate-derived Ets factor is associated with aggressive phenotype of prostate cancer: Regulation of MMP 9 by PDEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meacham Randall B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF is expressed in tissues of high epithelial content including prostate, although its precise function has not been fully established. Conventional therapies produce a high rate of cure for patients with localized prostate cancer, but there is, at present, no effective treatment for intervention in metastatic prostate cancer. These facts underline the need to develop new approaches for early diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer patients, and mechanism based anti-metastasis therapies that will improve the outlook for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. In this study we evaluated role of prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF in prostate cancer. Results We observed decreased PDEF expression in prostate cancer cell lines correlated with increased aggressive phenotype, and complete loss of PDEF protein in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines. Loss of PDEF expression was confirmed in high Gleason Grade prostate cancer samples by immuno-histochemical methods. Reintroduction of PDEF profoundly affected cell behavior leading to less invasive phenotypes in three dimensional cultures. In addition, PDEF expressing cells had altered cell morphology, decreased FAK phosphorylation and decreased colony formation, cell migration, and cellular invasiveness. In contrast PDEF knockdown resulted in increased migration and invasion as well as clonogenic activity. Our results also demonstrated that PDEF downregulated MMP9 promoter activity, suppressed MMP9 mRNA expression, and resulted in loss of MMP9 activity in prostate cancer cells. These results suggested that loss of PDEF might be associated with increased MMP9 expression and activity in aggressive prostate cancer. To confirm results we investigated MMP9 expression in clinical samples of prostate cancer. Results of these studies show increased MMP9 expression correlated with advanced Gleason grade. Taken together our results demonstrate decreased PDEF expression

  13. The oestrogen receptor alpha-regulated lncRNA NEAT1 is a critical modulator of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakravarty, Dimple; Sboner, Andrea; Nair, Sujit S; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Li, Ruohan; Hennig, Sven; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Pauwels, Jonathan; Park, Kyung; Kossai, Myriam; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Fontugne, Jacqueline; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Davicioni, Elai; Jenkins, Robert B; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Chen, Zhengming; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bander, Neil H; Beltran, Himisha; Fox, Archa H; Elemento, Olivier; Rubin, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in establishing an oncogenic cascade that drives prostate cancer progression. Some prostate cancers escape androgen dependence and are often associated with an aggressive phenotype. The oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is expressed in prostate cancers,

  14. The epigenome as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Antoinette S; Watson, R William G; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2010-12-01

    During cancer development and progression, tumor cells undergo abnormal epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. Collectively, these aberrations promote genomic instability and lead to silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and reactivation of oncogenic retroviruses. Epigenetic modifications, therefore, provide exciting new avenues for prostate cancer research. Promoter hypermethylation is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, which suggests that restoration of a 'normal' epigenome through treatment with inhibitors of the enzymes involved could be clinically beneficial. Global patterns of histone modifications are also being defined and have been associated with clinical and pathologic predictors of prostate cancer outcome. Although treatment for localized prostate cancer can be curative, the development of successful therapies for the management of castration-resistant metastatic disease is urgently needed. Reactivation of tumor-suppressor genes by demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors could be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced disease.

  15. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, which targets the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. SUMMARY: PET......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) as no effective therapies...... are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated...

  16. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  17. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  18. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  19. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  20. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  1. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  2. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    0.50; 95% CI: 0.34-0.74) among 5 randomized trials of daily aspirin for the prevention of vascular events (130). Additional observational studies...Bayraktar S, Hernadez- Aya LF, Lei X, Meric-Bernstam F, Litton JK, Hsu L, et al. Effect of metformin on survival outcomes in diabetic patients with triple...Zanchetti A, Roncaglioni MC, Tognoni G, et al. Short-term effects of daily aspirin on cancer incidence, mortality, and non-vascular death: analysis

  3. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Institutes of Health 900 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20892 Phone : (240) 276-6280 15 E-mail: sarah.lee@nih.gov 1 R01 CA179170-02 (PI: Ronai, Z.) 09/30...Cammie La National Institutes of Health 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20892 Phone : (240) 276-6323 E-mail: cl311z@nih.gov 1 R01 CA172017-02...PI: Ronai, Z.) 07/01/13–04/30/16 1.2 calendar (10.0%) NIH/NCI ATF2 Oncogenic Addiction in Melanoma Goals: The major goal of this project is to

  4. Targeting Mitochondrial Inhibitors for Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    described previously, authenticity documented by 1H and 13C NMR and mass spectrometry , and coupled using ethylene diamine derivatives as the self-cleaving...synthesizes all of the compounds proposed in this application. He uses 1H and 13C NMR and mass spectrometry for the quality assurance for each...time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this

  5. Targeting Mitochondrial Inhibitors for Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215...enzymatically active PSA within extracellular fluid (ECF) at sites of mCRPC. The advantage of ECF hydrolysis is that only a fraction of cancer cells need to...hydrolysis is that only a fraction of cancer cells need to secrete PSA since its enzymatic activity amplifies the level of liberated cell penetrant MTs

  6. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to...compound SBI-852 treated groups. Comparison on SIAH2 protein levels among the vehicle and 130B3-treated groups suggested that the compound SBI-852 didn’t...133B3 dose we found no difference in tumor size when combined with castration or castration+enzalutamide (n = 8). However, the histologic interrogation

  7. LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    effect t untreated w on. Occurr 25+ cells at s, sectioned either untreate +,CD25+, Fo eu within Ad- different, indi d-LIGHT trea tiple comparis VA, p...s l . , . s )   Task We t mice LIGH contr show been IDO Ad-C T ce burd 2.2 continu hen isolated and looked T treated ol

  8. Commentary on "Androgen-deprivation therapy alone or with docetaxel in non-castrate metastatic prostate cancer (GETUG-AFU 15): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial." Gravis G, Fizazi K, Joly F, Oudard S, Priou F, Esterni B, Latorzeff I, Delva R, Krakowski I, Laguerre B, Rolland F, Théodore C, Deplanque G, Ferrero JM, Pouessel D, Mourey L, Beuzeboc P, Zanetta S, Habibian M, Berdah JF, Dauba J, Baciuchka M, Platini C, Linassier C, Labourey JL, Machiels JP, El Kouri C, Ravaud A, Suc E, Eymard JC, Hasbini A, Bousquet G, Soulie M, Medical Oncology and Biostatistics, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. Lancet Oncol 2013;14(2):149-58 [Epub 2013 Jan 8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L

    2013-11-01

    Early chemotherapy might improve the overall outcomes of patients with metastatic non-castrate (i.e., hormone-sensitive) prostate cancer. We investigated the effects of the addition of docetaxel to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with metastatic non-castrate prostate cancer. In this randomised, open-label, phase 3 study, we enrolled patients in 29 centres in France and one in Belgium. Eligible patients were older than 18 years and had histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate and radiologically proven metastatic disease; a Karnofsky score of at least 70%; a life expectancy of at least 3 months; and adequate hepatic, haematological, and renal function. They were randomly assigned to receive to ADT (orchiectomy or luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists, alone or combined with non-steroidal antiandrogens) alone or in combination with docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) intravenously on the first day of each 21-day cycle; up to nine cycles). Patients were randomised in a 1:1 ratio, with dynamic minimisation to minimise imbalances in previous systemic treatment with ADT, chemotherapy for local disease or isolated rising concentration of serum prostate-specific antigen, and Glass risk groups. Patients, physicians, and data analysts were not masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Efficacy analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00104715. Between Oct 18, 2004, and Dec 31, 2008, 192 patients were randomly allocated to receive ADT plus docetaxel and 193 to receive ADT alone. Median follow-up was 50 months (IQR 39-63). Median overall survival was 58 9 months (95% CI 50 8-69 1) in the group given ADT plus docetaxel and 54 2 months (42 2-not reached) in that given ADT alone (hazard ratio 1 01, 95% CI 0 75-1 36). 72 serious adverse events were reported in the group given ADT plus docetaxel, of which the most frequent were neutropenia (40 [21%]), febrile

  9. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PSA testing anxiety, psychological morbidity, and PSA utility in the management of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Micsunescu, Anamaria Elia

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal reports from urologists and medical oncologists have suggested that patients with prostate cancer (PCa) often present with anxiety related to ongoing monitoring of their PSA levels as part of their disease management. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence and severity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing anxiety in a population of patients with either localised or metastatic PCa living in Australia. Other aspects of psychological morbidit...

  11. Characterizing the Hypermutated Subtype of Advanced Prostate Cancer as a Predictive Biomarker for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    was a think tank of leading prostate cancer researchers focused on the question of oligo- metastatic disease. I was part of the program organizing...Wilke, J., Wilder-Romans, K., Dhanireddy, S., Engelke, C., et al. (2014). Therapeutic targeting of BET bromodomain proteins in castration-resistant...begun to make a positive difference in the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer. Attention to how we might similarly adjust the way we think

  12. An Aggressive Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Prostate in a Japanese Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Hashimoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC of the prostate is rare, with approximately 100 case reports to date. Here we report a very aggressive case of SRCC of the prostate in a Japanese man. The patient received estramustine, docetaxel, and carboplatin combination chemotherapy, followed by TS-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy. Unfortunately, the disease progressed, and he died of general metastatic disease treated over 16 month with systemic chemotherapy.

  13. Zoledronic acid in metastatic bone disease: an audit based discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, R.A.; Gosh, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Metastatic bone disease is a common problem in patients with advanced cancer causing significant morbidity and poor quality of life. Effective and less toxic treatments, like bisphophonates, can reduce morbidity in such cases. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine whether Zoledronic acid was administered in accordance with current recommendations for its prescribing and to produce protocols for improved patient outcomes. Methods: The study was a retrospective audit of 39 consecutive patients with metastatic bone disease secondary to solid tumours who were treated with Zoledronic acid. The records were analysed to establish the administered dose of Zoledronic acid relative to creatinine clearance. The standards for Zoledronic acid therapy were defined from best practice guidelines. Results: The commonest diagnosis in patients receiving Zoledronic acid was carcinoma prostate 19/39 (49%) followed by carcinoma breast 11/39 (28%), gastrointestinal malignancies 4/39 (10%) and renal cell carcinoma 3/39 (8%). Indications for therapy were metastatic bone disease alone 31 (79%), hypercalcaemia alone 0/39 (0%), metastatic bone disease with hypercalcaemia 5/39 (13%), and prevention of chemotherapy induced bone loss 1/39 (3%). The dose of Zoledronic acid was appropriate to the creatinine clearance in 25/39 (6 4%), inappropriate in 5/39 (13%) and unclear from the notes in 9/39 (23%). Conclusions: Majority of patients received Zoledronic acid for the appropriate indications. The dose of Zoledronic acid was appropriate to serum creatinine clearance in a majority of patients. Poor documentation of data pertaining to Zoledronic acid treatment is observed which can potentially lead to major errors in prescribing. We recommend using a standard form to document each episode of therapy with Zoledronic acid. (author)

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the prostate gland for later laboratory testing. ... Do you have a personal ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Prostate ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  19. Driving things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    I explore how participants organise involvement with objects brought into the car, relative to the demands of driving and social activity. Objects in cars commonly include phones or other technologies, food, body care products, texts, clothing, bags and carry items, toys, and even animals...... 2004, Haddington et al. 2012). I focus here especially on how the practical and interactional work of locating, seeing, placing, handling, hearing, and relinquishing, is ordered and accomplished relative to the emerging and contingent demands of both driving and social participation......, such that involvement with objects is constituted as secondary to driving in a multiactivity setting (e.g. Haddington et al. 2014). We see how events with, for, of, and even by objects can occur as predictable, planned and even designed for (e.g. changing glasses, applying body lotion), or might be unexpected...

  20. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...