WorldWideScience

Sample records for drinking water disinfection

  1. Disinfection of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensenauer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Some methods for disinfecting drinking water are described, e.g. UV irradiation (optimal wavelength 210-250mm) with the advantage of constant water composition and the resulting danger of re-infection. (AJ) [de

  2. Disinfection of drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensenauer, P

    1977-01-01

    Some methods for disinfecting drinking water are described, e.g. UV irradiation (optimal wavelength 210-250mm) with the advantage of constant water composition and the resulting danger of re-infection.

  3. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to boil and disinfect water to kill most disease-causing microorganisms during emergency situations where regular water service has been interrupted and local authorities recommend using only bottled water, boiled water, or disinfected water.

  4. UV disinfection in drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, O

    2000-01-01

    UV disinfection has become a practical and safely validatable disinfection procedure by specifying the requirements for testing and monitoring in DVGW standard W 294. A standardized biodosimetric testing procedure and monitoring with standardized UV sensors is introduced and successfully applied. On-line monitoring of irradiance can be counterchecked with handheld reference sensors and makes it possible that UV systems can be used for drinking water disinfection with the same level of confidence and safety as is conventional chemical disinfection.

  5. Basic Information about Chloramines and Drinking Water Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloramines are disinfectants used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. Chloramines provide longer-lasting disinfection as the water moves through pipes to consumers.

  6. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  7. Disinfection of drinking water by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    It is no longer mandatory that a given residue of chlorine is present in drinking water and this has led to interest in the use of ultraviolet radiation for disinfection of water in large public waterworks. After a brief discussion of the effect of ultraviolet radiation related to wavelength, the most usual type of irradiation equipment is briefly described. Practioal considerations regarding the installation, such as attenuation of the radiation due to water quality and deposits are presented. The requirements as to dose and residence time are also discussed and finally it is pointed out that hydraulic imperfections can reduce the effectiveness drastically. (JIW)Ψ

  8. Impact of disinfection on drinking water biofilm bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zilong; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-11-01

    Disinfectants are commonly applied to control the growth of microorganisms in drinking water distribution systems. However, the effect of disinfection on drinking water microbial community remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of different disinfectants (chlorine and chloramine) and dosages on biofilm bacterial community in bench-scale pipe section reactors. Illumina MiSeq sequencing illustrated that disinfection strategy could affect both bacterial diversity and community structure of drinking water biofilm. Proteobacteria tended to predominate in chloraminated drinking water biofilms, while Firmicutes in chlorinated and unchlorinated biofilms. The major proteobacterial groups were influenced by both disinfectant type and dosage. In addition, chloramination had a more profound impact on bacterial community than chlorination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  10. Drinking Water Supply without Use of a Disinfectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnochova, Marketa; Tuhovcak, Ladislav; Rucka, Jan

    2018-02-01

    The paper focuses on the issue of drinking water supply without use of any disinfectants. Before the public water supply network operator begins to consider switching to operation without use of chemical disinfection, initial assessment should be made, whether or not the water supply system in question is suitable for this type of operation. The assessment is performed by applying the decision algorithm. The initial assessment is followed by another decision algorithm which serves for managing and controlling the process of switching to drinking water supply without use of a disinfectant. The paper also summarizes previous experience and knowledge of this way operated public water supply systems in the Czech Republic.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF TI02/UV DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to concern over the presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated byproducts in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. One of the alternative treatment methods currently being evaluated for potential use with small systems ...

  12. Recent advances in drinking water disinfection: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Ncube, Esper J; Parsons, James

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water is the most important single source of human exposure to gastroenteric diseases, mainly as a result of the ingestion of microbial contaminated water. Waterborne microbial agents that pose a health risk to humans include enteropathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. Therefore, properly assessing whether these hazardous agents enter drinking water supplies, and if they do, whether they are disinfected adequately, are undoubtedly aspects critical to protecting public health. As new pathogens emerge, monitoring for relevant indicator microorganisms (e.g., process microbial indicators, fecal indicators, and index and model organisms) is crucial to ensuring drinking water safety. Another crucially important step to maintaining public health is implementing Water Safety Plans (WSPs), as is recommended by the current WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Good WSPs include creating health-based targets that aim to reduce microbial risks and adverse health effects to which a population is exposed through drinking water. The use of disinfectants to inactivate microbial pathogens in drinking water has played a central role in reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and is considered to be among the most successful interventions for preserving and promoting public health. Chlorine-based disinfectants are the most commonly used disinfectants and are cheap and easy to use. Free chlorine is an effective disinfectant for bacteria and viruses; however, it is not always effective against C. parvum and G. lamblia. Another limitation of using chlorination is that it produces disinfection by-products (DBPs), which pose potential health risks of their own. Currently, most drinking water regulations aggressively address DBP problems in public water distribution systems. The DBPs of most concern include the trihalomethanes (THMs), the haloacetic acids (HAAs), bromate, and chlorite. However, in the latest edition of the WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

  13. Drinking water contamination and it's disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    High quality water is necessary for the survival of human life. In this paper, an effort has been made to highlight the various causes of water contamination. Some of the most common impurities present in water are pathogenic microorganisms along with organize and in organize pollutants. Different treatment methods are adopted to ensure the potability of water. They include physical, chemical and ultra viable treatment along with solar disinfection etc. The adoption of a particular disinfection strategy depends on the level of treatment required and the resources available to carry out such a treatment. (author)

  14. Sewage disinfection towards protection of drinking water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolch, A

    2000-01-01

    Wastewater applied in agriculture for irrigation could replace the use of natural drinking-water resources. With respect to high concentrations of human pathogens wastewater has to be disinfected prior to use. This paper introduces disinfection methods with emphasis on UV irradiation.

  15. Drinking water disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelzhaeuser, P.; Bewig, F.; Holm, K.; Kryschi, R.; Reich, G.; Steuer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The book presents all lectures held during a course at Technical Academy Esslingen, on September 10, 1985, on the subject of 'Drinking water disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation'. The methods hitherto used for disinfection are no longer suitable because of the increasing amounts of organic pollutants found in the untreated water, and because of the necessity to make drinking water disinfection less expensive, non-polluting and thus environmentally compatible. U.V. irradiation is a method allowing technically simple and safe disinfection of the water, and also does not have any effect on the natural taste of the drinking water. The lectures presented discuss all aspects of the method, the equipment, and the performance of irradiation systems in practice. (orig./PW) [de

  16. The Occurrence and Comparative Toxicity of Haloacetaldehyde Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of drinking water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases. However, the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in the source water can lead to an unintended consequence, which is the formation of drinking water disinfe...

  17. Inactivation model for disinfection of biofilms in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicki, A.; O'Leary, K.C.; Gagnon, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate experimentally the effects of free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide on the removal of biofilm growth in water as it applies to drinking water in distribution systems. In particular, biofilm kill for a particular dosage of disinfectant was measured as a function of time for each disinfectant over a range of disinfectant concentrations. These results were used to formulate concentration-time (Ct) inactivation values for each disinfectant to compare the efficacy of the three disinfectants for biofilm control. The biofilm reactor system consisted of a 125 mL columns, each containing tightly packed 3 mm glass beads on which heterotrophic bacterial biofilm is established. Following an initial biofilm inoculation period, the glass beads were removed from the columns and placed into glass jars for disinfection with free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide. Cell counts were determined on a time series basis with the goal of achieving a Ct inactivation model that is similar to models presently used for inactivation of suspended cells. Ultimately this research could be used to develop a rationale method for setting regulatory values for secondary disinfection in drinking water distribution systems, which presently in only a few states and provinces. (author)

  18. Drinking water and biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, F; Madeira, L M; Juhna, T; Block, J C

    2013-10-01

    A Fenton-like disinfection process was conducted with Fenton's reagent (H2O2) at pH 3 or 5 on autochthonous drinking water biofilms grown on corroded or non-corroded pipe material. The biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like oxidation was limited by the low content of iron and copper in the biomass grown on non-corroded plumbing. It was slightly improved by spiking the distribution system with some additional iron source (soluble iron II or ferrihydrite particles appeared as interesting candidates). However successful in situ disinfection of biofilms was only achieved in fully corroded cast iron pipes using H2O2 and adjusting the pH to 5. These new results provide additional support for the use of Fenton's processes for cleaning drinking water distribution systems contaminated with biological agents or organics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  20. Decontamination of B. globigii spores from drinking water infrastructure using disinfectants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to common drinking water infrastructure surfaces was evaluated using a variety of disinfectants. Corroded iron and...

  1. UV disinfection of injection and drinking water - an accepted method on offshore oil platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.; Klein, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet disinfection packages have been developed for the treatment of drinking water and injection water on offshore oil platforms. Large-scale tests with sulphate reducing bacteria out outlined. (Auth.)

  2. Chloraminated Concentrated Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Research: Evaluating Free Chlorine Contact Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex mixtures of disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when the disinfectant oxidizes constituents (e.g., natural organic matter (NOM) and organic pollutants) present in the source water. Since 1974, over 600 DBPs have been identified in drinking water, yet a large portio...

  3. Chloramination of Concentrated Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Creation- Indianapolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex mixtures of disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when the disinfectant oxidizes constituents (e.g., natural organic matter (NOM) and organic pollutants) found in the source water. Since 1974, over 600 DBPs have been identified in drinking water. Despite intense iden...

  4. Chloramination of Concentrated Drinking Water: Evaluation of Disinfection Byproduct Formation and Dosing Scenarios - Portland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex mixtures of disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when the disinfectant oxidizes constituents (e.g., natural organic matter (NOM) and organic pollutants) found in the source water. Since 1974, over 600 DBPs have been identified in drinking water. Despite intense iden...

  5. Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems - presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  6. Why Do People Stop Treating Contaminated Drinking Water with Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is a simple method designed to treat microbiologically contaminated drinking water at household level. This article characterizes relapse behavior in comparison with continued SODIS use after a 7-month nonpromotion period. In addition, different subtypes among relapsers and continuers were assumed to diverge mainly…

  7. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  8. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Peracetic Acid and Twin Oxide ™ as Disinfectants in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine is widely used as an inexpensive and potent disinfectant in the United States for drinking water. However, chlorine has the potential for forming carcinogenic and mutagenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In this study, bench scale experiments were conducted at the U.S...

  9. Continuous-flow solar UVB disinfection reactor for drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonimpa, Eric Gentil; Vadheim, Bryan; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2012-05-01

    Access to safe, reliable sources of drinking water is a long-standing problem among people in developing countries. Sustainable solutions to these problems often involve point-of-use or community-scale water treatment systems that rely on locally-available resources and expertise. This philosophy was used in the development of a continuous-flow, solar UVB disinfection system. Numerical modeling of solar UVB spectral irradiance was used to define temporal variations in spectral irradiance at several geographically-distinct locations. The results of these simulations indicated that a solar UVB system would benefit from incorporation of a device to amplify ambient UVB fluence rate. A compound parabolic collector (CPC) was selected for this purpose. Design of the CPC was based on numerical simulations that accounted for the shape of the collector and reflectance. Based on these simulations, a prototype CPC was constructed using materials that would be available and inexpensive in many developing countries. A UVB-transparent pipe was positioned in the focal area of the CPC; water was pumped through the pipe to allow exposure of waterborne microbes to germicidal solar UVB radiation. The system was demonstrated to be effective for inactivation of Escherichia coli, and DNA-weighted UV dose was shown to govern reactor performance. The design of the reactor is expected to scale linearly, and improvements in process performance (relative to results from the prototype) can be expected by use of larger CPC geometry, inclusion of better reflective materials, and application in areas with greater ambient solar UV spectral irradiance than the location of the prototype tests. The system is expected to have application for water treatment among communities in (developing) countries in near-equatorial and tropical locations. It may also have application for disaster relief or military field operations, as well as in water treatment in areas of developed countries that receive

  10. Drinking water disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation. Desinfektion von Trinkwasser durch UV-Bestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelzhaeuser, P; Bewig, F; Holm, K; Kryschi, R; Reich, G; Steuer, W

    1985-01-01

    The book presents all lectures held during a course at Technical Academy Esslingen, on September 10, 1985, on the subject of 'Drinking water disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation'. The methods hitherto used for disinfection are no longer suitable because of the increasing amounts of organic pollutants found in the untreated water, and because of the necessity to make drinking water disinfection less expensive, non-polluting and thus environmentally compatible. U.V. irradiation is a method allowing technically simple and safe disinfection of the water, and also does not have any effect on the natural taste of the drinking water. The lectures presented discuss all aspects of the method, the equipment, and the performance of irradiation systems in practice.

  11. Practical considerations in the use of UV light for drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyanayagam, S.; Cotton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light was discovered approximately 150 years ago. The first commercial UV lamp was made in the early 1900s soon followed by the manufacture of the quartz sleeve. These technological advances allowed the first application of UV light for water disinfection in 1907 in France. In the mid 1980s, UV disinfection was named as a Best available technology (BAT) for wastewater disinfection in the United States. Fueled by the recent findings that UV disinfection can inactivate key pathogens at cost effective UV doses, the drinking water industry in North America is closely investigating its application in large installations. (author)

  12. Toxic impact of bromide and iodide on drinking water disinfected with chlorine or chloramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Komaki, Yukako; Kimura, Susana Y; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    Disinfectants inactivate pathogens in source water; however, they also react with organic matter and bromide/iodide to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although only a few DBP classes have been systematically analyzed for toxicity, iodinated and brominated DBPs tend to be the most toxic. The objectives of this research were (1) to determine if monochloramine (NH2Cl) disinfection generated drinking water with less toxicity than water disinfected with free chlorine (HOCl) and (2) to determine the impact of added bromide and iodide in conjunction with HOCl or NH2Cl disinfection on mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genomic DNA damage induction. Water disinfected with chlorine was less cytotoxic but more genotoxic than water disinfected with chloramine. For both disinfectants, the addition of Br(-) and I(-) increased cytotoxicity and genotoxicity with a greater response observed with NH2Cl disinfection. Both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were highly correlated with TOBr and TOI. However, toxicity was weakly and inversely correlated with TOCl. Thus, the forcing agents for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were the generation of brominated and iodinated DBPs rather than the formation of chlorinated DBPs. Disinfection practices need careful consideration especially when using source waters containing elevated bromide and iodide.

  13. The Use of Genetic Algorithms in UV Disinfection of Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Zaldaña; Emerson Castañeda

    2015-01-01

    In order to have drinking water, some countries have to use chlorine. It is use cause is effective and it’s cheap. An alternative to this process is the UV disinfection of drinking water. Most of the devices in the market use UV bulbs or mercury lamps. The UV LED, which is cheaper and smaller, allows creating new smaller devices. The main contribution of this paper is the use of Genetic Algorithms to help design a drinking water device with UV LEDs.

  14. Chlorine dioxine DBPs (disinfection by-products in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lasagna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s it has been well known that, though water for human consumption is generally disinfected before being distributed along the network, the use of chemicals results in the formation of many different Disinfection By-Products (DBPs. In the case of chlorine dioxide, the most important and represented DBPs are chlorite and chlorate: after an introduction concerning the current Italian regulation on this subject, in the experimental part the results of a 7-year minitoring campaign, concerning water of different origin collected from taps in various Italian regions, are shown. The analytical technique used for the determination of chlorite and chlorate was Ion Chromatography. The result obtained are finally discussed.

  15. Nano-silver in drinking water and drinking water sources: stability and influences on disinfection by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugulea, A-M; Bérubé, D; Giddings, M; Lemieux, F; Hnatiw, J; Priem, J; Avramescu, M-L

    2014-10-01

    Nano-silver is increasingly used in consumer products from washing machines and refrigerators to devices marketed for the disinfection of drinking water or recreational water. The nano-silver in these products may be released, ending up in surface water bodies which may be used as drinking water sources. Little information is available about the stability of the nano-silver in sources of drinking water, its fate during drinking water disinfection processes, and its interaction with disinfection agents and disinfection by-products (DBPs). This study aims to investigate the stability of nano-silver in drinking water sources and in the finished drinking water when chlorine and chloramines are used for disinfection and to observe changes in the composition of DBPs formed when nano-silver is present in the source water. A dispersion of nano-silver particles (10 nm; PVP-coated) was used to spike untreated Ottawa River water, treated Ottawa River water, organic-free water, and a groundwater at concentrations of 5 mg/L. The diluted dispersions were kept under stirred and non-stirred conditions for up to 9 months and analyzed weekly using UV absorption to assess the stability of the nano-silver particles. In a separate experiment, Ottawa River water containing nano-silver particles (at 0.1 and 1 mg/L concentration, respectively) was disinfected by adding sodium hypochlorite (a chlorinating agent) in sufficient amounts to maintain a free chlorine residual of approximately 0.4 mg/L after 24 h. The disinfected drinking water was then quenched with ascorbic acid and analyzed for 34 neutral DBPs (trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, haloacetaldehydes, 1,1 dichloro-2-propanone, 1,1,1 trichloro-2-propanone, chloropicrin, and cyanogen chloride). The results were compared to the profile of DBPs obtained under the same conditions in the absence of nano-silver and in the presence of an equivalent concentration of Ag(+) ions (as AgNO3). The stability of the nano-silver dispersions in

  16. Solar disinfection of drinking water and oral rehydration solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acra, A; Raffoul, Z; Karahagopian, Y

    1984-01-01

    This document provides concise information on oral rehydration therapy for the control of diarrheal diseases in developing countries; however, the main emphasis has been placed on the disinfection of oral rehydration solutions, or the water used in their preparation, as achieved by exposure to sunlight in transparent containers. The fundamental principles of solar energy are presented as well as studies which demonstrate the efficacy of the method. 2 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  18. Disinfection Byproduct Formation in Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated and Lyophilized Natural Organic Matter from a Drinking Water Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking wa...

  19. Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Disinfection Technologies Used in Small Drinking Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher H; Shilling, Elizabeth G; Linden, Karl G; Cook, Sherri M

    2018-03-06

    Small drinking water systems serve a fifth of the U.S. population and rely heavily on disinfection. While chlorine disinfection is common, there is interest in minimizing chemical addition, especially due to carcinogenic disinfection byproducts and chlorine-resistant pathogens, by using ultraviolet technologies; however, the relative, broader environmental impacts of these technologies are not well established, especially in the context of small (environmental trade-offs between chlorine and ultraviolet disinfection via comparative life cycle assessment. The functional unit was the production of 1 m 3 of drinking water to U.S. Treatment included cartridge filtration followed by either chlorine disinfection or ultraviolet disinfection with chlorine residual addition. Environmental performance was evaluated for various chlorine contact zone materials (plastic, concrete, steel), ultraviolet validation factors (1.2 to 4.4), and electricity sources (renewable; U.S. average, high, and low impact grids). Performance was also evaluated when filtration and chlorine residual were not required. From a life cycle assessment perspective, replacing chlorine with UV was preferred only in a limited number of cases (i.e., high pumping pressure but filtration is not required). In all others, chlorine was environmentally preferred, although some contact zone materials and energy sources had an impact on the comparison. Utilities can use these data to inform their disinfection technology selection and operation to minimize environmental and human health impacts.

  20. Assesment of disinfectant by product in chlorinated drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was design to establish the report of spatial pattern and variations of Trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water sample collected from the area of Karachi. This is the first attempt of its nature to assess mainly the THMs level in drinking water samples of this region. THMs occurrence in water samples as investigated based on a program for preliminary monitoring of water quality throughout the distribution system. The most important species CHCl/sub 3/ of THMs were measured in the samples and were found at average level. The results of present investigation demonstrated that there are more than 95.06% of total Trihalomethanes spatial variations. Specially the CHCl/sub 3/ is considerable in all the utilities in question. (author)

  1. Models for predicting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation in drinking waters: a chronological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Champagne, Pascale; McLellan, P James

    2009-07-01

    Disinfection for the supply of safe drinking water forms a variety of known and unknown byproducts through reactions between the disinfectants and natural organic matter. Chronic exposure to disinfection byproducts through the ingestion of drinking water, inhalation and dermal contact during regular indoor activities (e.g., showering, bathing, cooking) may pose cancer and non-cancer risks to human health. Since their discovery in drinking water in 1974, numerous studies have presented models to predict DBP formation in drinking water. To date, more than 48 scientific publications have reported 118 models to predict DBP formation in drinking waters. These models were developed through laboratory and field-scale experiments using raw, pretreated and synthetic waters. This paper aims to review DBP predictive models, analyze the model variables, assess the model advantages and limitations, and to determine their applicability to different water supply systems. The paper identifies the current challenges and future research needs to better control DBP formation. Finally, important directions for future research are recommended to protect human health and to follow the best management practices.

  2. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method.

  3. The Use of Genetic Algorithms in UV Disinfection of Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Zaldaña

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to have drinking water, some countries have to use chlorine. It is use cause is effective and it’s cheap. An alternative to this process is the UV disinfection of drinking water. Most of the devices in the market use UV bulbs or mercury lamps. The UV LED, which is cheaper and smaller, allows creating new smaller devices. The main contribution of this paper is the use of Genetic Algorithms to help design a drinking water device with UV LEDs.

  4. Transformation of pharmaceuticals during oxidation/disinfection processes in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Cristina; Richardson, Susan D

    2014-08-30

    Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants of concern and are widespread in the environment. While the levels of these substances in finished drinking waters are generally considered too low for human health concern, there are now concerns about their disinfection by-products (DBPs) that can form during drinking water treatment, which in some cases have been proven to be more toxic than the parent compounds. The present manuscript reviews the transformation products of pharmaceuticals generated in water during different disinfection processes, i.e. chlorination, ozonation, chloramination, chlorine dioxide, UV, and UV/hydrogen peroxide, and the main reaction pathways taking place. Most of the findings considered for this review come from controlled laboratory studies involving reactions of pharmaceuticals with these oxidants used in drinking water treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl 2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  7. Formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in 10 chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water supply systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Deborah; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water supplies is a public health concern, particularly since some N-DBPs have been reported to be more toxic than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of the presence of N-DBPs in 10 drinking water supply systems in Western Australia is presented. A suite of 28 N-DBPs, including N-nitrosamines, haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAAms) and halonitromethanes (HNMs), were measured and evaluated for relationships with bulk parameters in the waters before disinfection. A number of N-DBPs were frequently detected in disinfected waters, although at generally low concentrations (water, N-DBP concentrations were significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ammonia, and these, in addition to high bromide in one of the waters, led to elevated concentrations of brominated HANs (26.6 μg/L of dibromoacetonitrile). There were significant differences in the occurrence of all classes of N-DBPs between chlorinated and chloraminated waters, except for HNMs, which were detected at relatively low concentrations in both water types. Trends observed in one large distribution system suggest that N-DBPs can continue to form or degrade within distribution systems, and redosing of disinfectant may cause further by-product formation.

  8. Synergistic effect of solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, G K; Fujioka, R S

    2001-01-01

    Waterborne diseases are still common in developing countries as drinking water sources are contaminated and feasible means to reliably treat and disinfect these waters are not available. Many of these developing countries are in the tropical regions of the world where sunlight is plentiful. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combining solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect contaminated water using a modified Family Sol*Saver System (FSP). The non-UV transmittable cover sheet of the former FSP system was replaced with an UV transmittable plastic cover sheet to enable more wavelengths of sunlight to treat the water. Disinfection efficiency of both systems was evaluated based on reduction of the natural populations of faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, C. perfringens, total heterotrophic bacteria, hydrogen sulphide producing bacteria and FRNA virus. The results showed that under sunny and partly sunny conditions, water was heated to critical temperature (60 degrees C) in both the FSP systems inactivating more than 3 log (99.9%) of the concentrations of faecal coliform and E. coli to undetectable levels of heat worked synergistically to enhance the inactivation of faecal indicator bacteria. The relative log removal of indicator microorganism in the FSP treated water was total heterotrophic bacteria heat and radiation effects of sunlight were important in disinfecting water by solar units. The data indicated that direct radiation of sunlight worked synergistically with solar heating of the water to disinfect the water. Thus, effective disinfection was observed even when the water temperature did not reach 60 degrees C. Finally, the hydrogen sulphide test is a simple and reliable test that householders can use to determine whether their water had been sufficiently disinfected.

  9. Validation of the analytical method for sodium dichloroisocyanurate aimed at drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Alvarez, Luis Octavio; Alejo Cisneros, Pedro; Garcia Pereira, Reynaldo; Campos Valdez, Doraily

    2014-01-01

    Cuba has developed the first effervescent 3.5 mg sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets as a non-therapeutic active principle. This ingredient releases certain amount of chlorine when dissolved into a litre of water and it can cause adequate disinfection of drinking water ready to be taken after 30 min. Developing and validating an analytical iodometric method applicable to the quality control of effervescent 3.5 mg sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets

  10. Evaluation of an Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  11. Assessing microbiological water quality in drinking water distribution systems with disinfectant residual using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Simon; Lipphaus, Patrick; Green, James; Parsons, Simon; Weir, Paul; Juskowiak, Kes; Jefferson, Bruce; Jarvis, Peter; Nocker, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Flow cytometry (FCM) as a diagnostic tool for enumeration and characterization of microorganisms is rapidly gaining popularity and is increasingly applied in the water industry. In this study we applied the method to obtain a better understanding of total and intact cell concentrations in three different drinking water distribution systems (one using chlorine and two using chloramines as secondary disinfectants). Chloramine tended to result in lower proportions of intact cells than chlorine over a wider residual range, in agreement with existing knowledge that chloramine suppresses regrowth more efficiently. For chlorinated systems, free chlorine concentrations above 0.5 mg L(-1) were found to be associated with relatively low proportions of intact cells, whereas lower disinfectant levels could result in substantially higher percentages of intact cells. The threshold for chlorinated systems is in good agreement with guidelines from the World Health Organization. The fact that the vast majority of samples failing the regulatory coliform standard also showed elevated proportions of intact cells suggests that this parameter might be useful for evaluating risk of failure. Another interesting parameter for judging the microbiological status of water, the biological regrowth potential, greatly varied among different finished waters providing potential help for investment decisions. For its measurement, a simple method was introduced that can easily be performed by water utilities with FCM capability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transformation of pharmaceuticals during oxidation/disinfection processes in drinking water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postigo, Cristina; Richardson, Susan D.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Review of transformation pathways of pharmaceuticals during disinfection processes. • DBPs are formed with chlorine, chloramine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, UV, or UV/H 2 O 2 . • Chlorine reacts with amine and reduced sulfur groups and activated aromatic systems. • Chlorine dioxide and ozone react with electron-rich functional groups. • Potential health effects are noted for some pharmacuetical DBPs when available. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants of concern and are widespread in the environment. While the levels of these substances in finished drinking waters are generally considered too low for human health concern, there are now concerns about their disinfection by-products (DBPs) that can form during drinking water treatment, which in some cases have been proven to be more toxic than the parent compounds. The present manuscript reviews the transformation products of pharmaceuticals generated in water during different disinfection processes, i.e. chlorination, ozonation, chloramination, chlorine dioxide, UV, and UV/hydrogen peroxide, and the main reaction pathways taking place. Most of the findings considered for this review come from controlled laboratory studies involving reactions of pharmaceuticals with these oxidants used in drinking water treatment

  13. Transformation of pharmaceuticals during oxidation/disinfection processes in drinking water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postigo, Cristina [Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA)—Spanish National Research Council (CID-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Richardson, Susan D., E-mail: richardson.susan@sc.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Review of transformation pathways of pharmaceuticals during disinfection processes. • DBPs are formed with chlorine, chloramine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, UV, or UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • Chlorine reacts with amine and reduced sulfur groups and activated aromatic systems. • Chlorine dioxide and ozone react with electron-rich functional groups. • Potential health effects are noted for some pharmacuetical DBPs when available. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants of concern and are widespread in the environment. While the levels of these substances in finished drinking waters are generally considered too low for human health concern, there are now concerns about their disinfection by-products (DBPs) that can form during drinking water treatment, which in some cases have been proven to be more toxic than the parent compounds. The present manuscript reviews the transformation products of pharmaceuticals generated in water during different disinfection processes, i.e. chlorination, ozonation, chloramination, chlorine dioxide, UV, and UV/hydrogen peroxide, and the main reaction pathways taking place. Most of the findings considered for this review come from controlled laboratory studies involving reactions of pharmaceuticals with these oxidants used in drinking water treatment.

  14. Seasonal evaluation of disinfection by-products throughout two full-scale drinking water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Cui, Chongwei; Yu, Shuili

    2017-07-01

    Carbonyl compounds can occur alpha-hydrogens or beta-diketones substitution reactions with disinfectants contributed to halogenated by-products formation. The objective of this research was to study the occurrence and fate of carbonyl compounds as ozonation by-products at two full-scale drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) using different disinfectants for one year. The quality of the raw water used in both plants was varied according to the season. The higher carbonyl compounds concentrations were found in raw water in spring. Up to 15 (as the sum of both DWTPs) of the 24 carbonyl compounds selected for this work were found after disinfection. The dominant carbonyl compounds were formaldehyde, glyoxal, methyl-glyoxal, fumaric, benzoic, protocatechuic and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid at both DWTPs. In the following steps in each treatment plant, the concentration patterns of these carbonyl compounds differed depending on the type of disinfectant applied. Benzaldehyde was the only aromatic aldehyde detected after oxidation with ozone in spring. As compared with DWTP 1, five new carbonyl compounds were formed (crotonaldehyde, benzaldehyde, formic, oxalic and malonic acid) disinfection by ozone, and the levels of the carbonyl compounds increased. In addition, pre-ozonation (PO) and main ozonation (OZ) increased the levels of carbonyl compounds, however coagulation/flocculation (CF), sand filtration (SF) and granular activated carbon filtration (GAC) decreased the levels of carbonyl compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Balancing the risks and benefits of drinking water disinfection: disability adjusted life-years on the scale.

    OpenAIRE

    Havelaar, A H; De Hollander, A E; Teunis, P F; Evers, E G; Van Kranen, H J; Versteegh, J F; Van Koten, J E; Slob, W

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the applicability of disability adjusted life-years (DALYs) as a measure to compare positive and negative health effects of drinking water disinfection, we conducted a case study involving a hypothetical drinking water supply from surface water. This drinking water supply is typical in The Netherlands. We compared the reduction of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium parvum by ozonation of water to the concomitant increase in risk of renal cell cancer arising from the produc...

  16. Evaluation of bactericidal efficacy of silver ions on Escherichia coli for drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Satya P; Gopal, K

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of a suitable process for the disinfection of drinking water by evaluating bactericidal efficacy of silver ions from silver electrodes. A prototype of a silver ioniser with silver electrodes and control unit has been fabricated. Silver ions from silver electrodes in water samples were estimated with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A fresh culture of Escherichia coli (1.75 × 10(3) c.f.u./ml) was exposed to 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 ppb of silver ions in 100 ml of autoclaved tap water for 60 min. The effect of different pH and temperatures on bactericidal efficacy was observed at constant silver ion concentration (5 ppb) and contact time of 30 min. The maximum bactericidal activity (100%) was observed at 20 ppb of silver ion concentration indicating total disinfection after 20 min while minimum bactericidal activity (25%) was observed after 10 min at 01 ppb of silver ions. Likewise, 100% bactericidal activity was noticed with 2, 5 and 10 ppb of silver ions after 60, 50 and 40 min, respectively. Bactericidal activity at pH 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 was observed at 79.9%, 79.8%, 80.5%, 100% and 100%, respectively, whereas it was 80.4%, 88.3%, 100%, 100% and 100% at 10°C, 20°C, 30°C, 40°C and 50°C, respectively. The findings of this study revealed that very low concentrations of silver ions at pH 8-9 and temperature >20°C have bactericidal efficacy for total disinfection of drinking water. Silver ionisation is suitable for water disinfection and an appropriate alternative to chlorination which forms carcinogenic disinfection by-products.

  17. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  18. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Do Iodine Contrast Media Compounds Used for Medical Imaging Contribute to the Formation of Iodinated Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) have recently gained attention due to their cyto- and genotoxicity and increased formation in drinking water treated with chloramine, which has become an increasingly popular disinfectant in the United States. One of these—iodoacetic acid...

  20. Formation and occurrence of new polar iodinated disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Li, Wenbin; An, Hao; Cui, Hao; Wang, Ying

    2016-02-01

    During drinking water disinfection, iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs) can be generated through reactions between iodide, disinfectants, and natural organic matter. Drinking water I-DBPs have been increasingly attracting attention as emerging organic pollutants as a result of their significantly higher toxicity and growth inhibition than their chloro- and bromo-analogues. In this study, by adopting ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry precursor ion scan, multiple reaction monitoring, and product ion scan analyses, 11 new polar I-DBPs with confirmed structures and eight new polar I-DBPs with proposed structures were detected in simulated drinking water samples. Chloramination of simulated raw waters containing natural organic matter with higher aromaticity produced higher levels of new phenolic I-DBPs. Formation of new polar I-DBPs and total organic iodine (TOI) was most favored in chloramination, followed by chlorine dioxide treatment, and relatively minor in chlorination. Lower pH in chloramination substantially enhanced the formation of new polar I-DBPs and TOI. NH2Cl and dissolved organic nitrogen could be important nitrogen sources and precursors for formation of the two new nitrogenous phenolic I-DBPs. Notably, in tap water samples collected from nine major cities located in the Yangtze River Delta region of China, seven of the 11 new polar I-DBPs with confirmed structures were detected at levels from 0.11 to 28 ng/L, and the two new nitrogenous phenolic I-DBPs were ubiquitous with concentrations from 0.12 to 24 ng/L, likely due to the relatively high dissolved organic nitrogen levels in regional source waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Consol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. Methods We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income was collected through personal interviews. Results The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57% and more bottled water (33% than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003. These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p Conclusions The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants.

  2. Survey of disinfection efficiency of small drinking water treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey involving 181 water treatment plants across 7 provinces of South Africa: Mpumalanga, Limpopo, North West, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Western Cape was undertaken to identify the challenges facing small water treatment plants (SWTPs) in South Africa . Information gathered included ...

  3. [Disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid, alone and in combination with hypochlorite, against Mycobacterium avium in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavano, G F; Sisti, M; De Santi, M; Brandi, G

    2006-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfectant with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the feasibility of using it in the field of drinking water treatment. The aim of this study has been assess disinfectant efficacy of PAA, alone or in combination with hypochlorite, against M. avium in drinking water M. avium is a common opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised subjects that is able to survive and grow in drinking water distribution systems. In this study PAA did not show appreciable activity against the greater number of tested strains (16/21) up to 5 ppm of PAA, a weak activity was seen on 4 strains, while a significant reduction in viable cells (about 50%) was seen only on 1 strain after 48 h of treatment with 5 ppm of PAA. We also evidenced that M. avium was unaffected by chlorine concentration usually present in drinking water distribution system. Finally, the combination of PAA and sodium hypochlorite did not promote enhanced antimicrobial efficacy respect to the single disinfectants. In conclusion, our result would indicate that PAA is an unlikely candidate for the disinfection of drinking water from M. avium and further strategies are required to eliminate M. avium from drinking water system.

  4. Nitrogenous disinfection byproducts in English drinking water supply systems: Occurrence, bromine substitution and correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Mokhtar Kamal, Nurul Hana; Graham, Nigel; Kanda, Rakesh

    2015-11-15

    Despite the recent focus on nitrogenous disinfection byproducts in drinking water, there is limited occurrence data available for many species. This paper analyses the occurrence of seven haloacetonitriles, three haloacetamides, eight halonitromethanes and cyanogen chloride in 20 English drinking water supply systems. It is the first survey of its type to compare bromine substitution factors (BSFs) between the haloacetamides and haloacetonitriles. Concentrations of the dihalogenated haloacetonitriles and haloacetamides were well correlated. Although median concentrations of these two groups were lower in chloraminated than chlorinated surface waters, median BSFs for both in chloraminated samples were approximately double those in chlorinated samples, which is significant because of the higher reported toxicity of the brominated species. Furthermore, median BSFs were moderately higher for the dihalogenated haloacetamides than for the haloacetonitriles. This indicates that, while the dihalogenated haloacetamides were primarily generated from hydrolysis of the corresponding haloacetonitriles, secondary formation pathways also contributed. Median halonitromethane concentrations were remarkably unchanging for the different types of disinfectants and source waters: 0.1 μg · mgTOC(-1) in all cases. Cyanogen chloride only occurred in a limited number of samples, yet when present its concentrations were higher than the other N-DBPs. Concentrations of cyanogen chloride and the sum of the halonitromethanes were not correlated with any other DBPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  6. Drinking water disinfection byproduct iodoacetic acid induces tumorigenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Weiwei; Wang, Xia; Liu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Songhui; Pi, Jingbo; Zheng, Yuxin; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2013-06-04

    Iodoacetic acid (IAA) and iodoform (IF) are unregulated iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) found in drinking water. Their presence in the drinking water of China has not been documented. Recently, the carcinogenic potential of IAA and IF has been a concern because of their mutagenicity in bacteria and genotoxicity in mammalian cells. Therefore, we measured their concentrations in Shanghai drinking water and assessed their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and ability to transform NIH3T3 cells to tumorigenic lines. The concentrations of IAA and IF in Shanghai drinking water varied between summer and winter with maximum winter levels of 2.18 μg/L IAA and 0.86 μg/L IF. IAA with a lethal concentration 50 (LC50) of 2.77 μM exhibited more potent cytotoxicity in NIH3T3 cells than IF (LC50 = 83.37 μM). IAA, but not IF, induced a concentration-dependent DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX staining and increased tail moment in single-cell gel electrophoresis. Neither IAA nor IF increased micronucleus frequency. Prolonged exposure of NIH3T3 cells to IAA increased the frequencies of transformed cells with anchorage-independent growth and agglutination with concanavalin A. IAA-transformed cells formed aggressive fibrosarcomas after inoculation into Balb/c nude mice. This study demonstrated that IAA has a biological activity that is consistent with a carcinogen and human exposure should be of concern.

  7. Predictive model for disinfection by-product in Alexandria drinking water, northern west of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ali M; Hussona, Salah El-dien

    2013-10-01

    Chlorine has been utilized in the early stages of water treatment processes as disinfectant. Disinfection for drinking water reduces the risk of pathogenic infection but may pose a chemical threat to human health due to disinfection residues and their by-products (DBP) when the organic and inorganic precursors are present in water. In the last two decades, many modeling attempts have been made to predict the occurrence of DBP in drinking water. Models have been developed based on data generated in laboratory-scale and field-scale investigations. The objective of this paper is to develop a predictive model for DBP formation in the Alexandria governorate located at the northern west of Egypt based on field-scale investigations as well as laboratory-controlled experimentations. The present study showed that the correlation coefficient between trihalomethanes (THM) predicted and THM measured was R (2)=0.88 and the minimum deviation percentage between THM predicted and THM measured was 0.8 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 89.3 %, and the average deviation was 17.8 %, while the correlation coefficient between dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) predicted and DCAA measured was R (2)=0.98 and the minimum deviation percentage between DCAA predicted and DCAA measured was 1.3 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 47.2 %, and the average deviation was 16.6 %. In addition, the correlation coefficient between trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) predicted and TCAA measured was R (2)=0.98 and the minimum deviation percentage between TCAA predicted and TCAA measured was 4.9 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 43.0 %, and the average deviation was 16.0 %.

  8. Combined effects of coagulation and adsorption on ultrafiltration membrane fouling control and subsequent disinfection in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiajian; Liang, Heng; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Haiyan; Xu, Daliang; Gan, Zhendong; Luo, Xinsheng; Zhu, Xuewu; Li, Guibai

    2018-06-02

    This study investigated the combined effects of coagulation and powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption on ultrafiltration (UF) membrane fouling control and subsequent disinfection efficiency through filtration performance, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy, and disinfectant curve. The fouling behavior of UF membrane was comprehensively analyzed especially in terms of pollutant removal and fouling reversibility to understand the mechanism of fouling accumulation and disinfectant dose reduction. Pre-coagulation with or without adsorption both achieved remarkable effect of fouling mitigation and disinfection dose reduction. The two pretreatments were effective in total fouling control and pre-coagulation combined with PAC adsorption even decreased hydraulically irreversible fouling notably. Besides, pre-coagulation decreased residual disinfectant decline due to the removal of hydrophobic components of natural organic matters (NOM). Pre-coagulation combined with adsorption had a synergistic effect on further disinfectant decline rate reduction and decreased total disinfectant consumption due to additional removal of hydrophilic NOM by PAC adsorption. The disinfectant demand was further reduced after membrane. These results show that membrane fouling and disinfectant dose can be reduced in UF coupled with pretreatment, which could lead to the avoidance of excessive operation cost disinfectant dose for drinking water supply.

  9. New chlorinated amphetamine-type-stimulants disinfection-by-products formed during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Fontela, Maria; Pineda, Oriol; Ventura, Francesc; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2012-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated high removal rates of amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATSs) through conventional drinking water treatments; however the behaviour of these compounds through disinfection steps and their transformation into disinfection-by-products (DBPs) is still unknown. In this work, for the first time, the reactivity of some ATSs such as amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) with chlorine has been investigated under simulated and real drinking water treatment conditions in order to evaluate their ability to give rise to transformation products. Two new DBPs from these illicit drugs have been found. A common chlorinated-by-product (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, was identified for both MDA and MDEA while for MDMA, 3-chlorocatechol was found. The presence of these DBPs in water samples collected through drinking water treatment was studied in order to evaluate their formation under real conditions. Both compounds were generated through treatment from raw river water samples containing ATSs at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 15 ng/L for MDA and from 2.3 to 78 ng/L for MDMA. One of them, (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, found after the first chlorination step, was eliminated after ozone and GAC treatment while the MDMA DBP mainly generated after the postchlorination step, showed to be recalcitrant and it was found in final treated waters at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5.8 ng/L. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  11. Characterization of soluble microbial products as precursors of disinfection byproducts in drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Yue-Feng; Tang, Hao

    2014-02-15

    Water pollution by wastewater discharge can cause the problem of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water supply. In this study, DBP formation characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMPs) as the main products of wastewater organic biodegradation were investigated. The results show that SMPs can act as DBP precursors in simulated wastewater biodegradation process. Under the experimental conditions, stabilized SMPs had DBPFP (DBP formation potential) yield of around 5.6 μmol mmol(-1)-DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and DBP speciation profile different from that of the conventional precursor, natural organic matter (NOM). SMPs contained polysaccharides, proteins, and humic-like substances, and the latter two groups can act as reactive DBP precursors. SMP fraction with molecular weight of water treatment processes, more efforts are needed to control wastewater-derived DBP problem in water resource management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ozone and hydrogen peroxide applications for disinfection by-products control in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collivignarelli, C.; Sorlini, S.; Riganti, V.

    2001-01-01

    A great interest has been developed during the last years for ozone in drinking water treatments thanks to its strong oxidant and disinfectant power and for its efficiency in disinfection by-products (DBPs) precursors removal. However ozonization produces some specific DBPs, such as aldehydes and ketones; moreover, the presence of bromide in raw water engages ozone in a complex cycle in which both organic bromide and inorganic bromate are end products. In this paper the combination of hydrogen peroxide with ozone (known as peroxone process) and the ozone alone process were experimented on one surface water coming from the lake of Brugneto (Genova) in order to investigate bromate formation and trihalomethanes precursors removal during the oxidation process. The results show that the advanced peroxone process can be applied for bromate reduction (about 30-40%) with better results in comparison with the ozone alone process, while no advantages are shown for THMs precursors removal. The addition of in-line filtration step after pre-oxidation improves both bromate and THMs precursors removal, particularly with increasing hydrogen peroxide/ozone ratio in the oxidation step [it

  13. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (pwater in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Occurrence and Toxicity of Disinfection Byproducts in European Drinking Waters in Relation with the HIWATE Epidemiology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Clara H.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Siebert, Vincent R.; Anduri, Sridevi; Richardson, Susan D.; Daiber, Eric J.; McKague, A. Bruce; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Goslan, Emma H.; Luo, Wentai; Isabelle, Lorne M.; Pankow, James F.; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Cordier, Sylvaine; Edwards, Susan C.; Righi, Elena; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The HIWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection byproducts in drinking WATEr) project was a systematic analysis that combined the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes and other health effects with long term exposure to low levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in the European Union. The present study focused on the relationship of the occurrence and concentration of DBPs with in vitro mammalian cell toxicity. Eleven drinking water samples were collected from 5 European countries. Each sampling location corresponded with an epidemiological study for the HIWATE program. Over 90 DBPs were identified; the range in the number of DBPs and their levels reflected the diverse collection sites, different disinfection processes, and the different characteristics of the source waters. For each sampling site, chronic mammalian cell cytotoxicity correlated highly with the numbers of DBPs identified and the levels of DBP chemical classes. Although there was a clear difference in the genotoxic responses among the drinking waters, these data did not correlate as well with the chemical analyses. Thus, the agents responsible for the genomic DNA damage observed in the HIWATE samples may be due to unresolved associations of combinations of identified DBPs, unknown emerging DBPs that were not identified, or other toxic water contaminants. This study represents the first to integrate quantitative in vitro toxicological data with analytical chemistry and human epidemiologic outcomes for drinking water DBPs. PMID:22958121

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) AND SEMEN QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic Evaluation of the Potential Association between Exposure to Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products and Semen Quality*Morris, R; +Olshan, A; +Lansdell, L; *Jeffay, S; *Strader, L; *Klinefelter, G; *Perreault, S.* U.S. EPA/ORD/NHEERL/RTD/GEEBB, Research ...

  16. Analysis, Occurrence and Toxicity of Haloacetaldehydes in Drinking Waters: Iodacetaldehyde as an Emerging Disinfection ByProduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated and brominated haloacetaldehydes (HALs) are consideredthe 3rd largest class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) by weight. The iodinatedHAL, iodoacetaldehyde, has been recently reported as an emerging DBP infinished drinking waters. Overall, iodinated DBPs, e.g., iodoa...

  17. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  18. Quantification of pathogen inactivation efficacy by free chlorine disinfection of drinking water for QMRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, S R; Stenström, T A

    2015-09-01

    To support the implementation of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) for managing infectious risks associated with drinking water systems, a simple modeling approach for quantifying Log10 reduction across a free chlorine disinfection contactor was developed. The study was undertaken in three stages: firstly, review of the laboratory studies published in the literature; secondly, development of a conceptual approach to apply the laboratory studies to full-scale conditions; and finally implementation of the calculations for a hypothetical case study system. The developed model explicitly accounted for variability in residence time and pathogen specific chlorine sensitivity. Survival functions were constructed for a range of pathogens relying on the upper bound of the reported data transformed to a common metric. The application of the model within a hypothetical case study demonstrated the importance of accounting for variable residence time in QMRA. While the overall Log10 reduction may appear high, small parcels of water with short residence time can compromise the overall performance of the barrier. While theoretically simple, the approach presented is of great value for undertaking an initial assessment of a full-scale disinfection contactor based on limited site-specific information.

  19. Occurrence of nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection byproducts in drinking water distributed in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Zhu, Haihui; Gan, Wenhui; Chen, Xue; Yang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    A 12-month sampling program was conducted throughout a drinking water distribution system in Shenzhen and the data from 251 samples provide a comprehensive picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of 17 species disinfection by-products (DBPs) in a city with subtropical monsoon climate. The carbonaceous disinfection by-product (C-DBPs) included four trihalomethanes (THMs), three trihaloacetaldehydes (THAs) and two haloketones (HKs). Their median concentrations over the entire period were 19.9 μg/L, 3.4 μg/L and 1.4 μg/L, respectively. The nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) monitored were four haloacetonitriles (HANs) and four haloacetamides (HAcAms). Their median levels were 2.0 μg/L and 1.5 μg/L, respectively. Low levels of brominated DBP species (bromine substitution factors ≤ 0.5) were observed. The BSF of each DBP class followed the trend: THMs ≈ DHAcAms > DHANs > THAs. All the DBP concentrations showed clear seasonal variations with the highest average concentrations in spring. Correlation analyses showed that the THMs and CH levels in Shenzhen drinking water could be used as statistical indicators of the levels of unregulated N-DBPs (0.4 water in China, and provide an important reference data set for DBP occurrence in cities with a subtropical monsoon climate around the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of thirteen haloacetic acids and ten trihalomethanes formation by peracetic acid and chlorine drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Runmiao; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Inniss, Enos C; Adams, Craig D; Eichholz, Todd

    2017-12-01

    Free chlorine is a commonly used disinfectant in drinking water treatment. However, disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed during water disinfection. Haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) are two major groups of DBPs. Iodo-HAAs and iodo-THMs (I-HAAs and I-THMs) are formed during the disinfection of the water containing high levels of iodide and are much more toxic than their chlorinated and brominated analogs. Peracetic acid (PAA) is a strong antimicrobial disinfectant that is expected to reduce the formation of HAAs and THMs during disinfection. In this study, the formations of thirteen HAAs and ten THMs, including the iodinated forms, have been investigated during PAA disinfection and chlorination as the comparison. The DBP formations under different iodide concentrations, pHs, and contact times were systematically investigated. Two types of commercial PAAs containing different concentrations of PAA and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were studied. A solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was upgraded for THM analysis including I-THMs. HAAs were analyzed by following a recently developed high performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results show that the ratio of PAA and H 2 O 2 concentration significantly affect the formation of I-THMs and I-HAAs. During PAA disinfection with lower PAA than H 2 O 2 , no detectable levels of THMs and HAAs were observed. During PAA disinfection with higher PAA than H 2 O 2 , low levels of monoiodoacetic acid, diiodoacetic acid, and iodoform were formed, and these levels were enhanced with the increase of iodide concentration. No significant quantities of chloro- or bromo-THMs and HAAs were formed during PAA disinfection treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced formation of disinfection byproducts in shale gas wastewater-impacted drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kimberly M; Zeng, Teng; Harkness, Jennifer; Vengosh, Avner; Mitch, William A

    2014-10-07

    The disposal and leaks of hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) to the environment pose human health risks. Since HFW is typically characterized by elevated salinity, concerns have been raised whether the high bromide and iodide in HFW may promote the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and alter their speciation to more toxic brominated and iodinated analogues. This study evaluated the minimum volume percentage of two Marcellus Shale and one Fayetteville Shale HFWs diluted by fresh water collected from the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers that would generate and/or alter the formation and speciation of DBPs following chlorination, chloramination, and ozonation treatments of the blended solutions. During chlorination, dilutions as low as 0.01% HFW altered the speciation toward formation of brominated and iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and brominated haloacetonitriles (HANs), and dilutions as low as 0.03% increased the overall formation of both compound classes. The increase in bromide concentration associated with 0.01-0.03% contribution of Marcellus HFW (a range of 70-200 μg/L for HFW with bromide = 600 mg/L) mimics the increased bromide levels observed in western Pennsylvanian surface waters following the Marcellus Shale gas production boom. Chloramination reduced HAN and regulated THM formation; however, iodinated trihalomethane formation was observed at lower pH. For municipal wastewater-impacted river water, the presence of 0.1% HFW increased the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chloramination, particularly for the high iodide (54 ppm) Fayetteville Shale HFW. Finally, ozonation of 0.01-0.03% HFW-impacted river water resulted in significant increases in bromate formation. The results suggest that total elimination of HFW discharge and/or installation of halide-specific removal techniques in centralized brine treatment facilities may be a better strategy to mitigate impacts on downstream drinking water treatment plants than altering

  2. Risk analysis of drinking water microbial contamination versus disinfection by-products (DBPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashbolt, Nicholas John

    2004-01-01

    Managing the provision of safe drinking water has a renewed focus in light of the new World Health Organization (WHO) water safety plans. Risk analysis is a necessary component to assist in selecting priority hazards and identifying hazardous scenarios, be they qualitative to quantitative assessments. For any approach, acute diarrhoeal pathogens are often the higher risk issue for municipal water supplies, no matter how health burden is assessed. Furthermore, potential sequellae (myocarditis, diabetes, reactive arthritis and cancers) only further increase the potential health burden of pathogens; despite the enormous uncertainties in determining pathogen exposures and chemical dose-responses within respective microbial and chemical analyses. These interpretations are currently being improved by Bayesian and bootstrapping approaches to estimate parameters for stochastic assessments. A case example, covering the health benefits of ozonation for Cryptosporidium inactivation versus potential cancers from bromate exposures, illustrated the higher risks from a pathogen than one of the most likely disinfection by-products (DBPs). Such analyses help justify the industries long-held view of the benefits of multiple barriers to hazards and that microbial contamination of water supplies pose a clear public health risk when treatment is inadequate. Therefore, efforts to reduce potential health risks from DBP must not compromise pathogen control, despite socio-political issues

  3. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  4. Exopolymeric substances from drinking water biofilms: Dynamics of production and relation with disinfection by products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus Pérez, M F; Rodríguez Susa, M

    2017-06-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) as an external matrix of biofilm could react with disinfectants in drinking water networks forming disinfection by-products (DBP). Based on an experimental setup using two chlorine conditions-biofilm 1 (2.6 ± 0.8 mgCl/L) and biofilm 2 (0.7 ± 0.2 mg Cl/L)-samples of biofilms were recovered during 9 campaigns and EPS were extracted. Analyses of SUVA, fluorescence and amino acid (AA) content were carried out on the EPS to observe variation over time and correlations with DBP formation potential (DBP fp ) after chlorination. SUVA values were under 2 L/mgC*m showing that both EPS were hydrophilic. Slightly higher SUVA in biofilm 2 with low variation over time was observed. Fluorescence showed that aromatic proteins and fulvic like substances were the principal components and increased in biofilm 1 over time. AA decreased with time, and higher values of alanine, threonine, proline and isoleucine were observed in biofilm 2. Based on general associations, the SUVA of biofilm 2 correlated well with chloroform (CF) (r = 0.80). Generally, in both biofilms, tryptophan-like substances were negatively correlated with DBP while humic acid-like substances correlated positively, but with low indexes (r = 0.3-0.6). Correlations of data from individual sampling increased the indices (r over 0.8), suggesting a temporal influence of other factors on DBP fp such as inorganics, filtered water and the structural composition of EPS. In biofilm 1, Br-haloacetic acids (Br-HAA), dibromoacetonitrile and bromochloro acetonitrile were inversely associated with arginine and valine, as were di and trichloropropanone to arginine. On the contrary, in biofilm 2, the following amino acids correlated positively with DBP: alanine with Br-HAA, alanine with CF, alanine with N-DBP (chloropicrin, di and tri-chloro acetonitrile), and valine with CF. As this is the first report about the relation between temporal variation of EPS and DBP fp of biofilms in two

  5. Randomized intervention study of solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in Kenyan children aged under 5 years

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the results of a randomized controlled intervention study (September 2007 to March 2009) investigating the effect of solar disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery, nondysentery diarrhea...

  6. Determinants of disinfectant pretreatment efficacy for nitrosamine control in chloraminated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Daniel L; Krasner, Stuart W; von Gunten, Urs; Mitch, William A

    2015-11-01

    Utilities using chloramines need strategies to mitigate nitrosamine formation to meet potential future nitrosamine regulations. The ability to reduce NDMA formation under typical post-chloramination conditions of pretreatment with ultraviolet light from a low pressure mercury lamp (LPUV), free chlorine (HOCl), ozone (O3), and UV light from a medium pressure mercury lamp (MPUV) were compared at exposures relevant to drinking water treatment. The order of efficacy after application to waters impacted by upstream wastewater discharges was O3 > HOCl ≈ MPUV > LPUV. NDMA precursor abatement generally did not correlate well between oxidants, and waters exhibited different behaviors with respect to pH and temperature, suggesting a variety of source-dependent NDMA precursors. For wastewater-impacted waters, the observed pH dependence for precursor abatement suggested the important role of secondary or tertiary amine precursors. Although hydroxyl radicals did not appear to be important for NDMA precursor abatement during O3 or MPUV pretreatment, the efficacy of MPUV correlated strongly with dissolved organic carbon concentration (p = 0.01), suggesting alternative indirect photochemical pathways. The temperature dependences during pre- and post-disinfection indicated that NDMA formation is likely to increase during warm seasons for O3 pretreatment, decrease for HOCl pretreatment, and remain unchanged for MPUV treatment, although seasonal changes in source water quality may counteract the temperature effects. For two waters impacted by relatively high polyDADMAC coagulant doses, pretreatment with HOCl, O3, and MPUV increased NDMA formation during post-chloramination. For O3 pretreatment, hydroxyl radicals likely led to precursor formation from the polymer in the latter tests. MPUV treatment of polymer-impacted water increased subsequent NDMA formation through an indirect photochemical process. Many factors may mitigate the importance of this increased NDMA formation

  7. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chusaksri, Sarinma; Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote; Sedlak, David L.; Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanism of chlorine reaction with phenylurea compounds has been studied. ► It depends on both chlorinating species and substitutents on the compounds. ► Main products were identified using LC–MS/MS and authentic standards. ► Their transformation under normal drinking water disinfection was predicted. - Abstract: Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3′-N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25 °C and pH 7 were 0.76 ± 0.16, 0.52 ± 0.11, 0.39 ± 0.02, 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.23 ± 0.05 M −1 s −1 for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be incomplete.

  8. Precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water--A critical review and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tom [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Templeton, Michael R.; Graham, Nigel [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proportion of N-DBP formation attributable to specific precursors was calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precursor concentrations are typically insufficient to account for observed N-DBP formation, except CNX and NDMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino acid precursors are easier to remove during water treatment than suggested by laboratory studies. - Abstract: In recent years research into the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water - including N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAcAms), cyanogen halides (CNX) and halonitromethanes (HNMs) - has proliferated. This is partly due to their high reported toxicity of N-DBPs. In this review paper information about the formation yields of N-DBPs from model precursors, and about environmental precursor occurrence, has been employed to assess the amount of N-DBP formation that is attributable to known precursors. It was calculated that for HANs and HAcAms, the concentrations of known precursors - mainly free amino acids are insufficient to account for the observed concentrations of these N-DBP groups. However, at least in some waters, a significant proportion of CNX and NDMA formation can be explained by known precursors. Identified N-DBP precursors tend to be of low molecular weight and low electrostatic charge relative to bulk natural organic matter (NOM). This makes them recalcitrant to removal by water treatment processes, notably coagulation, as confirmed by a number of bench-scale studies. However, amino acids have been found to be easier to remove during water treatment than would be suggested by the known molecular properties of the individual free amino acids.

  9. Halogenating reaction activity of aromatic organic compounds during disinfection of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Gaimei; Chen Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The halogenating reactions of five aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) with aqueous chlorine (HOCl/OCl - ) and aqueous bromine (HOBr/OBr - ) were studied with an aim to compare the formation properties of haloacetic acids (HAAs) for the corresponding chlorination or bromination reactions of AOCs, respectively. The experiment results indicated that the HAAs substitution efficiency for the bromination reactions of AOCs was greater than that for the chlorination reactions, and the formation of HAAs had a strong dependence on the chemical structure of AOCs. The chlorination or bromination reaction activities for the AOCs with electron donating functional groups were higher than that for them with electron withdrawing functional groups. The kinetic experiments indicated that the reactions of aqueous bromine with phenol were faster than those of aqueous chlorine with phenol and the halogen consumption exhibited rapid initial and slower consumption stages for the reactions of phenol with aqueous chlorine and bromine, respectively. In addition, the HAAs production for the chlorination reaction of phenol decreased with the increase of pH. These conclusions could provide the valuable information for the effective control of the disinfection by-products during drinking water treatment operation

  10. The effect of inorganic precursors on disinfection byproduct formation during UV-chlorine/chloramine drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bonnie A; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G; Weinberg, Howard S

    2012-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is being increasingly used in drinking water treatment. It is important to understand how its application to different types of water may influence finished water quality, particularly as anthropogenic activity continues to impact the quality of source waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inorganic precursors on the formation of regulated and unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during UV irradiation of surface waters when combined with chlorination or chloramination. Samples were collected from three drinking water utilities supplied by source waters with varying organic and inorganic precursor content. The filtered samples were treated in the laboratory with a range of UV doses delivered from low pressure (LP, UV output at 253.7 nm) and medium pressure (MP, polychromatic UV output 200-400 nm) mercury lamps followed by chlorination or chloramination, in the presence and absence of additional bromide and nitrate. The regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were not affected by UV pretreatment at disinfection doses (40-186 mJ/cm²). With higher doses (1000 mJ/cm²), trihalomethane formation was increased 30-40%. While most effects on DBPs were only observed with doses much higher than typically used for UV disinfection, there were some effects on unregulated DBPs at lower doses. In nitrate-spiked samples (1-10 mg N/L), chloropicrin formation doubled and increased three- to six-fold with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV followed by chloramination and chlorination, respectively. Bromopicrin formation was increased in samples containing bromide (0.5-1 mg/L) and nitrate (1-10 mg N/L) when pretreated with LP or MP UV (30-60% with 40 mJ/cm² LP UV and four- to ten-fold increase with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV, after subsequent chlorination). The formation of cyanogen chloride doubled and increased three-fold with MP UV doses of 186 and 1000 mJ/cm², respectively, when followed by chloramination in nitrate-spiked samples but

  11. Disinfection efficacy of chlorine and peracetic acid alone or in combination against Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Maurizio; Brandi, Giorgio; De Santi, Mauro; Rinaldi, Laura; Schiavano, Giuditta F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fungicidal activity of chlorine and peracetic acid in drinking water against various pathogenic Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans strains. A. nidulans exhibited the greatest resistance, requiring 10 ppm of chlorine for 30 min contact time for a complete inactivation. Under the same experimental conditions, peracetic acid was even less fungicidal. In this case, A. niger proved to be the most resistant species (50 ppm for 60 min for complete inactivation). All Aspergillus spp. were insensitive to 10 ppm even with extended exposure (>5 h). The combination of chlorine and peracetic acid against Aspergillus spp. did not show synergistic effects except in the case of A. flavus. Complete growth inhibition of C. albicans was observed after about 3 h contact time with 0.2 ppm. C. albicans was less sensitive to peracetic acid. Hence the concentrations of chlorine that are usually present in drinking water distribution systems are ineffective against several Aspergillus spp. and peracetic acid cannot be considered an alternative to chlorine for disinfecting drinking water. The combination of the two biocides is not very effective in eliminating filamentous fungi at the concentrations permitted for drinking water disinfection.

  12. Bacterial community changes in copper and PEX drinking water pipeline biofilms under extra disinfection and magnetic water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, J; Jayaprakash, B; Ahonen, M; Pitkänen, T; Mäkinen, R; Pursiainen, A; Santo Domingo, J W; Salonen, H; Elk, M; Keinänen-Toivola, M M

    2018-02-01

    To study the stability of biofilms and water quality in pilot scale drinking water copper and PEX pipes in changing conditions (extra disinfection, magnetic water treatment, MWT). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 16S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) to describe total bacterial community and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to describe active bacterial members in addition to traditional microbiological methods were applied. Biofilms from control copper and PEX pipes shared same most abundant bacteria (Methylobacterium spp., Sphingomonas spp., Zymomonas spp.) and average species diversities (Shannon 3·8-4·2) in rDNA and rRNA libraries, whereas few of the taxa differed by their abundance such as lower total Mycobacterium spp. occurrence in copper (disinfection (total chlorine increase from c. 0·5 to 1 mg l -1 ) affected total and active population in biofilms seen as decrease in many bacterial species and diversity (Shannon 2·7, P disinfected copper and PEX samples formed separate clusters in unweighted non-metric multidimensional scaling plot (rRNA) similarly to MWT-treated biofilms of copper (but not PEX) pipes that instead showed higher species diversity (Shannon 4·8, P < 0·05 interaction). Minor chlorine dose addition increased selection pressure and many species were sensitive to chlorination. Pipe material seemed to affect mycobacteria occurrence, and bacterial communities with MWT in copper but not in PEX pipes. This study using rRNA showed that chlorination affects especially active fraction of bacterial communities. Copper and PEX differed by the occurrence of some bacterial members despite similar community profiles. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Identification and characterization of phenylacetonitrile as a nitrogenous disinfection byproduct derived from chlorination of phenylalanine in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Deng, Jing; Feng, Jiao; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Smiley, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-10-01

    Unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), originating from chlorination of the precursor amino acid phenylalanine in aqueous systems, were identified in laboratory reactions and distributed tap. The major N-DBP identified was phenylacetonitrile, and minor DBPs of benzyl chloride, phenylacetaldehyde, 2-chlorobenzyl cyanide, and 2, 6-diphenylpyridine were also formed. Phenylacetonitrile was generated through decarboxylation, dechlorination and/or hydrolysis processes. With an aromatic structure, phenylacetonitrile has an unpleasant odor of various descriptors and an odor threshold concentration of 0.2 ppt-v as measured through gas chromatography-olfactometry. The half-life of phenylacetonitrile in reagent water and chlorinated water at 19 °C were 121 h and 792 h, respectively. The occurrence of phenylacetonitrile as an N-DBP in tap water was investigated for the first time; the results revealed that μg/L concentrations were present in nine different distributed drinking waters in China and the United States. Phenylacetonitrile deteriorates the aesthetic quality of drinking water and may present risk due to its prolonged existence in drinking water, especially in the presence of residual chlorine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Disinfection of drinking water by ultraviolet light. Minimum dose and shortest time of residence are central criteria when choosing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-23

    It is no longer mandatory that a given residue of chlorine is present in drinking water and this has led to interest in the use of ultraviolet radiation for disinfection of water in large public waterworks. After a brief discussion of the effect of ultraviolet radiation related to wavelength, the most usual type of irradiation equipment is briefly described. Practioal considerations regarding the installation, such as attenuation of the radiation due to water quality and deposits are presented. The requirements as to dose and residence time are also discussed and finally it is pointed out that hydraulic imperfections can reduce the effectiveness drastically.

  15. A Summary of Publications on the Development of Mode-of-Action Information and Statistical Tools for Evaluating Health Outcomes from Drinking Water Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical contaminants are formed as a consequence of chemical disinfection of public drinking waters. Chemical disinfectants, which are used to kill harmful microorganisms, react with natural organic matter (NOM), bromide, iodide, and other compounds, forming complex mixtures...

  16. Evaluation of associations between lifetime exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products and bladder cancer in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Lorraine C; Coss, Angela M; Wolkin, Amy F; Flanders, W Dana; Reif, John S

    2008-06-01

    To assess the risk of bladder cancer in dogs from exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products and determine whether dogs could serve as sentinels for human bladder cancer associated with such exposures. Case-control study. 100 dogs with cancer of the urinary bladder and 100 control dogs. Case and control dogs were frequency-matched by age (within 2 years) and sex. Owners of dogs enrolled provided verbal informed consent and were interviewed by telephone. The telephone questionnaire included a complete residence history for each dog. Each dog's total exposure history to trihalomethanes was reconstructed from its residence history and corresponding drinking water utility company data. No association was detected between increasing years of exposure to chlorinated drinking water and risk of bladder cancer. Dogs with bladder cancer were exposed to higher total trihalomethanes concentrations than control dogs; however, the difference was not significant. Although humans and their dogs live in the same household, the activity patterns of dogs may lead to lower exposures to household tap water. Thus, although exposure to disinfection by-products in tap water may be a risk factor for human bladder cancer, this may not be true for canine bladder cancer at the concentrations at which dogs are exposed.

  17. Non-PRASA Drinking Water Research on UV Disinfection in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA and InterAmerican University of San German worked with water treatment operators from Patillas, Puerto Rico on the installation, training and testing of pretreatment/UV disinfection systems in the communities of La Sofia and Apeadero. This presentation provides path...

  18. Water disinfection agents and disinfection by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.; Kapusta, O.; Kunštek, M.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to describe factors of water quality change in the distribution network and legislative requirements in Slovakia for disinfectants and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In the experimental part, the time dependence of the application of the chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on the formation of some by-products of disinfection for drinking water from WTP Hriňová is studied. We monitored trihalomethanes, free chlorine, chlorine dioxide and chlorites.

  19. Glutathione-mediated detoxification of halobenzoquinone drinking water disinfection byproducts in T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Use of reflectors to enhance the synergistic effects of solar heating and solar wavelengths to disinfect drinking water sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijal, G.K. [Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, Cicero, Illinois (United States); Fujioka, R.S. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu (United States). Water Resources Research Center

    2004-07-01

    Aluminum reflectors were added to solar units designed to inactivate faecal microorganisms (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, FRNA coliphage, C. perfringens) in stream water and diluted sewage by the two mechanisms (solar heat, solar UV) known to inactivate microorganisms. During sunny conditions, solar units with and without reflectors inactivated E. coli to <1 CFU/100 ml to meet drinking water standards. Solar units with reflectors disinfected to the water sooner by increasing the water temperature by 8-10{sup o}C to 64-75{sup o}C. However, FRNA coliphages were still detected in these samples, indicating that this treatment may not inactivate pathogenic human enteric viruses. During cloudy conditions, reflectors only increased the water temperature by 3-4{sup o}C to a maximum of 43-49{sup o}C and E. coli was not completely inactivated. Under sunny and cloudy conditions, the UV wavelengths of sunlight worked synergistically with increasing water temperatures and were able to disinfect microorganisms at temperatures (45-56{sup o}C), which were not effective in inactivating microorganisms. Relative resistance to the solar disinfecting effects were C perfringens > FRNA coliphages > enterococci >E. coli > faecal coliform. (author)

  1. Improved Drinking Water Disinfection with UVC-LEDs for Escherichia Coli and Bacillus Subtilis Utilizing Quartz Tubes as Light Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is investigated utilizing light guidance capabilities of optical pure quartz glass in order to maximize drinking water disinfection efficiency with UVC-light-emitting diodes (LEDs. Two experimental setups consisting of soda-lime AR® glass (VWR, Darmstadt, Germany or HSQ® 100 quartz glass (Heraeus, Wasserburg, Germany reactors were designed to compare disinfection rates with and without total reflection of UVC radiation along the reactor walls. Each reactor was filled with 9 mL bacteria samples containing either E. coli DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen 498 or B. subtilis DSM 402 strains (concentration 1–3 × 106 colony forming units (CFU/mL with and without additional mixing and irradiation periods of 10, 40, and 90 s. Disinfection rates were increased up to 0.95 log10 (E. coli and 0.75 log10 (B. subtilis by the light guide approach in stagnant samples. The same experiments with mixing of the samples resulted in an increased disinfection efficiency of 3.07 log10 (E. coli and 1.59 log10 (B. subtilis. Optical calculations determine that total reflection is achieved with the applied UVC-LED’s viewing angle of 15°. Furthermore measurements show that HSQ® 100 quartz has a transmittance of 92% at 280 nm UVC irradiation compared to the transmittance of soda-lime glass of 2% (1 mm wall thickness.

  2. Electrochemical disinfection of coliform and Escherichia coli for drinking water treatment by electrolysis method using carbon as an electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto; Agustiningsih, W. A.

    2018-04-01

    Disinfection of coliform and E. Coli in water has been performed by electrolysis using carbon electrodes. Carbon electrodes were used as an anode and cathode with a purity of 98.31% based on SEM-EDS analysis. This study was conducted using electrolysis powered by electric field using carbon electrode as the anode and cathode. Electrolysis method was carried out using variations of time (30, 60, 90, 120 minutes at a voltage of 5 V) and voltage (5, 10, 15, 20 V for 30 minutes) to determine the effect of the disinfection of the bacteria. The results showed the number of coliform and E. coli in water before and after electrolysis was 190 and 22 MPN/100 mL, respectively. The standards quality of drinking water No. 492/Menkes/Per/IV/2010 requires the zero content of coliform and E. Coli. Electrolysis with the variation of time and potential can reduce the number of coliforms and E. Coli but was not in accordance with the standards. The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to the electrochemical disinfection was determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The levels of H2O2 formed increased as soon after the duration of electrolysis voltage but was not a significant influence to the mortality of coliform and E.coli.

  3. Frequency of use controls chemical leaching from drinking-water containers subject to disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Shine, James P

    2011-12-15

    Microbial-, and chemical-based burden of disease associated with lack of access to safe water continues to primarily impact developing countries. Cost-effective health risk-mitigating measures, such as of solar disinfection applied to microbial-contaminated water stored in plastic bottles have been increasingly tested in developing countries adversely impacted by epidemic water-borne diseases. Public health concerns associated with chemical leaching from water packaging materials led us to investigate the magnitude and variability of antimony (Sb) and bromine (Br) leaching from reused plastic containers (polyethylene terephthalate, PET; and polycarbonate, PC) subject to UV and/or temperature-driven disinfection. The overall objective of this study was to determine the main and interactive effects of temperature, UV exposure duration, and frequency of bottle reuse on the extent of leaching of Sb and Br from plastic bottles into water. Regardless of UV exposure duration, frequency of reuse (up to 27 times) was the major factor that linearly increased Sb leaching from PET bottles at all temperatures tested (13-47 °C). Leached Sb concentrations (∼360 ng L(-1)) from the highly reused (27 times) PET bottles (minimal Sb leaching from PC bottles, water at much lower concentrations. Additional research on potential leaching of organic chemicals from water packaging materials is deemed necessary under relevant environmental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyto- and genotoxic profile of groundwater used as drinking water supply before and after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellacani, C; Cassoni, F; Bocchi, C; Martino, A; Pinto, G; Fontana, F; Furlini, M; Buschini, A

    2016-12-01

    The assessment of the toxicological properties of raw groundwater may be useful to predict the type and quality of tap water. Contaminants in groundwater are known to be able to affect the disinfection process, resulting in the formation of substances that are cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Though the European directive (98/83/EC, which establishes maximum levels for contaminants in raw water (RW)) provides threshold levels for acute exposure to toxic compounds, the law does not take into account chronic exposure at low doses of pollutants present in complex mixture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cyto- and genotoxic load in the groundwater of two water treatment plants in Northern Italy. Water samples induced cytotoxic effects, mainly observed when human cells were treated with RW. Moreover, results indicated that the disinfection process reduced cell toxicity, independent of the biocidal used. The induction of genotoxic effects was found, in particular, when the micronucleus assay was carried out on raw groundwater. These results suggest that it is important to include bio-toxicological assays as additional parameters in water quality monitoring programs, as their use would allow the evaluation of the potential risk of groundwater for humans.

  5. Balancing the risks and benefits of drinking water disinfection: disability adjusted life-years on the scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelaar, A H; De Hollander, A E; Teunis, P F; Evers, E G; Van Kranen, H J; Versteegh, J F; Van Koten, J E; Slob, W

    2000-04-01

    To evaluate the applicability of disability adjusted life-years (DALYs) as a measure to compare positive and negative health effects of drinking water disinfection, we conducted a case study involving a hypothetical drinking water supply from surface water. This drinking water supply is typical in The Netherlands. We compared the reduction of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium parvum by ozonation of water to the concomitant increase in risk of renal cell cancer arising from the production of bromate. We applied clinical, epidemiologic, and toxicologic data on morbidity and mortality to calculate the net health benefit in DALYs. We estimated the median risk of infection with C. parvum as 10(-3)/person-year. Ozonation reduces the median risk in the baseline approximately 7-fold, but bromate is produced in a concentration above current guideline levels. However, the health benefits of preventing gastroenteritis in the general population and premature death in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome outweigh health losses by premature death from renal cell cancer by a factor of > 10. The net benefit is approximately 1 DALY/million person-years. The application of DALYs in principle allows us to more explicitly compare the public health risks and benefits of different management options. In practice, the application of DALYs may be hampered by the substantial degree of uncertainty, as is typical for risk assessment.

  6. Solar Radiation Disinfection of Drinking Water at Temperate Latitudes: Inactivation rates for an optimized reactor configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34°S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1 x 10...

  7. Models for estimation of the presence of non-regulated disinfection by-products in small drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2017-10-23

    Among all the organic disinfection by-products (DBPs), only trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are regulated in drinking water, while most DBPs are not. Very little information exists on the occurrence of non-regulated DBPs, particularly in small water systems (SWS). Paradoxically, SWS are more vulnerable to DBPs because of a low capacity to implement adequate treatment technologies to remove DBP precursors. Since DBP analyses are expensive, usually SWS have difficulties to implement a rigorous characterization of these contaminants. The purpose of this study was to estimate non-regulated DBP levels in SWS from easy measurements of relevant parameters regularly monitored. Since no information on non-regulated DBPs in SWS was available, a sampling program was carried out in 25 SWS in two provinces of Canada. Five DBP families were investigated: THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs), halonitromethanes (HNMs), and haloketones (HKs). Multivariate linear mixed regression models were developed to estimate HAN, HK, and HNM levels from water quality characteristics in the water treatment plant, concentrations of regulated DBPs, and residual disinfectant levels. The models obtained have a good explanatory capacity since R 2 varies from 0.77 to 0.91 according to compounds and conditions for application (season and type of treatment). Model validation with an independent database suggested their ability for generalization in similar SWS in North America.

  8. Disinfection byproduct formation in reverse-osmosis concentrated and lyophilized natural organic matter from a drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Jonathan G; McCurry, Daniel L; Parvez, Shahid; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F

    2012-10-15

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking water research has been limited because the selected NOM sources are atypical of most drinking water sources. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that reconstituted NOM from a lyophilized reverse-osmosis (RO) concentrate of a typical drinking water source closely represents DBP formation in the original NOM. A preliminary experiment assessed DBP formation kinetics and yields in concentrated NOM, which demonstrated that chlorine decays faster in concentrate, in some cases leading to altered DBP speciation. Potential changes in NOM reactivity caused by lyophilization were evaluated by chlorination of lyophilized and reconstituted NOM, its parent RO concentrate, and the source water. Bromide lost during RO concentration was replaced by adding potassium bromide prior to chlorination. Although total measured DBP formation tended to decrease slightly and unidentified halogenated organic formation tended to increase slightly as a result of RO concentration, the changes associated with lyophilization were minor. In lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to source water TOC levels and then chlorinated, the concentrations of 19 of 21 measured DBPs, constituting 96% of the total identified DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the chlorinated source water. Furthermore, the concentrations of 16 of 21 DBPs in lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to the RO concentrate TOC levels, constituting 86% DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the RO concentrate. This study suggests that lyophilization can be used to preserve concentrated NOM without substantially altering the precursors to DBP formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Genotoxicity of a Low-Dose Nitrosamine Mixture as Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in NIH3T3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Qin, Ming; Dong, Lei; Lv, Jia-Ying; Wang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    N - nitrosamines (NAms), which can arise as byproducts of disinfection agents, are reportedly found in drinking water, and their potential carcinogenicity is a concern; however, little research exists regarding the genotoxicity or carcinogenicity of NAms exposure as a low-dose mixture. The three most common NAms components in China's drinking water are N -nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N -nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N -nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA). Thus, we measured the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of these compounds and measured the cell cycle and gene expression. The data show that exposure to the NAms-mixture doubled the revertants in the TA98 and TA100 S. typhimurium strains and increased the DNA double-strand breaks and the micronuclear frequency in the NIH3T3 cells compared to a single exposure. After long-term NAms mixture exposure, a malignant transformation of NIH3T3 and a significantly increased G2/M distribution were observed. Furthermore, P53, CDK1, P38, CDC25A and CyclinB expressions were down-regulated in the NAms-mixture exposure group; however, P21 and GADD45A genes were up-regulated. Interestingly, the CHK1/CHK2 and CDC25A genes had two responses, depending on the NAms concentrations. Thus, we observed mutagenic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects after a low-dose NAms-mixture exposure in drinking water, and DNA repair and apoptosis pathways may contribute to these adverse effects.

  10. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO2 photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In this study the potential application of TiO 2 photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  11. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Luigi, E-mail: l.rizzo@unisa.it [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    In this study the potential application of TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  12. Silver Nanoparticles (AgNP impregnated filters in drinking water disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rus Alexandru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how simple portable devices could eliminate water pathogens by using Silver Nanoparticles, based on their antimicrobial properties. Recent studies indicated that silver nanoparticles can achieve up to 100% antibacterial activity removal. Results are showing that Silver Nanoparticles retention in the filter structure, E. coli bacteria removal, water quality and water flow rate must be evaluated as main efficiency indicators of the designed filters, in order to obtain the optimal filter. To apply the antimicrobial property of Silver in drinking-water treatment, a filter is produced using Additive Manufacturing techniques and coated with different concentrations of silver solutions.

  13. Differences in influence patterns between groups predicting the adoption of a solar disinfection technology for drinking water in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Stephanie; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2008-08-01

    The lack of safe drinking water is one of the major problems faced by developing countries. The consequences of contaminated water are diseases such as diarrhea, one of the main causes of infant mortality. Because of its simplicity, solar water-disinfection technology provides a good way of treating water at the household level. Despite its obvious advantages and considerable promotional activities, this innovation has had rather a slow uptake. We conducted a field survey in which 644 households in Bolivia were interviewed in order to gain insights on motivations that resulted in adopting the technology. The aim was to examine possible differences in the predictors for adopting this technology during the diffusion process using the theory of innovation diffusion. Our findings indicate that early adoption was predicted by increased involvement in the topic of drinking water and that adoption in the middle of the diffusion process was predicted by increased involvement by opinion leaders and by recognition of a majority who supported the technology. Finally, late adoption was predicted by recognition that a majority had already adopted. Suggestions for future promotional strategies are outlined.

  14. Removal of soluble microbial products as the precursors of disinfection by-products in drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Water pollution worsens the problem of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water supply. Biodegradation of wastewater organics produces soluble microbial products (SMPs), which can be important DBP precursors. In this laboratory study, a number of enhanced water treatment methods for DBP control, including enhanced coagulation, ozonation, and activated carbon adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in treating SMP-containing water for the DBP reduction purpose. The results show that enhanced coagulation with alum could remove SMPs only marginally and decrease the DBP formation potential (DBPFP) of the water by less than 20%. Although ozone could cause destruction of SMPs in water, the overall DBPFP of the water did not decrease but increased after ozonation. In contrast, adsorption by granular activated carbon could remove the SMP organics from water by more than 60% and reduce the DBPFP by more than 70%. It is apparent that enhanced coagulation and ozonation are not suitable for the removal of SMPs as DBP precursors from polluted water, although enhanced coagulation has been commonly used to reduce the DBP formation caused by natural organic matter. In comparison, activated carbon adsorption is shown as a more effective means to remove the SMP content from water and hence to control the wastewater-derived DBP problem in water supply.

  15. Quality assessment of Egyptian drinking water supplies and disinfecting using ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karem, H.A.; Hassan, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Drinking water, surface and underground water were microbiological and chemical analyzed during storage in covered and uncovered tanks for four months. Microbiological analyses were carried out to determine the microbial indicators namely, Total bacterial counts, total coliform, E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Clostridium perfringens. Drinking water of Amiria municipal water station was microbiologically safe after storage in covered tanks however, in uncovered tanks the total bacterial counts increased gradually to reach 8 x 10 2 cfu/ml at the fourth month. With respect to underground water, all tested groups of microorganisms were attained high values except E. coli and E. faecalis counts were not detected. During storage the densities of total bacterial counts, total coliform and P. aeruginosa increased in both covered and uncovered tanks to reach at the fourth month 10 6 -10 7 , 58-68, 51-65 cfu/ml respectively. As to bottled water, samples of four companies producing it in Egypt were taken for analysis during the steps of production. Companies A, B and C were used underground water and company D used surface water. Results revealed that all companies were microbiologically unsatisfactory where final product still contained total bacterial counts, P. aeruginosa and C. perfringens exceeding the drinking water quality guideline values. An experiment was conducted to study the efficiency of uv radiation in reducing the densities of certain bacterial isolates inoculated in sterilized tap water. P. aeruginosa was the most sensitive bacteria followed by E. coli whereas E. faecalis and B. cereus were more resistant toward uv radiation. (author)

  16. Identification of developmentally toxic drinking water disinfection byproducts and evaluation of data relevant to mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, Joan; Rice, Glenn E.; Wright, J. Michael; Hunter, E. Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K.; Lipscomb, John C.; Hertzberg, Richard C.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Fransen, Margaret; Osier, Mark; Narotsky, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Reactions between chemicals used to disinfect drinking water and compounds present in source waters produce chemical mixtures containing hundreds of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although the results have been somewhat inconsistent, some epidemiological studies suggest associations may exist between DBP exposures and adverse developmental outcomes. The potencies of individual DBPs in rodent and rabbit developmental bioassays suggest that no individual DBP can account for the relative risk estimates reported in the positive epidemiologic studies, leading to the hypothesis that these outcomes could result from the toxicity of DBP mixtures. As a first step in a mixtures risk assessment for DBP developmental effects, this paper identifies developmentally toxic DBPs and examines data relevant to the mode of action (MOA) for DBP developmental toxicity. We identified 24 developmentally toxic DBPs and four adverse developmental outcomes associated with human DBP exposures: spontaneous abortion, cardiovascular defects, neural tube defects, and low birth weight infancy. A plausible MOA, involving hormonal disruption of pregnancy, is delineated for spontaneous abortion, which some epidemiologic studies associate with total trihalomethane and bromodichloromethane exposures. The DBP data for the other three outcomes were inadequate to define key MOA steps.

  17. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudey, Steve E; Backer, Lorraine C; Humpage, Andrew R; Krasner, Stuart W; Michaud, Dominique S; Moore, Lee E; Singer, Philip C; Stanford, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches.

  18. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Humpage, Andrew R.; Krasner, Stuart W.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Moore, Lee E.; Singer, Philip C.; Stanford, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  19. Drinking-Water Disinfection By-products and Semen Quality: A Cross-Sectional Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yong-Zhe; Li, Min; Yue, Jing; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been demonstrated to impair male reproductive health in animals, but human evidence is limited and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to drinking-water DBPs and semen quality in a Chinese population. Methods: We recruited 2,009 men seeking semen analysis from the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, between April 2011 and May 2012. Each man provided a semen sample and a urine sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm count. As a biomarker of exposure to drinking-water DBPs, trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was measured in the urine samples. Results: The mean (median) urinary TCAA concentration was 9.58 (7.97) μg/L (interquartile range, 6.01–10.96 μg/L). Compared with men with urine TCAA in the lowest quartile, increased adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated for below-reference sperm concentration in men with TCAA in the second and fourth quartiles (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.69 and OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.31, respectively), for below-reference sperm motility in men with TCAA in the second and third quartiles (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.90 and OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.70, respectively), and for below-reference sperm count in men with TCAA in the second quartile (OR 1.62; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.55). Nonmonotonic associations with TCAA quartiles were also estimated for semen parameters modeled as continuous outcomes, although significant negative associations were estimated for all quartiles above the reference level for sperm motility. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that exposure to drinking-water DBPs may contribute to decreased semen quality in humans. Citation: Zeng Q, Wang YX, Xie SH, Xu L, Chen YZ, Li M, Yue J, Li YF, Liu AL, Lu WQ. 2014. Drinking-water disinfection by-products and semen quality: a cross-sectional study in China. Environ Health Perspect 122:741–746; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  20. Limnoithona sinensis as refuge for bacteria: protection from UV radiation and chlorine disinfection in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Cai, Bo; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we tested the potential of Limnoithona sinensis to provide its attached bacteria refuge against disinfection. The experimental results indicated that in water devoid of zooplankton, both UV radiation and chlorine disinfection significantly decreased the viability of free-living bacteria. In the presence of L. sinensis, however, the attached bacteria could survive and rapidly recover from disinfection. This demonstrated that L. sinensis provided protection from external damage to various aquatic bacteria that were attached to its body. The surviving bacteria remained on L. sinensis after disinfection exposure, which enabled a rapid increase in the bacterial population followed by their subsequent release into the surrounding water. Compared with UV radiation, chlorine disinfection was more effective in terms of inactivating attached bacteria. Both UV radiation and chlorine disinfection had little effect in terms of preventing the spread of undesirable bacteria, due to the incomplete inactivation of the bacteria associated with L. sinensis.

  1. UV disinfection and flocculation-chlorination sachets to reduce hepatitis E virus in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Latorre, Laura; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Sommer, Regina; Rosina, Girones

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) is a major cause of waterborne outbreaks in areas with poor sanitation. As safe water supplies are the keystone for preventing HEV outbreaks, data on the efficacy of disinfection treatments are urgently needed. Here, we evaluated the ability of UV radiation and flocculation-chlorination sachets (FCSs) to reduce HEV in water matrices. The HEV-p6-kernow strain was replicated in the HepG2/C3A cell line, and we quantified genome number using qRT-PCR and infectivity using an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). UV irradiation tests using low-pressure radiation showed inactivation kinetics for HEV of 99.99% with a UV fluence of 232J/m(2) (IC 95%, 195,02-269,18). Moreover, the FCSs preparations significantly reduced viral concentrations in both water matrices, although the inactivation results were under the baseline of reduction (4.5 LRV) proposed by WHO guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Disinfection byproduct formation in drinking water sources: A case study of Yuqiao reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongyan; He, Xizhen; Zhang, Yan; Du, Tingting; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Li, Yao

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the potential formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination and chloramination of 20 water samples collected from different points of Yuqiao reservoir in Tianjin, China. The concentrations of dissolved organic matter and ammonia decreased downstream the reservoir, while the specific UV absorbance (SUVA: the ratio of UV 254 to dissolved organic carbon) increased [from 0.67 L/(mg*m) upstream to 3.58 L/(mg*m) downstream]. The raw water quality played an important role in the formation of DBPs. During chlorination, haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the major DBPs formed in most of the water samples, followed by trihalomethanes (THMs). CHCl 3 and CHCl 2 Br were the major THM species, while trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) were the major HAA species. Chloramination, on the other hand, generally resulted in lower concentrations of THMs (CHCl 3 ), HAAs (TCAA and DCAA), and haloacetonitriles (HANs). All the species of DBPs formed had positive correlations with the SUVA values, and HANs had the highest one (R 2  = 0.8). The correlation coefficients between the analogous DBP yields and the SUVA values in chlorinated samples were close to those in chloraminated samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of electrochemical method with ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination in drinking water disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongna, E-mail: lihongna@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu Xiuping [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China); Ni Jinren, E-mail: nijinren@iee.pku.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > Electrochemical, O{sub 3}, NaClO and NH{sub 2}Cl were compared at respective optimal condition. > Disinfection efficacy was similar for different bacteria in electrolysis. > Harsh Bacillus was inactivated more difficult in O{sub 3}, NaClO and NH{sub 2}Cl system. > Efficient disinfection of electrolysis was attributed to nonselectivity of {center_dot}OH. > Cell surface damage was more obvious in electrochemical process than the others. - Abstract: Electrochemical process in chloride-free electrolytes was proved to be powerful in disinfection due to the strong oxidants produced in the electrolysis and no formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this study, disinfection experiments were conducted by electrochemical treatment compared with ordinary and advanced methods (ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination), with Escherichia coli (E. coli) K-12, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) A106, Bacillus subtilis (BST) and an isolated Bacillus as the representative microorganisms. Firstly, factor tests were performed on E. coli to obtain the optimal conditions of the four disinfection procedures. At their respective optimal condition, CT (concentration of disinfectant x contact time) value of a 4-log E. coli inactivation was 33.5, 1440, 1575, 1674 mg min L{sup -1} for electrochemical process, ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination, respectively. It was demonstrated that the disinfection availability was in the following order: electrochemical process > ozonation > chlorination > monochloramination, which could be attributed to the hydroxyl radical generated in the electrolysis, with strong oxidizing ability and non-selectivity compared with the other three disinfectants. Moreover, the disinfection efficacy of the four disinfection procedures was compared for four different bacteria. It was found that the disinfection efficacy was similar for the selected four bacteria in electrochemical process, while in the other three treatments

  4. Comparison of electrochemical method with ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination in drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongna; Zhu Xiuping; Ni Jinren

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Electrochemical, O 3 , NaClO and NH 2 Cl were compared at respective optimal condition. → Disinfection efficacy was similar for different bacteria in electrolysis. → Harsh Bacillus was inactivated more difficult in O 3 , NaClO and NH 2 Cl system. → Efficient disinfection of electrolysis was attributed to nonselectivity of ·OH. → Cell surface damage was more obvious in electrochemical process than the others. - Abstract: Electrochemical process in chloride-free electrolytes was proved to be powerful in disinfection due to the strong oxidants produced in the electrolysis and no formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this study, disinfection experiments were conducted by electrochemical treatment compared with ordinary and advanced methods (ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination), with Escherichia coli (E. coli) K-12, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) A106, Bacillus subtilis (BST) and an isolated Bacillus as the representative microorganisms. Firstly, factor tests were performed on E. coli to obtain the optimal conditions of the four disinfection procedures. At their respective optimal condition, CT (concentration of disinfectant x contact time) value of a 4-log E. coli inactivation was 33.5, 1440, 1575, 1674 mg min L -1 for electrochemical process, ozonation, chlorination and monochloramination, respectively. It was demonstrated that the disinfection availability was in the following order: electrochemical process > ozonation > chlorination > monochloramination, which could be attributed to the hydroxyl radical generated in the electrolysis, with strong oxidizing ability and non-selectivity compared with the other three disinfectants. Moreover, the disinfection efficacy of the four disinfection procedures was compared for four different bacteria. It was found that the disinfection efficacy was similar for the selected four bacteria in electrochemical process, while in the other three treatments inactivation of the two

  5. Batch solar disinfection inactivates oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum and cysts of Giardia muris in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, K G; Méndez-Hermida, F; Castro-Hermida, J A; Ares-Mazás, E; Kehoe, S C; Boyle, M; Sichel, C; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Meyer, B P; Ramalingham, S; Meyer, E A

    2006-08-01

    To determine whether batch solar disinfection (SODIS) can be used to inactivate oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum and cysts of Giardia muris in experimentally contaminated water. Suspensions of oocysts and cysts were exposed to simulated global solar irradiation of 830 W m(-2) for different exposure times at a constant temperature of 40 degrees C. Infectivity tests were carried out using CD-1 suckling mice in the Cryptosporidium experiments and newly weaned CD-1 mice in the Giardia experiments. Exposure times of > or =10 h (total optical dose c. 30 kJ) rendered C. parvum oocysts noninfective. Giardia muris cysts were rendered completely noninfective within 4 h (total optical dose >12 kJ). Scanning electron microscopy and viability (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole/propidium iodide fluorogenic dyes and excystation) studies on oocysts of C. parvum suggest that inactivation is caused by damage to the oocyst wall. Results show that cysts of G. muris and oocysts of C. parvum are rendered completely noninfective after batch SODIS exposures of 4 and 10 h (respectively) and is also likely to be effective against waterborne cysts of Giardia lamblia. These results demonstrate that SODIS is an appropriate household water treatment technology for use as an emergency intervention in aftermath of natural or man-made disasters against not only bacterial but also protozoan pathogens.

  6. Drinking Water Disinfection By-products, Genetic Polymorphisms, and Birth Outcomes in a European Mother-Child Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Bustamante, Mariona; Gracia-Lavedán, Esther; Ballester, Ferran; Cordier, Sylvaine; Costet, Nathalie; Espinosa, Ana; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Danileviciute, Asta; Ibarluzea, Jesus; Karadanelli, Maria; Krasner, Stuart; Patelarou, Evridiki; Stephanou, Euripides; Tardón, Adonina; Toledano, Mireille B; Wright, John; Villanueva, Cristina M; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We examined the association between exposure during pregnancy to trihalomethanes, the most common water disinfection by-products, and birth outcomes in a European cohort study (Health Impacts of Long-Term Exposure to Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water). We took into account exposure through different water uses, measures of water toxicity, and genetic susceptibility. We enrolled 14,005 mothers (2002-2010) and their children from France, Greece, Lithuania, Spain, and the UK. Information on lifestyle- and water-related activities was recorded. We ascertained residential concentrations of trihalomethanes through regulatory records and ad hoc sampling campaigns and estimated route-specific trihalomethane uptake by trimester and for whole pregnancy. We examined single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants in disinfection by-product metabolizing genes in nested case-control studies. Average levels of trihalomethanes ranged from around 10 μg/L to above the regulatory limits in the EU of 100 μg/L between centers. There was no association between birth weight and total trihalomethane exposure during pregnancy (β = 2.2 g in birth weight per 10 μg/L of trihalomethane, 95% confidence interval = 3.3, 7.6). Birth weight was not associated with exposure through different routes or with specific trihalomethane species. Exposure to trihalomethanes was not associated with low birth weight (odds ratio [OR] per 10 μg/L = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.95, 1.10), small-for-gestational age (OR = 0.99, 0.94, 1.03) and preterm births (OR = 0.98, 0.9, 1.05). We found no gene-environment interactions for mother or child polymorphisms in relation to preterm birth or small-for-gestational age. In this large European study, we found no association between birth outcomes and trihalomethane exposures during pregnancy in the total population or in potentially genetically susceptible subgroups. (See video abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B104.).

  7. Disinfection byproduct formation during biofiltration cycle: Implications for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatolla, R; Séguin, C; Springthorpe, S; Gorman, E; Campbell, A; Douglas, I

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of biofiltration to reduce the formation potential of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Particularly, the work investigates the effect of the duration of the filter cycle on the formation potential of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and five species of haloacetic acids (HAA5), dissolved oxygen (DO), organic carbon, nitrogen and total phosphorous concentrations along with biofilm coverage of the filter media and biomass viability of the attached cells. The study was conducted on a full-scale biologically active filter, with anthracite and sand media, at the Britannia water treatment plant (WTP), located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The formation potential of both TTHMs and HAA5s decreased due to biofiltration. However the lowest formation potentials for both groups of DBPs and or their precursors were observed immediately following a backwash event. Hence, the highest percent removal of DBPs was observed during the early stages of the biofiltration cycle, which suggests that a higher frequency of backwashing will reduce the formation of DBPs. Variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM) analysis shows that biofilm coverage of anthracite and sand media increases as the filtration cycle progressed, while biomass viability analysis demonstrates that the percentage of cells attached to the anthracite and sand media also increases as the filtration cycle progresses. These results suggest that the development and growth of biofilm on the filters increases the DPB formation potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Drinking Water Disinfectant Byproducts Compliance Data as an Indirect Measure for Short-Term Exposure in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Shahid; Frost, Kali; Sundararajan, Madhura

    2017-05-20

    In the absence of shorter term disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) data on regulated Trihalomethanes (THMs) and Haloacetic acids (HAAs), epidemiologists and risk assessors have used long-term annual compliance (LRAA) or quarterly (QA) data to evaluate the association between DBP exposure and adverse birth outcomes, which resulted in inconclusive findings. Therefore, we evaluated the reliability of using long-term LRAA and QA data as an indirect measure for short-term exposure. Short-term residential tap water samples were collected in peak DBP months (May-August) in a community water system with five separate treatment stations and were sourced from surface or groundwater. Samples were analyzed for THMs and HAAs per the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) standard methods (524.2 and 552.2). The measured levels of total THMs and HAAs were compared temporally and spatially with LRAA and QA data, which showed significant differences ( p water stations showed higher levels than LRAA or QA. Significant numbers of samples in surface water stations exceeded regulatory permissible limits: 27% had excessive THMs and 35% had excessive HAAs. Trichloromethane, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid were the major drivers of variability. This study suggests that LRAA and QA data are not good proxies of short-term exposure. Further investigation is needed to determine if other drinking water systems show consistent findings for improved regulation.

  9. Evaluation of the efficiency of the photo Fenton disinfection of natural drinking water source during the rainy season in the Sahelian region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndounla, J.; Pulgarin, C.

    2014-01-01

    abstract: Photo-Fenton and direct solar Light inactivation of enteric bacteria content of natural wells water (25 L) in a compound parabolic collector (CPC) solar reactor. - Highlights: • Evaluation of photo-Fenton disinfection of water during the raining season • Treating 25 L of natural well water in a CPC solar reactor at field scale • Evolution of physico-chemical parameters during the photo-disinfection treatment • Effect of the dry or rainy season on photo-Fenton disinfection of drinking water

  10. Evaluation of the efficiency of the photo Fenton disinfection of natural drinking water source during the rainy season in the Sahelian region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndounla, J., E-mail: juliette.ndounla@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering GPAO, Station 6, CH 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Institut International d' Ingénierie de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Laboratoire Eau, Dépollution, Ecosystème et Santé (LEDES), 01 BP 594 Ouagadougou 01 (Burkina Faso); Pulgarin, C., E-mail: Cesar.pulgarin@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering GPAO, Station 6, CH 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    ammonia. - Graphical abstract: Photo-Fenton and direct solar Light inactivation of enteric bacteria content of natural wells water (25 L) in a compound parabolic collector (CPC) solar reactor. - Highlights: • Evaluation of photo-Fenton disinfection of water during the raining season • Treating 25 L of natural well water in a CPC solar reactor at field scale • Evolution of physico-chemical parameters during the photo-disinfection treatment • Effect of the dry or rainy season on photo-Fenton disinfection of drinking water.

  11. Spatial variations in the occurrence of potentially genotoxic disinfection by-products in drinking water distribution systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Donghong; Xu, Xiong; Xu, Meijia; Wang, Zijian

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) with genotoxic potential in plant effluent and distribution water samples from four drinking water treatment plants in two Chinese cities using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tested the samples for 37 DBPs with genotoxic potential, which we had previously identified and prioritized in water under controlled laboratory conditions. Thirty of these DBPs were found in the water samples at detection frequencies of between 10% and 100%, and at concentrations between 3.90 and 1.77 × 10 3  ng/L. Of the DBPs detected, the concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloropropan-2-one were highest, and ranged from 299 to 1.77 × 10 3  ng/L with an average of 796 ng/L. The concentrations of 6-chloro-2-N-propan-2-yl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 2,6-ditert-butylcyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione were also much higher, and ranged from 107 to 721 ng/L, and from 152 to 504 ng/L, respectively. Concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloropropan-2-one, 2-chloro-1-phenylethanone, 2,2-dichloro-1-phenylethanone and 6-chloro-2-N-propan-2-yl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine were highest at or near the treatment plants and decreased with increasing distance from the plants. Patterns in the concentrations of benzaldehyde, 2-phenylpropan-2-ol, and 1-methylnaphthalene differed between plants. The levels of DBPs such as 4-ethylbenzaldehyde, (E)-non-2-enal, and 1-phenylethanone were relatively constant within the distribution systems, even at the furthest sampling points (20 km drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water and Evaluation of Potential Health Risks of Long-Term Exposure in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Nsikak U; Akintokun, Oyeronke A; Adedapo, Adebusayo E

    2017-01-01

    Levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water from water treatment plants (WTPs) in Nigeria were studied using a gas chromatograph (GC Agilent 7890A with autosampler Agilent 7683B) equipped with electron capture detector (ECD). The mean concentrations of the trihalomethanes ranged from zero in raw water samples to 950  μ g/L in treated water samples. Average concentration values of THMs in primary and secondary disinfection samples exceeded the standard maximum contaminant levels. Results for the average THMs concentrations followed the order TCM > BDCM > DBCM > TBM. EPA-developed models were adopted for the estimation of chronic daily intakes (CDI) and excess cancer incidence through ingestion pathway. Higher average intake was observed in adults (4.52 × 10 -2  mg/kg-day), while the ingestion in children (3.99 × 10 -2  mg/kg-day) showed comparable values. The total lifetime cancer incidence rate was relatively higher in adults than children with median values 244 and 199 times the negligible risk level.

  13. Fingerprinting the reactive toxicity pathways of 50 drinking water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Daniel; O'Malley, Elissa; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-03-15

    A set of nine in vitro cellular bioassays indicative of different stages of the cellular toxicity pathway was applied to 50 disinfection by-products (DBPs) to obtain a better understanding of the commonalities and differences in the molecular mechanisms of reactive toxicity of DBPs. An Eschericia coli test battery revealed reactivity towards proteins/peptides for 64% of the compounds. 98% activated the NRf2-mediated oxidative stress response and 68% induced an adaptive stress response to genotoxic effects as indicated by the activation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. All DBPs reactive towards DNA in the E. coli assay and activating p53 also induced oxidative stress, confirming earlier studies that the latter could trigger DBP's carcinogenicity. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ELUMO as reactivity descriptor was linearly correlated with oxidative stress induction for trihalomethanes (r(2)=0.98) and haloacetamides (r(2)=0.58), indicating that potency of these DBPs is connected to electrophilicity. However, the descriptive power was poor for haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (r(2) (0.80, indicating that HAAs' potency is connected to both, electrophilicity and speciation. Based on the activation of oxidative stress response and the soft electrophilic character of most tested DBPs we hypothesize that indirect genotoxicity-e.g., through oxidative stress induction and/or enzyme inhibition-is more plausible than direct DNA damage for most investigated DBPs. The results provide not only a mechanistic understanding of the cellular effects of DBPs but the effect concentrations may also serve to evaluate mixture effects of DBPs in water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. UV drinking water disinfection with photovoltaic power supply. UV-Trinkwasserentkeimung mit photovoltaischer Stromversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharmer, K; Pappers, B; Guenner, C

    1990-06-01

    The study carried out on commission of the BMFT describes in the first three chapters UV disinfectation systems as well as experience gained from their use in industry and developing countries. In the chapter 4-7 special requirements for the use in developing countries are specified and compared to the results of other projects of the BMFT, GTZ and UNIDO. Chapter 5 gives a matrix of cost in which UV and chlorine disinfectation are compared to each other. In the final chapters 8 and 9 test programs and laboratory tests are described which are to serve as basis for planned field tests. (ORU).

  15. Effect of Hypochlorite-Based Disinfectants on Inactivation of Murine Norovirus and Attempt to Eliminate or Prevent Infection in Mice by Additionto Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Taharaguchi, Motoko; Sakai, Koji; Takagi, Hirotaka; Tohya, Yukinobu; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) against murine norovirus (MNV) by plaque assay and compared the efficacy with diluted NaOCl (Purelox) and 70% ethanol. WAHS was as effective as 70% ethanol and diluted Purelox for 0.5-min reactions. For 0.5-min reactions in the presence of mouse feces emulsion, the efficacy of WHAS and 1:600 diluted Purelox was decreased, reducing the virus titers by 2.3 and 2.6 log10, respectively, while 70% ethanol reduced the titer by more than 5 log10. However, WAHS showed more than 5 log10 reductions for the 5-min reaction even in the presence of feces emulsion. Since WAHS showed enough efficacy in inactivating MNV in vitro, we tried to eliminate MNV from MNV-infected mice by substituting WAHS for their drinking water. However, MNV was found to be positive in feces of mice drinking WAHS by an RT-nested PCR and plaque assay. To investigate whether hypochlorite-based disinfectants could prevent infection of a mouse with MNV, WAHS or 1:6,000 diluted Purelox was substituted for the drinking water of mice for 2 or 4 weeks, and then the mice were placed in a cage with an MNV-infected mouse. The supply of disinfectants was continued after cohabitation, but MNV was detected in the feces of all the mice at 1 week after cohabitation. In this study, we tried to eliminate and prevent MNV infection from mice by supplying hypochlorite-based disinfectants as an easy and low-cost method. Unfortunately, drinking disinfectants was ineffective, so it is important to keep the facility environment clean by use of effective disinfectants. Also, animals introduced into facilities should be tested as MNV free by quarantine and periodically confirmed as MNV free by microbiological monitoring. PMID:23903059

  16. Understanding the Impacts and Meaning of Maintaining Detectable Disinfection Residuals in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Controlling Waterborne Pathogens, Disinfection Byproducts, Organic Chloramines, and Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    : EPA Region 6, in collaboration with the Office of Research and Development and Office of Water (OW) in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (LDHH), proposes a drinking water research project to understand how maintaining various drinking water...

  17. The study of chloroform levels during water disinfection by chlorination reference to health risk in drinking water of karachi (pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, H.A.; Khattak, I.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the levels of the chloroform formation during water disinfiction treatment by chlorination with the subsequent formation of by-products like trihalomethanes (THMs) are formed. These THMs in drinking water are found in the form of chloroform, bromodichloromethane, Chlorodibromomethane and bromoform. Out of these four compounds chloroform is the major culprit and Contribute 9.0% of the total THMs concentration (I). Therefore the present work was focused on the Estimation of levels of chloroform in the drinking water samples of Karachi city (Pakistan) by using Bootstrapping statistical technique with regards to the average cancer risk in the community. (author)

  18. Detection, formation and occurrence of 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Wang, Ying; Li, Aimin; Xu, Bin; Xian, Qiming; Shuang, Chendong; Shi, Peng; Zhou, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Recently, 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts (Cl- and Br-DBPs) were identified and quantified in simulated chlorinated drinking water by adopting product ion scan, precursor ion scan, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analyses using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-tqMS). The 13 new DBPs have been drawing increasing concern not only because they possess significantly higher growth inhibition, developmental toxicity, and chronic cytotoxicity than commonly known aliphatic DBPs, but also because they act as intermediate DBPs that can decompose to form the U.S. EPA regulated DBPs. In this study, through MS parameter optimization of the UPLC/ESI-tqMS MRM analysis, the instrument detection and quantitation limits of the 13 new DBPs were substantially lowered to 0.42-6.44 and 1.35-16.51 μg/L, respectively. The total levels of the 13 new DBPs formed in chlorination were much higher than those formed in chloramination within a contact time of 3 d. In chlorination, the 13 new DBPs formed quickly and decomposed rapidly, and their total concentration kept on decreasing with contact time. In chloramination, the levels of the dominant species (i.e., trihalo-phenols) firstly increased and then decreased with contact time, whereas the levels of the other new DBPs were relatively low and kept on increasing with contact time. An increasing of pH from 6.0 to 9.0 decreased the formation of the 13 new DBPs by 57.8% and 62.3% in chlorination and chloramination, respectively. Gallic acid was found to be present in various simulated and real source water samples and was demonstrated to be a precursor of the 13 new DBPs with elucidated formation pathways. Furthermore, 12 of the 13 new DBPs were detected in 16 tap water samples obtained from major cities in East China, at total levels from 9.5 to 329.8 ng/L. The concentrations of the new DBPs were higher in samples

  19. Pyruvate remediation of cell stress and genotoxicity induced by haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H; Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) > chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN 2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M.J.; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15–50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%). - Highlights: • Occurrence of 46 regulated and non-regulated DBPs through a DWTP was

  1. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M.J.; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.gallego@uco.es

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15–50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%). - Highlights: • Occurrence of 46 regulated and non-regulated DBPs through a DWTP was

  2. A novel combined solar pasteurizer/TiO2 continuous-flow reactor for decontamination and disinfection of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, José María; Durán, Antonio; Martín, Israel San; Acevedo, Alba María

    2017-02-01

    A new combined solar plant including an annular continuous-flow compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactor and a pasteurization system was designed, built, and tested for simultaneous drinking water disinfection and chemical decontamination. The plant did not use pumps and had no electricity costs. First, water continuously flowed through the CPC reactor and then entered the pasteurizer. The temperature and water flow from the plant effluent were controlled by a thermostatic valve located at the pasteurizer outlet that opened at 80 °C. The pasteurization process was simulated by studying the effect of heat treatment on the death kinetic parameters (D and z values) of Escherichia coli K12 (CECT 4624). 99.1% bacteria photo-inactivation was reached in the TiO 2 -CPC system (0.60 mg cm -2 TiO 2 ), and chemical decontamination in terms of antipyrine degradation increased with increasing residence time in the TiO 2 -CPC system, reaching 70% degradation. The generation of hydroxyl radicals (between 100 and 400 nmol L -1 ) was a key factor in the CPC system efficiency. Total thermal bacteria inactivation was attained after pasteurization in all cases. Chemical degradation and bacterial photo-inactivation in the TiO 2 -CPC system were improved with the addition of 150 mg L -1 of H 2 O 2 , which generated approximately 2000-2300 nmol L -1 of HO ● radicals. Finally, chemical degradation and bacterial photo-inactivation kinetic modelling in the annular CPC photoreactor were evaluated. The effect of the superficial liquid velocity on the overall rate constant was also studied. Both antipyrine degradation and E. coli photo-inactivation were found to be controlled by the catalyst surface reaction rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioanalytical assessment of adaptive stress responses in drinking water: A predictive tool to differentiate between micropollutants and disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Armelle; Feliers, Cedric; Lecarpentier, Caroline; Neale, Peta A; Schlichting, Rita; Thibert, Sylvie; Escher, Beate I

    2018-04-01

    Drinking water can contain low levels of micropollutants, as well as disinfection by-products (DBPs) that form from the reaction of disinfectants with organic and inorganic matter in water. Due to the complex mixture of trace chemicals in drinking water, targeted chemical analysis alone is not sufficient for monitoring. The current study aimed to apply in vitro bioassays indicative of adaptive stress responses to monitor the toxicological profiles and the formation of DBPs in three drinking water distribution systems in France. Bioanalysis was complemented with chemical analysis of forty DBPs. All water samples were active in the oxidative stress response assay, but only after considerable sample enrichment. As both micropollutants in source water and DBPs formed during treatment can contribute to the effect, the bioanalytical equivalent concentration (BEQ) approach was applied for the first time to determine the contribution of DBPs, with DBPs found to contribute between 17 and 58% of the oxidative stress response. Further, the BEQ approach was also used to assess the contribution of volatile DBPs to the observed effect, with detected volatile DBPs found to have only a minor contribution as compared to the measured effects of the non-volatile chemicals enriched by solid-phase extraction. The observed effects in the distribution systems were below any level of concern, quantifiable only at high enrichment and not different from bottled mineral water. Integrating bioanalytical tools and the BEQ mixture model for monitoring drinking water quality is an additional assurance that chemical monitoring is not overlooking any unknown chemicals or transformation products and can help to ensure chemically safe drinking water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Strontium Adsorption and Desorption Reactions in Model Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-04

    disinfected drinking water and the other with the same water with secondary chloramine disinfection . Flow...systems (DWDS). One system was maintained with chlorine- disinfected drinking water and the other with the same water with secondary chloramine... disinfectant concen- tration in drinking water can decrease during periods of stagnation, i.e., minimal to no water flow (Al-Jasser 2007). These

  5. CFD in drinking water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wols, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrodynamic processes largely determine the efficacy of drinking water treatment systems, in particular disinfection systems. A lack of understanding of the hydrodynamics has resulted in suboptimal designs of these systems. The formation of unwanted disinfection-by-products and the energy

  6. UV disinfection of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipperud, E.; Johansen; Myhrstad, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    UV radiation has been found to have advantages over chloration for the disinfection of water. New regulations for dietary conditions on Norwegian ships introduced in 1974 led to increased use of UV disinfection, and this has in the following years spread to waterworks. The present article is based on a study to determine possible limitation. The nature of the injuries to the microorganisms is first discussed, together with repair mechanisms. A table is given showing the energy required for 90 and 100 percent inactivation of a number of microorganisms. Some other factors affecting UV inactivation are briefly mentioned. (JIW)

  7. Solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS to reduce childhood diarrhoea in rural Bolivia: a cluster-randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mäusezahl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS is a low-cost, point-of-use water purification method that has been disseminated globally. Laboratory studies suggest that SODIS is highly efficacious in inactivating waterborne pathogens. Previous field studies provided limited evidence for its effectiveness in reducing diarrhoea.We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in 22 rural communities in Bolivia to evaluate the effect of SODIS in reducing diarrhoea among children under the age of 5 y. A local nongovernmental organisation conducted a standardised interactive SODIS-promotion campaign in 11 communities targeting households, communities, and primary schools. Mothers completed a daily child health diary for 1 y. Within the intervention arm 225 households (376 children were trained to expose water-filled polyethyleneteraphtalate bottles to sunlight. Eleven communities (200 households, 349 children served as a control. We recorded 166,971 person-days of observation during the trial representing 79.9% and 78.9% of the total possible person-days of child observation in intervention and control arms, respectively. Mean compliance with SODIS was 32.1%. The reported incidence rate of gastrointestinal illness in children in the intervention arm was 3.6 compared to 4.3 episodes/year at risk in the control arm. The relative rate of diarrhoea adjusted for intracluster correlation was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.59-1.12. The median length of diarrhoea was 3 d in both groups.Despite an extensive SODIS promotion campaign we found only moderate compliance with the intervention and no strong evidence for a substantive reduction in diarrhoea among children. These results suggest that there is a need for better evidence of how the well-established laboratory efficacy of this home-based water treatment method translates into field effectiveness under various cultural settings and intervention intensities. Further global promotion of SODIS for general use

  8. Use of reflectors to enhance the synergistic effects of solar heating and solar wavelengths to disinfect drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, G K; Fujioka, R S

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum reflectors were added to solar units designed to inactivate faecal microorganisms (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, FRNA coliphage, C. perfringens) in stream water and diluted sewage by the two mechanisms (solar heat, solar UV) known to inactivate microorganisms. During sunny conditions, solar units with and without reflectors inactivated E. coli to water standards. Solar units with reflectors disinfected the water sooner by increasing the water temperature by 8-10 degrees C to 64-75 degrees C. However, FRNA coliphages were still detected in these samples, indicating that this treatment may not inactivate pathogenic human enteric viruses. During cloudy conditions, reflectors only increased the water temperature by 3-4 degrees C to a maximum of 43-49 degrees C and E. coli was not completely inactivated. Under sunny and cloudy conditions, the UV wavelengths of sunlight worked synergistically with increasing water temperatures and were able to disinfect microorganisms at temperatures (45-56 degrees C), which were not effective in inactivating microorganisms. Relative resistance to the solar disinfecting effects were C. perfringens > FRNA coliphages > enterococci > E. coli > faecal coliform.

  9. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The determination of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) requires an understanding of how drinking waters come into contact with the human through multiple pathways. The most significant pathway is the ingestion of drinking water. However, ingestion can oc...

  10. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  11. SOLAIR disinfection of coliform bacteria in hand-drawn drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specifically UV-A and UV-B radiation) and oxygen (from atmospheric air) to damage, inactivate and / or kill the coliform bacteria found in contaminated water. It is a natural process (virtually self-purification) with no need to add any potentially hazardous ...

  12. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  13. Drinking water disinfection by-products during pregnancy and child neuropsychological development in the INMA Spanish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Cristina M; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Julvez, Jordi; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Lertxundi, Nerea; Ibarluzea, Jesús; Llop, Sabrina; Ballester, Ferran; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Tardón, Adonina; Vrijheid, Martine; Guxens, Mònica; Sunyer, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) constitute a complex mixture of prevalent chemicals in drinking water and there is evidence of neurotoxicity for some of them. We evaluated the association between estimates of DBP exposure during pregnancy and child neuropsychological outcomes at 1 and 4-5years of age. We conducted a population-based mother-child cohort study in Spain with recruitment at first trimester of gestation (INMA Project, 2003-2008). Neuropsychological development was measured at 1year of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and at 4-5years with the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities. Modeled tap water concentrations of trihalomethanes (THM) were combined with personal ingestion, showering and bathing habits to estimate exposure as ingestion uptake, all route (showering, bathing, ingestion) uptake (μg/day) and crude levels (μg/l) in the residence. Chloroform, brominated THMs (bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform) and total THMs (chloroform and brominated THMs) were analysed separately. Nine haloacetic acids levels were available in one of the areas. Linear regression was used to estimate associations in 1855 subjects adjusting for covariables. The median concentration of total THMs, chloroform, brominated THMs, total haloacetic acids, dichloroacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid were, respectively 30.3μg/L, 9.4μg/L, 11.6μg/L, 10.5μg/L, 2.7μg/L, and 3.1μg/L. The associations between THM exposure and neuropsychological outcomes were null, except for total and brominated THM uptake though all routes and the general cognitive score at 4-5years, with a decrease in -0.54 points (95%CI -1.03, -0.05) and -0.64 (95%CI -1.16, -0.12), respectively, for doubling total and brominated THM uptake. A positive association found between dichloroacetic acid and the mental score at 1year did not persist at 4-5years. Minor associations observed between DBP exposure during gestation and child neuropsychological development at 1year

  14. Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This encyclopedic entry deals with various aspects of microbiology as it relates to drinking water treatment. The use of microbial indicators for assessing fecal contamination is discussed as well as current national drinking water regulations (U.S. EPA) and guidelines proposed ...

  15. Alternative disinfectant in drinking water systems. The peracetic acid; Disinfettanti alternativi in potabilizzazione. L`acido peracetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragazzo, Patrizia; Navazio, Giancarlo [Padua, Univ. (Italy). Fac. di Ingegneria. Dipt. dei Processi Chimici dell`Ingegneria; Cavadore, Alberto [Solvay Interox, Rosignano (Italy); Babato, Ferdinando [Consorzio per l`Acquedotto del Basso Piave, S. Dona` di Piave (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    The need to use oxidation techniques in mains water systems, especially when treating surface water, has brought about a greater awareness as to the health risks associated to the presence of residual chemical compounds or disinfection by-products (DBP), which are commonly found in water supplies treated by means of traditional disinfectants (i.e. Cl{sub 2}, ClO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}Cl, O{sub 3}, etc.). As a consequence, legislative standards have had to define greater restrictions regarding their use. In the light of this situation, the authors have set out to examine the feasibility of employing peracetic acid (PAA), which features low production of DBPs, as an alternative disinfectant. Preliminary experimental tests have been carried out on water samples taken from several process points within a water treatment plant at the Basso Piave mains water system, located in Jesolo, near Venice in Italy. These samples were treated with batch PAA doses ranging from 1 to 5 ppm for a variety of different exposition periods, also with varying temperature, pH and water properties. These experiments made it possible to asses the decay kinetics of PAA as well as reduction of characteristic microbiological parameters in raw and treated incoming and outgoing water throughout the various stages of the treatment process. The results achieved during these tests appear to provide ample evidence regarding the possibilities of use for PAA (with medium dosage of 1.5 to 2 ppm, contact times from 30` to 60` and abatement up to 95 %), after having assessed its compatibility, especially in order to the increase of the assimilable organic carbon, with the characteristics of the plant and distribution network, by continuous reactors and pilot plants.

  16. N-nitrosamine formation by monochloramine, free chlorine, and peracetic acid disinfection with presence of amine precursors in drinking water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Danielle M; Wu, Qihua; Donovan, Ariel; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Jianmin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the formation of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosomethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine, N-Nitrosopiperidine, N-Nitrosopyrrolidine, N-Nitrosomorpholine, were systematically evaluated with respect to seven N-nitrosamine precursors (dimethylamine, trimethylamine, 3-(dimethylaminomethyl)indole, 4-dimethylaminoantipyrine, ethylmethylamine, diethylamine, dipropylamine) and three disinfectants (monochloramine, free chlorine, peracetic acid) under variable dosages, exposure times, and pH in a drinking water system. Without the presence of the seven selected N-nitrosamine precursors N-nitrosamine formation was not observed under any tested condition except very low levels of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine under some conditions. With selected N-nitrosamine precursors present N-nitrosamines formed at different levels under different conditions. The highest N-nitrosamine formation was NDMA with a maximum concentration of 1180 ng/L by monochloramine disinfection with precursors present; much lower levels of N-nitrosamines were formed by free chlorine disinfection; and no detectable level of N-nitrosamines were observed by peracetic acid disinfection except low level of N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine under some conditions. NDMA formation was not affected by pH while four other N-nitrosamine formations were slightly affected by sample pH tested between 7 and 9, with formation decreasing with increasing pH. Monochloramine exposure time study displayed fast formation of N-nitrosamines, largely formed in four hours of exposure and maximized after seven days. This was a systematic study on the N-nitrosamine formation with the seven major N-nitrosamine precursors presence and absence under different conditions, including peracetic acid disinfection which has not been studied elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of a behavior change campaign on household drinking water disinfection in the Lake Chad basin using the RANAS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, Jonathan; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-04-01

    Worldwide, an estimated 700 million people rely on unimproved drinking water sources; even more consume water that is not safe to drink. Inadequate drinking water quality constitutes a major risk factor for cholera and other diarrheal diseases around the globe, especially for young children in developing countries. Household water treatment and safe storage systems represent an intermediate solution for settings that lack infrastructure supplying safe drinking water. However, the correct and consistent usage of such treatment technologies rely almost exclusively on the consumer's behavior. This study targeted at evaluating effects of a behavior change campaign promoting the uptake of household drinking water chlorination in communities along the Chari and Logone rivers in Chad. The campaign was based on formative research using health psychological theory and targeted several behavioral factors identified as relevant. A total of 220 primary caregivers were interviewed concerning their household water treatment practices and mindset related to water treatment six months after the campaign. The Risks, Attitudes, Norms, Abilities, and Self-regulation (RANAS) model was used to structure the interviews as the RANAS approach had been used for designing the campaign. Results show significantly higher self-reported drinking water chlorination among participants of the intervention. Significant differences from a control group were identified regarding several behavioral factors. Mediation analysis revealed that the intervention positively affected participants' individual risk estimation for diarrheal disease, health knowledge, perceived efforts and benefits of water treatment, social support strategies, knowledge of how to perform chlorination, and perceived ability to do so. The campaign's effect on water treatment was mainly mediated through differences in health knowledge, changes in norms, and self-efficacy convictions. The findings imply that water treatment behavior

  18. Long-term spatial and temporal microbial community dynamics in a large-scale drinking water distribution system with multiple disinfectant regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Sarah; Pinto, Ameet; Sigudu, Makhosazana; du Preez, Hein; Ncube, Esper; Venter, Stephanus

    2018-08-01

    Long-term spatial-temporal investigations of microbial dynamics in full-scale drinking water distribution systems are scarce. These investigations can reveal the process, infrastructure, and environmental factors that influence the microbial community, offering opportunities to re-think microbial management in drinking water systems. Often, these insights are missed or are unreliable in short-term studies, which are impacted by stochastic variabilities inherent to large full-scale systems. In this two-year study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of the microbial community in a large, full scale South African drinking water distribution system that uses three successive disinfection strategies (i.e. chlorination, chloramination and hypochlorination). Monthly bulk water samples were collected from the outlet of the treatment plant and from 17 points in the distribution system spanning nearly 150 km and the bacterial community composition was characterised by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Like previous studies, Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria dominated the drinking water bacterial communities, with an increase in Betaproteobacteria post-chloramination. In contrast with previous reports, the observed richness, diversity, and evenness of the bacterial communities were higher in the winter months as opposed to the summer months in this study. In addition to temperature effects, the seasonal variations were also likely to be influenced by changes in average water age in the distribution system and corresponding changes in disinfectant residual concentrations. Spatial dynamics of the bacterial communities indicated distance decay, with bacterial communities becoming increasingly dissimilar with increasing distance between sampling locations. These spatial effects dampened the temporal changes in the bulk water community and were the dominant factor when considering the entire distribution system. However

  19. Compliance Determination for Inactivation Requirements of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations when a Public Water Systems Uses Dichlor and Trichlor for Primary Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memorandum has been developed to assist SDWA primacy agencies (EPA Regions, states and territories) when considering inactivation/disinfection compliance requirements for those water systems that choose to use Dichlor or Trichlor.

  20. A stepped wedge, cluster-randomized trial of a household UV-disinfection and safe storage drinking water intervention in rural Baja California Sur, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Joshua S; Reygadas, Fermin; Arnold, Benjamin F; Ray, Isha; Nelson, Kara; Colford, John M

    2013-08-01

    In collaboration with a local non-profit organization, this study evaluated the expansion of a program that promoted and installed Mesita Azul, an ultraviolet-disinfection system designed to treat household drinking water in rural Mexico. We conducted a 15-month, cluster-randomized stepped wedge trial by randomizing the order in which 24 communities (444 households) received the intervention. We measured primary outcomes (water contamination and diarrhea) during seven household visits. The intervention increased the percentage of households with access to treated and safely stored drinking water (23-62%), and reduced the percentage of households with Escherichia coli contaminated drinking water (risk difference (RD): -19% [95% CI: -27%, -14%]). No significant reduction in diarrhea was observed (RD: -0.1% [95% CI: -1.1%, 0.9%]). We conclude that household water quality improvements measured in this study justify future promotion of the Mesita Azul, and that future studies to measure its health impact would be valuable if conducted in populations with higher diarrhea prevalence.

  1. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  2. Biological Treatment of Water Disinfection Byproducts using ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major disinfection by-products (DBPs) from the chlorination process of drinking water include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acides (HAA5). THMs mainly consist of chloroform, and other harsh chemicals. Prolonged consumptions of drinking water containing high levels of THMs has been linked with diseases of the liver, kidneys, bladder, or central nervous system and may increase likelihood of cancer. A risk also exists for THMs exposure via inhalation while showering, bathing or washing clothes and dishes. Due to these risks, the U.S. EPA regulate THMs content in drinking water. This research investigates biological degradation of THM using chloroform as a model compound. The study aims to decrease possible risks of THMs through filtration. Throughout this year’s presentations, there is a common theme of health and safety concerns. UC researchers are working hard to clean water ways of naturally occurring contaminates as well as man-made toxins found in our waterways. The significance of these presentations translates into the promise of safer environments, and more importantly saved lives, as UC’s faculty continues to produce real-world solutions to problems threatening the world around us. A biotech process has been developed and demonstrated that effectively remove and treat volatile disinfection by-products from drinking water. The process strips low concentration disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes, that are formed during the chlori

  3. Application of effect-directed analysis to identify mutagenic nitrogenous disinfection by-products of advanced oxidation drinking water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vughs, D.; Baken, K.A.; Kolkman, A.; Martijn, A.J.; de Voogt, P.

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants in (drinking) water treatment. It is however known that medium pressure UV/H2O2 treatment may lead to mutagenicity in the Ames test, which is no longer present after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Many

  4. Photovoltaic powered ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes for sustainable point-of-use disinfection of drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Jagals, Paul; Stuetz, Richard

    2014-09-15

    For many decades, populations in rural and remote developing regions will be unable to access centralised piped potable water supplies, and indeed, decentralised options may be more sustainable. Accordingly, improved household point-of-use (POU) disinfection technologies are urgently needed. Compared to alternatives, ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection is very attractive because of its efficacy against all pathogen groups and minimal operational consumables. Though mercury arc lamp technology is very efficient, it requires frequent lamp replacement, involves a toxic heavy metal, and their quartz envelopes and sleeves are expensive, fragile and require regular cleaning. An emerging alternative is semiconductor-based units where UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) are powered by photovoltaics (PV). Our review charts the development of these two technologies, their current status, and challenges to their integration and POU application. It explores the themes of UV-C-LEDs, non-UV-C LED technology (e.g. UV-A, visible light, Advanced Oxidation), PV power supplies, PV/LED integration and POU suitability. While UV-C LED technology should mature in the next 10 years, research is also needed to address other unresolved barriers to in situ application as well as emerging research opportunities especially UV-A, photocatalyst/photosensitiser use and pulsed emission options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spiral-shaped reactor for water disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane; Ait-Djoudi, Fariza; Naceur, Wahib M.; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine-based processes are still widely used for water disinfection. The disinfection process for municipal water consumption is usually carried out in large tanks, specifically designed to verify several hydraulic and disinfection criteria

  6. Characteristics of water obtained by dewatering cyanobacteria-containing sludge formed during drinking water treatment, including C-, N-disinfection byproduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hangzhou; Pei, Haiyan; Jin, Yan; Xiao, Hongdi; Ma, Chunxia; Sun, Jiongming; Li, Hongmin

    2017-03-15

    This is the first study to systematically investigate the characteristics of the water obtained by dewatering cyanobacteria-containing sludge generated in the drinking water treatment plant, including formation of C- and N-disinfection by-products (DBPs). Results showed that this 'dewatering water' (DW) had different properties when the sludge was stored at different times. The content of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and microcystins (MCs) in the DW were low when the sludge was treated or disposed of within 4 days; correspondingly, the C-, N-DBP production was also low. However, due to the damage of algal cells to some extent, the DOM and MC levels increased significantly for storage time longer than 4 days; the production of C-, N-DBPs also increased. There were also obvious differences in the characteristics of the DW from sludges generated with different coagulant species. Due to the better protective effect of FeCl 3 and polymeric aluminium ferric chloride (PAFC) flocs, the DOM and MC levels and the production of C-, N-DBPs in the DW with FeCl 3 and PAFC coagulation were lower than those with AlCl 3 coagulation, even though the sludges were stored for the same amount of time. Furthermore, because of the formation of Al and Fe hydroxides, precipitated onto the surface of flocs, the soluble Al and Fe in the DW decreased with increased storage time, especially in the first four days. Overall, this study revealed the trends in variation of DW quality for cyanobacteria-containing sludges formed with different coagulants, then FeCl 3 and PAFC coagulants are recommended and sludge should be treated or disposed of within 4 days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The removal process of 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a new disinfection by-product, in drinking water treatment process and its toxicity on zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Dongju; Yu, Shilin; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The removal process of 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a new disinfection by-product (DBP) in conventional drinking water treatment plant (C-DWTP) and advanced DWTP (ADWTP) was studied with newly maximum formation potential (MFP) process. It was demonstrated that the advanced treatment displayed greater removal efficiency towards DCAcAm formation potential (MFP) than the conventional treatment. The hydrophilic natural organic matter and natural organic matter with molecular weight 10 kDa leaded to more DCAcAm formation, and the aromatic protein was inferred as one part of DCAcAm precursor. DCAcAm was found to cause delayed development and malformation to zebrafish embryos at embryonic growth stage. Compared with heart toxicity, it caused a significant neuron toxicity. It also could cause the acute DNA damage to adult zebrafish, which should be extremely cautioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical degradation of drinking water disinfection byproducts by millimeter-sized particles of iron-silicon and magnesium-aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyu; Chen, Yongmei; Wan, Pingyu; Fan, Maohong; Yang, X Jin

    2010-03-03

    The candidature of Fe-Si and Mg-Al alloys at millimeter-scale particle sizes for chemical degradation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water systems was substantiated by their enhanced corrosion resistance and catalytic effect on the degradation. The Mg-Al particles supplied electrons for reductive degradation, and the Fe-Si particles acted as a catalyst and provided the sites for the reaction. The alloy particles are obtained by mechanical milling and stable under ambient conditions. The proposed method for chemical degradation of DBPs possesses the advantages of relatively constant degradation performance, long-term durability, no secondary contamination, and ease of handling, storage and maintenance in comparison with nanoparticle systems.

  9. Removal of the precursors of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), an emerging disinfection byproduct, in drinking water treatment process and its toxicity to adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is one of the emerging nitrogenous disinfection byproducts with probable cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. Its potential toxicological effects have received extensive attention but remain to be poorly understood. In this study, changes in NDEA precursors in drinking water treatment process were studied using the trial of its formation potential (FP), and the toxicity induced by NDEA to adult zebrafish was investigated. NDEA FP in the raw water of Taihu Lake ranged from 46.9 to 68.3 ng/L. The NDEA precursors were removed effectively by O 3 /BAC process. Hydrophilic fraction and low-molecular-weight fraction (stress and antioxidant defense to zebrafish metabolism system at concentrations over 5 μg/L. After a 42-day exposure, a significant DNA damage was observed in zebrafish liver cells at NDEA concentrations beyond 500 μg/L. This study investigated NDEA properties in both engineering prospective and toxicity evaluation, thus providing comprehensive information on its control in drinking water treatment process and its toxicity effect on zebrafish as a model animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Four groups of new aromatic halogenated disinfection byproducts: effect of bromide concentration on their formation and speciation in chlorinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Xiangru

    2013-02-05

    Bromide is naturally present in source waters worldwide. Chlorination of drinking water can generate a variety of chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although substantial efforts have been made to examine the effect of bromide concentration on the formation and speciation of halogenated DBPs, almost all previous studies have focused on trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. Given that about 50% of total organic halogen formed in chlorination remains unknown, it is still unclear how bromide concentration affects the formation and speciation of the new/unknown halogenated DBPs. In this study, chlorinated drinking water samples with different bromide concentrations were prepared, and a novel approach-precursor ion scan using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry-was adopted for the detection and identification of polar halogenated DBPs in these water samples. With this approach, 11 new putative aromatic halogenated DBPs were identified, and they were classified into four groups: dihalo-4-hydroxybenzaldehydes, dihalo-4-hydroxybenzoic acids, dihalo-salicylic acids, and trihalo-phenols. A mechanism for the formation of the four groups of new aromatic halogenated DBPs was proposed. It was found that increasing the bromide concentration shifted the entire polar halogenated DBPs as well as the four groups of new DBPs from being less brominated to being more brominated; these new aromatic halogenated DBPs might be important intermediate DBPs formed in drinking water chlorination. Moreover, the speciation of the four groups of new DBPs was modeled: the speciation patterns of the four groups of new DBPs well matched those determined from the model equations, and the reactivity differences between HOBr and HOCl in reactions forming the four groups of new DBPs were larger than those in reactions forming trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.

  11. Drinking Water Microbiome as a Screening Tool for Nitrification in Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water utilities in the US using chloramine as disinfectant treatment in their distribution systems have experienced nitrification episodes, which detrimentally impact the water quality. A chloraminated drinking water distribution system (DWDS) simulator was operated throug...

  12. Formation and Occurrence of N-Chloro-2,2-dichloroacetamide, a Previously Overlooked Nitrogenous Disinfection Byproduct in Chlorinated Drinking Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Reckhow, David A

    2017-02-07

    Haloacetamides (HAMs) are a class of newly identified nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) whose occurrence in drinking waters has recently been reported in several DBP surveys. As the most prominent HAM species, it is commonly acknowledged that 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAM) is mainly generated from dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) hydrolysis because the concentrations of these two compounds are often well correlated. Instead of DCAM, a previously unreported N-DBP, N-chloro-2,2-dichloroacetamide (N-Cl-DCAM), was confirmed in this study as the actual DCAN degradation product in chlorinated drinking waters. It is suspected that N-Cl-DCAM has been erroneously identified as DCAM, because its nitrogen-bound chlorine is readily reduced by most commonly used quenching agents. This hypothesis is supported by kinetic studies that indicate almost instantaneous N-chlorination of DCAM even at low chlorine residuals. Therefore, it is unlikely that DCAM can persist as a long-lived DCAN decomposition product in systems using free chlorine as a residual disinfectant. Instead, chlorination of DCAM will lead to the formation of an equal amount of N-Cl-DCAM by forming a hydrogen bond between hypochlorite oxygen and amino hydrogen. Alternatively, N-Cl-DCAM can be produced directly from DCAN chlorination via nucleophilic addition of hypochlorite on the nitrile carbon. Due to its relatively low pK a value, N-Cl-DCAM tends to deprotonate under typical drinking water pH conditions, and the anionic form of N-Cl-DCAM was found to be very stable in the absence of chlorine. N-Cl-DCAM can, however, undergo acid-catalyzed decomposition to form the corresponding dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) when chlorine is present, although those acidic conditions that favor N-Cl-DCAM degradation are generally atypical for finished drinking waters. For these reasons, N-Cl-DCAM is predicted to have very long half-lives in most distribution systems that use free chlorine. Furthermore, an analytical method using

  13. APPLICATION OF DNPH DERIVATIZATION WITH LC/MS TO THE IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR CARBONYL DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for analyzing and identifying highly polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking wa...

  14. Ozonization effects on trihalo methane formation during the disinfection of drinking water with chlorine; Efectos de la ozonizacion sobre la formacion de trihalometanos durante la desinfeccion final del agua potable con cloro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Vidal, F. J.; Perez Serrano, A.; Orozco Barrentxea, C.; Sanllorente Santamaria, M. C.; Ibeas Reoyo, M. V.

    2001-07-01

    One of the main aspects in the control of drinking water treatment is the formation of disinfection by-products (DBP), some of the most important are the trihalomethanes (THM). The use of ozone as primary disinfectant in drinking water treatment plants reduces noticeably the amount of THM generated after the chlorination at the end of the treatment. The aim of this work is to study the main factors influencing the ozone effect in this process: the delay between the time of ozonization and chlorination, the applied ozone dose and the presence of bromide ion ind the raw water. These factors have been studied on natural waters (Uzquiza Reservoir-Burgos) and on synthetic waters (fulvic and humic acids extracted from the mentioned reservoir). (Author) 36 refs.

  15. Optical monitoring of Disinfection By-product Precursors with Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM): Practical Application Issues for Drinking, Waste and Reuse Water Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water, wastewater and reuse plants must deal with regulations associated with bacterial contamination and halogen disinfection procedures that can generate harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HOAAs) and other compounds. The natural fluorescent chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is regulated as the major DBP precursor. This study outlines the advantages and current limitations associated with optical monitoring of water treatment processes using tcontemporary Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM). The F-EEM method coupled with practical peak indexing and multi-variate analyses is potentially superior in terms of cost, speed and sensitivity over conventional total organic carbon (TOC) meters and specific UV-absorbance (SUVA) measurements. Hence there is strong interest in developing revised environmental regulations around the F-EEM technique instruments which can incidentally simultaneously measure the SUVA and DOC parameters. Importantly, the F-EEM technique, compared to the single-point TOC and SUVA signals can resolve CDOM classes distinguishing those that strongly cause DBPs. The F-EEM DBP prediction method can be applied to surface water sources to evaluate DBP potential as a function of the point sources and reservoir depth profiles. It can also be applied in-line to rapidly adjust DOC removal processes including sedimentation-flocculation, microfiltration, reverse-osmosis, and ozonation. Limitations and interferences for F-EEMs are discussed including those common to SUVA and TOC in contrast to the advantages including that F-EEMs are less prone to interferences from inorganic carbon and metal contaminations and require little if any chemical preparation. In conclusion, the F-EEM method is discussed in terms of not only the DBP problem but also as a means of predicting (concurrent to DBP monitoring) organic membrane fouling in water-reuse and desalination plants.

  16. Reducing Volatile Disinfection By-Products in Treated Drinking Water Using Aeration Technologies (WaterRF Report 4441)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate cost-effective aeration technology solutions to address TTHM compliance at a water treatment plant clearwell. The project team worked closely with EPA Region 6 and the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) to identify a...

  17. The impact of iodinated X-ray contrast agents on formation and toxicity of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Clara H; Machek, Edward J; Shakeri, Morteza; Duirk, Stephen E; Ternes, Thomas A; Richardson, Susan D; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    The presence of iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) in source waters is of high concern to public health because of their potential to generate highly toxic disinfection by-products (DBPs). The objective of this study was to determine the impact of ICM in source waters and the type of disinfectant on the overall toxicity of DBP mixtures and to determine which ICM and reaction conditions give rise to toxic by-products. Source waters collected from Akron, OH were treated with five different ICMs, including iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, diatrizoate and iomeprol, with or without chlorine or chloramine disinfection. The reaction product mixtures were concentrated with XAD resins and the mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the reaction mixture concentrates was measured. Water containing iopamidol generated an enhanced level of mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after disinfection. While chlorine disinfection with iopamidol resulted in the highest cytotoxicity overall, the relative iopamidol-mediated increase in toxicity was greater when chloramine was used as the disinfectant compared with chlorine. Four other ICMs (iopromide, iohexol, diatrizoate, and iomeprol) expressed some cytotoxicity over the control without any disinfection, and induced higher cytotoxicity when chlorinated. Only iohexol enhanced genotoxicity compared to the chlorinated source water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Microbial interactions in drinking water biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Lúcia C.; Simões, M.; Vieira, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water distribution networks may be viewed as a large reactor where a number of chemical and microbiological processes are taking place. Control of microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) often achieved through the addition of disinfectants, is essential to limit the spread of waterborne pathogens. However, microorganisms can resist disinfection through protection within biofilms and resistant host cells. Recent studies into the microbial ecology ...

  19. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, R. L. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1990-06-15

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection.

  20. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection

  1. Modification of cellulose foam paper for use as a high-quality biocide disinfectant filter for drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarifard, Solmaz; Taneja, Kapila; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Nazhad, Mousa M; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kumar, Sandeep

    2018-02-01

    Development of a foam-formed cellulose filter paper with high wet strength was carried out for application as a drinking water filter. The wet strength and antimicrobial activity of cellulose foam paper against several bacteria species (Bacillus subtilis MTCC 441 (Gram +ve), B. cereus NCDC 240 (Gram +ve), Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCDC 105 (Gram -ve), Klebsiella pneumonia NCDC 138 (Gram -ve), and Escherichia coli MTCC 40 (Gram -ve)) were investigated. The morphology and structure of the cellulose foam paper were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of our study confirmed that glutaraldehyde solution or 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) added to cellulose foam paper pretreated with cationic polyacrylamide (C-PAM) provided very high and stable wet strength performance together with excellent antimicrobial properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of Disinfection by-products formation via UV irradiation of the water from Tajan River (source water for Sari drinking water, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahbakhsh Javid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Irradiation with ultraviolet light (UV is used for the disinfection of bacterial contaminants in the production of potable water. The main objective of the study was to investigate and model Disinfection By-Products (DBPs formation due to the UV Irradiation of the Tajan River water under different Irradiation conditions. Materials & Methods:  Water samples were collected throughout September 2011 to August 2013. Transportation of the sample to the laboratory was done on ice in a cooler, and physiochemical analysis was conducted immediately within one day. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was determined by a TOC analyzer. Irradiation experiments were conducted in a series of 25 mL glass serum bottles with Teflon septa. The present study adopts an orthogonal design. The design involved irradiation with UV at a UV/DOC ratio of 0.5–3.0 and incubating (headspace-free storage for 5–25 sec. A 1 mM phosphate buffer maintained the pH at 6, 7, or 8 respectively, and an incubator maintained the temperature (Temp at 15, 20, or 25 °C respectively. The development of empirical models for DBPs formation used a multivariate regression procedure (stepwise which applied the SPSS System for Windows (Version 16.0. Results:  The results showed that the total DBPs formation ranged between 12.3 and 67.4 mg/l and that control of the levels was primarily due to the reaction time and the dissolved organic carbon level (DOC in the water. Conclusions:  Reaction time and level of DOC concentrations in water exerted a dominant influence on the formation of DBPs during the UV irradiation of water from the Tajan River. The relationships between the measured and predicted values were satisfactory with R 2 values ranging from 0.89 (for Octanal–0.92 (for Formaldehydes. The DOC level in water is the key factor in controlling DBPs formation.

  3. THE OCCURRENCE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE DBP OCCURRENCE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The motivation for this Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study was two-fold: First, more than 500 DBPs have been reported in the literature, yet there is almost no quantitative occurrence information for most. As a result, there is significant uncertainty ove...

  4. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  5. Drinking Water - National Drinking Water Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savings Septic Unsafe Disposable Wipe Woes FacebookLogo FOCUS AREAS Drinking Water Wastewater Training Security Conservation & Water Efficiency Water We Drink Source Water Protection SORA/COI EPA MOU CartIcon Links Listserv Educators Homeowners Operators Small Systems Drinking Water Read On Tap Latest

  6. A Novel TiQ2-Assisted Solar Photocatalytic Batch-Process Disinfection Reactor for the Treatment of Biological and Chemical Contaminants in Domestic Drinking Water in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, E. F.; Al Touati, F.; Kehoe, S. C.; McLoughlin, O. A.; Gill, L. W.; Gernjak, W.; Oller, I.; Maldonado, M. I.; Malato, S.; Cassidy, John; Reed, R. H.; McGuigan, K. G.

    2004-01-01

    he technical feasibility and performance of photocatalytic Ti02 coatings in batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) reactors to improve potability of drinking water in developing countries have been studied. Borosilicate glass and PET plastic SODIS reactors fitted with flexible plastic inserts coated with Ti02 powder were shown to be 2(Jt1o and 25% more effective, respectively, than standard SODIS reactors for the inactivation of E. coli K12. Isopropanol at 100 ppm concentration levels was o...

  7. Conventional and Alternative Disinfection Methods of Legionella in Water Distribution Systems – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pūle Daina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of Legionella in drinking water distribution systems is a widespread problem. Outbreaks of Legionella caused diseases occur despite various disinfectants are used in order to control Legionella. Conventional methods like thermal disinfection, silver/copper ionization, ultraviolet irradiation or chlorine-based disinfection have not been effective in the long term for control of biofilm bacteria. Therefore, research to develop more effective disinfection methods is still necessary.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency of the photo Fenton disinfection of natural drinking water source during the rainy season in the Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndounla, J; Pulgarin, C

    2014-09-15

    The photo-disinfection of water from two different wells (W1, pH: 4.6-5.1 ± 0.02) and (W2 pH: 5.6-5.7 ± 0.02) was carried out during the rainy season at Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso, West Africa. The weather variation during the rainy season significantly affects the photo-disinfection processes (solar disinfection and photo-Fenton). The dilution of the water by rainwater highly affected the chemical composition of the wells' water used in this study; very low iron contents Compared to the ones recorded during the dry season were recorded in all water samples. Both photo-disinfection processes were used to treat 25 L of water in a compound parabolic collector (CPC). None of them have shown the total inactivation of both wild enteric bacteria strains (total coliforms/E. coli and Salmonella spp.) involved in the treatment. However, the total coliforms/E. coli strains were totally inactivated during the exposure under most of the photo-Fenton treatment. Also, the remaining strains, especially those of Salmonella spp. were achieved during the subsequent 24h of dark storage under the action of the Fenton process. Under uniquely solar radiation, total inactivation was recorded only in the total coliforms/E. coli strains. The impact of the available irradiance on the efficiency of the photo-Fenton disinfection of natural water was highlighted during the exposure under high intermittent solar radiation. The impact of the HCO3(-) concentration of both wells' water on the evolution of the pH during the photo-disinfection was recorded. Drastic decrease was noticed after the initial fast increase in presence of low HCO3(-) concentration while a steady state was observed after the increase in presence of higher concentration. The redox activities of the nitrogen components of the water during both photo-disinfection processes have led to increased concentration of nitrite in all the cases and variations were noticed in that of nitrate and ammonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  9. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired powerplants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. W...

  10. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired power plants, conventional oil and gas extraction, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. ...

  11. Disinfection of grey water

    OpenAIRE

    Winward, Gideon Paul

    2007-01-01

    The reuse of grey water, for applications such as toilet flushing and irrigation, represents a potential sustainable solution to water shortages experienced by regions worldwide. Although reused grey water is not intended for potable use, the potential for transmission of waterborne pathogens by aerosol inhalation, topical contact, or indirect ingestion is a key concern for grey water reuse. This thesis explores the pathogen content of grey water and investigates pathogen remov...

  12. The toxicity of a new disinfection by-product, 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), on adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its occurrence in the chlorinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shilin; Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Tao, Hui

    2015-11-01

    The detection method of 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a new disinfection by-product (DBP) in chlorinated drinking water, was established using a gas chromatograph coupled with a micro-electron capture detector. The chlorinated water samples were taken from ten drinking water treatment plants around Yangtze River or Taihu Lake in China. The concentration of DCAcAm was detected ranging from 0.5 to 1.8μg/L in the waterworks around Yangtze River, and 1.5-2.6μg/L around Taihu Lake. The toxicity of DCAcAm on adult zebrafish was assessed by investigating the metabolism damage with multiple metabolic biomarkers and the accumulation capability with bio-concentration factor. The results showed that DCAcAm could cause the acute metabolism damage and was easily accumulated in zebrafish, and should be extremely cautioned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drinking Water Quality in Hospitals and Other Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water quality entering large buildings is generally adequately controlled by the water utility, but localized problems may occur within building or “premise” plumbing. Particular concerns are loss of disinfectant residual and temperature variability, which may enhance pa...

  14. New England's Drinking Water | Drinking Water in New ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    Information on Drinking Water in New England. Major Topics covered include: Conservation, Private Wells, Preventing Contamination, Drinking Water Sources, Consumer Confidence Reports, and Drinking Water Awards.

  15. Silver disinfection in water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestry Rodriguez, Nadia

    Silver was evaluated as disinfectant to maintain water quality in water distribution system. It was used to inhibit growth of two opportunistic bacteria in planktonik form and in biofilm formation in Robbins devices with stainless steel and PVC surfaces. The results of this work show that silver is a potential secondary disinfectant to be used in water distribution systems.

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticles for water disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emelita Asuncion S. Dimapilis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The world faces a growing challenge for adequate clean water due to threats coming from increasing demand and decreasing supply. Although there are existing technologies for water disinfection, their limitations, particularly the formation of disinfection-by-products, have led to researches on alternative methods. Zinc oxide, an essential chemical in the rubber and pharmaceutical industries, has attracted interest as antimicrobial agent. In nanoscale, zinc oxide has shown antimicrobial properties which make its potential great for various applications. This review discusses the synthesis of zinc oxide with focus on precipitation method, its antimicrobial property and the factors affecting it, disinfection mechanisms, and the potential application to water disinfection.

  17. [Complex technology for water and wastewater disinfection and its industrial realization in prototype unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, E N; Brunman, V E; Brunman, M V; Konyashin, A V; Dyachenko, V A; Petkova, A P

    Usage of complex automated electrolysis unit for drinking water disinfection and wastewater oxidation and coagulation is scoped, its ecological and energy efficiency is shown. Properties of technological process of anolyte production using membrane electrolysis of brine for water disinfection in municipal pipelines and potassium ferrate production using electrochemical dissolution of iron anode in NaOH solution for usage in purification plants are listed. Construction of modules of industrial prototype for anolyte and ferrate production and applied aspects of automation of complex electrolysis unit are proved. Results of approbation of electrolytic potassium ferrate for drinking water disinfection and wastewater, rain water and environmental water oxidation and coagulation are shown.

  18. Sources and characteristics of organic matter in the Clackamas River, Oregon, related to the formation of disinfection by-products in treated drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kurt D.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Goldman, Jami H.; Saraceno, John Franco; Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; McGhee, Gordon; Triplett, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    This study characterized the amount and quality of organic matter in the Clackamas River, Oregon, to gain an understanding of sources that contribute to the formation of chlorinated and brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs), focusing on regulated DBPs in treated drinking water from two direct-filtration treatment plants that together serve approximately 100,000 customers. The central hypothesis guiding this study was that natural organic matter leaching out of the forested watershed, in-stream growth of benthic algae, and phytoplankton blooms in the reservoirs contribute different and varying proportions of organic carbon to the river. Differences in the amount and composition of carbon derived from each source affects the types and concentrations of DBP precursors entering the treatment plants and, as a result, yield varying DBP concentrations and species in finished water. The two classes of DBPs analyzed in this study-trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs)-form from precursors within the dissolved and particulate pools of organic matter present in source water. The five principal objectives of the study were to (1) describe the seasonal quantity and character of organic matter in the Clackamas River; (2) relate the amount and composition of organic matter to the formation of DBPs; (3) evaluate sources of DBP precursors in the watershed; (4) assess the use of optical measurements, including in-situ fluorescence, for estimating dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and DBP formation; and (5) assess the removal of DBP precursors during treatment by conducting treatability "jar-test" experiments at one of the treatment plants. Data collection consisted of (1) monthly sampling of source and finished water at two drinking-water treatment plants; (2) event-based sampling in the mainstem, tributaries, and North Fork Reservoir; and (3) in-situ continuous monitoring of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, chlorophyll-a, and

  19. A Review of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis for Water and Surface Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Anthony Byrne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Photo-excitation of certain semiconductors can lead to the production of reactive oxygen species that can inactivate microorganisms. The mechanisms involved are reviewed, along with two important applications. The first is the use of photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water. It is estimated that 750 million people do not have accessed to an improved source for drinking and many more rely on sources that are not safe. If one can utilize photocatalysis to enhance the solar disinfection of water and provide an inexpensive, simple method of water disinfection, then it could help reduce the risk of waterborne disease. The second application is the use of photocatalytic coatings to combat healthcare associated infections. Two challenges are considered, i.e., the use of photocatalytic coatings to give “self-disinfecting” surfaces to reduce the risk of transmission of infection via environmental surfaces, and the use of photocatalytic coatings for the decontamination and disinfection of medical devices. In the final section, the development of novel photocatalytic materials for use in disinfection applications is reviewed, taking account of materials, developed for other photocatalytic applications, but which may be transferable for disinfection purposes.

  20. High compliance randomized controlled field trial of solar disinfection of drinking water and its impact on childhood diarrhea in rural Cambodia

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McGuigan, KG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available of a 1 year randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of SODIS of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in rural communities in Cambodia. They compared 426...

  1. Solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in South African children under 5 years: the role of participant motivation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This 1-year randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of SODIS of drinking water and motivation on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in periurban communities in South...

  2. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The determination of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) requires an understanding of how drinking water comes in contact with humans through multiple pathways. In order to facilitate the investigation of human exposure to DBPs via foods and beverages, analy...

  3. Quality of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of drinking water has been gaining a great deal of attention lately, especially as water delivery infrastructure continues to age. Particles of various metals such as lead and copper, and other substances like radon and arsenic could be entering drinking water supplies. Spilled-on-the-ground hydrocarbon-based substances are also…

  4. Enhancement of ultraviolet water disinfection process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grabi-1

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... disinfected water distribution systems, including. Legionella .... soft agar, mixed, incubated at room temperature for 2 min and poured onto the ... The determination of a log increase methodology was employed to quantify the ...

  5. Monte-Carlo and multi-exposure assessment for the derivation of criteria for disinfection byproducts and volatile organic compounds in drinking water: Allocation factors and liter-equivalents per day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Megumi; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Kido, Junki; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2018-06-01

    The probability distributions of total potential doses of disinfection byproducts and volatile organic compounds via ingestion, inhalation, and dermal exposure were estimated with Monte Carlo simulations, after conducting physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations to takes into account the differences in availability between the three exposures. If the criterion that the 95th percentile estimate equals the TDI (tolerable daily intake) is regarded as protecting the majority of a population, the drinking water criteria would be 140 (trichloromethane), 66 (bromodichloromethane), 157 (dibromochloromethane), 203 (tribromomethane), 140 (dichloroacetic acid), 78 (trichloroacetic acid), 6.55 (trichloroethylene, TCE), and 22 μg/L (perchloroethylene). The TCE criterion was lower than the Japanese Drinking Water Quality Standard (10 μg/L). The latter would allow the intake of 20% of the population to exceed the TDI. Indirect inhalation via evaporation from water, especially in bathrooms, was the major route of exposure to compounds other than haloacetic acids (HAAs) and accounted for 1.2-9 liter-equivalents/day for the median-exposure subpopulation. The ingestion of food was a major indirect route of exposure to HAAs. Contributions of direct water intake were not very different for trihalomethanes (30-45% of TDIs) and HAAs (45-52% of TDIs). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg

    is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter......Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  7. Detection of chlorinated and brominated byproducts of drinking water disinfection using electrospray ionization-high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, B; Barnett, D A; Froese, K; Purves, R W; Hrudey, S; Guevremont, R

    1999-10-15

    The lower limit of detection for low molecular weight polar and ionic analytes using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is often severely compromised by an intense background that obscures ions of trace components in solution. Recently, a new technique, referred to as high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), has been shown to separate gas-phase ions at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. A FAIMS instrument is an ion filter that may be tuned, by control of electrical voltages, to continuously transmit selected ions from a complex mixture. This capability offers significant advantages when FAIMS is coupled with ESI, a source that generates a wide variety of ions, including solvent clusters and salt adducts. In this report, the tandem arrangement of ESI-FAIMS-MS is used for the analysis of haloacetic acids, a class of disinfection byproducts regulated by the US EPA. FAIMS is shown to effectively discriminate against background ions resulting from the electrospray of tap water solutions containing the haloacetic acids. Consequently, mass spectra are simplified, the selectivity of the method is improved, and the limits of detection are lowered compared with conventional ESI-MS. The detection limits of ESI-FAIMS-MS for six haloacetic acids ranged between 0.5 and 4 ng/mL in 9:1 methanol/tap water (5 and 40 ng/mL in the original tap water samples) with no preconcentration, derivatization, or chromatographic separation prior to analysis.

  8. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  9. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  10. Drinking Water FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 90 different contaminants in public drinking water, including E.coli , Salmonella , and Cryptosporidium species. More information regarding the ... page. Water Quality Indicators: Total Coliforms Fecal Coliforms / Escherichia coli (E. coli) pH Contaminants: Nitrate Volatile Organic Compounds ( ...

  11. Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about an overview of drinking water distribution systems, the factors that degrade water quality in the distribution system, assessments of risk, future research about these risks, and how to reduce cross-connection control risk.

  12. SDWISFED Drinking Water Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — SDWIS/FED is EPA's national regulatory compliance database for the drinking water program. It includes information on the nation's 160,000 public water systems and...

  13. Disinfection by-products and extractable organic compounds in South African tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carien Nothnagel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An important step in urban purification of drinking water is disinfection by e.g. chlorination where potential pathogenic micro-organisms in the water supply are killed. The presence of organic material in natural water leads to the formation of organic by- products during disinfection. Over 500 of these disinfection by-products (DBPs have been identified and many more are estimated to form during the disinfection step. Several DBPs such as trihalomethanes (THMs, which is carcinogenic, poses serious health risks to the community. There is very few quantitative data available which realizes the actual levels of these compounds present in drinking water. The levels of four THMs present in drinking water were measured. It included chloroform, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform. Although microbiological parameters are considered to get more attention than disinfection by-products, the measurement of the levels of these compounds in South-African drinking water is essential together with establishing minimum acceptable concentration levels. The target range for total trihalomethanes (TTHMs established by the US EPA at the end of 2003 is 0-0.08ug/mL. The aim of this paper is to create an awareness of the problem as well as presenting preliminary results obtained with the method of analysis. Preliminary results indicate that urgent attention must be given to the regulation and monitoring of DBPs in South African drinking water.

  14. Highly efficient inactivation of bacteria found in drinking water using chitosan-bentonite composites: Modelling and breakthrough curve analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motshekga, Sarah C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Disinfection of bacterially-contaminated drinking water requires a robust and effective technique and can be achieved by using an appropriate disinfectant material. The advanced use of nanomaterials is observed as an alternative and effective way...

  15. Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) presents referenced information on the control of contaminants in drinking water. It allows drinking water utilities,...

  16. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.72 Disinfection. A public water... the direct influence of surface water and provides filtration treatment must provide disinfection...) Disinfection requirements for public water systems which provide filtration. Each public water system that...

  17. Changes in Biofilm Community Structure Associated with Monochloramine-treated Drinking Water Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monochloramine is increasingly used as a drinking water disinfectant because it forms lower levels of traditional disinfectant by-products compared to free-chlorine disinfection treatment. The use of monochloramine has been shown to increase ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and the pr...

  18. 78 FR 10269 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Illness CWS--Community Water System DBP--Disinfection Byproduct DWC--Drinking Water Committee EA--Economic... 141 and 142 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule; Final...-9684-8] RIN 2040-AD94 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule...

  19. Measuring User Compliance and Cost Effectiveness of Safe Drinking Water Programs: A Cluster-Randomized Study of Household Ultraviolet Disinfection in Rural Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reygadas, Fermín; Gruber, Joshua S; Dreizler, Lindsay; Nelson, Kara L; Ray, Isha

    2018-03-01

    Low adoption and compliance levels for household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies have made it challenging for these systems to achieve measurable health benefits in the developing world. User compliance remains an inconsistently defined and poorly understood feature of HWTS programs. In this article, we develop a comprehensive approach to understanding HWTS compliance. First, our Safe Drinking Water Compliance Framework disaggregates and measures the components of compliance from initial adoption of the HWTS to exclusive consumption of treated water. We apply this framework to an ultraviolet (UV)-based safe water system in a cluster-randomized controlled trial in rural Mexico. Second, we evaluate a no-frills (or "Basic") variant of the program as well as an improved (or "Enhanced") variant, to test if subtle changes in the user interface of HWTS programs could improve compliance. Finally, we perform a full-cost analysis of both variants to assess their cost effectiveness (CE) in achieving compliance. We define "compliance" strictly as the habit of consuming safe water. We find that compliance was significantly higher in the groups where the UV program variants were rolled out than in the control groups. The Enhanced variant performed better immediately postintervention than the Basic, but compliance (and thus CE) degraded with time such that no effective difference remained between the two versions of the program.

  20. MODERATING INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON A DITHIOCARBAMATE-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE IN FEMALE RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been found in female rats to increase circulating concentrations of both estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). This effect is apparently due, at least in part, to a suppression in hepatic catabolism. The present study investigat...

  1. Ames and random amplified polymorphic DNA tests for the validation of the mutagenic and/or genotoxic potential of the drinking water disinfection by-products chloroform and bromoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallef, Messaouda; Cenkci, Süleyman; Akyil, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Benouareth, Djamel Eddine

    2018-01-28

    Chloroform and Bromoform are two abundant trihalomethanes found in Algerian drinking water. The investigation of the mutagenic hazard of these disinfection by-products was studied by Ames test as prokaryotic bioassay to show their mutagenic effects. For this, Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains were employed. Both chloroform and bromoform showed a direct mutagenic effect since the number of revertant colonies gradually increase in dose-dependent manner with all concentrations tested with the two bacterial strains and these were both in the absence and presence of S9 metabolic activation. The genotoxic hazard was also studied by random amplified polymorphic DNA test on the root cells of Allium cepa as eukaryotic bioassay. DNA extracted from the roots of the onion were incubated at different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction. This was based on demonstrating a major effect of disappearance of bands compared to roots incubated in the negative control (distilled water). The results showed that these two compounds affected genomic DNA by breaks although by mutations.

  2. Drinking water quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, J; Gautam, B; Sapkota, N

    2012-09-01

    Drinking water quality is the great public health concern because it is a major risk factor for high incidence of diarrheal diseases in Nepal. In the recent years, the prevalence rate of diarrhoea has been found the highest in Myagdi district. This study was carried out to assess the quality of drinking water from different natural sources, reservoirs and collection taps at Arthunge VDC of Myagdi district. A cross-sectional study was carried out using random sampling method in Arthunge VDC of Myagdi district from January to June,2010. 84 water samples representing natural sources, reservoirs and collection taps from the study area were collected. The physico-chemical and microbiological analysis was performed following standards technique set by APHA 1998 and statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11.5. The result was also compared with national and WHO guidelines. Out of 84 water samples (from natural source, reservoirs and tap water) analyzed, drinking water quality parameters (except arsenic and total coliform) of all water samples was found to be within the WHO standards and national standards.15.48% of water samples showed pH (13) higher than the WHO permissible guideline values. Similarly, 85.71% of water samples showed higher Arsenic value (72) than WHO value. Further, the statistical analysis showed no significant difference (Pwater for collection taps water samples of winter (January, 2010) and summer (June, 2010). The microbiological examination of water samples revealed the presence of total coliform in 86.90% of water samples. The results obtained from physico-chemical analysis of water samples were within national standard and WHO standards except arsenic. The study also found the coliform contamination to be the key problem with drinking water.

  3. Virus contamination from operation and maintenance practices in small drinking water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the association of common events in drinking water distribution systems with contamination of household tap water with human enteric viruses. Viruses were enumerated by qPCR in the tap water of 14 municipal systems that use non-disinfected groundwater. Ultra-violet disinfection was install...

  4. Focus on the CSIR research in pollution waste: Safe drinking water from the sun

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Water for Health group at the CSIR represents South Africa in an international project to demonstrate solar disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water. This project is set to demonstrate that SODIS is an effective, appropriate and acceptable...

  5. Characterizing natural organic matter in drinking water treatment processes and trains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baghoth, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) generally influences water treatment processes such as coagulation, oxidation, adsorption, and membrane filtration. NOM contributes colour, taste and odour in drinking water, fouls membranes, serves as a precursor for disinfection by-products, increases the exhaustion

  6. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  7. Effect of the Distribution System on Drinking Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grünwald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to characterise the main aspects of water quality deterioration in a distribution system. The effect of residence time on chlorine uptake and the formation and evolution of disinfection by-products in distributed drinking water are discussed.

  8. CERN’s Drinking Water

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    CERN’s drinking water is monitored on a regular basis. A certified independent laboratory takes and analyses samples to verify that the water complies with national and European regulations for safe drinking water. Nevertheless, the system that supplies our drinking water is very old and occasionally, especially after work has been carried out on the system, the water may become cloudy or discoloured, due to traces of corrosion. For this reason, we recommend: Never use hot water from the tap for drinking or cooking. If you need hot water, then draw water from the cold water tap and heat it. Only drink or cook with cold water. Let the cold water run until it is clear before drinking or making your tea or coffee. If you have any questions about the quality of CERN’s drinking water, please contact: Jerome Espuche (GS/SEM), Serge Deleval (EN/CV) or Jonathan Gulley (DG/SCG).

  9. Safe drinking water act: Amendments, regulations and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, E.J.; Gilbert, C.E.; Pastides, H.

    1989-01-01

    This book approaches the topic of safe drinking water by communicating how the EPA has responded to the mandates of Congress. Chapter 1 summarizes what is and will be involved in achieving safe drinking water. Chapter 2 describes the historical development of drinking water regulations. Chapter 3 summarizes the directives of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. Chapters 4 through 9 discuss each phase of the regulatory program in turn. Specific problems associated with volatile organic chemicals, synthetic organics, inorganic chemicals, and microbiological contaminants are assessed in Chapter 4 and 5. The unique characteristics of radionuclides and their regulation are treated in Chapter 6. The disinfection process and its resultant disinfection by-products are presented in Chapter 7. The contaminant selection process and the additional contaminants to be regulated by 1989 and 1991 and in future years are discussed in Chapters 8 and 9. EPA's Office of Drinking Water's Health Advisory Program is explained in Chapter 10. The record of public water system compliance with the primary drinking water regulations is detailed in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 offers a nongovernmental perspective on the general quality of drinking water and how this is affected by a wide range of drinking water treatment technologies. Separate abstracts are processed for 5 chapters in this book for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  10. Carbon nanoparticles for solar disinfection of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddigpu, Pratap Reddy; Sawant, Bhairavi; Wanjari, Snehal; Goel, M D; Vione, Davide; Dhodapkar, Rita S; Rayalu, S

    2018-02-05

    The present manuscript deals with the application of carbon nano particles (CNP) and chitosan (CHIT) in the form of CHIT-CNP composite for the disinfection of water. The CHIT-CNP composite was prepared by the solution casting method and characterized by TEM, XRD and elemental analysis. In the present investigation we study the disinfection efficiency towards E. coli bacteria of both CNP and CHIT-CNP, under sunlight (SODIS) in identical experimental conditions. Both CNP and CHIT-CNP enhanced disinfection as compared to SODIS alone, and comparable performance was achieved when the same dose of CNP in the two materials was applied. However, the CHIT-CNP composite is in the form of a fabric and it is easier to use and handle as compared to the CNP powder, especially in rural and resource-constrained areas. Moreover the SODIS-CHIT-CNP setup, when used in a compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactor showed high bactericidal efficiency compared to SODIS alone, which is promising for practical applications. The disinfection potential of the CNP powder was compared with that of the well-known material TiO 2 Degussa P25 (DP 25 ): DP 25 gave 6-log kill of bacteria in 180min, whereas CNP produced 6-log kill in 150min. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  12. Drinking Water in your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many people choose to filter or test the drinking water that comes out of their tap or from their private well for a variety of reasons. And whether at home, at work or while traveling, many Americans drink bottled water.

  13. Infectious Disinfection: "Exploring Global Water Quality"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaya, Evans; Tippins, Deborah J.; Mueller, Michael P.; Thomson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Learning about the water situation in other regions of the world and the devastating effects of floods on drinking water helps students study science while learning about global water quality. This article provides science activities focused on developing cultural awareness and understanding how local water resources are integrally linked to the…

  14. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  15. CERN’s Drinking Water

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

      CERN’s drinking water is monitored, with regular samples being taken and analysed by a certified independent laboratory, which checks on compliance with national and European regulations for safe drinking water. Nevertheless, the drinking water network is very old and occasionally, especially after work has been carried out on the network, the clarity and colour of the water can be adversely affected due to high levels of corrosion in suspension. Some basic recommendations should always be followed:   Never use hot water from the tap for drinking or cooking. If you need hot water, then draw water from the cold water tap before heating it. Only drink or cook with cold water. Let the cold water run until you notice that the water has become clear.   If you have questions about the quality of CERN’s drinking water, then please contact: Jerome Espuche (GS/SEM), Serge Deleval (EN/CV) or Jonathan Gulley (DG/SCG).

  16. CERN’s Drinking Water

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

      CERN’s drinking water is monitored, with regular samples being taken and analysed by a certified independent laboratory, which checks on compliance with national and European regulations for safe drinking water. Nevertheless, the drinking water network is very old and occasionally, especially after work has been carried out on the network, the clarity and colour of the water can be adversely affected due to high levels of corrosion in suspension. Some basic recommendations should always be followed: Never use hot water from the tap for drinking or cooking. If you need hot water, then draw water from the cold water tap before heating it. Only drink or cook with cold water. Let the cold water run until you notice that the water has become clear. If you have questions about the quality of CERN’s drinking water, then please contact: Jerome Espuche (GS/SEM), Serge Deleval (EN/CV) or Jonathan Gulley (DG/SCG).

  17. Spiral-shaped reactor for water disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2016-04-20

    Chlorine-based processes are still widely used for water disinfection. The disinfection process for municipal water consumption is usually carried out in large tanks, specifically designed to verify several hydraulic and disinfection criteria. The hydrodynamic behavior of contact tanks of different shapes, each with an approximate total volume of 50,000 m3, was analyzed by solving turbulent momentum transport equations with a computational fluid dynamics code, namely ANSYS fluent. Numerical experiments of a tracer pulse were performed for each design to generate flow through curves and investigate species residence time distribution for different inlet flow rates, ranging from 3 to 12 m3 s−1. A new nature-inspired Conch tank design whose shape follows an Archimedean spiral was then developed. The spiral design is shown to strongly outperform the other tanks’ designs for all the selected plug flow criteria with an enhancement in efficiency, less short circuiting, and an order of magnitude improvement in mixing and dispersion. Moreover, following the intensification philosophy, after 50% reduction in its size, the new design retains its properties and still gives far better results than the classical shapes.

  18. Disinfection of municipal water using solar radiation: an economical approach for rural dwellers in the coastal region of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.F.; Saleem, M.

    2010-01-01

    At present acquiring safe drinking water in rural or remote areas of Pakistan is a challenging task for dwellers. Coast line of Karachi is a sporadic habitat of villages not having access to safe drinking water. Many incidents of waterborne diseases have been reported in that area and attributed to contaminated municipal water supply. Solution of the problem is disinfection however, general methods of water disinfection such as boiling, UV-lamp, ozonation and chemical additive are costly or require skilled manpower. Present study investigates the solar disinfection method to treat municipal water supply at Karachi Institute of Power Engineering (KINPOE) located at the coastal belt of Karachi. Effect of exposure time, bottle material and turbidity of water on the process performance was evaluated. Model indicator bacteria total coliform (TC) was used to evaluate the solar disinfection process. Study revealed that in order to disinfect the municipal water, samples should be filled in PET transparent bottles, having turbidity below 23 NTU, and expose to solar radiation in the study area at least for one hour. Study shows that solar disinfection may provide safe drinking water meeting national and international water quality standards at minimum cost and effort in sunshine rich areas and not having access to other water purification systems. (author)

  19. Comprehensive Assessment of a Chlorinated Drinking Water Concentrate in a Rat Multigenerational Reproductive Toxicity Study##

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some epidemiological studies report associations between drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, e.g., low birth weight, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and birth defects. To address concerns raised by these studies, w...

  20. Comprehensive assessment of a chlorinated drinking water concentrate in a rat multigenerational reproductive toxicity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some epidemiological studies report associations between drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, e.g., low birth weight, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and birth defects. To address concerns raised by these studies, w...

  1. Development of the electrical discharge method for water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtenko, L.M.; Kononov, O.V.; Starchik, P.D.; Samojlenko, L.S.; Stavs'ka, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of processes of bacterially polluted water disinfection by the method of pulse electrical discharge in water are presented. The studies was performed to improve the disinfection technology. Main attention was concentrated to clear up effect of discharge instability on the disinfection. An influence of the shape and sizes of electrodes on repeatability of discharges was also investigated. It was found that salts solved in water greatly influence ultraviolet radiation absorption coefficients

  2. Damage mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water during chlorine and solar disinfection using a simple plating method. The well-known bacterial model Escherichia coli was used as pathogenic bacteria for the experiments. The damage mechanisms of E. coli were ...

  3. Disinfection Methods for Swimming Pool Water: Byproduct Formation and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Ilyas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive and critical comparison of 10 disinfection methods of swimming pool water: chlorination, electrochemically generated mixed oxidants (EGMO, ultraviolet (UV irradiation, UV/chlorine, UV/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, UV/H2O2/chlorine, ozone (O3/chlorine, O3/H2O2/chlorine, O3/UV and O3/UV/chlorine for the formation, control and elimination of potentially toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs: trihalomethanes (THMs, haloacetic acids (HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs, trihaloacetaldehydes (THAs and chloramines (CAMs. The statistical comparison is carried out using data on 32 swimming pools accumulated from the reviewed studies. The results indicate that O3/UV and O3/UV/chlorine are the most promising methods, as the concentration of the studied DBPs (THMs and HANs with these methods was reduced considerably compared with chlorination, EGMO, UV irradiation, UV/chlorine and O3/chlorine. However, the concentration of the studied DBPs including HAAs and CAMs remained much higher with O3/chlorine compared with the limits set by the WHO for drinking water quality. Moreover, the enhancement in the formation of THMs, HANs and CH with UV/chlorine compared with UV irradiation and the increase in the level of HANs with O3/UV/chlorine compared with O3/UV indicate the complexity of the combined processes, which should be optimized to control the toxicity and improve the quality of swimming pool water.

  4. Disinfection of contaminated water by using solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caslake, Laurie F; Connolly, Daniel J; Menon, Vilas; Duncanson, Catriona M; Rojas, Ricardo; Tavakoli, Javad

    2004-02-01

    Contaminated water causes an estimated 6 to 60 billion cases of gastrointestinal illness annually. The majority of these cases occur in rural areas of developing nations where the water supply remains polluted and adequate sanitation is unavailable. A portable, low-cost, and low-maintenance solar unit to disinfect unpotable water has been designed and tested. The solar disinfection unit was tested with both river water and partially processed water from two wastewater treatment plants. In less than 30 min in midday sunlight, the unit eradicated more than 4 log10 U (99.99%) of bacteria contained in highly contaminated water samples. The solar disinfection unit has been field tested by Centro Panamericano de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ciencias del Ambiente in Lima, Peru. At moderate light intensity, the solar disinfection unit was capable of reducing the bacterial load in a controlled contaminated water sample by 4 log10 U and disinfected approximately 1 liter of water in 30 min.

  5. Slowly biodegradable organic compounds impact the biostability of non-chlorinated drinking water produced from surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Schurer, R.; Bahlman, J.A.; Ketelaars, H.A.M.; Italiaander, R.; Wal, van der A.; Wielen, van der P.W.J.J.

    2018-01-01

    It is possible to distribute drinking water without a disinfectant residual when the treated water is biologically stable. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of easily and slowly biodegradable compounds on the biostability of the drinking water at three full-scale production

  6. The Dutch secret : How to provide safe drinking water without chlorine in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.W.M.H.; Medema, G.J.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Netherlands is one of the few countries where chlorine is not used at all, neither for primary disinfection nor to maintain a residual disinfectant in the distribution network. The Dutch approach that allows production and distribution of drinking water without the use of chlorine while not

  7. Establishment and Early Succession of Bacterial Communities in Monochloramine-Treated Drinking Water Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monochloramine is increasingly used as a drinking water disinfectant because it forms lower levels of regulated disinfection by-products. While its use has been shown to increase nitrifying bacteria, little is known about the bacterial succession within biofilms in monochloramin...

  8. A practical demonstration of water disinfection using TiO2 films and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelover, Silvia; Gómez, Luis A; Reyes, Karina; Teresa Leal, Ma

    2006-10-01

    The scope of this study is the assessment of the efficiency of solar disinfection by heterogeneous photocatalysis with sol-gel immobilized (titanium dioxide) TiO2 films over glass cylinders. The solar disinfection process known as SODIS was considered as a reference. Spring water naturally polluted with coliform bacteria was exposed to sunlight in plastic bottles with and without TiO2 over simple solar collectors and the disinfection effectiveness was measured. Total and fecal coliforms quantification was performed by means of the chromogenic substrate method in order to obtain the efficiency of each disinfection treatment. The disinfection with TiO2 was more efficient than the SODIS process, inactivating total coliforms as well as fecal coliforms. On a sunny day (more than 1000 W m(-2) irradiance), it took the disinfection with immobilized TiO2 15 min of irradiation to inactivate the fecal coliforms to make them undetectable. For inactivation of total coliforms, 30 min was required, so that in less than half the time it takes SODIS, the treated water complies with the microbial standards for drinking water in Mexico. Another important part of this study has been to determine the bacterial regrowth in water after the disinfection processes were tested. After SODIS, bacterial regrowth of coliforms was observed. In contrast, when using the TiO2 catalyst, coliforms regrowth was not detected, neither for total nor for fecal coliforms. The disinfection process using TiO2 kept treated water free of coliforms at least for seven days after sun irradiation. This demonstration opens the possibility of application of this simple method in rural areas of developing countries.

  9. Biofilm in drinking water networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiani, Pietrangela

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial growth in drinking waters is today controlled adding small and non toxic quantities of sanitising products. An innovative electrochemical biofilm monitoring system, already successfully applied in industrial waters, could be confirmed as an effective diagnostic tool of water quality also for drinking distributions systems [it

  10. The Dependence of Chlorine Decay and DBP Formation Kinetics On Pipe Flow Properties in Drinking Water Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous chlorine decay and disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation has long been discussed because of its regulatory and operational significance. This study further examines the water quality changes under hydrodynamic settings during drinking water distribution. Comparative...

  11. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  12. Optimization of fixed titanium dioxide film on PET bottles and visual indicator for water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Munoz, Manuel Antonio

    Water is perhaps the most important resource that sustains human life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), almost two billion people do not have access to the required water that is needed to satisfy their daily needs and one billion do not have access to clean sources of water for consumption, most of them living in isolated and poor areas around the globe. Poor quality water increases the risk of cholera, typhoid fever and dysentery, and other water-borne illness making this problem a real crisis that humankind is facing. Several water disinfection technologies have been proposed as solutions for this problem. Solar water disinfection using TiO2 coated PET bottles was the alternative that is studied in this work. This technology does not only inactivate bacteria but also disintegrates organic chemicals that can be present in water. The objectives of this work address the optimization of the TiO 2 coated PET bottles technologies. The improvement on the bottle coating process, using two coats of 10% W/V of TiO2 in a solution of vinegar and sodium bicarbonate to form the TiO2 film, the use of a different indigo carmine (1.25 X 10-1mg/pill) concentration in the pill indicator of contamination, the increase of the disinfection rate through shaking the bottles, degradation under intermittent UV radiation and the effect of bottle size on photocatalytic water disinfection were among the most important findings. A new mathematical model that describes better photocatalytic water disinfection in TiO2 coated bottles and simulates water disinfection under different working conditions was another important achievement. These results can now be used to design a strategy for disseminating this technology in areas where it is required and, in that way, generate the greatest positive impact on the people needing safe drinking water.

  13. A pilot solar water disinfecting system: performance analysis and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, T.S.; El-Ghetany, H.H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Aeronautics and Space Engineering

    2002-07-01

    In most countries, contaminated water is the major cause of most water-borne diseases. Disinfection of water may be accomplished by a number of different physical-chemical treatments including direct application of thermal energy, chemical and filtration techniques. Solar energy also can be used effectively in this field because inactivation of microorganisms is done either by heating water to a disinfecting temperature or by exposing it to ultraviolet solar radiation. A pilot solar system for disinfecting contaminated water is designed, constructed and tested. Investigations are carried out to evaluate the performance of a wooden hot box solar facility as a solar disinfectant. Experimental data show that solar energy is viable for the disinfection process. A solar radiation model is presented and compared with the experimental data. A mathematical model of the solar disinfectant is also presented. The governing equations are solved numerically via the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of environmental conditions (ambient temperature, wind speed, solar radiation, etc.) on the performance of the solar disinfectant are examined. Results showed that the system is affected by ambient temperature, wind speed, ultraviolet solar radiation intensity, the turbidity of the water, the quantity of water exposed, the contact area between the transparent water container in the solar disinfectant and the absorber plate as well as the geometrical parameters of the system. It is pointed out that for partially cloudy conditions with a low ambient temperature and high wind speeds, the thermal efficiency of the solar disinfectant is at a minimum. The use of solar energy for the disinfection process will increase the productivity of the system while completely eliminating the coliform group bacteria at the same time. (author)

  14. Effect of sodium hypochlorite on typical biofilms formed in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huirong; Zhu, Xuan; Wang, Yuxin; Yu, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Human health and biological safety problems resulting from urban drinking water pipe network biofilms pollution have attracted wide concern. Despite the inclusion of residual chlorine in drinking water distribution systems supplies, the bacterium is a recalcitrant human pathogen capable of forming biofilms on pipe walls and causing health risks. Typical drinking water bacterial biofilms and their response to different concentrations of chlorination was monitored. The results showed that the four bacteria all formed single biofilms susceptible to sodium hypochlorite. After 30 min disinfection, biomass and cultivability decreased with increasing concentration of disinfectant but then increased in high disinfectant doses. PMA-qPCR results indicated that it resulted in little cellular damage. Flow cytometry analysis showed that with increasing doses of disinfectant, the numbers of clusters increased and the sizes of clusters decreased. Under high disinfectant treatment, EPS was depleted by disinfectant and about 0.5-1 mg/L of residual chlorine seemed to be appropriate for drinking water treatment. This research provides an insight into the EPS protection to biofilms. Resistance of biofilms against high levels of chlorine has implications for the delivery of drinking water.

  15. Performance analysis of a solar photovoltaic hybrid system for electricity generation and simultaneous water disinfection of wild bacteria strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichel, N.; Vivar, M.; Fuentes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new hybrid solar water disinfection and energy generation system was designed and tested. • SOLWAT comprises a water disinfection reactor and a PV module fully integrated into a single unit. • Natural water with wild strains of E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and C. perfringens were studied. • The water disinfection reactor located above the PV module did not affect the final energy output. • The SOLWAT disinfection results were always higher than conventional PET bottles. - Abstract: A hybrid solar water disinfection and energy generation system for meeting the needs of safe drinking water and electricity was designed and tested in Alcalá de Henares (Spain) under summer climatic conditions to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. Natural water sources with wild strains of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and Clostridium perfringens (including spores) were studied. Results showed that SOLWAT disinfection efficiency was higher than conventional PET bottles and that the water disinfection reactor located above the PV module did not affect the total energy output produced by the hybrid system in comparison to the single PV module, achieving the same power losses over the 6 h of sun exposure in relation to their power at standard test conditions (STC).

  16. The performance and applicability study of a fixed photovoltaic-solar water disinfection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yanchao; Wang, Yiping; Huang, Qunwu; Zhu, Li; Cui, Yong; Cui, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A fixed photovoltaic-SODIS (solar water disinfection) system was constructed. • The system could generate electricity and produce clean water simultaneously. • The daily solar generated electricity was much more than the system consumption. • The system can be used for about 90% of whole year in Lhasa and Chennai. • Temperature enhanced the SODIS process for about 60% days of whole year in Chennai. - Abstract: The objective of the study is to construct and evaluate a fixed PV (photovoltaic) cell integrated with SODIS (solar water disinfection) system to treat drinking water and generate electricity under different climate through experimental and simulation methods. The photovoltaic and disinfection performances of the hybrid system were studied by the disinfection of Escherichia coli. The applicability of the system in Lhasa and Chennai was evaluated by analyzing the daily radiation and predicting the daily water temperature and the system electricity output. The results confirm that the temperature would dramatically enhance the SODIS process and shorten the disinfection time, when the water temperature was above 45 °C. The PV cell in the hybrid system could work under low temperature because of the water layer and the generated electricity was much more than the system consumption. The simulation results show that the days with maximum water temperature above 45 °C were more than 60% of whole year in Chennai. The generated electricity of the hybrid system was 49682.3 W h and 45615.9 W h a year in Lhasa and Chennai respectively. It was sufficient to drive the system of whole year. The number of days which realized drinking water treatment was 324 days in Lhasa and 315 days in Chennai a year.

  17. Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daley, Kiley; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Jamieson, Rob C.

    2017-01-01

    plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks......Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank...... inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings...

  18. Disinfection of bacteriophage MS2 by copper in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew M; Sobsey, Mark D; Casanova, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Households that lack piped water supply are often forced to meet water needs by storing in the home, leaving water vulnerable to contamination by viruses. Storage in copper containers can potentially prevent this type of contamination, but the inactivation kinetics of viruses by copper need to be described to make appropriate storage recommendations. This work characterized inactivation kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 as a surrogate for enteric viruses by dissolved ionic copper in water. Reduction of MS2 increased with increasing doses of copper. At 0.3 mg/L, there was a 1.8-log 10 reduction of MS2 within 6 h. At 1 and 3 mg/L, 2-2.5 log 10 inactivation could be achieved between 6 and 24 h. Parameters for the Chick-Watson, Hom, and One Hit-Two Population models of inactivation were calculated and evaluated, all of which demonstrated strong goodness-of-fit and predictability at various contact times. Copper inactivates MS2 under controlled conditions at doses between 0.3 and 3 mg/L. Although requiring longer contact times than conventional disinfectants, it is a candidate for improving the safety of stored drinking water.

  19. MODULATION OF THE CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY OF THE DRINKING WATER DBP IODOACETIC ACID BY SUPPRESSORS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose a hazard to the public health. Previously we demonstrated that iodoacetic acid was the most cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP analyzed in a mammalian cell system. Little is k...

  20. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF DlBROMOACETIC ACID ADMINISTERED VIA DRINKING WATER TO FEMALE B6C3Fl MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA) is a disinfection by product commonly found in drinking water as a result of chlorination/ozonation processes. The EPA estimates that more than 200 million people consume disinfected water in the U.S. (EPA 1998). This study was conducted to evaluate the p...

  1. Enhanced drinking water supply through harvested rainwater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddeo, Vincenzo; Scannapieco, Davide; Belgiorno, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Decentralized drinking water systems represent an important element in the process of achieving the Millennium Development Goals, as centralized systems are often inefficient or nonexistent in developing countries. In those countries, most water quality related problems are due to hygiene factors and pathogens. A potential solution might include decentralized systems, which might rely on thermal and/or UV disinfection methods as well as physical and chemical treatments to provide drinking water from rainwater. For application in developing countries, decentralized systems major constraints include low cost, ease of use, environmental sustainability, reduced maintenance and independence from energy sources. This work focuses on an innovative decentralized system that can be used to collect and treat rainwater for potable use (drinking and cooking purposes) of a single household, or a small community. The experimented treatment system combines in one compact unit a Filtration process with an adsorption step on GAC and a UV disinfection phase in an innovative design (FAD - Filtration Adsorption Disinfection). All tests have been carried out using a full scale FAD treatment unit. The efficiency of FAD technology has been discussed in terms of pH, turbidity, COD, TOC, DOC, Escherichia coli and Total coliforms. FAD technology is attractive since it provides a total barrier for pathogens and organic contaminants, and reduces turbidity, thus increasing the overall quality of the water. The FAD unit costs are low, especially if compared to other water treatment technologies and could become a viable option for developing countries.

  2. Detection and persistence of fecal Bacteroidales as water quality indicators in unchlorinated drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Aaron Marc; Kristiansen, Anja; Lund, Marie Braad

    2009-01-01

    doi:10.1016/j.syapm.2008.11.004 The results of this study support the use of fecal Bacteroidales qPCR as a rapid method to complement traditional, culture dependent, water quality indicators in systems where drinking water is supplied without chlorination or other forms of disinfection. A SYBR...... green based, quantitative PCR assay was developed to determine the concentration of fecal Bacteroidales 16S rRNA gene copies. The persistence of a Bacteroides vulgatus pure culture and fecal Bacteroidales from a wastewater inoculum was determined in unchlorinated drinking water at10°C. B. vulgatus 16S r......RNA gene copies persisted throughout the experimental period (200 days) in sterile drinking water but decayed faster in natural drinking water, indicating that the natural microbiota accelerated decay. In a simulated fecal contamination of unchlorinated drinking water, the decay of fecal Bacteroidales 16S...

  3. Home drinking-water purifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzichini, Massimo; Pozio, Alfonso; Russo, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    To salve the widespread problem of contaminated drinking water, home purifiers are now sold in Italy as well as other countries. This article describes how these devices work, how safe they are to use and how safe the water they produce, in the broad context of regulations on drinking water and mineral water. A new device being developed by ENEA to treat municipal water and ground water could provide greater chemical and bacteriological safety. However, the appearance of these new systems makes it necessary to update existing regulations [it

  4. Waterline ATS B. globigii spore water disinfection data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Disinfection of B. globigii spores (a non-pathogenic surrogate for B. anthracis) in clean and dirty water using the ATS-Waterline system, which uses ultraviolet...

  5. development of an automated batch-process solar water disinfection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This work presents the development of an automated batch-process water disinfection system ... Locally sourced materials in addition to an Arduinomicro processor were used to control ..... As already mentioned in section 3.1.1, a statistical.

  6. Centralized Drinking Water Treatment Operations Shape Bacterial and Fungal Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Vikram, Amit; Casson, Leonard; Bibby, Kyle

    2017-07-05

    Drinking water microbial communities impact opportunistic pathogen colonization and corrosion of water distribution systems, and centralized drinking water treatment represents a potential control for microbial community structure in finished drinking water. In this article, we examine bacterial and fungal abundance and diversity, as well as the microbial community taxonomic structure following each unit operation in a conventional surface water treatment plant. Treatment operations drove the microbial composition more strongly than sampling time. Both bacterial and fungal abundance and diversity decreased following sedimentation and filtration; however, only bacterial abundance and diversity was significantly impacted by free chlorine disinfection. Similarly, each treatment step was found to shift bacterial and fungal community beta-diversity, with the exception of disinfection on the fungal community structure. We observed the enrichment of bacterial and fungal taxa commonly found in drinking water distribution systems through the treatment process, for example, Sphingomonas following filtration and Leptospirillium and Penicillium following disinfection. Study results suggest that centralized drinking water treatment processes shape the final drinking water microbial community via selection of community members and that the bacterial community is primarily driven by disinfection while the eukaryotic community is primarily controlled by physical treatment processes.

  7. TIC-Tox: A preliminary discussion on identifying the forcing agents of DBP-mediated toxicity of disinfected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Richardson, Susan D

    2017-08-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is a major public health achievement; however, an unintended consequence of disinfection is the generation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many of the identified DBPs exhibit in vitro and in vivo toxicity, generate a diversity of adverse biological effects, and may be hazards to the public health and the environment. Only a few DBPs are regulated by several national and international agencies and it is not clear if these regulated DBPs are the forcing agents that drive the observed toxicity and their associated health effects. In this study, we combine analytical chemical and biological data to resolve the forcing agents associated with mammalian cell cytotoxicity of drinking water samples from three cities. These data suggest that the trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids may be a small component of the overall cytotoxicity of the organic material isolated from disinfected drinking water. Chemical classes of nitrogen-containing DBPs, such as the haloacetonitriles and haloacetamides, appear to be the major forcing agents of toxicity in these samples. These findings may have important implications for the design of epidemiological studies that primarily rely on the levels of THMs to define DBP exposure among populations. The TIC-Tox approach constitutes a beginning step in the process of identifying the forcing agents of toxicity in disinfected water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Selection Criteria for Water Disinfection Techniques in Agricultural Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Haute, Sam van; Sampers, Imca; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    This paper comprises a selection tool for water disinfection methods for fresh produce pre- and postharvest practices. A variety of water disinfection technologies is available on the market and no single technology is the best choice for all applications. It can be difficult for end users to choose the technology that is best fit for a specific application. Therefore, the different technologies were characterized in order to identify criteria that influence the suitability of a technology fo...

  9. Solar water disinfection (SODIS): A review from bench-top to roof-top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuigan, Kevin G., E-mail: kmcguigan@rcsi.ie [Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Conroy, Ronan M. [Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mosler, Hans-Joachim [EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 133: CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Preez, Martella du; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, Pretoria, Gauteng (South Africa); Fernandez-Ibanez, Pilar [Plataforma Solar de Almeria - CIEMAT, P.O. Box 22, 07200 Tabernas, Almeria (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Graphical abstract: . Water being treated by solar disinfection outside a primary school classroom in Southern Uganda. Students fill their bottles at home and expose them to the sun while they are at school. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thorough review of current state of play of solar water disinfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An examination of both laboratory and field studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of the economic and behaviour change aspects of this technology. - Abstract: Solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been known for more than 30 years. The technique consists of placing water into transparent plastic or glass containers (normally 2 L PET beverage bottles) which are then exposed to the sun. Exposure times vary from 6 to 48 h depending on the intensity of sunlight and sensitivity of the pathogens. Its germicidal effect is based on the combined effect of thermal heating of solar light and UV radiation. It has been repeatedly shown to be effective for eliminating microbial pathogens and reduce diarrhoeal morbidity including cholera. Since 1980 much research has been carried out to investigate the mechanisms of solar radiation induced cell death in water and possible enhancement technologies to make it faster and safer. Since SODIS is simple to use and inexpensive, the method has spread throughout the developing world and is in daily use in more than 50 countries in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. More than 5 million people disinfect their drinking water with the solar disinfection (SODIS) technique. This review attempts to revise all relevant knowledge about solar disinfection from microbiological issues, laboratory research, solar testing, up to and including real application studies, limitations, factors influencing adoption of the technique and health impact.

  10. Solar water disinfection (SODIS): A review from bench-top to roof-top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.; Conroy, Ronán M.; Mosler, Hans-Joachim; Preez, Martella du; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Fernandez-Ibañez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: . Water being treated by solar disinfection outside a primary school classroom in Southern Uganda. Students fill their bottles at home and expose them to the sun while they are at school. Highlights: ► A thorough review of current state of play of solar water disinfection. ► An examination of both laboratory and field studies. ► Description of the economic and behaviour change aspects of this technology. - Abstract: Solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been known for more than 30 years. The technique consists of placing water into transparent plastic or glass containers (normally 2 L PET beverage bottles) which are then exposed to the sun. Exposure times vary from 6 to 48 h depending on the intensity of sunlight and sensitivity of the pathogens. Its germicidal effect is based on the combined effect of thermal heating of solar light and UV radiation. It has been repeatedly shown to be effective for eliminating microbial pathogens and reduce diarrhoeal morbidity including cholera. Since 1980 much research has been carried out to investigate the mechanisms of solar radiation induced cell death in water and possible enhancement technologies to make it faster and safer. Since SODIS is simple to use and inexpensive, the method has spread throughout the developing world and is in daily use in more than 50 countries in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. More than 5 million people disinfect their drinking water with the solar disinfection (SODIS) technique. This review attempts to revise all relevant knowledge about solar disinfection from microbiological issues, laboratory research, solar testing, up to and including real application studies, limitations, factors influencing adoption of the technique and health impact.

  11. Application of neutral electrolyzed water to disinfection of alginate impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Hiroshi; Kozono, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neutral electrolyzed water was developed with new concepts of long-term good durability and minimum corrosiveness to metal in addition to its excellent bactericidal activities similar to acid type of electrolyzed waters. The present study examined the bactericidal effects of the neutral electrolyzed water on disinfection of the alginate impression of a dental arch model contaminated by bacteria. Only 1-min immersion in neutral electrolyzed water could sufficiently disinfect the alginate impression including the metallic tray under ultrasonic with no significant differences from acid electrolyzed waters. No bactericidal effects were found in any electrolyzed water when used as mixing water. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of each electrolyzed water in a comprehensive way, it was suggested that neutral electrolyzed water may be the most appropriate for the disinfection of alginate impression.

  12. Radiological investigation of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, E.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of the report ''Radiological investigation of drinking water'' submitted by a working group of WHO to the Brussels meeting held between Nov 7 and 10, 1978. Annex II is emphasized of the WHO publication bearing the title ''The revision of WHO standards for drinking water''. It is shown that the draft of the revision does not basically differ from the revision introduced in Czechoslovakia and published in a revised standard CSN 83 0611 Drinking Water from 1978, including its harmonization with the Decree 59/72 Collect. of Laws on the protection of health from ionizing radiation, and from the standard CSN 83 0523 Radiometric analysis of drinking water. It is also shown that the text of the working group report contains some incorrect or unclear statements and views, which is explained by the misunderstanding of some ICRP recommendations. (H.S.)

  13. Drinking Water State Revolving Fund

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) National Information Management System collects information that provide a record of progress and accountability for...

  14. Resilience of microbial communities in a simulated drinking water distribution system subjected to disturbances: role of conditionally rare taxa and potential implications for antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many US water utilities using chloramine as their secondary disinfectant have experienced nitrification episodes that detrimentally impact water quality in their distribution systems. A semi-closed pipe-loop chloraminated drinking water distribution system (DWDS) simulator was u...

  15. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on purified water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon Andreu, P.; Lardin Mifsut, C.; Vergara Romero, L.; Polo Canas, P. M.; Perez Sanchez, P.; Rancano Perez, A.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the importance of a suitable water disinfection in order to insure a pollutant effect minimization against environment, this work has been carried out to determine how can affect an ultrasonic pre-treatment upon disinfection step. It has been confirmed the ultrasonic disintegration of bacterial cells in treated water and disinfectant power of treatment by itself, which is not enough to be used as a single method in water disinfection. It has also been proved that from a technical and economical point of view the combination of UV and ultrasound improves the UV treatment performance. Finally, it has been detected that an ultrasonic pre-treatment increases chlorination effectiveness, however the high cost in this combination makes it unfeasible of industrial scale. (Author) 6 refs

  16. Drinking Water Quality in Hospitals and Other Buildings ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water quality entering large buildings is generally adequately controlled by the water utility, but localized problems may occur within building or “premise” plumbing. Particular concerns are loss of disinfectant residual and temperature variability, which may enhance pathogen activity and metallic corrosion. Disinfection systems are available to building managers and are being installed in a variety of commercial buildings (hospitals, hotels, office buildings.) Yet our understanding of such additional treatment and of how to monitor end water quality at these buildings is limited. This class lecture will discuss challenges in maintaining acceptable water quality in hospitals, schools and other buildings. To give a lecture to a class of graduate students (ENVE 6054: Physical/Chemical Processes for Water Quality Control) at the University of Cincinnati, by presenting past research projects.

  17. A Systems Approach to Manage Drinking Water Quality through Integrated Model Projections, Adaptive Monitoring and Process Optimization - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water supplies can be vulnerable to impacts from short-term weather events, long-term changes in land-use and climate, and water quality controls in treatment and distribution. Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in drinking water is a prominent example to illustrate...

  18. A Systems Approach to Manage Drinking Water Quality through Integrated Model Projections, Adaptive Monitoring and Process Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water supplies can be vulnerable to impacts from short-term weather events, long-term changes in land-use and climate, and water quality controls in treatment and distribution. Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in drinking water is a prominent example to illustrate...

  19. Safety and durability of low-density polyethylene bags in solar water disinfection applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danwittayakul, Supamas; Songngam, Supachai; Fhulua, Tipawan; Muangkasem, Panida; Sukkasi, Sittha

    2017-08-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a simple point-of-use process that uses sunlight to disinfect water for drinking. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles are typically used as water containers for SODIS, but a new SODIS container design has recently been developed with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bags and can overcome the drawbacks of PET bottles. Two nesting layers of LDPE bags are used in the new design: the inner layer containing the water to be disinfected and the outer one creating air insulation to minimize heat loss from the water to the surroundings. This work investigated the degradation of LDPE bags used in the new design in actual SODIS conditions over a period of 12 weeks. The degradation of the LDPE bags was investigated weekly using a scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer, and tensile strength tester. It was found that the LDPE bags gradually degraded under the sunlight due to photo-oxidation reactions, especially in the outer bags, which were directly exposed to the sun and surroundings, leading to the reduction of light transmittance (by 11% at 300 nm) and tensile strength (by 33%). In addition, possible leaching of organic compounds into the water contained in the inner bags was examined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol was found in some SODIS water samples as well as the as-received water samples, in the concentration range of 1-4 μg/L, which passes the Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Guidance on Disinfection By-Products.

  20. Responsibility for drinking water; Verantwortung fuer Trinkwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lein, Peter [Ingenieurbuero Dipl.-Ing. Peter Lein, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Planners of drinking water supply systems, implementing sanitary companies as well as building owners probably can be made liable, if the user of drinking water supply systems suffer health damages by drinking water hygienic problems. The germinating of the drinking water with legionella often is the consequence of a not professional start-up of a plant immediately after completion.

  1. [Drinking water quality and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Anna; Miralles, Maria Josepa; Corbella, Irene; García, Soledad; Navarro, Sonia; Llebaria, Xavier

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of drinking water legislation is to guarantee the quality and safety of water intended for human consumption. In the European Union, Directive 98/83/EC updated the essential and binding quality criteria and standards, incorporated into Spanish national legislation by Royal Decree 140/2003. This article reviews the main characteristics of the aforementioned drinking water legislation and its impact on the improvement of water quality against empirical data from Catalonia. Analytical data reported in the Spanish national information system (SINAC) indicate that water quality in Catalonia has improved in recent years (from 88% of analytical reports in 2004 finding drinking water to be suitable for human consumption, compared to 95% in 2014). The improvement is fundamentally attributed to parameters concerning the organoleptic characteristics of water and parameters related to the monitoring of the drinking water treatment process. Two management experiences concerning compliance with quality standards for trihalomethanes and lead in Barcelona's water supply are also discussed. Finally, this paper presents some challenges that, in the opinion of the authors, still need to be incorporated into drinking water legislation. It is necessary to update Annex I of Directive 98/83/EC to integrate current scientific knowledge, as well as to improve consumer access to water quality data. Furthermore, a need to define common criteria for some non-resolved topics, such as products and materials in contact with drinking water and domestic conditioning equipment, has also been identified. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Drinking Water Microbiome as a Screening Tool for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water utilities in the US using chloramine as disinfectant treatment in their distribution systems have experienced nitrification episodes, which detrimentally impact the water quality. Here, we used 16S rRNA sequencing data to generate high-resolution taxonomic profiles of the bulk water (BW) microbiome from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system (DWDS) simulator. The DWDS was operated through four successive operational schemes, including two stable events (SS) and an episode of nitrification (SF), followed by a ‘chlorine burn’ (SR) by switching disinfectant from chloramine to free chlorine. Specifically, this study focuses on biomarker discovery and their potential use to classify SF episodes. Principal coordinate analysis identified two major clusters (SS and SF; PERMANOVA, p 0.976, p < 0.01). Furthermore, models were able to correctly predict 95% (AUC = 0.983, n = 104) and 96% (AUC = 0.973, n = 72) of samples of the DWDS (community structure of two published studies) and water quality datasets, respectively. The results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of selected BW microbiome signatures as predictive biomarkers of nitrification in DWDS. This new information can be used to optimize current nitrification monitoring plans. The purpose of this research is to add to our knowledge of chloramine and chlorine disinfectants, with regards to effects on the microbial communities in drinking water distribution systems. We used a

  3. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water: particle size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, G P; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T; Jefferson, B

    2008-02-01

    The impact of water quality on the ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water was investigated with reference to urban water reuse. Direct UV disinfection of grey water did not meet the stringent California State Title 22 criteria for unrestricted urban water reuse due to the presence of particulate material ranging from or = 2000 microm in size. Grey water was manipulated by settling to produce fractions of varying particle size distributions and blending was employed post-disinfection to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs). The efficacy of UV disinfection was found to be linked to the particle size of the grey water fractions. The larger particle size fractions with a mean particle size of 262 microm and above were observed to shield more coliforms from UV light than did the smaller particles with a mean particle size below 119 microm. Up to 70% of total coliforms in the larger particle size fractions were particle-associated following a UV dose (fluence) of 260 mJ.cm(-2) and would remain undetected by standard coliform enumeration techniques. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and recommendations made for grey water treatment to ensure removal of particle-associated indicator bacteria and pathogens prior to UV disinfection.

  4. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompelat, S; Thomas, O; Le Bot, B

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of 20 human pharmaceutical compounds and metabolites from 10 representative therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface water). Of the 20 human pharmaceutical compounds selected, 16 were quantified in both the surface water and drinking water, with 22% of the values above the limit of quantification for surface water and 14% for drinking water). Psychostimulants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, iodinated contrast media and anxiolytic drugs were the main therapeutic classes of human pharmaceutical compounds detected in the surface water and drinking water. The results for surface water were close to results from previous studies in spite of differences in prescription rates of human pharmaceutical compounds in different countries. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other human pharmaceutical compounds seemed to be removed more efficiently (average elimination rate of over 50%) by adsorption onto activated carbon and oxidation/disinfection with ozone or chlorine (not taking account of the disinfection by-products). These results add to the increasing evidence of the occurrence of human pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water that may represent a threat to human beings exposed to a cocktail of human pharmaceutical compounds and related metabolites and by-products in drinking water.

  5. Basic Information about Your Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Ground Water and Drinking Water Contact Us Share Basic Information about Your Drinking Water Infographic: How does your water system work? The ...

  6. Drinking water and health hazards in environmental perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeteman, B C

    1985-12-01

    Among the present environmental issues drinking water quality and more specifically organic micropollutants receive not the highest priority. The long tradition of potable water quality assurance and the sophisticated evaluation methodologies provide a very useful approach which has great potential for wider application in environmental research and policy making. Water consumption patterns and the relative importance of the drinking water exposure route show that inorganic water contaminants generally contribute much more to the total daily intake than organic micropollutants. An exception is chloroform and probably the group of typical chlorination by-products. Among the carcinogenic organic pollutants in drinking water only chlorination by-products may potentially increase the health risk. Treatment should therefore be designed to reduce chemical oxidant application as much as possible. It is expected that in the beginning of next century organic micropollutants will receive much less attention and that the present focus on treatment by-products will shift to distribution problems. Within the total context of water quality monitoring microbiological tests will grow in relative importance and might once again dominate chemical analysis the next century. As disinfection is the central issue of the present water treatment practice the search for the ideal disinfection procedure will continue and might result in a further reduction in the use of chemical oxidants. 26 references.

  7. Nanofiltration Membranes for Removal of Color and Pathogens in Small Public Drinking Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small public water supplies that use surface water as a source for drinking water are frequently faced with elevated levels of color and natural organic matter (NOM) that are precursors for chlorinated disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation. Nanofiltration (NF) systems can preve...

  8. Fresh water disinfection by pulsed low electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, C; Xu, Y; Liu, Z; Yan, K

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pulsed low electric field process for water disinfection. Electric intensity of 0.6–1.7 kV cm −1 is applied. Experiments are performed with a 1.2 L axis-cylinder reactor. A bipolar pulsed power source with pulsed width of 25 μs and frequency of 100–3000 Hz is used. Water conductivity of 3–200 μs cm −1 is investigated, which can significantly affect pulsed voltage-current waveforms and injected energy. Energy per pulse rises with increased water conductivity. The initial E. Coli density and water conductivity are two major factors influencing the disinfection. No disinfection effect is performed with deionized water of 3 μs cm −1 . When water conductivity is 25 μs cm −1 and bacteria density is 10 4 –10 6 cfu ml −1 , significant disinfection effect is observed. More than 99% of the cells can be disinfected with an energy density of less than 70 J ml −1 , while water temperature is below 30 °C.

  9. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose from drinking water Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Salonen, Laina; Huikuri, Pia; Arvela, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The dose from drinking water originates almost totally from naturally occurring radionuclides in the uranium-238 series, the most important nuclide being radon-222. Second comes lead-210, and third polonium-210. The mean age-group-weighted dose received by ingestion of drinking water is 0.14 mSv per year. More than half of the total cumulative dose of 750 manSv is received by the users of private wells, forming 13% of the population. The most exposed group comprises the users of wells drilled in bedrock, who receive 320 manSv while comprising only 4% of the population. The calculated number of annual cancer incidences due to drinking water is very sensitive to the dose-conversion factors of ingested radon used, as well as to the estimated lung cancer incidences caused by radon released from water into indoor air. (au)

  11. Rapid water disinfection using vertically aligned MoS_2 nanofilms and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Kong, Desheng; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yuan, Hongtao; Lee, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Here, solar energy is readily available in most climates and can be used for water purification. However, solar disinfection of drinking water (SODIS) mostly relies on ultraviolet light, which represents only 4% of total solar energy, and this leads to slow treatment speed. The development of new materials that can harvest visible light for water disinfection, and speed up solar water purification, is therefore highly desirable. Here, we show that few-layered vertically aligned MoS_2 (FLV-MoS_2) films can be used to harvest the whole spectrum of visible light (~ 50% of solar energy) and achieve highly efficient water disinfection. The bandgap of MoS_2 was increased from 1.3 eV to 1.55 eV by decreasing the domain size, which allowed the FLV-MoS_2 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for bacterial inactivation in water. The FLV-MoS_2 showed ~15 times better log inactivation efficiency of indicator bacteria compared to bulk MoS_2, and much faster inactivation of bacteria under both visible light and sunlight illumination compared to widely used TiO_2. Moreover, by using a 5 nm copper film on top of the FLV-MoS_2 as a catalyst to facilitate electron-hole pair separation and promote the generation of ROS, the disinfection rate was further increased 6 fold. With our approach, we achieved water disinfection of >99.999% inactivation of bacteria in 20 minutes with a small amount of material (1.6 mg/L) under simulated visible light.

  12. Rapid water disinfection using vertically aligned MoS2 nanofilms and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Kong, Desheng; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yuan, Hongtao; Lee, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    In most climates, solar energy is readily available and can be used for water purification. But, solar disinfection of drinking water mostly relies on ultraviolet light, which represents only 4% of the total solar energy, and this leads to a slow treatment speed. Therefore, the development of new materials that can harvest visible light for water disinfection, and so speed up solar water purification, is highly desirable. Here we show that few-layered vertically aligned MoS_2 (FLV-MoS_2) films can be used to harvest the whole spectrum of visible light (~50% of solar energy) and achieve highly efficient water disinfection. The bandgap of MoS_2 was increased from 1.3 to 1.55 eV by decreasing the domain size, which allowed the FLV-MoS_2 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for bacterial inactivation in the water. The FLV-MoS_2 showed a ~15 times better log inactivation efficiency of the indicator bacteria compared with that of bulk MoS_2, and a much faster inactivation of bacteria under both visible light and sunlight illumination compared with the widely used TiO_2. Moreover, by using a 5 nm copper film on top of the FLV-MoS_2 as a catalyst to facilitate electron–hole pair separation and promote the generation of ROS, the disinfection rate was increased a further sixfold. Here, we achieved water disinfection of >99.999% inactivation of bacteria in 20 min with a small amount of material (1.6 mg l–1) under simulated visible light.

  13. How dogs drink water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2014-11-01

    Animals with incomplete cheeks (i.e. dogs and cats) need to move fluid against gravity into the body by means other than suction. They do this by lapping fluid with their tongue. When a dog drinks, it curls its tongue posteriorly while plunging it into the fluid and then quickly withdraws its tongue back into the mouth. During this fast retraction fluid sticks to the ventral part of the curled tongue and is drawn into the mouth due to inertia. We show several variations of this drinking behavior among many dog breeds, specifically, the relationship between tongue dynamics and geometry, lapping frequency, and dog weight. We also compare the results with the physical experiment of a rounded rod impact onto a fluid surface. Supported by NSF PoLS #1205642.

  14. Solar water disinfecting system using compound parabolic concentrating collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghetany, H.H.; Saitoh, T.S. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2000-05-31

    Solar water disinfection is an alternative technology using solar radiation and thermal treatment to inactivate and destroy pathogenic microorganisms present in water. The Compound Parabolic Concentrating, (CPC) collector can be used as an efficient key component for solar disinfectanting system. Two types of the CPC collectors are studied, namely the transparent-tube and the Copper-tube CPC collector. It is found that after 30 minutes of exposing the water sample to solar radiation or heating it up to 65 degree C for a few minuets all the coliform bacterial present in the contaminated water sample were completely eliminated. In this article, the effect of water temperature on the disinfecting process was presented. Thermal and micro-biological measurements were also made to evaluate the system performance. (author)

  15. Pathogens in drinking water: Are there any new ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reasoner, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1976 three newly recognized human pathogens have become familiar to the drinking water industry as waterborne disease agents. These are: the legionnaires disease agent, Legionella pneumophila and related species; and two protozoan pathogens, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum, both of which form highly disinfectant resistant cysts that are shed in the feces of infected individuals. The question frequently arises - are there other emerging waterborne pathogens that may pose a human health problem that the drinking water industry will have to deal with. The paper will review the current state of knowledge of the occurrence and incidence of pathogens and opportunistic pathogens other than Legionella, Giardia and Cryptosporidium in treated and untreated drinking water. Bacterial agents that will be reviewed include Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Campylobacter, Mycobacterium, Yersinia and Plesiomonas. Aspects of detection of these agents including detection methods and feasibility of monitoring will be addressed.

  16. [Parasitic zoonoses transmitted by drinking water. Giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, M; Gornik, V

    2004-07-01

    Nowadays, the parasitic zoonose organisms Giardia lamblia und Cryptosporidium spp. are among the most relevant pathogens of drinking water-associated disease outbreaks. These pathogens are transmitted via a fecal-oral route; in both cases the dose of infection is low. Apart from person-to-person or animal-to-person transmissions, the consumption of contaminated food and water are further modes of transmission. The disease is mainly characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms. In industrialized countries, the prevalence rate of giardiasis is 2-5 % and of cryptosporidiosis 1-3%. Throughout the world, a large number of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis outbreaks associated with drinking water were published; in 2001 the first case in Germany was identified. Giardia and Cryptosporidium are detected in surface water and sporadically in unprotected groundwater. Use of these waters for drinking water abstraction makes high demands on the technology of the treatment process: because of the disinfectant resistance of the parasites, safe elimination methods are needed, which even at high contamination levels of source water guarantee safe drinking water. Further measures for prevention and control are implementation of the HACCP concept, which includes the whole chain of procedures of drinking water supply from catchment via treatment to tap and a quality management system.

  17. Biological stability of drinking water: controlling factors, methods and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle ePrest

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g. development of opportunistic pathogens, aesthetic (e.g. deterioration of taste, odour, colour or operational (e.g. fouling or biocorrosion of pipes problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors such as (i type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii presence of predators such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv environmental conditions such as water temperature, and (v spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment or biofilm. Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discuss how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to

  18. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  19. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.

    2016-02-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  20. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, Gough Yumu, E-mail: gough@student.unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Roser, David, E-mail: djroser@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Corkish, Richard, E-mail: r.corkish@unsw.edu.au [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ashbolt, Nicholas J., E-mail: ashbolt@ualberta.ca [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Public Health, South Academic Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Stuetz, Richard, E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270–740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6 h. Five log{sub 10} and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log{sub 10}s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6 h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for > 3-log{sub 10} reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5–2.5 fold at 365–455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. - Highlights: • Disinfection of E. coli and E. faecalis achieved with 270 and 365–455 nm LEDs • No significant disinfection was found with 310 and > 455 nm LEDs

  1. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270–740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6 h. Five log_1_0 and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log_1_0s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6 h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for > 3-log_1_0 reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5–2.5 fold at 365–455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. - Highlights: • Disinfection of E. coli and E. faecalis achieved with 270 and 365–455 nm LEDs • No significant disinfection was found with 310 and > 455 nm LEDs. • UV

  2. Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells Recommend on ... remove lead from my drinking water? What is lead? Lead is a naturally occurring bluish-gray metal ...

  3. Consumer protection on the drinking water market

    OpenAIRE

    Kosová, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The goal of Bachelor thesis is marketing research on consumer preferences and knowledge in the field of drinking water and also analyze and compare the price of tap water and bottled water. The theoretical part describes how the consumer market with drinking water is protected in the Czech Republic. They compared the advantages and disadvantages of both types of drinking water.

  4. Selection criteria for water disinfection techniques in agricultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haute, Sam van; Sampers, Imca; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This paper comprises a selection tool for water disinfection methods for fresh produce pre- and postharvest practices. A variety of water disinfection technologies is available on the market and no single technology is the best choice for all applications. It can be difficult for end users to choose the technology that is best fit for a specific application. Therefore, the different technologies were characterized in order to identify criteria that influence the suitability of a technology for pre- or postharvest applications. Introduced criteria were divided into three principal components: (i) criteria related to the technology and which relate to the disinfection efficiency, (ii) attention points for the management and proper operation, and (iii) necessities in order to sustain the operation with respect to the environment. The selection criteria may help the end user of the water disinfection technology to obtain a systematic insight into all relevant aspects to be considered for preliminary decision making on which technologies should be put to feasibility testing for water disinfection in pre- and postharvest practices of the fresh produce chain.

  5. Ionizing radiation in the disinfection of water contaminated with potentially pathogenic mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, M.; Sedlackova, J.; Vacek, K.

    1982-01-01

    Sterile drinking water samples were artificially colonized with M. kansasii, M. gardonae and M. fortuitum suspensions (the numbers of viable units in 1 ml were 1.2x10 3 , 48.5 and 3.2x10 3 , respectively) prepared from mycobacterial strains replicated in Tween 80-free liquid Dubos medium STO. The contaminated water samples were irradiated from a rotary cobalt 60 source (gamma radiation, E=1.17 and 1.33 MeV, dose rate 1 kJ/kg.h at room temperature) with doses 0.7, 1.5, 2.2, 3, 9, 16 and 27 kJ/kg. The disinfecting effectiveness was assessed by direct cultivation tests (0.5 ml volumes of water inoculated on egg medium) and by cultivation on membrane filtres after filtering the whole amount of the water examined (about 500 ml). Total disinfection was recorded for M. kansasii and M. fortuitum irradiated with 9 kJ/kg and for M. gordonae after irradiation with 1.5 kJ/kg. The calculated value of D 10 =0.4 kJ/kg (i.e., the radiation dose that reduces the number of viable mycobacteria by an order of magnitude) is suggestive of a strong disinfecting effect of ionizing radiation on the tested strains of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria. The results indicate that ionizing radiation could be applxcable in disinfecting supply and potable water contaminated with mycobacteria difficult to remove by other methods which, as a rule, cannot ensure permanent disinfection. (author)

  6. Ionizing radiation in the disinfection of water contaminated with potentially pathogenic mycobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubin, M [Institut Hygieny a Epidemiologie, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Sedlackova, J; Vacek, K [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu CSKAE, Rez (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-01-01

    Sterile drinking water samples were artificially colonized with M. kansasii, M. gardonae and M. fortuitum suspensions (the numbers of viable units in 1 ml were 1.2x10/sup 3/, 48.5 and 3.2x10/sup 3/, respectively) prepared from mycobacterial strains replicated in Tween 80-free liquid Dubos medium STO. The contaminated water samples were irradiated from a rotary cobalt 60 source (gamma radiation, E=1.17 and 1.33 MeV, dose rate 1 kJ/kg.h at room temperature) with doses 0.7, 1.5, 2.2, 3, 9, 16 and 27 kJ/kg. The disinfecting effectiveness was assessed by direct cultivation tests (0.5 ml volumes of water inoculated on egg medium) and by cultivation on membrane filtres after filtering the whole amount of the water examined (about 500 ml). Total disinfection was recorded for M. kansasii and M. fortuitum irradiated with 9 kJ/kg and for M. gordonae after irradiation with 1.5 kJ/kg. The calculated value of D/sub 10/=0.4 kJ/kg (i.e., the radiation dose that reduces the number of viable mycobacteria by an order of magnitude) is suggestive of a strong disinfecting effect of ionizing radiation on the tested strains of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria. The results indicate that ionizing radiation could be applicable in disinfecting supply and potable water contaminated with mycobacteria difficult to remove by other methods which, as a rule, cannot ensure permanent disinfection.

  7. Microbial quality of drinking water in Dar es Salaam and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite this, prevalence of waterborne diseases like cholera, dysentery and typhoid are still high. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Waterguard® in disinfecting drinking water, and determine the level of fecal coliform contamination of water from four sources viz. taps, streams, shallow wells and ...

  8. Breakthrough analysis for water disinfection using silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in fixed-bed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mthombeni, Nomcebo H.; Mpenyana-Monyatsi, Lizzy; Onyango, Maurice S.; Momba, Maggie N.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Performance of silver nanoparticles coated resin in water disinfection is presented. ► Sigmoidal models are used to describe breakthrough curves. ► The performance of the media in water disinfection is affected by process variables. ► Test with environmental water shows the media is effective in water disinfection. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the use of silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in deactivating microbes in drinking water in a column filtration system. The coated resin beads are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to confirm the functional groups, morphology and the presence of silver nanoparticles on the surface of the resin. The performance of the coated resin is evaluated as a function of bed mass, initial bacterial concentration and flow rate using Escherichia coli as model microbial contaminant in water. The survival curves of E. coli are expressed as breakthrough curves (BTCs), which are modeled using sigmoidal regression equations to obtain relevant rate parameters. The number of bed volumes processed at breakthrough point and capacity of the bed are used as performance indicators. Results show that performance increases with a decrease in initial bacterial concentration, an increase in flow rate and an increase in bed mass.

  9. Proactive modeling of water quality impacts of extreme precipitation events in a drinking water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeznach, Lillian C; Hagemann, Mark; Park, Mi-Hyun; Tobiason, John E

    2017-10-01

    Extreme precipitation events are of concern to managers of drinking water sources because these occurrences can affect both water supply quantity and quality. However, little is known about how these low probability events impact organic matter and nutrient loads to surface water sources and how these loads may impact raw water quality. This study describes a method for evaluating the sensitivity of a water body of interest from watershed input simulations under extreme precipitation events. An example application of the method is illustrated using the Wachusett Reservoir, an oligo-mesotrophic surface water reservoir in central Massachusetts and a major drinking water supply to metropolitan Boston. Extreme precipitation event simulations during the spring and summer resulted in total organic carbon, UV-254 (a surrogate measurement for reactive organic matter), and total algae concentrations at the drinking water intake that exceeded recorded maximums. Nutrient concentrations after storm events were less likely to exceed recorded historical maximums. For this particular reservoir, increasing inter-reservoir transfers of water with lower organic matter content after a large precipitation event has been shown in practice and in model simulations to decrease organic matter levels at the drinking water intake, therefore decreasing treatment associated oxidant demand, energy for UV disinfection, and the potential for formation of disinfection byproducts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Small Drinking Water Systems Communication and Outreach ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of our small drinking water systems efforts, this poster highlights several communications and outreach highlights that EPA's Office of Research and Development and Office of Water have been undertaking in collaboration with states and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators. To share information at EPA's annual small drinking water systems workshop

  11. Water Purification and Disinfection by using Solar Energy: Towards Green Energy Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Z.H. Khan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to design a solar water treatment plant for household purpose. Water purification is the process of eradicating detrimental chemicals, biological poisons, suspended solids and gases from contaminated water. In this work we have reported an investigation of compact filter which is cost effective for developing countries and ease of maintenance. We have arranged a solar water disinfection system that improves the microbiological quality of drinking water at household level. We get 14 L pure water and 16 ml water vapour within 240 min by using filtration method. From our work we get hot water up to 49°C. The efficiency of the system at sunny days and cloudy days are 18.23% and 18.13% respectively. This simple solar hybrid system helps to remove turbidity as well as chemical and pathogenic contaminants from water sources in the most affordable, and expedient manner possibly.

  12. Uranium in Kosovo's drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Fatlume; Goessler, Walter

    2013-11-01

    The results of this paper are an initiation to capture the drinking water and/or groundwater elemental situation in the youngest European country, Kosovo. We aim to present a clear picture of the natural uranium concentration in drinking water and/or groundwater as it is distributed to the population of Kosovo. Nine hundred and fifty-one (951) drinking water samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The results are the first countrywide interpretation of the uranium concentration in drinking water and/or groundwater, directly following the Kosovo war of 1999. More than 98% of the samples had uranium concentrations above 0.01 μg L(-1), which was also our limit of quantification. Concentrations up to 166 μg L(-1) were found with a mean of 5 μg L(-1) and median 1.6 μg L(-1) were found. Two point six percent (2.6%) of the analyzed samples exceeded the World Health Organization maximum acceptable concentration of 30 μg L(-1), and 44.2% of the samples exceeded the 2 μg L(-1) German maximum acceptable concentrations recommended for infant food preparations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drinking Water - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialect)) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention French (français) Expand Section Keep Food and Water Safe After a Disaster or Emergency - English HTML Keep Food and Water Safe After a Disaster or Emergency - français (French) HTML Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Haitian ...

  14. Hot Topics/New Initiatives | Drinking Water in New England ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    Information on Drinking Water in New England. Major Topics covered include: Conservation, Private Wells, Preventing Contamination, Drinking Water Sources, Consumer Confidence Reports, and Drinking Water Awards.

  15. Drinking-water monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A new measuring system was developed by the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf for monitoring the quality of drinking-water. It is based on the experience made with the installation of UWEDAT (registered trademark) environmental monitoring networks in several Austrian provinces and regions. The standard version of the drinking-water monitoring system comprises sensors for measuring chemical parameters in water, radioactivity in water and air, and meteorological values of the environment. Further measuring gauges, e.g. for air pollutants, can be connected at any time, according to customers' requirements. For integration into regional and supraregional networks, station computers take over the following tasks: Collection of data and status signals transmitted by the subsystem, object protection, intermediate storage and communication of data to the host or several subcentres via Datex-P postal service, permanent lines or radiotransmission

  16. Drinking Water Contaminants -- Standards and Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Drinking Water Contaminants – Standards and Regulations EPA identifies contaminants to regulate ... other partners to implement these SDWA provisions. Regulated Contaminants National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs) - table of ...

  17. Regulation Development for Drinking Water Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    To explain what process and information underlies regulations including how the Safe Drinking Water Act applies to regulation development i.e. how does the drinking water law translate into regulations.

  18. Biological instability in a chlorinated drinking water distribution network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Rubulis, Janis; Vital, Marius; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of a drinking water distribution system is to deliver drinking water to the consumer, preferably with the same quality as when it left the treatment plant. In this context, the maintenance of good microbiological quality is often referred to as biological stability, and the addition of sufficient chlorine residuals is regarded as one way to achieve this. The full-scale drinking water distribution system of Riga (Latvia) was investigated with respect to biological stability in chlorinated drinking water. Flow cytometric (FCM) intact cell concentrations, intracellular adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), heterotrophic plate counts and residual chlorine measurements were performed to evaluate the drinking water quality and stability at 49 sampling points throughout the distribution network. Cell viability methods were compared and the importance of extracellular ATP measurements was examined as well. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 5×10(3) cells mL(-1) to 4.66×10(5) cells mL(-1) in the network. While this parameter did not exceed 2.1×10(4) cells mL(-1) in the effluent from any water treatment plant, 50% of all the network samples contained more than 1.06×10(5) cells mL(-1). This indisputably demonstrates biological instability in this particular drinking water distribution system, which was ascribed to a loss of disinfectant residuals and concomitant bacterial growth. The study highlights the potential of using cultivation-independent methods for the assessment of chlorinated water samples. In addition, it underlines the complexity of full-scale drinking water distribution systems, and the resulting challenges to establish the causes of biological instability.

  19. Potassium permanganate in drinking water treatment: reduction of organic matter and disinfection by-products; Permanganato potasico en potabilizacion de aguas : Reduccion de materias organicas y subproductos de desinfeccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Galvin, R. [Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)

    1997-09-01

    This paper deals on the results obtained with the use of potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) in drinking water treatment. Thus, permanganization of water before chlorination implied the reduction of 50% in odors. Moreover, oxidation with KMnO{sub 4} reduced UV absorbency of water (UV-254nm) by a 17% more as compared with that obtained by chlorine. Finally as far as the production of organo-chlorinated compounds, the treatment with (potassium permanganate+chlorine) allowed an important reduction vs the conventional chlorination: only a 65% of total THMs were generated (between 58% and 80% of specific THM) and between 30 % and 68% of tri-and tetra-phenolchlorinated, as compared with only chlorination. (Author)

  20. LCA of Drinking Water Supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Berit; Meron, Noa; Rygaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Water supplies around the globe are growing complex and include more intense treatment methods than just decades ago. Now, desalination of seawater and wastewater reuse for both non-potable and potable water supply have become common practice in many places. LCA has been used to assess...... the potentials and reveal hotspots among the possible technologies and scenarios for water supplies of the future. LCA studies have been used to support decisions in the planning of urban water systems and some important findings include documentation of reduced environmental impact from desalination of brackish...... water over sea water, the significant impacts from changed drinking water quality and reduced environmental burden from wastewater reuse instead of desalination. Some of the main challenges in conducting LCAs of water supply systems are their complexity and diversity, requiring very large data...

  1. Occurrences of nitrosamines in chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water in three representative cities, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Qian; Wang, Donghong; Wang, Zijian

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the occurrence of nine nitrosamines in drinking water following different water treatment processes was conducted using samples from seven drinking water treatment plants in three cities and tap waters in one city in China. The total nitrosamine levels ranged from not detected (n.d.) to 43.45 ng/L. The species and concentrations of the nine nitrosamines varied with disinfection methods and source waters. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is the nitrosamines of greatest concern, was identified in raw water, disinfecting water, finished water and tap water samples, ranging from 0.8 to 21.6, 0.12 to 24.2, n.d. to 8.8, and n.d. to 13.3 ng/L, respectively. Chloramination alone produced the most significant amounts of NDMA, while ozonation followed by chloramination led to moderately reduced levels. Additionally, chlorination produced relatively less NDMA, while low pressure ultraviolet radiation followed by chlorination could also significantly reduce them. Total organic carbon is one of the most important factors influencing nitrosamines formation in disinfecting water. In contrast, the addition of chlorine following any other disinfection was found to increase the formation of the other eight species of nitrosamines. The three nitrosamines recommended for monitoring by the US EPA were detected in the tap water samples, but most were present at levels below those that pose a risk to human health. Nevertheless, the occurrence and concentration of nitrosamines regulated in the Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List could cause some potential human effects and therefore warrant attention. Highlights: ► Nitrosamines in disinfected drinking water in three Chinese cities were investigated. ► Some nitrosamines could be detected in raw water. ► Advanced treatment affects nitrosamine levels both positively and negatively. ► Organic matters contribute to increased nitrosamine level. ► Nitrosamine levels in this study were below the EPA MAC but

  2. Safe Drinking Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-23

    Listen to this podcast to learn more about the steps that are taken to bring you clean tap water.  Created: 4/23/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/1/2008.

  3. Comammox in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulin; Ma, Liping; Mao, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaotao; Xia, Yu; Yu, Ke; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of complete ammonia oxidizer (comammox) has fundamentally upended our perception of the global nitrogen cycle. Here, we reported four metagenome assembled genomes (MAGs) of comammox Nitrospira that were retrieved from metagenome datasets of tap water in Singapore (SG-bin1 and SG-bin2), Hainan province, China (HN-bin3) and Stanford, CA, USA (ST-bin4). Genes of phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (hao) were identified in these four MAGs. Phylogenetic analysis based on ribosomal proteins, AmoA, hao and nitrite oxidoreductase (subunits nxrA and nxrB) sequences indicated their close relationships with published comammox Nitrospira. Canonical ammonia-oxidizing microbes (AOM) were also identified in the three tap water samples, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in Singapore's and Stanford's samples and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Hainan's sample. The comammox amoA-like sequences were also detected from some other drinking water systems, and even outnumbered the AOA and AOB amoA-like sequences. The findings of MAGs and the occurrences of AOM in different drinking water systems provided a significant clue that comammox are widely distributed in drinking water systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1718 - Drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drinking water. 75.1718 Section 75.1718 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1718 Drinking water. [Statutory Provisions] An adequate supply of potable water shall be provided for drinking purposes in the active workings of the mine...

  6. Monitoring for the Presence of Parasitic Protozoa and Free-living Amoebae in Drinking Water Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Saad Amer.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of drinking water by microorganisms represents a major human health hazard in many parts of the world. The main objective of drinking water treatment is to provide microbiologically safe drinking water. The conventional drinking water treatment and disinfection has proved to be one of the major public health advances in modern times. A number of processes; namely water treatment, disinfection and changes influence the quality of drinking water delivered to the customer’s tap during transport of treated water via the distribution system. At least 325 water-associated outbreaks of parasitic protozoan disease have reported. In this study, drinking water from treatment plants evaluated for the presence of parasitic protozoa. Water samples collected from two main points: (a outlet of the water treatment plants (b distribution system at different distances from the water treatment plants. Protozoa were concentrated from each water sample by adsorption and accumulation on the nitrocellulose membrane filters (0.45 μm pore size and detected by conventional staining methods.

  7. Development of Thresholds and Exceedance Probabilities for Influent Water Quality to Meet Drinking Water Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. L.; Samson, C.; Summers, R. S.; Balaji, R.

    2017-12-01

    Drinking water treatment utilities (DWTU) are tasked with the challenge of meeting disinfection and disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations to provide safe, reliable drinking water under changing climate and land surface characteristics. DBPs form in drinking water when disinfectants, commonly chlorine, react with organic matter as measured by total organic carbon (TOC), and physical removal of pathogen microorganisms are achieved by filtration and monitored by turbidity removal. Turbidity and TOC in influent waters to DWTUs are expected to increase due to variable climate and more frequent fires and droughts. Traditional methods for forecasting turbidity and TOC require catchment specific data (i.e. streamflow) and have difficulties predicting them under non-stationary climate. A modelling framework was developed to assist DWTUs with assessing their risk for future compliance with disinfection and DBP regulations under changing climate. A local polynomial method was developed to predict surface water TOC using climate data collected from NOAA, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the IRI Data Library, and historical TOC data from three DWTUs in diverse geographic locations. Characteristics from the DWTUs were used in the EPA Water Treatment Plant model to determine thresholds for influent TOC that resulted in DBP concentrations within compliance. Lastly, extreme value theory was used to predict probabilities of threshold exceedances under the current climate. Results from the utilities were used to produce a generalized TOC threshold approach that only requires water temperature and bromide concentration. The threshold exceedance model will be used to estimate probabilities of exceedances under projected climate scenarios. Initial results show that TOC can be forecasted using widely available data via statistical methods, where temperature, precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and NDVI with various lags were shown to be important

  8. The efficacy of potassium ferrate as a chemical disinfectant on E. coli, Vibrio cholera, human adenovirus, and Giardia lamblia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Drinking water and wastewater go through numerous treatments to remove microorganisms and other contaminants one of many processes along the treatment train is disinfection. There are different ways to disinfect these waters, however to date the most common disinf...

  9. Applications of Photocatalytic Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Gamage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the superior ability of photocatalysis to inactivate a wide range of harmful microorganisms, it is being examined as a viable alternative to traditional disinfection methods such as chlorination, which can produce harmful byproducts. Photocatalysis is a versatile and effective process that can be adapted for use in many applications for disinfection in both air and water matrices. Additionally, photocatalytic surfaces are being developed and tested for use in the context of “self-disinfecting” materials. Studies on the photocatalytic technique for disinfection demonstrate this process to have potential for widespread applications in indoor air and environmental health, biological, and medical applications, laboratory and hospital applications, pharmaceutical and food industry, plant protection applications, wastewater and effluents treatment, and drinking water disinfection. Studies on photocatalytic disinfection using a variety of techniques and test organisms are reviewed, with an emphasis on the end-use application of developed technologies and methods.

  10. A review on wastewater disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in regulations and development of new technologies have affected the selection of alternative for treated wastewater disinfection. Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. Driving forces include water scarcity and drinking water supply, irrigation, rapid industrialization, using reclaimed water, source protection, overpopulation, and environmental protection. The safe operation of water reuse depends on effluent disinfection. Understanding the differences in inactivation mechanisms is critical to identify rate-limiting steps involved in the inactivation process as well as to develop more effective disinfection strategies. Disinfection byproducts discharged from wastewater treatment plants may impair aquatic ecosystems and downstream drinking-water quality. Numerous inorganic and organic micropollutants can undergo reactions with disinfectants. Therefore, to mitigate the adverse effects and also to enhance that efficiency, the use of alternative oxidation/disinfection systems should be evaluated as possible alternative to chlorine. This review gives a summary of the traditional, innovative, and combined disinfection alternatives and also disinfection byproducts for effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

  11. Drinking and Cleaning Water Use in a Dairy Cow Barn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Krauß

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water is used in dairy farming for producing feed, watering the animals, and cleaning and disinfecting barns and equipment. The objective of this study was to investigate the drinking and cleaning water use in a dairy cow barn. The water use was measured on a well-managed commercial dairy farm in North-East Germany. Thirty-eight water meters were installed in a barn with 176 cows and two milking systems (an automatic milking system and a herringbone parlour. Their counts were logged hourly over 806 days. On average, the cows in the automatic milking system used 91.1 (SD 14.3 L drinking water per cow per day, while those in the herringbone parlour used 54.4 (SD 5.3 L per cow per day. The cows drink most of the water during the hours of (natural and artificial light in the barn. Previously published regression functions of drinking water intake of the cows were reviewed and a new regression function based on the ambient temperature and the milk yield was developed (drinking water intake (L per cow per day = −27.937 + 0.49 × mean temperature + 3.15 × milk yield (R2 = 0.67. The cleaning water demand had a mean of 28.6 (SD 14.8 L per cow per day in the automatic milking system, and a mean of 33.8 (SD 14.1 L per cow per day in the herringbone parlour. These findings show that the total technical water use in the barn makes only a minor contribution to water use in dairy farming compared with the water use for feed production.

  12. Occurrence of regulated and emerging iodinated DBPs in the Shanghai drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wei

    Full Text Available Drinking water chlorination plays a pivotal role in preventing pathogen contamination against water-borne disease. However, chemical disinfection leads to the formation of halogenated disinfection by products (DBPs. Many DBPs are highly toxic and are of health concern. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive measurements of DBPs, including iodoacetic acid (IAA, iodoform (IF, nine haloacetic acids and four trihalomethanes in drinking waters from 13 water plants in Shanghai, China. The results suggested that IAA and IF were found in all the water treatment plants, with maximum levels of 1.66 µg/L and 1.25 µg/L for IAA and IF, respectively. Owing to deterioration of water quality, the Huangpu River has higher IAA and IF than the Yangtze River. Our results also demonstrated that low pH, high natural organic matter, ammonia nitrogen, and iodide in source waters increased IAA and IF formation. Compared to chlorine, chloramines resulted in higher concentration of iodinated DBP, but reduced the levels of trihalomethanes. This is the first study to reveal the widespread occurrence of IAA and IF in drinking water in China. The data provide a better understanding on the formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts and the findings should be useful for treatment process improvement and disinfection byproducts controls.

  13. Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs or primary standards) are legally enforceable standards that apply to public water systems. Primary standards...

  14. New Perspectives in Monitoring Drinking Water Microbial Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Borrego

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The safety of drinking water is evaluated by the results obtained from faecal indicators during the stipulated controls fixed by the legislation. However, drinking-water related illness outbreaks are still occurring worldwide. The failures that lead to these outbreaks are relatively common and typically involve preceding heavy rain and inadequate disinfection processes. The role that classical faecal indicators have played in the protection of public health is reviewed and the turning points expected for the future explored. The legislation for protecting the quality of drinking water in Europe is under revision, and the planned modifications include an update of current indicators and methods as well as the introduction of Water Safety Plans (WSPs, in line with WHO recommendations. The principles of the WSP approach and the advances signified by the introduction of these preventive measures in the future improvement of dinking water quality are presented. The expected impact that climate change will have in the quality of drinking water is also critically evaluated.

  15. Cleaning Up Our Drinking Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manke, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    Imagine drinking water that you wring out of the sponge you've just used to wash your car. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply our drinking water. 'We need to understand this natural system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water,' said Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Applied Geology and Geochemistry Group Manager, Wayne Martin. Biologists, statisticians, hydrologists, geochemists, geologists and computer scientists at PNNL work together to clean up contaminated soils and groundwater. The teams begin by looking at the complexities of the whole environment, not just the soil or just the groundwater. PNNL researchers also perform work for private industries under a unique use agreement between the Department of Energy and Battelle, which operates the laboratory for DOE. This research leads to new remediation methods and technologies to tackle problems ranging from arsenic at old fertilizer plants to uranium at former nuclear sites. Our results help regulators, policy makers and the public make critical decisions on complex environmental issues

  16. A review on wastewater disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin; Hassan Hashemi; Amir Mohammadi Bovini; Yung Tse Hung

    2013-01-01

    Changes in regulations and development of new technologies have affected the selection of alternative for treated wastewater disinfection. Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. Driving forces include water scarcity and drinking water supply, irrigation, rapid industrialization, using reclaimed water, source protection, overpopulation, and environmental protection. The safe operation of water reuse depends on effluent d...

  17. Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Nitrosamines in Treated Drinking Water and Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    N-Nitrosamines, including N-dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), were identified as chlorination byproducts in drinking water in 1989. Nitrosamines are known rodent carcinogens and probable human carcinogens, so that they have been considered disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of public healt...

  18. The Impact of Commercially Treated Oil and Gas Produced Water Discharges on Bromide Concentrations and Modeled Brominated Trihalomethane Disinfection Byproducts at two Downstream Municipal Drinking Water Plants in the Upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species were observed in finished water at several Western Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in br...

  19. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH FOR MEASURING PRIORITY DBPS IN REVERSE OSMOSIS CONCENTRATED DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when drinking water is chlorinated, but only a few are routinely measured or regulated. Various studies have revealed a plethora of DBPs for which sensitive and quantitative analytical methods have always been a major limiting facto...

  20. Induction of Abasic Sites by the Drinking-Water Mutagen MX in Salmonella TA100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagen X (MX) is a chlorinated furanone that accounts for more of the mutagenic activity of drinking water than any other disinfection by-product. It is one of the most potent base-substitution mutagens in the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, producing primarily GC to TA mu...

  1. OVERVIEW OF DRINKING WATER MUTAGENICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY AND RISK FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroacetic acid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of 2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxici...

  2. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m 3 d −1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L −1 ; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L −1 ), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L −1 ) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  3. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Larry B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Hladik, Michelle L. [U.S. Geological Survey, 6000 J Street Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819 (United States); Vajda, Alan M. [University of Colorado, Department of Integrative Biology, CB 171, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Fitzgerald, Kevin C. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); AECOM, 500 West Jefferson St., Ste. 1600, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Douville, Chris [City of Boulder, 4049 75th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m{sup 3} d{sup −1} design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L{sup −1}; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L{sup −1}), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L{sup −1}) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had

  4. Drugs, diagnostic agents and disinfectants in wastewater and water--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmerer, K

    2000-01-01

    After administration pharmaceuticals are excreted by the patients into the aquatic environment via wastewater. Unused medications are sometimes disposed of in drains. The drugs may enter the aquatic environment and eventually reach drinking water, if they are not biodegraded or eliminated during sewage treatment. Additionally, antibiotics and disinfectants are assumed to disturb the wastewater treatment process and the microbial ecology in surface waters. Furthermore, resistant bacteria may be selected in the aeration tanks of sewage treatment plants by the antibiotic substances present. Since the 1980s, data on the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in natural surface waters and the effluents of sewage treatment plants have been reported. More recently, pharmaceuticals have been detected in ground and drinking water. However, only little is known about the risk imposed on humans by pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in surface and drinking water. An overview of input, occurrence, elimination (e.g. biodegradability) and possible effects of different pharmaceutical groups such as anti-tumour drugs, antibiotics and contrast media as well as AOX resulting from hospitals effluent input into sewage water and surface water is presented.

  5. Electrochemical disinfection of bacteria-laden water using antimony-doped tin-tungsten-oxide electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian, Saloumeh; Asadishad, Bahareh; Omanovic, Sasha; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2017-12-01

    Electrochemical disinfection has been shown to be an efficient method with a shortrequired contact time for treatment of drinking water supplies, industrial raw water supplies, liquid foodstuffs, and wastewater effluents. In the present work, the electrochemical disinfection of saline water contaminated with bacteria was investigated in chloride-containing solutions using Sb-doped Sn 80% -W 20% -oxide anodes. The influence of current density, bacterial load, initial chloride concentration, solution pH, and the type of bacteria (E. coli D21, E. coli O157:H7, and E. faecalis) on disinfection efficacy was systematically examined. The impact of natural organic matter and a radical scavenger on the disinfection process was also examined. The electrochemical system was highly effective in bacterial inactivation for a 0.1 M NaCl solution contaminated with ∼10 7  CFU/mL bacteria by applying a current density ≥1 mA/cm 2 through the cell.100% inactivation of E. coli D21 was achieved with a contact time of less than 60 s and power consumption of 48 Wh/m 3 , by applying a current density of 6 mA/cm 2 in a 0.1 M NaCl solution contaminated with ∼10 7 CFU/mL. Reactive chlorine species as well as reactive oxygen species (e.g. hydroxyl radicals) generated in situ during the electrochemical process were determined to be responsible for inactivation of bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carcinogenic and mutagenic properties of chemicals in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, R J

    1985-12-01

    Isolated cases of careless handling of industrial and domestic waste has lead to a wide variety of dangerous chemicals being inadvertently introduced into drinking water. However, chemicals with established carcinogenic and mutagenic properties that occur with a high frequency and in multiple locations are limited in number. To date, the chief offenders have been chemicals of relatively low carcinogenic potency. Some of the more common chemicals are formed as by-products of disinfection. The latter process is generally regarded as essential to the production of a ''microbiologically safe'' drinking water. Consequently, any reductions in what may be a relatively small carcinogenic risk must be balanced against a potential for a higher frequency of waterborne infectious disease. The results of recent toxicological investigations will be reviewed to place the potential carcinogenic and mutagenic hazards frequently associated with drinking water into perspective. First, evidence for the carcinogenicity of certain volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride is considered. Second, the carcinogenic activity that can be ascribed to various by-products of chlorination is reviewed in some detail. Finally, recent evidence that other chemicals derived from the treatment and distribution of drinking water is highlighted as an area requiring move systematic attention. 72 references.

  7. Dimethylamine biodegradation by mixed culture enriched from drinking water biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jingxu; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylamine (DMA) is one of the important precursors of drinking water disinfection by-product N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Reduction of DMA to minimize the formation of carcinogenic NDMA in drinking water is of practical importance. Biodegradation plays a major role in elimination of DMA pollution in the environment, yet information on DMA removal by drinking water biofilter is still lacking. In this study, microcosms with different treatments were constructed to investigate the potential of DMA removal by a mixed culture enriched from a drinking water biofilter and the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources. DMA could be quickly mineralized by the enrichment culture. Amendment of a carbon source, instead of a nitrogen source, had a profound impact on DMA removal. A shift in bacterial community structure was observed with DMA biodegradation, affected by carbon and nitrogen sources. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum group in DMA-degrading microcosms. Microorganisms from a variety of bacterial genera might be responsible for the rapid DMA mineralization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Army's drinking water surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneeringer, P.V.; Belkin, F.; Straffon, N.; Costick, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 827 water sources from Army installations throughout the world were sampled and analyzed for 53 chemical constituents and physical parameters. Medically significant contaminants included radiation measurements, heavy metals, fluoride, nitrate, and pesticides. Radiological activity appeared to vary with geographic location; a majority being from water sources in the western part of the U.S. No results for tritium were found to exceed the health-reference limit. Confirmatory analyses for radium-226 identified 3 groundwater sources as exceeding the limit; one was attributed to natural activity and the other sources are currently being investigated. Of the metals considered to be medically significant, mercury, chromium, lead, cadmium, silver, barium and arsenic were found in amounts within health level limits. Nitrate levels exceeding the health limit were confirmed for 2 drinking water sources

  9. Uranium and drinking water; Uran und Trinkwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konietzka, Rainer [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet II 3.6 - Toxikologie des Trink- und Badebeckenwassers; Dieter, Hermann H.

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is provoking public anxiety based on the radioactivity of several isotopes and the connection to nuclear technology. Drinking water contains at the most geogenic uranium in low concentrations that might be interesting in the frame of chemical of toxicology, but not due to radiological impact. The contribution gives an overview on the uranium content in drinking water and health effects for the human population based on animal tests. These experiments indicate a daily tolerable intake of 0.2 microgram per kg body mass. The actual limiting value for uranium in drinking water is 0.3 microgram per kg body mass water (drinking water regulation from 2001).

  10. Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kiley; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth; Jamieson, Rob C; Hayward, Jenny L; Piorkowski, Greg S; Krkosek, Wendy; Gagnon, Graham A; Castleden, Heather; MacNeil, Kristen; Poltarowicz, Joanna; Corriveau, Emmalina; Jackson, Amy; Lywood, Justine; Huang, Yannan

    2017-06-13

    Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of water conveyance. Generally, the source and drinking water was of satisfactory microbial quality, containing Escherichia coli levels of water in households receiving trucked water contained less than the recommended 0.2 mg/L of free chlorine, while piped drinking water in Iqaluit complied with Health Canada guidelines for residual chlorine (i.e. >0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.

  11. Organic chloramines in chlorine-based disinfected water systems: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Kristiana, Ina; Busetti, Francesco; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-08-01

    This paper is a critical review of current knowledge of organic chloramines in water systems, including their formation, stability, toxicity, analytical methods for detection, and their impact on drinking water treatment and quality. The term organic chloramines may refer to any halogenated organic compounds measured as part of combined chlorine (the difference between the measured free and total chlorine concentrations), and may include N-chloramines, N-chloramino acids, N-chloraldimines and N-chloramides. Organic chloramines can form when dissolved organic nitrogen or dissolved organic carbon react with either free chlorine or inorganic chloramines. They are potentially harmful to humans and may exist as an intermediate for other disinfection by-products. However, little information is available on the formation or occurrence of organic chloramines in water due to a number of challenges. One of the biggest challenges for the identification and quantification of organic chloramines in water systems is the lack of appropriate analytical methods. In addition, many of the organic chloramines that form during disinfection are unstable, which results in difficulties in sampling and detection. To date research has focussed on the study of organic monochloramines. However, given that breakpoint chlorination is commonly undertaken in water treatment systems, the formation of organic dichloramines should also be considered. Organic chloramines can be formed from many different precursors and pathways. Therefore, studying the occurrence of their precursors in water systems would enable better prediction and management of their formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Determination of the minor disinfection by-products formed in the water plant of Sant Joan Despi (Barcelona, Spain); Determinacion de los subproductos de desinfeccion minoritarios formados en la planta de Sant Joan Despi (Barcelona)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancho, B.; Galceran, M.T. [Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Ventura, F. [AGBAR. Societat General d` Aigues de Barcelona, S.A. (Spain)

    1997-09-01

    Chlorine is widely used in drinking water disinfection due to be a powerful and not expense disinfection. Although the benefits of disinfection, the formation of stable disinfection by-products of the health concern, is the result of the interaction of aqueous chlorine with natural organic matter presents in water. Disinfection by-products generated in major concentration are trihalomethane and haloacetic acids. Disinfection by-products generated in minor concentration are haloacetonitriles, haloketones,chloral hydrate and chloropicrin and some new groups such as cyanogen halides and trihaloacetaldydes. In this work two analytical methods.: headspace/gas chromatography/electron capture detector and liquid-liquid microextraction/gas chromatography/electron capture detector are studied and compared to determine the minor by-products and to establish finally, a systematic control of them in the different stages of the Water Treatment Plant of San Joan Despi (Barcelona, Spain). (Author) 12 refs.

  13. Drinking water quality in urban areas of pakistan a case study of gujranwala city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydar, S.; Rashid, H.

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the drinking water quality of Gujranwala city. Samples were collected from 16 locations including: 4 tube wells, 4 overhead reservoirs (OHR) and 8 house connections. Twelve physicochemical and two bacteriological parameters were tested, before and after monsoon and compared with National Standards for Drinking Water Quality (NSDWQ). The results demonstrated that most of the physicochemical parameters, except lead, nickle and chromium were within NSDWQ before and after monsoon. Bacteriological and heavy metal contamination was found before and after the monsoon. Possible reasons of contamination are: no disinfection, old and leaking water pipes, poor drainage during monsoon and possible cross connections between water and sewerage lines. It is recommended to practice disinfection, laying of water and sewerage pipes on opposite sides of streets and periodic water quality monitoring. (author)

  14. Pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Chander

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical products and their wastes play a major role in the degradation of environment. These drugs have positive as well as negative consequences on different environmental components including biota in different ways. Many types of pharmaceutical substances have been detected with significant concentrations through various advanced instrumental techniques in surface water, subsurface water, ground water, domestic waste water, municipal waste water and industrial effluents. The central as well as state governments in India are providing supports by creating excise duty free zones to promote the pharmaceutical manufacturers for their production. As a result, pharmaceutical companies are producing different types of pharmaceutical products at large scale and also producing complex non-biodegradable toxic wastes byproducts and releasing untreated or partially treated wastes in the environment in absence of strong regulations. These waste pollutants are contaminating all types of drinking water sources. The present paper focuses on water quality pollution by pharmaceutical pollutants, their occurrences, nature, metabolites and their fate in the environment.

  15. The study of interrelationship between raw water quality parameters, chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Md. Pauzi; Yee, Lim Fang; Ata, Sadia; Abdullah, Abass; Ishak, Basar; Abidin, Khairul Nidzham Zainal

    Disinfection is the most crucial process in the treatment of drinking water supply and is the final barrier against bacteriological impurities in drinking water. Chlorine is the primary disinfectant used in the drinking water treatment process throughout Malaysia. However, the occurrence of various disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids created a major issue on the potential health hazards which may pose adverse health effects in both human and animals. To simulate real water treatment conditions and to represent the conditions inherent in a tropical country, this study was performed at an urbanized water treatment plant with a daily production of about 549,000 m 3 of treated water. The purpose of this work is to examine the relationship between the water quality parameters in the raw water with chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products. This study also investigated the possibility of the statistical model applications for the prediction of chlorine demand and the THM formation. Two models were developed to estimate the chlorine demand and the THM formation. For the statistical evaluation, correlation and simple linear regression analysis were conducted using SPSS. The results of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the estimation of goodness-of-fit of the dependent variables of the models to the normal distribution showed that all the dependent variables followed the normal distribution at significance level of 0.05. Good linear correlations were observed between the independent parameters and formation of THM and the chlorine demand. This study also revealed that ammonia and the specific ultraviolet absorbent (SUVA) were the function of chlorine consumption in the treatment process. Chlorine dosage and SUVA increase the yield of THM. Chlorine demand and THM formation was moderately sensitive, but significant to the pH. The level of significance ( α) for the statistical tests and the inclusion of a variable in the

  16. TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS ASSESSMENT OF THE DRINKING WATER TREATMENT AT TARGU-MURES WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORNELIA DIANA HERTIA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to assess the technological process of obtaining drinking water at Targu-Mures water treatment plant. The assessment was performed before changing the technological process and four months were chosen to be analized during 2008: January, April, July and October for its efficiency analysis on treatment steps. Mures River is the water source for the water treatment plant, being characterized by unsteady flow and quality parameters with possible important variability in a very short period of time. The treatment technological process is the classic one, represented by coagulation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection, but also prechlorination was constantly applied as additional treatment during 2008. Results showed that for the measured parameters, raw water at the water treatment plant fits into class A3 for surface waters, framing dictated by the bacterial load. The treatment processes efficiency is based on the performance calculation for sedimentation, filtration, global and for disinfection, a better conformation degree of technological steps standing out in January in comparison to the other three analyzed months. A variable non-compliance of turbidity and residual chlorine levels in the disinfected water was observed constantly. Previous treatment steps managed to maintain a low level of oxidisability, chlorine consumption and residual chlorine levels being also low. 12% samples were found inconsistent with the national legislation in terms of bacteriological quality. Measures for the water treatment plant retechnologization are taken primarily for hyperchlorination elimination, which currently constitutes a discomfort factor (taste, smell, and a generating factor of chlorination by-products.

  17. The Dutch secret: how to provide safe drinking water without chlorine in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Medema

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Netherlands is one of the few countries where chlorine is not used at all, neither for primary disinfection nor to maintain a residual disinfectant in the distribution network. The Dutch approach that allows production and distribution of drinking water without the use of chlorine while not compromising microbial safety at the tap, can be summarized as follows:
    1. Use the best source available, in order of preference:
        – microbiologically safe groundwater,
        – surface water with soil passage such as artificial recharge or bank filtration,
        – direct treatment of surface water in a multiple barrier treatment;
    2. Use a preferred physical process treatment such as sedimentation, filtration and UV-disinfection. If absolutely necessary, also oxidation by means of ozone or peroxide can be used, but chlorine is avoided;
    3. Prevent ingress of contamination during distribution;
    4. Prevent microbial growth in the distribution system by production and distribution of biologically stable (biostable water and the use of biostable materials;
    5. Monitor for timely detection of any failure of the system to prevent significant health consequences.

    New developments in safe drinking water in the Netherlands include the adaptation of the Dutch drinking water decree, implementation of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA by water companies and research into source water quality, drinking water treatment efficacy, safe distribution and biostability of drinking water during distribution and Legionella. This paper summarizes how the Dutch water companies warrant the safety of the drinking water without chlorine.

  18. Risk management for assuring safe drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Hrudey, Elizabeth J.; Pollard, Simon J. T.

    2006-01-01

    Millions of people die every year around the world from diarrheal diseases much of which is caused by contaminated drinking water. By contrast, drinking water safety is largely taken for granted by many citizens of affluent nations. The ability to drink water that is delivered into households without fear of becoming ill may be one of the key defining characteristics of developed nations in relation to the majority of the world. Yet there is well-documented evidence that dis...

  19. Mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, H.J.; van Kreijl, C.F.; Hrubec, J.

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter results of oxidation treatments with chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet (UV), with respect to their effects on activity (Ames test) in drinking water supplies are reviewed. In addition, the authors present the preliminary results of a pilot plant study on the effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on mutagenicity. Furthermore, results of several carcinogenicity studies performed with organic drinking water concentrates are discussed in relation to the results of a Dutch carcinogenicity study with mutagenic drinking water concentrates

  20. Shift in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system following the introduction of an on-site monochloramine disinfection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Julianne L; Vikram, Amit; Duda, Scott; Stout, Janet E; Bibby, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Drinking water distribution systems, including premise plumbing, contain a diverse microbiological community that may include opportunistic pathogens. On-site supplemental disinfection systems have been proposed as a control method for opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing. The majority of on-site disinfection systems to date have been installed in hospitals due to the high concentration of opportunistic pathogen susceptible occupants. The installation of on-site supplemental disinfection systems in hospitals allows for evaluation of the impact of on-site disinfection systems on drinking water system microbial ecology prior to widespread application. This study evaluated the impact of supplemental monochloramine on the microbial ecology of a hospital's hot water system. Samples were taken three months and immediately prior to monochloramine treatment and monthly for the first six months of treatment, and all samples were subjected to high throughput Illumina 16S rRNA region sequencing. The microbial community composition of monochloramine treated samples was dramatically different than the baseline months. There was an immediate shift towards decreased relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria, and increased relative abundance of Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. Following treatment, microbial populations grouped by sampling location rather than sampling time. Over the course of treatment the relative abundance of certain genera containing opportunistic pathogens and genera containing denitrifying bacteria increased. The results demonstrate the driving influence of supplemental disinfection on premise plumbing microbial ecology and suggest the value of further investigation into the overall effects of premise plumbing disinfection strategies on microbial ecology and not solely specific target microorganisms.

  1. Regulating tritium in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, R.

    1994-01-01

    This article incorporates an article by E. Koehl from an internal Ontario Hydro publication, and a letter from the Joint Committee of Health and Safety of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering, submitted to the Ontario Minister of the Environment and Energy. The Advisory Committee on Environmental Standards had recommended that the limit for tritium in Ontario drinking water be reduced from 40,000 to 100 Bq/L, with a further reduction to 20 in five years. Some facts and figures are adduced to show that the effect of tritium in drinking water in Ontario is negligible compared to the effect of background radiation. The risk from tritium to the people of Ontario is undetectably small, and the attempt to estimate this risk by linear extrapolation is extremely dubious. Regulation entails social and economic costs, and the government ought to ensure that the benefits exceed the costs. The costs translate into nothing less than wasted opportunity to save lives in other ways. 3 refs

  2. Radioactivity standards for drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, V.N.; Mahadevan, T.N.; Nair, R.N.; Krishnamoorthy, T.M.; Nambi, K.S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) had issued drinking water specifications for radioactivity in 1991 as 0.1 Bq/L for gross α and 1 pCi/L for gross β. The specification for gross β should have been 1 Bq/L, however the basis for arriving at these standards were not clearly stated. The radiological basis for fixing the Drinking Water Standards (DWS) has, therefore, been reviewed in the present work. The values derived now for gross α (0.01 Bq/L) and gross β (0.34 Bq/L) are different from the values given above. In addition, the DWS for some important radionuclides using the ingestion dose factors applicable to members of the general public (adult as well as children) are given here. It is hoped that the presently suggested values will be accepted by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board and adopted by the BIS in the near future. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs., 2 ills

  3. Provision of the population of Kazakhstan with qualitative drinking water by the main water lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastanov, K.Kh; Tokmurzin, Zh.T.; Baibatyrov, E.N.; Taubaldiev, T.S.; Murinov, S.K.; But, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the status of drinking water supply of the Kazakhstan Caspian region is revealed. It is noted, that on the Kazakhstan coast of the Caspian sea by reason of lack of local water resources suitable for economic-consumption and technical usage water-supply is generally made with the Volga waters by water line 'Astrakhan-Mangistau', flow of the Ural river with very low water quality and sea water after water preparation on the Mangistau atomic energetic plant (for technical aims). By reason of lack of proper water preparation an intensive processes of corrosion of internal uninsulated surface in pipeline is coming. Water is enriched with iron lower water sanitary-hygienic norms and gets a stagnant smell. Nowadays half of population of Caspian region uses water which does not meet standard of quality, or is faced with lack of water what negatively results in human health. Large concentration of iron in drinking water is causing of illness of liver, blood and allergy reactions. Raised content of strontium results in development of rickets and other skeletal diseases. At present plants for treatment and disinfecting of water in water-line 'Astrakhan-Mangistau' were elaborated and put into operation for supply of population of several villages of Western Kazakhstan with drinking water of quarantined quality and necessary quantity

  4. Naphthalene: Drinking water health advisory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The Drinking Water Health Advisory, Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has issued its report on the chemical, naphthalene. Naphthalene is used in the manufacture of phthalic and anthranilic acids and other derivatives, and in making dyes; in the manufacture of resins, celluloid, lampblack and smokeless gunpowder; and as moth repellant, insecticide, anthelmintic, vermicide, and intestinal antiseptic. The report covers the following areas: the occurrence of the chemical in the environment; its environmental fate; the chemical's absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in the human body; and its health effects on humans and animals, including its mutagenicity and carcinogenicity characteristics. Also included is the quantification of its toxicological effects.

  5. The efficacy of potassium ferrate as a chemical disinfectant on E. coli, Vibrio cholera, human adenovirus, and Giardia lamblia - Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Drinking water and wastewater effluents go through numerous treatments to remove microorganisms and other contaminants in the United States. One of many processes along the treatment train is disinfection, and to date the most common disinfectants still remain chemi...

  6. Estimation of the total daily oral intake of NDMA attributable to drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristachi, Anthony; Rice, Glenn

    2007-09-01

    Disinfection with chlorine and chloramine leads to the formation of many disinfection by-products including N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Because NDMA is a probable human carcinogen, public health officials are concerned with its occurrence in drinking water. The goal of this study was to estimate NDMA concentrations from exogenous (i.e., drinking water and food) and endogenous (i.e., formed in the human body) sources, calculate average daily doses for ingestion route exposures and estimate the proportional oral intake (POI) of NDMA attributable to the consumption of drinking water relative to other ingestion sources of NDMA. The POI is predicted to be 0.02% relative to exogenous and endogenous NDMA sources combined. When only exogenous sources are considered, the POI was predicted to be 2.7%. The exclusion of endogenously formed NDMA causes the POI to increase dramatically, reflecting its importance as a potentially major source of exposure and uncertainty in the model. Although concentrations of NDMA in foods are small and human exposure to NDMA from foods is quite low, the contribution from food is predicted to be high relative to that of drinking water. The mean concentration of NDMA in drinking water would need to increase from 2.1 x 10(-3) microg/L to 0.10 microg/L, a 47-fold increase, for the POI to reach 1%, relative to all sources of NDMA considered in our model, suggesting that drinking water consumption is most likely a minor source of NDMA exposure.

  7. A potential approach for monitoring drinking water quality from groundwater systems using organic matter fluorescence as an early warning for contamination events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stedmon, Colin; Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bożena; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    at levels equivalent to the addition of 60 μg C/L in drinking water with a TOC concentration of 3.3 mg C/L. The results of this study suggest that these types of drinking water systems, which are vulnerable to microbial contamination due to the lack of disinfectant treatment, can be easily monitored using...

  8. The efficiency of water treatment and disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, J.

    1993-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of various water disinfection methods are discussed. The report examines the effectiveness of combined chlorine treatment and UV irradiation method of water disinfection and describes methods of determining UV radiation intensity, α absorption coefficient and radiation dose by means of measuring equipment constructed by the author. The α absorption coefficient dependence on the colour and turbidity of water exposed to radiation is defined. Enchytraeus albidus was applied as bioindicator in UV radiation intensity and disinfection effects measurements. The influence of UV radiation on microbiological, physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of water was determined. Prototype devices for water disinfection with UV radiation were made. (author)

  9. The efficiency of water treatment and disinfection by means of ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, J [Medical Academy, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Social Medicine

    1993-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of various water disinfection methods are discussed. The report examines the effectiveness of combined chlorine treatment and UV irradiation method of water disinfection and describes methods of determining UV radiation intensity, [alpha] absorption coefficient and radiation dose by means of measuring equipment constructed by the author. The [alpha] absorption coefficient dependence on the colour and turbidity of water exposed to radiation is defined. Enchytraeus albidus was applied as bioindicator in UV radiation intensity and disinfection effects measurements. The influence of UV radiation on microbiological, physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of water was determined. Prototype devices for water disinfection with UV radiation were made. (author).

  10. Management of drinking water quality in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Drinking water quality in both urban and rural areas of Pakistan is not being managed properly. Results of various investigations provide evidence that most of the drinking water supplies are faecally contaminated. At places groundwater quality is deteriorating due to the naturally occurring subsoil contaminants, or by anthropogenic activities. The poor bacteriological quality of drinking water has frequently resulted in high incidence of water borne diseases while subsoil contaminants have caused other ailments to consumers. This paper presents a detailed review of drinking water quality in the country and the consequent health impacts. It identifies various factors contributing to poor water quality and proposes key actions required to ensure safe drinking water supplies to consumers. (author)

  11. Bromination of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter following Full Scale Electrochemical Ballast Water Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Michael; Mitchelmore, Carys; Heyes, Andrew; Harir, Mourad; Richardson, Susan D; Petty, William Tyler; Wright, David A; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-08-04

    An extensively diverse array of brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) were generated following electrochemical disinfection of natural coastal/estuarine water, which is one of the main treatment methods currently under consideration for ballast water treatment. Ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed 462 distinct brominated DBPs at a relative abundance in the mass spectra of more than 1%. A brominated DBP with a relative abundance of almost 22% was identified as 2,2,4-tribromo-5-hydroxy-4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione, which is an analogue to several previously described 2,2,4-trihalo-5-hydroxy-4-cyclopentene-1,3-diones in drinking water. Several other brominated molecular formulas matched those of other known brominated DBPs, such as dibromomethane, which could be generated by decarboxylation of dibromoacetic acid during ionization, dibromophenol, dibromopropanoic acid, dibromobutanoic acid, bromohydroxybenzoic acid, bromophenylacetic acid, bromooxopentenoic acid, and dibromopentenedioic acid. Via comparison to previously described chlorine-containing analogues, bromophenylacetic acid, dibromooxopentenoic acid, and dibromopentenedioic acid were also identified. A novel compound at a 4% relative abundance was identified as tribromoethenesulfonate. This compound has not been previously described as a DBP, and its core structure of tribromoethene has been demonstrated to show toxicological implications. Here we show that electrochemical disinfection, suggested as a candidate for successful ballast water treatment, caused considerable production of some previously characterized DBPs in addition to novel brominated DBPs, although several hundred compounds remain structurally uncharacterized. Our results clearly demonstrate that electrochemical and potentially direct chlorination of ballast water in estuarine and marine systems should be approached with caution and the concentrations, fate, and toxicity of DBP need to be further characterized.

  12. Drinking water treatment is not associated with an observed increase in neural tube defects in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Johnstone, David W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2018-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) arise when natural organic matter in source water reacts with disinfectants used in the water treatment process. Studies have suggested an association between DBPs and birth defects. Neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice were first observed in-house in May 2006 and have continued to date. The source of the NTD-inducing agent was previously determined to be a component of drinking water. Tap water samples from a variety of sources were analyzed for trihalomethanes (THMs) to determine if they were causing the malformations. NTDs were observed in CD-1 mice provided with treated and untreated surface water. Occurrence of NTDs varied by water source and treatment regimens. THMs were detected in tap water derived from surface water but not detected in tap water derived from a groundwater source. THMs were absent in untreated river water and laboratory purified waters, yet the percentage of NTDs in untreated river water were similar to the treated water counterpart. These findings indicate that THMs were not the primary cause of NTDs in the mice since the occurrence of NTDs was unrelated to drinking water disinfection. PMID:24497082

  13. Comparison of permanganate preoxidation and preozonation on algae containing water: cell integrity, characteristics, and chlorinated disinfection byproduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pengchao; Ma, Jun; Fang, Jingyun; Guan, Yinghong; Yue, Siyang; Li, Xuchun; Chen, Liwei

    2013-12-17

    Aqueous suspensions of Microcystis aeruginosa were preoxidized with either ozone or permanganate and then subjected to chlorination under conditions simulating drinking water purification. The impacts of the two oxidants on the algal cells and on the subsequent production of dissolved organic matter and disinfection byproducts were investigated. Preozonation dramatically increased disinfection byproduct formation during chlorination, especially the formation of haloaldehydes, haloacetonitriles, and halonitromethanes. Preoxidation with permanganate had much less effect on disinfection byproduct formation. Preozonation destroyed algal cell walls and cell membranes to release intracellular organic matter (IOM), and less than 2.0% integrated cells were left after preozonation with the dosage as low as 0.4 mg/L. Preoxidation with permanganate mainly released organic matter adsorbed on the cells' surface without causing any damage to the cells' integrity, so the increase in byproduct formation was much less. More organic nitrogen and lower molecular weight precursors were produced in a dissolved phase after preozonation than permanganate preoxidation, which contributes to the significant increase of disinfection byproducts after preozonation. The results suggest that permanganate is a better choice than ozone for controlling algae derived pollutants and disinfection byproducts.

  14. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  15. Ozone Disinfection of Vibrio vulnificus in Shrimp Pond Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyah Pita Rengga, Wara; Cahya Julyta Putri, Echa; Wulansarie, Ria; Suryanto, Agus

    2018-03-01

    One variety of shrimp, L.Vanamei, often uses brackish water during the operation in the shrimp pond. Chlorination and ultraviolet are usually used for disinfection of brackish water. However, it is ineffective and forms sediment in the water distribution. It can be a negative impact on the water quality cause a contamination on the shrimp, so the farmers might have loss of profit because Vibrio vulnificus causes infection and dead on the shrimp. It affects the safety of consumers and should be minimized. The purpose of this study is to reduce the number of V. vulnificus bacteria in the pond water. The water was put in the storage tanks then pumped to filter out the impurities of the water. Furthermore, the water set the flow rate in 1 LPM, 2 LPM, and 3 LPM. After that, the ozone was injected to the water flow to sterilize the V. vulnificus bacteria. Finally, the water was returned to the original tank. The water from the tank was taken through a valve and analyzed in 0, 3, 7, 12, 18, 24, 30 minutes. The sample was analyzed immediately using a Total Plate Count method to determine the number of V. vulnificus bacteria in the shrimp pond water. The flow rate shows that the longer time of ozone made a lower amount of Vibrio v. bacteria. In 2 LPM water, it shows the optimum results of V. vulnificus. bacteria reduction for 88.1% compared to the flow rate of 1 LPM and 3 LPM with the bacteria reduction of 68,8% and 70.6%. This study shows that the ozone with a flow rate of 2 LPM circulation is the most effective method to help reducing the number of V. vulnificus in brackish water distribution system in the shrimp environment and potentially as a disinfectant.

  16. Application of an electrochemical chlorine-generation system combined with solar energy as appropriate technology for water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jusol; Park, Chan Gyu; Yoon, Jeyong

    2013-02-01

    Affordable water disinfection is key to reducing the waterborne disease experienced worldwide where resources are limited. A simple electrochemical system that can generate chlorine as a disinfectant from the electrolysis of sodium chloride is an appropriate technology to produce clean water, particularly if driven by solar energy. This study examined the affordability of an electrochemical chlorine generation system using solar energy and developed the necessary design information for its implementation. A two-electrode batch reactor, equipped with commercial IrO(2)-coated electrodes and a solar panel (approximate area 0.2 m(2)), was used to produce chlorine from a 35g/L solution of NaCl. Within 1 h, sufficient chlorine (0.8 g) was generated to produce clean drinking water for about 80 people for 1 day (target microorganism: Escherichia coli; daily drinking water requirement: 2 L per person; chlorine demand: 4 mg/L; solar power: 650 W/m(2) in Seoul, Korea. Small household batteries were demonstrated to be a suitable alternative power source when there is insufficient solar irradiation. Using a 1 m(2) solar panel, the reactor would take only 15 min in Seoul, Korea, or 7 min in the tropics (solar power 1300 W/m(2)), to generate 1 g of chlorine. The solar-powered electrochemical chlorine generation system for which design information is provided here is a simple and affordable way to produce chlorine with which to convert contaminated water into clean drinking water.

  17. Phthalocyanines as sensitizers for photodynamic water disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, N.; Slivka, L.; Kaliya, O.; Lukyanets, E.; Negrimovsky, V.; Vorozhtsov, G. [Organic Intermediates and Dyes Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Nedachin, E.; Artemova, T.; Ivanova, L.; Lavrova, D. [A.N. Sysin Research Inst. of Human Ecology and Environmental Health of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    New octapyridiniomethyl-substituted phthalocyanines of Al and Zn have been synthesized. These octacationic complexes are readily soluble in water, show monomeric behavior and sensitize formation of singlet oxygen efficiently. They are of high photodynamic potential in killing both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in contrast to negatively charged sulfonated derivatives, which are substantially less effective, particularly towards coliform bacteria in natural or sewage water. The present study confirms that cationic phthalocyanines represent a class of photosensitizing agents with an efficient antibacterial activity. (orig.)

  18. Radon in private drinking water wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otahal, P.; Merta, J.; Burian, I.

    2014-01-01

    At least 10 % of inhabitants in the Czech Republic are supplied with water from private sources (private wells, boreholes). With the increasing cost of water, the number of people using their own sources of drinking water will be likely to increase. According to the Decree of the State Office for Nuclear Safety about the Radiation Protection 307/2002 as amended by Decree 499/2005, the guideline limit for the supplied drinking water ('drinking water for public supply') for radon concentration is 50 Bq.l -1 . This guideline does not apply to private sources of drinking water. Radon in water influences human health by ingestion and also by inhalation when radon is released from water during showering and cooking. This paper presents results of measurements of radon concentrations in water from private wells in more than 300 cases. The gross concentration of alpha-emitting radionuclides and the concentrations of radium and uranium were also determined. (authors)

  19. Drinking water biofilm cohesiveness changes under chlorination or hydrodynamic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, L; Bertrand, I; Abe, Y; Angel, E; Block, J C; Skali-Lami, S; Francius, G

    2014-05-15

    Attempts at removal of drinking water biofilms rely on various preventive and curative strategies such as nutrient reduction in drinking water, disinfection or water flushing, which have demonstrated limited efficiency. The main reason for these failures is the cohesiveness of the biofilm driven by the physico-chemical properties of its exopolymeric matrix (EPS). Effective cleaning procedures should break up the matrix and/or change the elastic properties of bacterial biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the cohesive strength of two-month-old drinking water biofilms under increasing hydrodynamic shear stress τw (from ∼0.2 to ∼10 Pa) and shock chlorination (applied concentration at T0: 10 mg Cl2/L; 60 min contact time). Biofilm erosion (cell loss per unit surface area) and cohesiveness (changes in the detachment shear stress and cluster volumes measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM)) were studied. When rapidly increasing the hydrodynamic constraint, biofilm removal was found to be dependent on a dual process of erosion and coalescence of the biofilm clusters. Indeed, 56% of the biofilm cells were removed with, concomitantly, a decrease in the number of the 50-300 μm(3) clusters and an increase in the number of the smaller (i.e., 600 μm(3)) ones. Moreover, AFM evidenced the strengthening of the biofilm structure along with the doubling of the number of contact points, NC, per cluster volume unit following the hydrodynamic disturbance. This suggests that the compactness of the biofilm exopolymers increases with hydrodynamic stress. Shock chlorination removed cells (-75%) from the biofilm while reducing the volume of biofilm clusters. Oxidation stress resulted in a decrease in the cohesive strength profile of the remaining drinking water biofilms linked to a reduction in the number of contact points within the biofilm network structure in particular for the largest biofilm cluster volumes (>200 μm(3)). Changes in the cohesive

  20. An overview of water disinfection in developing countries and the potential for solar thermal water pasteurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, J.; Thomas, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    This study originated within the Solar Buildings Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to assess the potential for solar thermal water disinfection in developing countries. In order to assess solar thermal potential, the alternatives must be clearly understood and compared. The objectives of the study are to: (a) characterize the developing world disinfection needs and market; (b) identify competing technologies, both traditional and emerging; (c) analyze and characterize solar thermal pasteurization; (d) compare technologies on cost-effectiveness and appropriateness; and (e) identify research opportunities. Natural consequences of the study beyond these objectives include a broad knowledge of water disinfection problems and technologies, introduction of solar thermal pasteurization technologies to a broad audience, and general identification of disinfection opportunities for renewable technologies.

  1. Drinking Water Cyanotoxin Risk Communication Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    The drinking water cyanotoxin risk communication toolbox is a ready-to-use, “one-stop-shop” to support public water systems, states, and local governments in developing, as they deem appropriate, their own risk communication materials.

  2. Determination of Phthalates in Drinking Water Samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    successfully applied to the analysis of phthalate esters contamination in bottled drinking water samples. ... esters are used in the manufacturing of polyvinyl chloride. (PVC). ... water, soil, air, food products and the human body. (Castillo et al.

  3. GROUNDWATER, DRINKING WATER, ARSENIC POLLUTION, NORTH DAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Abdulmutalimova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we studied the chemical particularities of ground water of the North Daghestan, using by population as drinking water. In particular we examined the problem of arsenic pollution.

  4. Application of solar disinfection for treatment of contaminated public water supply in a developing country: field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Atif; Scholz, Miklas; Khan, Sadia; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2013-03-01

    A sustainable and low-cost point-of-use household drinking water solar disinfection (SODIS) technology was successfully applied to treat microbiologically contaminated water. Field experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of SODIS and evaluate the potential benefits and limitations of SODIS under local climatic conditions in Karachi, Pakistan. In order to enhance the efficiency of SODIS, the application of physical interventions were also investigated. Twenty per cent of the total samples met drinking water guidelines under strong sunlight weather conditions, showing that SODIS is effective for complete disinfection under specific conditions. Physical interventions, including black-backed and reflecting rear surfaces in the batch reactors, enhanced SODIS performance. Microbial regrowth was also investigated and found to be more controlled in reactors with reflective and black-backed surfaces. The transfer of plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) released from the bottle material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) under SODIS conditions was also investigated. The maximum DEHP concentration in SODIS-treated water was 0.38 μg/L less than the value of 0.71 μg/L reported in a previous study and well below the WHO drinking-quality guideline value. Thus SODIS-treated water can successfully be used by the people living in squatter settlements of mega-cities, such as Karachi, with some limitations.

  5. Culture-Independent Techniques for Rapid Detection of Bacteria Associated with Loss of Chloramine Residual in a Drinking Water System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoefel, Daniel; Monis, Paul T.; Grooby, Warwick L.; Andrews, Stuart; Saint, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Chloramination is often the disinfection regimen of choice for extended drinking water systems. However, this process is prone to instability due to the growth of nitrifying bacteria. This is the first study to use alternative approaches for rapid investigation of chloraminated drinking water system instability in which flow cytometric cell sorting of bacteria with intact membranes (membrane-intact fraction) (BacLight kit) or with active esterases (esterase-active fraction) (carboxyfluorescei...

  6. Ammonia- and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in a Pilot-Scale Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, John M.; Harrington, Gregory W.; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is a common operational problem for many utilities that use chloramines for secondary disinfection. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the distribution systems of a pilot-scale chloraminated drinking water treatment system was characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA [rDNA]) cloning and sequencing. For ammon...

  7. Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification c...... a pilot scale sand column which initial analysis confirmed performed similarly to the full scale filters. Long term increased ammonium loads were applied to the pilot filter both with and without phosphate addition. Phosphate was added at a concentration of 0.5 mg PO4-P/L to ensure...

  8. Occurrences of nitrosamines in chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water in three representative cities, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qian; Wang, Donghong; Wang, Zijian

    2012-10-15

    An investigation of the occurrence of nine nitrosamines in drinking water following different water treatment processes was conducted using samples from seven drinking water treatment plants in three cities and tap waters in one city in China. The total nitrosamine levels ranged from not detected (n.d.) to 43.45 ng/L. The species and concentrations of the nine nitrosamines varied with disinfection methods and source waters. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is the nitrosamines of greatest concern, was identified in raw water, disinfecting water, finished water and tap water samples, ranging from 0.8 to 21.6, 0.12 to 24.2, n.d. to 8.8, and n.d. to 13.3 ng/L, respectively. Chloramination alone produced the most significant amounts of NDMA, while ozonation followed by chloramination led to moderately reduced levels. Additionally, chlorination produced relatively less NDMA, while low pressure ultraviolet radiation followed by chlorination could also significantly reduce them. Total organic carbon is one of the most important factors influencing nitrosamines formation in disinfecting water. In contrast, the addition of chlorine following any other disinfection was found to increase the formation of the other eight species of nitrosamines. The three nitrosamines recommended for monitoring by the US EPA were detected in the tap water samples, but most were present at levels below those that pose a risk to human health. Nevertheless, the occurrence and concentration of nitrosamines regulated in the Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List could cause some potential human effects and therefore warrant attention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA damage and oxidative stress in human liver cell L-02 caused by surface water extracts during drinking water treatment in a waterworks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Hui-Juan; Jin, Bang-Xiong; Lu, Wen-Hong; Li, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Because of the daily and life-long exposure to disinfection by-products formed during drinking water treatment, potential adverse human health risk of drinking water disinfection is of great concern. Toxicological studies have shown that drinking water treatment increases the genotoxicity of surface water. Drinking water treatment is comprised of different potabilization steps, which greatly influence the levels of genotoxic products in the surface water and thus may alter the toxicity and genotoxicity of surface water. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of specific steps on toxicity and genotoxicity during the treatment of surface water in a water treatment plant using liquid chlorine as the disinfectant in China. An integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays was used in the study, and the results showed that both the prechlorination and postchlorination steps increased DNA damage and oxidative stress caused by water extracts in human derived L-02 cells while the tube settling and filtration steps had the opposite effect. This research also highlighted the usefulness of an integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays in evaluating the genotoxicity of surface water during drinking water treatment. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Chlorine disinfection of grey water for reuse: effect of organics and particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, Gideon P; Avery, Lisa M; Stephenson, Tom; Jefferson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Adequate disinfection of grey water prior to reuse is important to prevent the potential transmission of disease-causing microorganisms. Chlorine is a widely utilised disinfectant and as such is a leading contender for disinfection of grey water intended for reuse. This study examined the impact of organics and particles on chlorine disinfection of grey water, measured by total coliform inactivation. The efficacy of disinfection was most closely linked with particle size. Larger particles shielded total coliforms from inactivation and disinfection efficacy decreased with increasing particle size. Blending to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs) following chlorine disinfection revealed that up to 91% of total coliforms in chlorinated grey water were particle associated. The organic concentration of grey water affected chlorine demand but did not influence the disinfection resistance of total coliforms when a free chlorine residual was maintained. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and it is recommended that grey water treatment systems target suspended solids removal to ensure removal of PACs prior to disinfection.

  11. Virus Disinfection in Water by Biogenic Silver Immobilized in Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B De Gusseme; T Hennebel; E Christiaens; H Saveyn; K Verbeken; J Fitts; N Boon; W Vertraete

    2011-12-31

    The development of innovative water disinfection strategies is of utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases related to poor treatment of (drinking) water. Recently, the association of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cell surface of Lactobacillus fermentum (referred to as biogenic silver or bio-Ag{sup 0}) has been reported to exhibit antiviral properties. The microscale bacterial carrier matrix serves as a scaffold for Ag{sup 0} particles, preventing aggregation during encapsulation. In this study, bio-Ag{sup 0} was immobilized in different microporous PVDF membranes using two different pre-treatments of bio-Ag{sup 0} and the immersion-precipitation method. Inactivation of UZ1 bacteriophages using these membranes was successfully demonstrated and was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} from the membranes. At least a 3.4 log decrease of viruses was achieved by application of a membrane containing 2500 mg bio-Ag{sup 0}{sub powder} m{sup -2} in a submerged plate membrane reactor operated at a flux of 3.1 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Upon startup, the silver concentration in the effluent initially increased to 271 {mu}g L{sub -1} but after filtration of 31 L m{sup -2}, the concentration approached the drinking water limit (= 100 {mu}g L{sup -1}). A virus decline of more than 3 log was achieved at a membrane flux of 75 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, showing the potential of this membrane technology for water disinfection on small scale.

  12. Health implications of PAH release from coated cast iron drinking water distribution systems in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokker, E J Mirjam; van de Ven, Bianca M; de Jongh, Cindy M; Slaats, P G G Nellie

    2013-05-01

    Coal tar and bitumen have been historically used to coat the insides of cast iron drinking water mains. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may leach from these coatings into the drinking water and form a potential health risk for humans. We estimated the potential human cancer risk from PAHs in coated cast iron water mains. In a Dutch nationwide study, we collected drinking water samples at 120 locations over a period of 17 days under various operational conditions, such as undisturbed operation, during flushing of pipes, and after a mains repair, and analyzed these samples for PAHs. We then estimated the health risk associated with an exposure scenario over a lifetime. During flushing, PAH levels frequently exceeded drinking water quality standards; after flushing, these levels dropped rapidly. After the repair of cast iron water mains, PAH levels exceeded the drinking water standards for up to 40 days in some locations. The estimated margin of exposure for PAH exposure through drinking water was > 10,000 for all 120 measurement locations, which suggests that PAH exposure through drinking water is of low concern for consumer health. However, factors that differ among water systems, such as the use of chlorination for disinfection, may influence PAH levels in other locations.

  13. Advanced Oxidation Treatment of Drinking Water and Wastewater Using High-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Behjat

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Application of electron beam as a strong oxidation method for disinfection of drinking water and wastewater has been investigated. Drinking water samples were prepared from wells in rock zones in Yazd Province. Wastewater samples were collected from Yazd Wastewater Treatment Plant. Samples were irradiated by 10 MeV electron beam accelerator at Yazd Radiation Processing Center. The irradiation dose range varied from 0.5-5 kGy. Biological parameters and microbial agents such as aerobic mesophiles and coliforms including E. coli count before and after irradiation versus irradiation dose were obtained using MPN method. The data obtained from irradiated water and wastewater were compared with un-irradiated (control samples. The results showed a removal of 90% of all microorganisms at irradiation doses below 5 kGy, suggesting electron beam irradiation as an effective method for disinfection of wastewater.

  14. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes in water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhunen, Sari; Särkkä, Heikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2009-06-01

    The novel system of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) was studied in water disinfection. Conventional UV lamps, like mercury vapor lamp, consume much energy and are considered to be problem waste after use. UV LEDs are energy efficient and free of toxicants. This study showed the suitability of LEDs in disinfection and provided information of the effect of two emitted wavelengths and different test mediums to Escherichia coli destruction. Common laboratory strain of E. coli (K12) was used and the effects of two emitted wavelengths (269 and 276 nm) were investigated with two photolytic batch reactors both including ten LEDs. The effects of test medium were examined with ultrapure water, nutrient and water, and nutrient and water with humic acids. Efficiency of reactors was almost the same even though the one emitting higher wavelength had doubled optical power compared to the other. Therefore, the effect of wavelength was evident and the radiation emitted at 269 nm was more powerful. Also, the impact of background was studied and noticed to have only slight deteriorating effect. In the 5-min experiment, the bacterial reduction of three to four log colony-forming units (CFU) per cubic centimeter was achieved, in all cases. When turbidity of the test medium was greater, part of the UV radiation was spent on the absorption and reactions with extra substances on liquid. Humic acids can also coat the bacteria reducing the sensitivity of the cells to UV light. The lower wavelength was distinctly more efficient when the optical power is considered, even though the difference of wavelengths was small. The reason presumably is the greater absorption of DNA causing more efficient bacterial breakage. UV LEDs were efficient in E. coli destruction, even if LEDs were considered to have rather low optical power. The effect of wavelengths was noticeable but the test medium did not have much impact. This study found UV LEDs to be an optimal method for bacterial

  15. Precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water––A critical review and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R.; Graham, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The proportion of N-DBP formation attributable to specific precursors was calculated. ► Precursor concentrations are typically insufficient to account for observed N-DBP formation, except CNX and NDMA. ► Amino acid precursors are easier to remove during water treatment than suggested by laboratory studies. - Abstract: In recent years research into the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water – including N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAcAms), cyanogen halides (CNX) and halonitromethanes (HNMs) – has proliferated. This is partly due to their high reported toxicity of N-DBPs. In this review paper information about the formation yields of N-DBPs from model precursors, and about environmental precursor occurrence, has been employed to assess the amount of N-DBP formation that is attributable to known precursors. It was calculated that for HANs and HAcAms, the concentrations of known precursors – mainly free amino acids are insufficient to account for the observed concentrations of these N-DBP groups. However, at least in some waters, a significant proportion of CNX and NDMA formation can be explained by known precursors. Identified N-DBP precursors tend to be of low molecular weight and low electrostatic charge relative to bulk natural organic matter (NOM). This makes them recalcitrant to removal by water treatment processes, notably coagulation, as confirmed by a number of bench-scale studies. However, amino acids have been found to be easier to remove during water treatment than would be suggested by the known molecular properties of the individual free amino acids.

  16. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Concentration by Reverse Osmosis Membrane Techniques of Disinfection By-Products from Water Disinfected by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    To conduct the health-effect studies described in subsequent articles in this series, concentrated aqueous mixtures of disinfection by-products were required for the two water treatment trains described in the preceding article (Miltner et al., 2008). To accomplish this, the fini...

  17. Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

    1993-08-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG ampersand G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a open-quotes community water systemclose quotes (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG ampersand G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG ampersand G Idaho production wells

  18. Evaluation of Handheld Assays for the Detection of Ricin and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in Disinfected Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Margaret Wade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid field test is needed capable of determining if field supplies of water are safe to drink by the warfighter during a military operation. The present study sought to assess the effectiveness of handheld assays (HHAs in detecting ricin and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB in water. Performance of HHAs was evaluated in formulated tap water with and without chlorine, reverse osmosis water (RO with chlorine, and RO with bromine. Each matrix was prepared, spiked with ricin or SEB at multiple concentrations, and then loaded onto HHAs. HHAs were allowed to develop and then read visually. Limits of detection (LOD were determined for all HHAs in each water type. Both ricin and SEB were detected by HHAs in formulated tap water at or below the suggested health effect levels of 455 ng/mL and 4.55 ng/mL, respectively. However, in brominated or chlorinated waters, LODs for SEB increased to approximately 2,500 ng/mL. LODs for ricin increased in chlorinated water, but still remained below the suggested health effect level. In brominated water, the LOD for ricin increased to approximately 2,500 ng/mL. In conclusion, the HHAs tested were less effective at detecting ricin and SEB in disinfected water, as currently configured.

  19. Water quality modeling in the dead end sections of drinking water distribution networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokifa, Ahmed A; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Lo, Cynthia S; Biswas, Pratim

    2016-02-01

    Dead-end sections of drinking water distribution networks are known to be problematic zones in terms of water quality degradation. Extended residence time due to water stagnation leads to rapid reduction of disinfectant residuals allowing the regrowth of microbial pathogens. Water quality models developed so far apply spatial aggregation and temporal averaging techniques for hydraulic parameters by assigning hourly averaged water demands to the main nodes of the network. Although this practice has generally resulted in minimal loss of accuracy for the predicted disinfectant concentrations in main water transmission lines, this is not the case for the peripheries of the distribution network. This study proposes a new approach for simulating disinfectant residuals in dead end pipes while accounting for both spatial and temporal variability in hydraulic and transport parameters. A stochastic demand generator was developed to represent residential water pulses based on a non-homogenous Poisson process. Dispersive solute transport was considered using highly dynamic dispersion rates. A genetic algorithm was used to calibrate the axial hydraulic profile of the dead-end pipe based on the different demand shares of the withdrawal nodes. A parametric sensitivity analysis was done to assess the model performance under variation of different simulation parameters. A group of Monte-Carlo ensembles was carried out to investigate the influence of spatial and temporal variations in flow demands on the simulation accuracy. A set of three correction factors were analytically derived to adjust residence time, dispersion rate and wall demand to overcome simulation error caused by spatial aggregation approximation. The current model results show better agreement with field-measured concentrations of conservative fluoride tracer and free chlorine disinfectant than the simulations of recent advection dispersion reaction models published in the literature. Accuracy of the simulated

  20. Investigation of Drinking Water Quality in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatlume Berisha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, not much environmental monitoring has been conducted in the territory of Kosovo. This study represents the first comprehensive monitoring of the drinking water situation throughout most of the territory of Kosovo. We present the distribution of major and minor trace elements in drinking water samples from Kosovo. During our study we collected 951 samples from four different sources: private-bored wells; naturally flowing artesian water; pumped-drilled wells; and public water sources (tap water. The randomly selected drinking water samples were investigated by routine water analyses using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS for 32 elements (Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th, U. Even though there are set guidelines for elemental exposure in drinking water worldwide, in developing countries, such as Kosovo, the lack of monitoring drinking water continues to be an important health concern. This study reports the concentrations of major and minor elements in the drinking water in Kosovo. Additionally, we show the variation of the metal concentration within different sources. Of the 15 regulated elements, the following five elements: Mn, Fe, Al, Ni, As, and U were the elements which most often exceeded the guidelines set by the EU and/or WHO.

  1. Kinetic model for the radical degradation of tri-halonitromethane disinfection byproducts in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Cooper, William J.; Kirkham Cole, S.; Fox, Robert V.; Gardinali, Piero R.

    2012-01-01

    The halonitromethanes (HNMs) are byproducts of the ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of drinking waters. Although typically occurring at low concentrations HNMs have high cytotoxicity and mutagenicity, and may therefore represent a significant human health hazard. In this study, we have investigated the radical based mineralization of fully-halogenated HNMs in water using the congeners bromodichloronitromethane and chlorodibromonitromethane. We have combined absolute reaction rate constants for their reactions with the hydroxyl radical and the hydrated electron as measured by electron pulse radiolysis and analytical measurements of stable product concentrations obtained by 60 Co steady-state radiolysis with a kinetic computer model that includes water radiolysis reactions and halide/nitrogen oxide radical chemistry to fully elucidate the reaction pathways of these HNMs. These results are compared to our previous similar study of the fully chlorinated HNM chloropicrin. The full optimized computer model, suitable for predicting the behavior of this class of compounds in irradiated drinking water, is provided. - Highlights: ► Radical-based mineralization of aqueous halonitromethane disinfection byproducts. ► Constructed kinetic computer model for tri-halogenated halonitromethane removal. ► Model predicted that superoxide reaction is unimportant for halonitromethanes. ► Measured superoxide reaction with chloropicrin was negligibly slow, 4 M −1 s −1 . ► Determined that superoxide reaction with nitrate also insignificant at ∼10 4 M −1 s −1 .

  2. Detection of mutagens in water-distribution systems after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzella, Licia; Di Caterino, Filomena; Monarca, Silvano; Zani, Claudia; Feretti, Donatella; Zerbini, Ilaria; Nardi, Giuseppe; Buschini, Annamaria; Poli, Paola; Rossi, Carlo

    2006-09-19

    This research examined the quality of water-before and after distribution-of four drinking-water production plants located in Northern Italy, two of which collected water from local aquifers and two from the River Po. A battery of genotoxicity assays for monitoring drinking-water was performed to assess the quality of the water produced by the treatment plants under study. Three different sampling stations were selected at each plant, one right at the outlet of the treatment plant and two along with the distribution pipelines. Raw river water was also sampled and analysed as a control. The water samples (500 l) were concentrated on silica C18 cartridges and the extracts were tested in in vitro mutagenicity assays (Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA 98 and TA 100; SOS Chromotest with Escherichia coli strain PQ37); gene conversion, point mutation and mitochondrial DNA mutability assays with the diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 and a toxicity test using the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox). The Microtox test and the mitochondrial DNA mutability assay showed the greatest sensitivity towards toxic or mutagenic substances in the water extracts considered. The results show that this battery of short-term tests is applicable in the routine monitoring of drinking-water quality before and after distribution.

  3. ON A NEW TECHNOLOGY OF PREPARATION OF HOT DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Jalilov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article contains information concerning the new Cl-anionization technology in the preparation of hot drinking water. In contrast with water softening, that replaces all the hardness salts by sodium cations in the cation exchanger, this new technology makes it possible to replace incrustating HCO3̄ and SO42--anions in a strong-base anion exchanger by Cl⁻-ions. As a result, the incrustation on the surfaces of heating hot water heaters is prevented. Thus, cations of hardness that are valuable for the human body remain in the water, the quality of the latter conforming to drinking water quality. Considering the important role of calcium and magnesium in the human body, in Germany and Turkey the minimum value of hardness cations in drinking water is limited to 2.85 and 7.50 mg-Eqv/l, respectively. According to the World Health Organization, in the composition of drinking water, the concentration of cations of magnesium and calcium is recommended, respectively, within 10–(20–30, and 20–50 mg/l; the minimum value of total hardness is 2–4 mg-Eqv/l. According to the developed technology drinking water is passed consistently in the downward direction through the mechanical and chlorineanionite exchanger filters. In the latter, the main part of HCO3̄ and SO42--water ions are exchanged for Cl-anions of anionite. Then the water is collected in the tank, from where it is pumped to the hot water heater through the ultraviolet disinfection unit. After the depletion of the anionite by HCO3̄ and SO42--anions, it is regenerated by a solution of 8–12 % NaCl. The results of research by the anion exchangers Purolite A200EMBCl and AB-17-8 are plotted. It is noted that when the specific consumption of salt for regeneration is of about 45–55 kg/m³, working exchange capacity of the A200EMBCl occurs to be in the range 300–370 g-Eqv/m³. For anionization of water, the residual concentration of HCO3̄-ions are changed from 0.5 to 3.2 mg

  4. The use of electron beam accelerator for the treatment of drinking water and wastewater in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Borrely, S.I.; Silva, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Brazil started a research program using high-energy electrons from accelerators for treating drinking water and wastewater in 1991. The objective is to study the potential use of this technique for disinfection of domestic wastewater, chemical degradation of dyes, phenols, oils and greases in industrial wastewater and reduction of trihalomethanes (THM's) concentration in drinking water. An Electron Beam Accelerator, 1.5MeV - 25mA from Radiation Dynamics Inc., was used for all experiments. A pilot plant designed to treat up to 3m 3 /h was built. (author)

  5. The use of electron beam accelerator for the treatment of drinking water and wastewater in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Borrely, S.I.; Silva, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Brazil started a research program using high-energy electrons from accelerators for treating drinking water and wastewater in 1991. The objective is to study the potential use of this technique for disinfection of domestic wastewater, chemical degradation of dyes, phenols, oils and greases in industrial wastewater and reduction of trihalomethanes (THM's) concentration in drinking water. An Electron Beam Accelerator, 1.5MeV -25mA from Radiation Dynamics Inc., was used for all experiments. A pilot plant designed to treat up to 3m 3 /h was built. (author)

  6. The use of electron beam accelerator for the treatment of drinking water and wastewater in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampa, M. H. O.; Borrely, S. I.; Silva, B. L.; Vieira, J. M.; Rela, P. R.; Calvo, W. A. P.; Nieto, R. C.; Duarte, C. L.; Perez, H. E. B.; Somessari, E. S.; Lugão, A. B.

    1995-09-01

    Brazil started a research program using high-energy electrons from accelerators for treating drinking water and wastewater in 1991. The objective is to study the potential use of this technique for disinfection of domestic wastewater, chemical degradation of dyes, phenols, oils and greases in industrial wastewater and reduction of trihalomethanes (THM's) concentration in drinking water. An Electron Beam Accelerator, 1.5MeV-25mA from Radiation Dynamics Inc., was used for all experiments. A pilot plant designed to treat up to 3m3/h was built.

  7. Disinfection for small water supplies: a technical guide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Solsona, F

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This guide will present some disinfection systems, which will be useful in supporting disinfection programmes. The description of the different systems will provide a guideline for the selection of equipment base on balancing the simplicity...

  8. Mapping of drinking water research: A bibliometric analysis of research output during 1992–2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Ming-Huang; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2013-01-01

    A bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index Expanded from the Web of Science was carried out to provide insights into research activities and tendencies of the global drinking water from 1992 to 2011. Study emphases included performance of publication covering annual outputs, mainstream journals, Web of Science categories, leading countries, institutions, research tendencies and hotspots. The results indicated that annual output of the related scientific articles increased steadily. Water Research, Environmental Science and Technology, and Journal American Water Works Association were the three most common journals in drinking water research. The USA took a leading position out of 168 countries/territories, followed by Japan and Germany. A summary of the most frequently used keywords obtained from words in paper title analysis, author keyword analysis and KeyWords Plus analysis provided the clues to discover the current research emphases. The mainstream research related to drinking water was water treatment methods and the related contaminants. Disinfection process and consequent disinfection by-products attracted much attention. Ozonation and chlorination in disinfection, and adsorption were common techniques and are getting popular. Commonly researched drinking water contaminants concerned arsenic, nitrate, fluoride, lead, and cadmium, and pharmaceuticals emerged as the frequently studied contaminants in recent years. Disease caused by contaminants strongly promoted the development of related research. - Highlights: ► Drinking water research was characterized based on SCI-Expanded during 1992–2011. ► Research emphases were obtained from title, author keywords and KeyWords Plus. ► Ozonation, chlorination and adsorption were common techniques and are getting popular. ► Emerging contaminants concerned arsenic, nitrate, fluoride, lead, and cadmium

  9. Mapping of drinking water research: A bibliometric analysis of research output during 1992–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Ming-Huang; Ho, Yuh-Shan, E-mail: ysho@asia.edu.tw

    2013-01-15

    A bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index Expanded from the Web of Science was carried out to provide insights into research activities and tendencies of the global drinking water from 1992 to 2011. Study emphases included performance of publication covering annual outputs, mainstream journals, Web of Science categories, leading countries, institutions, research tendencies and hotspots. The results indicated that annual output of the related scientific articles increased steadily. Water Research, Environmental Science and Technology, and Journal American Water Works Association were the three most common journals in drinking water research. The USA took a leading position out of 168 countries/territories, followed by Japan and Germany. A summary of the most frequently used keywords obtained from words in paper title analysis, author keyword analysis and KeyWords Plus analysis provided the clues to discover the current research emphases. The mainstream research related to drinking water was water treatment methods and the related contaminants. Disinfection process and consequent disinfection by-products attracted much attention. Ozonation and chlorination in disinfection, and adsorption were common techniques and are getting popular. Commonly researched drinking water contaminants concerned arsenic, nitrate, fluoride, lead, and cadmium, and pharmaceuticals emerged as the frequently studied contaminants in recent years. Disease caused by contaminants strongly promoted the development of related research. - Highlights: ► Drinking water research was characterized based on SCI-Expanded during 1992–2011. ► Research emphases were obtained from title, author keywords and KeyWords Plus. ► Ozonation, chlorination and adsorption were common techniques and are getting popular. ► Emerging contaminants concerned arsenic, nitrate, fluoride, lead, and cadmium.

  10. Persistence of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds in chlorinated drinking water as a function of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibs, J.; Stackelberg, P.E.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.; Zaugg, S.D.; Lippincott, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Ninety eight pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds (POOCs) that were amended to samples of chlorinated drinking-water were extracted and analyzed 1, 3, 6, 8, and 10 days after amendment to determine whether the total chlorine residual reacted with the amended POOCs in drinking water in a time frame similar to the residence time of drinking water in a water distribution system. Results indicated that if all 98 were present in the finished drinking water from a drinking-water treatment plant using free chlorine at 1.2??mg/L as the distribution system disinfectant residual, 52 POOCs would be present in the drinking water after 10??days at approximately the same concentration as in the newly finished drinking water. Concentrations of 16 POOCs would be reduced by 32% to 92%, and 22 POOCs would react completely with residual chlorine within 24??h. Thus, the presence of free chlorine residual is an effective means for transforming some POOCs during distribution. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF THE THREAT OF REUSING PET BOTTLES FOR THE STORAGE OF DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuilov A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to a sociological survey of about 86% of Kharkiv (Ukraine residents reuse PET bottles for a drinking water storing. This type of reuse of PET bottles isn't safe and the results of numerous research unequivocally confirm this assertion. The largest hazard of plastic bottles reuse for drinking water storage is biological film on the internally surface of bottle. This biofilm may contain pathogenic microorganisms which can migrate from biofilm to fresh water. Human, who drinking contaminated water, may drink microorganisms in common with this water. It's very dangerous, because the numerous strains of pathogens may migration in water and infect from gastric-bowel tract to the humans. Scientists from National technical university "Kharkiv polytechnic institute" in common with experts from Mechnikov institute of microbiology and immunology explored this problem and devised the apparatus, which can destroy a biofilm on polymer or another surface. Materials & Methods. The tested apparatus was the electrical device consisting of a block with electrodes, an electronic control, a water pump and a sprinkler for spraying the disinfectant. The electrode was made of 925˚ silver (sterling silver. Water for the preparation of a disinfectant was tap water and wasn't treated additionally. The sprinkler for spraying the disinfectant was placed in the neck of the infected bottle. Disinfectant solution was sprayed inside the bottle for 4 seconds. The water pressure was about 1.5 atmospheres. After that, the sprinkler was removed and the disinfectant was drained. A smear for microbiological composition was taken from three parts of the bottle - the neck, the middle part and the bottom. Growth of microorganisms and their detections was fixed by classic microbiological methods. Results & Discussion. In the article the scheme of the most probable and widespread way of infection of PET-bottles by pathogens and the way of minimization of this

  12. Drinking Water Microbiome as a Screening Tool for Nitrification in Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water utilities in the US using chloramine as disinfectant treatment in their distribution systems have experienced nitrification episodes, which detrimentally impact the water quality. Here, we used 16S rRNA sequencing data to generate high-resolution taxonomic profiles of...

  13. Environmental health sciences center task force review on halogenated organics in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinzer, M; Schaumburg, F; Klein, E

    1978-06-01

    The disinfection of drinking water by chlorination has in recent years come under closer scrutiny because of the potential hazards associated with the production of stable chlorinated organic chemicals. Organic chemical contaminants are common to all water supplies and it is now well-established that chlorinated by-products are obtained under conditions of disinfection, or during tertiary treatment of sewage whose products can ultimately find their way into drinking water supplies. Naturally occurring humic substances which are invariably present in drinking waters are probably the source of chloroform and other halogenated methanes, and chloroform has shown up in every water supply investigated thus far.The Environmental Protection Agency is charged with the responsibility of assessing the public health effects resulting from the consumption of contaminated drinking water. It has specifically undertaken the task of determining whether organic contaminants or their chlorinated derivatives have a special impact, and if so, what alternatives there are to protect the consumer against bacterial and viral diseases that are transmitted through infected drinking waters. The impetus to look at these chemicals is not entirely without some prima facie evidence of potential trouble. Epidemiological studies suggested a higher incidence of cancer along the lower Mississippi River where the contamination from organic chemicals is particularly high. The conclusions from these studies have, to be sure, not gone unchallenged.The task of assessing the effects of chemicals in the drinking water is a difficult one. It includes many variables, including differences in water supplies and the temporal relationship between contamination and consumption of the finished product. It must also take into account the relative importance of the effects from these chemicals in comparison to those from occupational exposure, ingestion of contaminated foods, inhalation of polluted air, and many

  14. Risk management for assuring safe drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudey, Steve E; Hrudey, Elizabeth J; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-12-01

    Millions of people die every year around the world from diarrheal diseases much of which is caused by contaminated drinking water. By contrast, drinking water safety is largely taken for granted by many citizens of affluent nations. The ability to drink water that is delivered into households without fear of becoming ill may be one of the key defining characteristics of developed nations in relation to the majority of the world. Yet there is well-documented evidence that disease outbreaks remain a risk that could be better managed and prevented even in affluent nations. A detailed retrospective analysis of more than 70 case studies of disease outbreaks in 15 affluent nations over the past 30 years provides the basis for much of our discussion [Hrudey, S.E. and Hrudey, E.J. Safe Drinking Water--Lessons from Recent Outbreaks in Affluent Nations. London, UK: IWA Publishing; 2004.]. The insights provided can assist in developing a better understanding within the water industry of the causes of drinking water disease outbreaks, so that more effective preventive measures can be adopted by water systems that are vulnerable. This preventive feature lies at the core of risk management for the provision of safe drinking water.

  15. Heterogeneous dermatitis complaints after change in drinking water treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia Rajiv

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The disinfectant monochloramine minimizes the formation of potentially hazardous and regulated byproducts, and many drinking water utilities are shifting to its use. Case presentation After a drinking water utility serving 2.4 million people switched to monochloramine for residual disinfection, a small number of residents complained of dermatitis reactions. We interviewed 17 people about their symptoms. Skin appearance, symptoms, and exposures were heterogeneous. Five respondents had history of hives or rash that preceded the switch to monochloramine. Conclusion The complaints described were heterogeneous, and many of the respondents had underlying or preexisting conditions that would offer plausible alternative explanations for their symptoms. We did not recommend further study of these complaints.

  16. Peracetic acid in the disinfection of a hospital water system contaminated with Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Biasin, Cinzia; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Zotti, Carla Maria; Cavanna, Alberto; Ruggenini Moiraghi, Angela

    2005-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of an alternative disinfection method for hospital water distribution systems contaminated with Legionella. Disinfection with peracetic acid was performed in a small hospital contaminated with L. pneumophila serotype 1. The disinfectant was used at concentrations of 50 ppm (first three surveillance phases) and 1,000 ppm (fourth surveillance phase) for 30 minutes. Environmental monitoring revealed that disinfection was maintained 1 week after treatment; however, levels of recontamination surpassing baseline values were detected after approximately 1 month. Comparison of water temperatures measured at the distal outlets showed a statistically significant association between temperature and bacterial load. The circulating water temperature was found to be lower in the two wards farthest away from the hot water production plant than in other wards. It was thought that the lower water temperature in the two wards promoted the bacterial growth even after disinfection. Peracetic acid may be useful in emergency situations, but does not provide definitive protection even if used monthly.

  17. Occurrences of nitrosamines in chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water in three representative cities, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Qian; Wang, Donghong; Wang, Zijian

    2012-10-15

    An investigation of the occurrence of nine nitrosamines in drinking water following different water treatment processes was conducted using samples from seven drinking water treatment plants in three cities and tap waters in one city in China. The total nitrosamine levels ranged from not detected (n.d.) to 43.45 ng/L. The species and concentrations of the nine nitrosamines varied with disinfection methods and source waters. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is the nitrosamines of greatest concern, was identified in raw water, disinfecting water, finished water and tap water samples, ranging from 0.8 to 21.6, 0.12 to 24.2, n.d. to 8.8, and n.d. to 13.3 ng/L, respectively. Chloramination alone produced the most significant amounts of NDMA, while ozonation followed by chloramination led to moderately reduced levels. Additionally, chlorination produced relatively less NDMA, while low pressure ultraviolet radiation followed by chlorination could also significantly reduce them. Total organic carbon is one of the most important factors influencing nitrosamines formation in disinfecting water. In contrast, the addition of chlorine following any other disinfection was found to increase the formation of the other eight species of nitrosamines. The three nitrosamines recommended for monitoring by the US EPA were detected in the tap water samples, but most were present at levels below those that pose a risk to human health. Nevertheless, the occurrence and concentration of nitrosamines regulated in the Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List could cause some potential human effects and therefore warrant attention. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrosamines in disinfected drinking water in three Chinese cities were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some nitrosamines could be detected in raw water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advanced treatment affects nitrosamine levels both positively and negatively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matters

  18. Succession of Biofilm Microbial Community during Nitrification in Lab-Scale Reactors Simulating Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Conditions: the Impact of Simultaneously Increasing Monochloramine and Chlorine to Nitrogen Mass Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloramination has been shown to promote nitrifying bacteria and 30 to 63% of utility plants using secondary chloramine disinfection experience nitrification episodes. Although nitrifying bacteria are not considered human pathogens, nitrification can affect drinking water qualit...

  19. A new silver based composite material for SPA water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartanson, M A; Soussan, L; Rivallin, M; Chis, C; Penaranda, D; Lapergue, R; Calmels, P; Faur, C

    2014-10-15

    A new composite material based on alumina (Al2O3) modified by two surface nanocoatings - titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silver (Ag) - was studied for spa water disinfection. Regarding the most common microorganisms in bathing waters, two non-pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Gram positive) were selected as surrogates for bacterial contamination. The bactericidal properties of the Al2O3-TiO2-Ag material were demonstrated under various operating conditions encountered in spa water (temperature: 22-37 °C, presence of salt: CaCO3 or CaCl2, high oxygen content, etc.). Total removal of 10(8) CFU mL(-1) of bacteria was obtained in less than 10 min with 16 g L(-1) of material. Best results were observed for both conditions: a temperature of 37 °C and under aerobic condition; this latest favouring Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation. The CaCO3 salt had no impact on the bactericidal activity of the composite material and CaCl2 considerably stabilized the silver desorption from the material surface thanks to the formation of AgCl precipitate. Preliminary tests of the Al2O3-TiO2-Ag bactericidal behaviour in a continuous water flow confirmed that 2 g L(-1) of material eliminated more than 90% of a 2.0 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1) bacterial mixture after one water treatment recycle and reached the disinfection standard recommended by EPA (coliform removal = 6 log) within 22 h. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons Ultraviolet light and Ultraviolet compounded with chlorine (Ultraviolet/chlorine) has been brought to attention ed in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studies with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm 2 Ultraviolet dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (Ultraviolet/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum Ultraviolet dose was 16000 μW.s/cm 2 attention to 50 percent Ultraviolet absorption ca sued to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the Ultraviolet/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm 2 Ultraviolet dose/0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 10 5 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600 CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number (MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm 3 /s or 0.9 m 3 /h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E. Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with Ultraviolet in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12 CFU/100 ml for pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower

  1. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons UV light and UV compounded with chlorine (UV/chlorine) has been brought to attention in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studied with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm 2 UV dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (UV/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum UV dose was 16000 μW.s/cm 2 attention to 50 percent UV absorption caused to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the UV/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm 2 UV dose /0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 10 5 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number(MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm 3 /s or 0.9 m 3 /h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E.Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with UV in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower turbidity, TSS and TDS in tap water, higher flow rate about 560 cm 3 /s or 2 m 3 /h acessesed

  2. Photoreactivation Study of Wastewater Treatment Effluent Disinfected by UV-disinfection for Water Reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, C.G.; Jung, K.W.; Ham, J.H.; Jeon, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Photoreactivation of microorganism following UV-disinfection is one of the research topics of interest in assessing the UV-disinfection performance. Apparent photoreactivation was examined under fluorescent lamp and solar radiation as well as in darkness. Total coliform, fecal coliform, and Escherichia coli were used as indicator microorganisms, and their concentration of 10~30 MPN/100mL increased to the level of 100 MPN/100mL after 24 hours, which implied that part of damaged microorganisms by UV-disinfection might be repairable with time

  3. Development of silver and zinc oxide decorated nanoclay containing polymeric composites for water disinfection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motshekga, Sarah C.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha; Onyango, Maurice S.; Momba, Maggie N. B.

    2015-01-01

    Contaminated drinking water has serious implications to the human health that could lead to death. The rapid growth of bacterial contamination in drinking water is alarming, and yet a robust and cost effective method with less limitation has not been developed. The current study is aimed at evaluating the performance of nanoclay composites dispersed in chitosan biopolymer as an antibacterial material. The performances of the composites were evaluated using the batch kinetic studies. Three composites of Ag-CtsB, ZnO-CtsB and Ag/ZnO-CtsB were prepared and evaluated against gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. The composites were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy and BET surface area measurements. Antibacterial activity results showed that the composites can be a potent bactericide material for water disinfection as they are highly effective against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria tested. Whereas both Ag-CtsB and ZnO-CtsB composites showed good antibacterial activity against bacteria with removal efficiency from 51%, best antibacterial activity was observed with Ag/ZnO-CtsB composite with removal efficiency from 78%. The results revealed that Ag/ZnO-CtsB composite is a promising bactericide that is highly effective against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria tested

  4. Development of silver and zinc oxide decorated nanoclay containing polymeric composites for water disinfection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motshekga, Sarah C. [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nanostructured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Ray, Suprakas Sinha [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nanostructured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Onyango, Maurice S. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Momba, Maggie N. B. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Arcadia Campus, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa)

    2015-05-22

    Contaminated drinking water has serious implications to the human health that could lead to death. The rapid growth of bacterial contamination in drinking water is alarming, and yet a robust and cost effective method with less limitation has not been developed. The current study is aimed at evaluating the performance of nanoclay composites dispersed in chitosan biopolymer as an antibacterial material. The performances of the composites were evaluated using the batch kinetic studies. Three composites of Ag-CtsB, ZnO-CtsB and Ag/ZnO-CtsB were prepared and evaluated against gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. The composites were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy and BET surface area measurements. Antibacterial activity results showed that the composites can be a potent bactericide material for water disinfection as they are highly effective against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria tested. Whereas both Ag-CtsB and ZnO-CtsB composites showed good antibacterial activity against bacteria with removal efficiency from 51%, best antibacterial activity was observed with Ag/ZnO-CtsB composite with removal efficiency from 78%. The results revealed that Ag/ZnO-CtsB composite is a promising bactericide that is highly effective against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria tested.

  5. Investigation of Trihalomethanes in Drinking Water of Abbas Abad Water Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiani R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chlorination is the most common and successful method for disinfection of drinking water, especially in developing countries. However, due to the probability of formation of disinfection by-products especially Trihalomethanes (THMs that are known as hazardous and usually carcinogenic compounds, this study was conducted to assess the investigation of THMs in drinking water of Abbas Abad water treatment plant in 2015. Methods: In this study, 81 water samples were gathered during autumn season of 2015. Temperature, pH, Ec, turbidity, and residual chlorine were measured on site. After samples preparation in the laboratory, THMs concentrations were determined using gas chromatography. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical package. Results: The results showed that the minimum and maximum mean concentrations (µg/l for bromodichloromethane were 1.47 ± 0.57 and 1.90 ± 0.26, for bromoform were 1.47 ± 0.35 and 2.36 ± 1.10, for dibromochloromethane were 1.47 ± 0.42 and 1.53 ± 0.55, and for chloroform were 3.40 ± 0.70 and 7.53 ± 1.00, and all compounds were determined for stations 1 and 3, respectively. Also comparing the mean concentrations of assessed THMs with ISIRI and World Health Organization (WHO Maximum Permissible Limits (MPL showed significant differences (P < 0.05. Thus, the mean concentrations of all Trihalomethanes compounds were significantly lower than the maximum permissible limits. Conclusions: Although the mean concentrations of THMs were lower than MPL, yet due to discharge of restaurants and gardens’ wastewater into the Abbas Abad River, pre-chlorination process of water in Abbas Abad water treatment plant, high retention time and increasing loss of foliage into the water, especially in autumn season, the formation of Trihalomethanes compounds could increase. Therefore, periodic monitoring of THMs in drinking water distribution network is recommended.

  6. Get the Facts: Drinking Water and Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Related Links CDC Food Safety Adolescent and School Health BAM! Body and Mind Get the Facts: Drinking Water and Intake Recommend ...

  7. Drinking Water Mapping Application (DWMA) - Public Version

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Drinking Water Mapping Application (DWMA) is a web-based geographic information system (GIS) that enhances the capabilities to identify major contaminant risks...

  8. Risk assessment of radon in drinking water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Risk Assessment of Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water, National Research Council

    .... This book presents a valuable synthesis of information about the total inhalation and ingestion risks posed by radon in public drinking water, including comprehensive reviews of data on the transfer...

  9. Drinking Water Earthquake Resilience Paper Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data for the 9 figures contained in the paper, A SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING THE RESILIENCE OF DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS TO DISASTERS WITH AN EXAMPLE EARTHQUAKE...

  10. Drinking Water Quality Forecast of Peshawar Valley on the Basis of Sample Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.U.; Bangash, F.K.

    2001-01-01

    Microbiological and related parameters of 75 portable water samples collected from source, distribution line and consumer tap in 25 different locations were investigated. The findings were used to forecast statistically the quality of drinking water of hole valley at all three sites and compared with WHO's standards. The study shows that the valley has good water deposits and suitable for drinking purposes however the same quality is not maintained throughout the distribution systems. The presence of total and fecal coliform in the samples collected from distribution line and consumer tap shows the mixing of wastewater through leaky joints and corroded underground supply system. The study also shows poor disinfecting practices in the study area. On the basis of this study we can say that the area got excellent subsoil water deposits but most of the consumers are supplied with water not fit for drinking purposes which is the main cause of Heath problems in the area. (author)

  11. [Causes of drinking-water contamination in rain-fed cisterns in three villages in Ramallah and Al-Bireh District, Palestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Orabi, Moammar

    2004-05-01

    We studied the biological characteristics of drinking-water in three villages in Ramallah and al-Bireh district, by testing the total coliforms. Water samples were collected from rain-fed cisterns between October and November 2001. The results show that 87% of tested samples of drinking-water were highly contaminated and in need of coagulation, filtration and disinfection based on the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking-water, and 10.5% had low contamination and were in need of treatment by disinfection only. Only 2.5% of the tested samples were not contaminated and were suitable for drinking without treatment. The main cause of drinking-water con tamination was the presence of cesspits, wastewater and solid waste dumping sites near the cisterns.

  12. New Water Disinfection Technology for Earth and Space Applications as Part of the NPP Fellowship Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SilvestryRodriquez, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    There is the need for a safe, low energy consuming and compact water disinfection technology to maintain water quality for human consumption. The design of the reactor should present no overheating and a constant temperature, with good electrical and optical performance for a UV water treatment system. The study assessed the use of UVA-LEDs to disinfectant water for MS2 Bacteriophage. The log reduction was sufficient to meet US EPA standards as a secondary disinfectant for maintaining water quality control. The study also explored possible inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli.

  13. Nitrogen Transformation and Microbial Spatial Distribution in Drinking Water Biofilter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yongxing; Zhang, Huining; Jin, Huizheng; Wu, Chengxia

    2018-02-01

    Well understanding the rule of nitrogen mutual transformation in biofilters is important for controlling the DBPs formation in the subsequent disinfection process. Ammonia nitrogen removal effect and nitrogen transformation approach in biofilter of drinking water was researched in the study. The biofilter removed ammonia of 48.5% and total phosphorus of 72.3%. And the removal rate of TN, NO3 --N, DON were 37.1%, 33.1%, 46.9%, respectively. Biomass and bioactivity of different depth of the biofilter were determined, too. The overall distribution of biomass showed a decreasing trend from top to bottom. The bioactivity in lower layer gradually increased. Especially the bioactivity of heterotrophic microorganisms showed a gradual increase trend. The amount of the nitrogen loss was 3.06mg/L. Non-nitrification pathway of “nitrogen loss” phenomenon in biofilter might exist assimilation, nitrification and denitrification in autotrophic.

  14. Report of the NATO/CCMS drinking water pilot study on health aspects of drinking water contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzelleca, J F

    1981-04-01

    Various methods of disinfection are being successfully used to control water borne diseases due to biological contaminants in water (viruses, bacteria, protozoa). These methods of chemical control are adding chemical contaminants to the drinking water. For example, trihalomethanes may be formed by the interaction of chlorine with humic and/or fulvic acids. In addition, chemical contaminants may arise from natural, agricultural, industrial or distributional sources. Acute or chronic exposures to these chemicals may result in adverse health effects that are immediate or delayed, reversible or irreversible. Since these contaminants rarely occur singly, chemical interactions (additives, synergistic, antagonistic) must be considered. The nature of the adverse health effects can usually be determined from properly designed and executed animal experiments and/or human epidemiological studies. Potentially toxic agents may also be identified by the use of short term or in vitro tests. Other methods of identification of potentially toxic agents include chemical similarity with known toxicants. Attempts should be made to reduce the number of potentially toxic chemical contaminants but the microbiological quality of drinking water must not be compromised.

  15. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m3 d−1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L−1; n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L−1), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L−1) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  16. Thermal disinfection of hotels, hospitals, and athletic venues hot water distribution systems contaminated by Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2007-11-01

    Legionella spp. (> or = 500 cfu liter(-1)) were detected in 92 of 497 water distribution systems (WDS) examined. Thermal disinfection was applied at 33 WDS. After the first and second application of the disinfection procedure, 15 (45.4%) and 3 (9%) positive for remedial actions WDS were found, respectively. Legionella pneumophila was more resistant to thermal disinfection than Legionella non-pneumophila spp. (relative risk [RR]=5.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1-35). WDS of hotels with oil heater were more easily disinfected than those with electrical or solar heater (RR=0.4 95% CI=0.2-0.8). Thermal disinfection seems not to be efficient enough to eliminate legionellae, unless repeatedly applied and in combination with extended heat flushing, and faucets chlorine disinfection.

  17. Disinfection of bore well water with chlorine dioxide/sodium hypochlorite and hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Jia, Aiyin; Wu, Yue; Wu, Chunde; Chen, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) on potable water disinfection of chemicals was investigated. The bore well water was introduced into HC set-up to examine the effect of HC alone and combination of HC and chemicals such as chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite. The effect of inlet pressure and geometrical parameters on disinfection was studied using HC alone and the results showed that increasing inlet pressure and using more and bigger holes of orifice plates can result in a higher disinfection rates. When HC was combined with chemicals, HC can reduce the doses of the chemicals and shorten the time of disinfection. It was also found that the decrease in bacteria concentration followed a first-order kinetic model. As for the experiment of combination of HC and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection, HC not only improves the disinfection rate but also degrades natural organic matter and chloroform. Compared with only sodium hypochlorite disinfection, combined processes get higher disinfection rate and lower production of chloroform, particularly the pretreatment with HC enhances the disinfection rate by 32% and there is a simultaneous reduction in production of chloroform by 39%.

  18. Natural radionuclides in drinking water in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A.M.; Palacios, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the national survey to evaluate natural radioactivity in the environment, concentration levels of natural uranium and 226 Ra have been analyzed in over 300 drinking water samples taken from different locations in Argentina. 226 Ra was determined by 222 Rn emanation and liquid scintillation counting, and natural uranium by a fluorimetric procedure. Values ranging from 0.03 to 24 μg.l -1 of natural uranium and from 0.06 to 50 μg.l -1 , were measured on drinking water samples taken from tap water systems and private wells, respectively. Concentrations up to 15 mBq.l -1 and to 22 mBq.l -1 of 226 Ra were found in drinking water samples taken from tap water systems and private wells, respectively. These values are compared with the reference values accepted for drinking water. Based on the water intake rate, the age distribution and the measured concentrations, an annual collective effective dose of 1.9 man Sv and an individual committed effective dose of 0.49 μSv.y -1 were calculated for the city of Buenos Aires adult inhabitants, for the ingestion of both natural radionuclides analyzed in drinking water. (author)

  19. Overview of the current National Primary Drinking Water Regulations and regulation development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotruvo, J.A.; Regelski, M.

    1989-01-01

    The promulgation of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR) follows specific steps. First, the Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ANPRM) is published. Second, the EPA, as mandated by the SDWA Amendments, proposes maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), (enforceable standards) and maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs) simultaneously. The Office of Drinking Water developed a six-phase schedule that has attempted to parallel the SDWA-specified deadlines: Phase I - Voltile organic chemicals - July 8, 1987; Phase II - Synthetic organic chemicals and inorganic chemicals - June 1989, microbials and surface water treatment - June 1989, and Lead/copper - December 1988; Phase III - Radionuclides - December 1988; Phase IV - Disinfectants and disinfection by-products - June 1989; Phase V - Other inorganic chemicals, synthetic organic chemicals, and pesticides - June 1989; and Phase VI - 25 additional chemicals - January 199. In selecting contaminants for regulation, the most relevant criteria are (1) potential health risk; (2) ability to detect a contaminant in the drinking water; and (3) occurrence or potential occurrence in drinking water. The EPA uses a three category approach for setting maximum contaminant level goals for carcinogens: Category I, strong evidence of carcinogenicity-zero; Category II, equivocal evidence - reference dose (RfD) approach or 0.00001 to 0.000001 cancer risk range; and Category III, inadequate or no evidence from animal studies - RfD approach. 10 refs., 5 tabs

  20. National trends in drinking water quality violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Maura; Wu, Haowei; Lall, Upmanu

    2018-02-27

    Ensuring safe water supply for communities across the United States is a growing challenge in the face of aging infrastructure, impaired source water, and strained community finances. In the aftermath of the Flint lead crisis, there is an urgent need to assess the current state of US drinking water. However, no nationwide assessment has yet been conducted on trends in drinking water quality violations across several decades. Efforts to reduce violations are of national concern given that, in 2015, nearly 21 million people relied on community water systems that violated health-based quality standards. In this paper, we evaluate spatial and temporal patterns in health-related violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act using a panel dataset of 17,900 community water systems over the period 1982-2015. We also identify vulnerability factors of communities and water systems through probit regression. Increasing time trends and violation hot spots are detected in several states, particularly in the Southwest region. Repeat violations are prevalent in locations of violation hot spots, indicating that water systems in these regions struggle with recurring issues. In terms of vulnerability factors, we find that violation incidence in rural areas is substantially higher than in urbanized areas. Meanwhile, private ownership and purchased water source are associated with compliance. These findings indicate the types of underperforming systems that might benefit from assistance in achieving consistent compliance. We discuss why certain violations might be clustered in some regions and strategies for improving national drinking water quality.

  1. SYNERGY OF OZONE TECHNOLOGY AND UV RAYS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AS A BREAKTHROUGH IN PREVENTION OF DIARRHEA DISEASES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Wulansarie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria which lead to contamination of drinking water in Indonesia, disinfected using ozone technology and UV rays in this research, particularly for solving the problem of water supply. The research was carried out by the variation of samples (tap water and AMDK and presence or absence of UV rays on the research. All the results, which are related to the number of colonies of E. coli analyzed by using the method of TPC (Total Plate Count. Based on the results of the research, the number of bacteria after disinfection show a significant decline either using ozone alone, UV rays alone, or both, particularly at the time of disinfection for 3 minutes. The most optimal technology for the disinfection process is a synergy between ozone technology and UV rays, proven by the number of bacteria equal to 0 after the disinfection process for 30 minutes.

  2. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Neagu (Pascu), Mihaela; Alina Traistaru, Gina; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Raluca Miron, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering both local economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption m...

  3. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of Aeromonas spp. in drinking and waste water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Vânia; Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Silva, Márcia; Manaia, Célia M

    2011-11-01

    The taxonomic diversity and antibiotic resistance phenotypes of aeromonads were examined in samples from drinking and waste water treatment plants (surface, ground and disinfected water in a drinking water treatment plant, and raw and treated waste water) and tap water. Bacteria identification and intra-species variation were determined based on the analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB and cpn60 gene sequences. Resistance phenotypes were determined using the disc diffusion method. Aeromonas veronii prevailed in raw surface water, Aeromonas hydrophyla in ozonated water, and Aeromonas media and Aeromonas puntacta in waste water. No aeromonads were detected in ground water, after the chlorination tank or in tap water. Resistance to ceftazidime or meropenem was detected in isolates from the drinking water treatment plant and waste water isolates were intrinsically resistant to nalidixic acid. Most of the times, quinolone resistance was associated with the gyrA mutation in serine 83. The gene qnrS, but not the genes qnrA, B, C, D or qepA, was detected in both surface and waste water isolates. The gene aac(6')-ib-cr was detected in different waste water strains isolated in the presence of ciprofloxacin. Both quinolone resistance genes were detected only in the species A. media. This is the first study tracking antimicrobial resistance in aeromonads in drinking, tap and waste water and the importance of these bacteria as vectors of resistance in aquatic environments is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Perceived agricultural runoff impact on drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Andrea; Ragusa, Angela T

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural runoff into surface water is a problem in Australia, as it is in arguably all agriculturally active countries. While farm practices and resource management measures are employed to reduce downstream effects, they are often either technically insufficient or practically unsustainable. Therefore, consumers may still be exposed to agrichemicals whenever they turn on the tap. For rural residents surrounded by agriculture, the link between agriculture and water quality is easy to make and thus informed decisions about water consumption are possible. Urban residents, however, are removed from agricultural activity and indeed drinking water sources. Urban and rural residents were interviewed to identify perceptions of agriculture's impact on drinking water. Rural residents thought agriculture could impact their water quality and, in many cases, actively avoided it, often preferring tank to surface water sources. Urban residents generally did not perceive agriculture to pose health risks to their drinking water. Although there are more agricultural contaminants recognised in the latest Australian Drinking Water Guidelines than previously, we argue this is insufficient to enhance consumer protection. Health authorities may better serve the public by improving their proactivity and providing communities and water utilities with the capacity to effectively monitor and address agricultural runoff.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - REMOVAL OF PRECURSORS TO DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER, PCI MEMBRANE SYSTEMS FYNE PROCESS MODEL ROP 1434 WITH AFC-30 NANOFILTRATON AT BARROW, AK - NSF 00/19/EPADW395

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equipment testing and verification of PCI Membrane Systems Inc. Fyne Process nanofiltraton systems Model ROP 1434 equipped with a C10 module containing AFC-30 tubular membranes was conducted from 3/16-5/11/2000 in Barrow, AS. The source water was a moderate alkalinity, moderately...

  6. [On bacterial aftergrowth in drinking and industrial water. II. Apparative and processing influence upon the growth and the possibility of disinfection of ion exchange resin filter systems (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, R H

    1975-12-01

    The comparative examination of numerous ion exchange resin filter systems for discontinuous water softening on the market revealed that apparative and processing characteristics are of great influence upon the aftergrowth of bacteria in the water of ion exchange resin systems. Within the examination it was taken into consideration that on the end-delivery-tube of the water pipe with regard to the colony count the conditions were more unfavourable during the long standstill over a weekend (table 1) than during the week (table2). The less favourable conditions have therefore been examined separately. The work has been divided in six test series. In the first one 5 ion exchange resin systems the types A-E are simultaneously tested with regard to the colony count in the water at the inflow to the apparatus and after the passage of it; regeneration twice a week with sodium chloride. The data ascertained in the course of several weeks (without first data on mondays) and the separated mondays data are examined according to logarithmic transformation with the assistance of variance analysis and the Newman Keuls-test for differences. The results show (tab. 4 and 5) that apparative parameters and such relevant to the technical process (tab. 3) have an influence upon the bacterial after growth of the water. The most favourable ion exchange resin filter is type E because it shows more favourable values than all other systems and the tapwater. In the second test serie the systems A-E have been regenerated with 1% Chloramin T containing sodium chloride. The results show again the type E as the statistically significant most favourable system in comparison with the others and the tapwater. In the third test serie it has been examined whether the long period of standstill of the brine in the resin bed which has probably been responsible for the good results of the type E would lead to values just as favourable if transferred to another type of apparatus. ...

  7. 77 FR 8865 - Public Water System Supervision Program Approval for the State of Illinois; Tentative Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. Illinois is also applying its Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection... for Long-Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment and Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-product..., Ground Water and Drinking Water Branch (WG-15J), 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. FOR...

  8. Utilization of the ultraviolet rays in drinking water and wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoli, D.; Alava, F.; Conio, O.; Giacosa, D.

    2001-01-01

    According with the Who (World Health Organization, Geneve) Guidelines for drinking-water quality- second edition (1993), the Italian normative DPR 236/88 and the European directive 98/83/CE underline the importance of the microbiological safety of the drinking water, relating it to the absence of parasites and microorganisms potentially dangerous for public health. The radiant energy impact on the microorganism constituent materials, particularly with the nucleic acids, destabilising the hydrogen bonds among the nitrogenous bases and forming covalent bonds, especially among pyrimidinic bases; intensive irradiation could cause even the denaturation of nucleic acids. In many European countries UV disinfection is becoming more and more spread for drinking water disinfection; no statistics about UV treatment in Italy are available, even if at the moment UV process concerns mainly drinking water and small plants. This survey presents the chlorination as a good system for bacterial removal, but UV treatment with comparable efficiency and cost does not show the formation of toxic by-products and is easier to maintain and to check up [it

  9. Efficacy of detergent and water versus bleach for disinfection of direct contact ophthalmic lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Ashkan M; Gregori, Ninel Z; Surapaneni, Krishna; Miller, Darlene

    2014-06-01

    Although manufacturers recommend cleaning ophthalmic lenses with detergent and water and then with a specific disinfectant, disinfectants are rarely used in ophthalmic practices. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of detergent and water versus that of bleach, a recommended disinfectant, to eliminate common ocular bacteria and viruses from ophthalmic lenses. Three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Corynebacterium straitum, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 2 viral strains (adenovirus and herpes simplex virus [HSV] type-1) were individually inoculated onto 20 gonioscopy and laser lenses. The lenses were washed with detergent and water and then disinfected with 10% bleach. All the lenses were cultured after inoculation, after washing with detergent and water, and after disinfecting with the bleach. Bacterial cultures in thioglycollate broth were observed for 3 weeks, and viral cultures were observed for 2 weeks. The presence of viruses was also detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All 20 lenses inoculated with S. epidermidis, C. straitum, adenovirus, and HSV-1 showed growth after inoculation but no growth after washing with detergent/water and after disinfecting with the bleach. All lenses showed positive HSV and adenovirus PCR results after inoculation and negative PCR results after washing with detergent/water and after disinfecting with bleach. All methicillin-resistant S. aureus-contaminated lenses showed growth after inoculation and no growth after washing with detergent and water. However, 1 lens showed positive growth after disinfecting with bleach. Cleaning with detergent and water seemed to effectively eliminate bacteria and viruses from the surface of contaminated ophthalmic lenses. Further studies are warranted to design practical disinfection protocols that minimize lens damage.

  10. 75 FR 75761 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... from high levels of nitrates, possible formation of disinfection byproducts in drinking water, and... treat drinking water react with organic carbon (from the algae in source waters). Some disinfection... nitrate limit of 10 mg/L and nitrite limit of 1 mg/L for the protection of human health in drinking water...

  11. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  12. Quantitative risk assessment of drinking water contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothern, C.R.; Coniglio, W.A.; Marcus, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    The development of criteria and standards for the regulation of drinking water contaminants involves a variety of processes, one of which is risk estimation. This estimation process, called quantitative risk assessment, involves combining data on the occurrence of the contaminant in drinking water and its toxicity. The human exposure to a contaminant can be estimated from occurrence data. Usually the toxicity or number of health effects per concentration level is estimated from animal bioassay studies using the multistage model. For comparison, other models will be used including the Weibull, probit, logit and quadratic ones. Because exposure and toxicity data are generally incomplete, assumptions need to be made and this generally results in a wide range of certainty in the estimates. This range can be as wide as four to six orders of magnitude in the case of the volatile organic compounds in drinking water and a factor of four to five for estimation of risk due to radionuclides in drinking water. As examples of the differences encountered in risk assessment of drinking water contaminants, discussions are presented on benzene, lead, radon and alachlor. The lifetime population risk estimates for these contaminants are, respectively, in the ranges of: <1 - 3000, <1 - 8000, 2000-40,000 and <1 - 80. 11 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  13. Drinking water regulations under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The fact sheet describes the requirements covered under the 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act. Levels of various contaminants (including radio nuclides) are explained. Also discussed are the Surface Water Treatment Rule and the Total Coliforms Rule

  14. Virus disinfection in water by biogenic silver immobilized in polyvinylidene fluoride membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusseme, B.D.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Christiaens, E.; Saveyn, H.; Verbeken, K.; Boon, N.; Verstraete, W.

    2011-03-01

    The development of innovative water disinfection strategies is of utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases related to poor treatment of (drinking) water. Recently, the association of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cell surface of Lactobacillus fermentum (referred to as biogenic silver or bio-Ag{sup 0}) has been reported to exhibit antiviral properties. The microscale bacterial carrier matrix serves as a scaffold for Ag{sup 0} particles, preventing aggregation during encapsulation. In this study, bio-Ag{sup 0} was immobilized in different microporous PVDF membranes using two different pre-treatments of bio-Ag{sup 0} and the immersion-precipitation method. Inactivation of UZ1 bacteriophages using these membranes was successfully demonstrated and was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} from the membranes. At least a 3.4 log decrease of viruses was achieved by application of a membrane containing 2500 mg bio-Ag{sub powder}{sup 0} m{sup -2} in a submerged plate membrane reactor operated at a flux of 3.1 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Upon startup, the silver concentration in the effluent initially increased to 271 {micro}g L{sup -1} but after filtration of 31 L m{sup -2}, the concentration approached the drinking water limit (= 100 {micro}g L{sup -1}). A virus decline of more than 3 log was achieved at a membrane flux of 75 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, showing the potential of this membrane technology for water disinfection on small scale. In biogenic silver, silver nanoparticles are attached to a bacterial carrier matrix. Bio-Ag{sup 0} was successfully immobilized in PVDF membranes using immersion-precipitation. The antiviral activity of this material was demonstrated in a plate membrane reactor. The antimicrobial mechanism was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} ions. The membranes can be applied for treatment of limited volumes of contaminated water.

  15. Shift in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system following the introduction of an on-site monochloramine disinfection system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne L Baron

    Full Text Available Drinking water distribution systems, including premise plumbing, contain a diverse microbiological community that may include opportunistic pathogens. On-site supplemental disinfection systems have been proposed as a control method for opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing. The majority of on-site disinfection systems to date have been installed in hospitals due to the high concentration of opportunistic pathogen susceptible occupants. The installation of on-site supplemental disinfection systems in hospitals allows for evaluation of the impact of on-site disinfection systems on drinking water system microbial ecology prior to widespread application. This study evaluated the impact of supplemental monochloramine on the microbial ecology of a hospital's hot water system. Samples were taken three months and immediately prior to monochloramine treatment and monthly for the first six months of treatment, and all samples were subjected to high throughput Illumina 16S rRNA region sequencing. The microbial community composition of monochloramine treated samples was dramatically different than the baseline months. There was an immediate shift towards decreased relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria, and increased relative abundance of Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. Following treatment, microbial populations grouped by sampling location rather than sampling time. Over the course of treatment the relative abundance of certain genera containing opportunistic pathogens and genera containing denitrifying bacteria increased. The results demonstrate the driving influence of supplemental disinfection on premise plumbing microbial ecology and suggest the value of further investigation into the overall effects of premise plumbing disinfection strategies on microbial ecology and not solely specific target microorganisms.

  16. Disinfection of hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage in water by ultraviolet irradiation: comparison of UV-susceptibilty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenmann, A; Fischer, B; Straub, U; Wang, C -H; Flehmig, B [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Hygiene-Inst.; Schoenen, D [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Hygiene-Inst.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation is gaining importance as a disinfection procedure for drinking water and in waste water treatment. Since water is one of the main transmission routes of hepatitis A virus the susceptibility of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) to UV rays is of special interest. MS-2 coliphage resembles HAV in size and structure, is easy to handle, and might therefore serve as indicator organism for the assessment of water quality and for evaluating the quality of water treatment processes. Hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage were suspended in 0.9% sodium chloride solution and were irradiated in a 20-ml quartz cuvette at 254 nm. For a reduction rate of four log units a three times higher UV dose was required with MS-2 than with HAV. (author).

  17. Disinfection of hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage in water by ultraviolet irradiation: comparison of UV-susceptibilty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenmann, A.; Fischer, B.; Straub, U.; Wang, C.-H.; Flehmig, B.; Schoenen, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation is gaining importance as a disinfection procedure for drinking water and in waste water treatment. Since water is one of the main transmission routes of hepatitis A virus the susceptibility of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) to UV rays is of special interest. MS-2 coliphage resembles HAV in size and structure, is easy to handle, and might therefore serve as indicator organism for the assessment of water quality and for evaluating the quality of water treatment processes. Hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage were suspended in 0.9% sodium chloride solution and were irradiated in a 20-ml quartz cuvette at 254 nm. For a reduction rate of four log units a three times higher UV dose was required with MS-2 than with HAV. (author)

  18. Disinfection of hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage in water by ultraviolet irradiation: comparison of UV-susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widenmann, A.; Fischer, B.; Straub, U.; Wang, C. H.; Flehmig, B.; Schoenen, D. [Abteilung für Allgemeine Hygiene und Umwelthygiene, Hygiene-Institut der Universitat Tubingen, D-7400 Tubingen (Germany)

    1993-07-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation is gaining importance as a disinfection procedure for drinking water and in waste water treatment. Since water is one of the main transmission routes of hepatitis A virus the susceptibility of HAV to UV rays is of special interest. MS-2 coliphage resembles HAV in size and structure, is easy to handle, and might tlierefore serve as indicator organism for the assessment of water quality and for evaluating the quality of water treatment processes. Hepatitis A virus and MS-2 coliphage were suspended in 0.9% sodium chloride solution and were irradiated in a 20-ml quarz cuvette at 254 nm. For a reduction rate of four log units a three times lighter UV dose was required with MS-2 than with HAV.

  19. Evaluation of Plastic Household Biosand Filter (BSF) In Combination with Solar Disinfection (SODIS) For Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, G.; Haydar, S.; Bari, A. J.; Anis, M.; Asif, Z.; Aziz, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency of a household plastic biosand filter (BSF) for the removal of turbidity and fecal contamination was evaluated. Water of river Ravi was used as influent. Water filtered through BSF was further treated using Solar Disinfection (SODIS). The study was conducted for raw water with low pollution level (total coliforms <500 MPN/100 ml) and high pollution level (total coliforms between 500-20,000 MPN/100 ml). The average value of turbidity removal by BSF was 94.5 percentage with 0.9 NTU as average turbidity of effluent. For raw water with low pollution level, the BSF was able to achieve a maximum of 2.2 log10 unit reduction (99.4 percentage) for total coliforms (39 MPN/100 mL in effluent) and 1.95 log10 unit reduction (98.5 percentage) for fecal coliforms (9 MPN/100 mL in effluent). While for raw water with high pollution level, the maximum removal of 1.5 log10 unit (97.5 percentage) for total coliforms (1430 MPN/100 mL in effluent) and 1.8 log10 units (98.4 percentage) for fecal coliforms (387 MPN/100 mL in effluent) was achieved in BSF. To make the effluent fit for drinking it was further treated using SODIS, which rendered the BSF effluent fit for drinking with zero fecal coliforms count (for full sunny and partially cloudy conditions). Newly proposed plastic BSF could be a good replacement of already used concrete household BSF (used in more than 63 countries) being cheaper in cost and lighter in weight by 85 percentage and 80 percentage, respectively than the concrete BSF. (author)

  20. The microbial quality of drinking water in Manonyane community: Maseru District (Lesotho).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwimbi, P

    2011-09-01

    Provision of good quality household drinking water is an important means of improving public health in rural communities especially in Africa; and is the rationale behind protecting drinking water sources and promoting healthy practices at and around such sources. To examine the microbial content of drinking water from different types of drinking water sources in Manonyane community of Lesotho. The community's hygienic practices around the water sources are also assessed to establish their contribution to water quality. Water samples from thirty five water sources comprising 22 springs, 6 open wells, 6 boreholes and 1 open reservoir were assessed. Total coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria were analyzed in water sampled. Results of the tests were compared with the prescribed World Health Organization desirable limits. A household survey and field observations were conducted to assess the hygienic conditions and practices at and around the water sources. Total coliform were detected in 97% and Escherichia coli in 71% of the water samples. The concentration levels of Total coliform and Escherichia coli were above the permissible limits of the World Health Organization drinking water quality guidelines in each case. Protected sources had significantly less number of colony forming units (cfu) per 100 ml of water sample compared to unprotected sources (56% versus 95%, p water sources from livestock faeces, laundry practices, and water sources being down slope of pit latrines in some cases. These findings suggest source water protection and good hygiene practices can improve the quality of household drinking water where disinfection is not available. The results also suggest important lines of inquiry and provide support and input for environmental and public health programmes, particularly those related to water and sanitation.

  1. Drinking water in Cuba and seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses-Ruiz, E.; Turtos-Carbonell, L.M.; Oviedo-Rivero, I.

    2004-01-01

    The lack of drinking water has become a problem at world level because, in many places, supplies are very limited and, in other places, their reserves have been drained. At the present time there are estimated to be around two thousand million people that don't have drinking water for several reasons, such as drought, contamination and the presence of saline waters not suitable for human consumption. Because of the human need for water, they have always taken residence in areas where the supply was guaranteed, sometimes impeding the exploitation of other areas that can be economically very interesting. However, this resource is usually very close and in abundance in the form of seawater but its salinity makes it unusable for many basic requirements. Humanity has been forced, therefore, to take into consideration the possibilities of the economic treatment of seawater. Cuba has regions where the supplies of drinking water are scarce and others where the lack of this resource limits economic exploitation. The present work is approached with regard to the situation of hydro resources in Cuba, it includes: a description of the main hydrographic basins of the country; the contamination levels of the waters and the measures for mitigation; analysis of the supplies and demand for drinking water and its quality; regulatory aspects. The state of seawater desalination in Cuba is also included and the possibility of its realisation using nuclear energy and the advantages that this would bring is evaluated. (author)

  2. Drinking water protection plan; a discussion document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This draft document outlines the plan of action devised by the Government of British Columbia in an effort to safeguard the purity of the drinking water supply in the province, and invites British Columbians to participate in the elaboration of such a plan. This document concentrates on the assessment of the sources of the water supply (watersheds and aquifers) and on measures to ensure the integrity of the system of water treatment and distribution as the principal components of a comprehensive plan to protect drinking water. The proposed plan involves a multi-barrier approach that will use a combination of measures to ensure that water sources are properly managed and waterworks systems provide safe drinking water. New drinking water planning procedures, more effective local influence and authority, enforceable standards, better access to information and public education programs form the essence of the plan. A series of public meetings are scheduled to provide the public at large with opportunities to comment on the government's plan of action and to offer suggestions for additional measures

  3. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    -depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to maintain good drinking water microbial quality up

  4. A bibliometric analysis of drinking water research in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Keywords: Africa, bibliometric review, drinking water, publications, research ...... and 'heavy metal water pollution' (1 article) with 89 citations. The high ..... KHAN MA and HO YS (2011) Arsenic in drinking water: A review on.

  5. Nitrification in Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Factors Affecting Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water distribution systems with ammonia present from either naturally occurring ammonia or ammonia addition during chloramination are at risk for nitrification. Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is undesirable and may result in water quality degradatio...

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of UV disinfection for water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.Y.; Osman, H.; Kang, C.W.; Ba, T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • UV irradiation for water treatment is numerically and experimentally investigated. • Fluence rate E increases exponentially with the increase of UVT. • UV dose distribution moves to a high range with increase of UVT and lamp power. • A linear relationship is observed between fluence rate E and average UV dose D_a_v_e. • D_a_v_e decreases with the increase of UVT and fluid flow rate. - Abstract: Disinfection by ultraviolet (UV) for water treatment in a UV reactor is numerically and experimentally investigated in this paper. The flow of water, UV radiation transportation as well as microorganism particle trajectories in the UV reactor is simulated. The effects of different parameters including UV transmittance (UVT), lamp power and water flow rate on the UV dose distribution and average UV dose are studied. The UV reactor performance in terms of average UV dose under these parameters is analysed. Comparisons are made between experiments and simulations on the average UV dose and reasonable agreement is achieved. The results show that the fluence rate increases exponentially with the increase of UVT. The UV dose distribution profiles moves to a high range of UV dose with the increase of UVT and lamp power. The increase of water flow rate reduces the average exposure time of microorganism particles to the UV light, resulting in the shifting of UV dose distribution to a low range of UV dose. A linear relationship is observed between fluence rate and the average UV dose. The average UV dose increases with the increase of lamp power while it decreases with the increase of UVT and water flow rate.

  7. Drinking Water Research Division's research activities in support of EPA's regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.M.; Feige, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act and its Amendments will have a dramatic impact on the way in which one views the treatment and distribution of water in the U.S. The paper discusses the regulatory agenda, including proposed and promulgated regulations for volatile and synthetic organic contaminants, pesticides, lead, copper, inorganic contaminants, and radionuclides. In addition, the Surface Water Treatment and Coliform Rules are discussed in some detail. Tables are presented that list the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs), as well as Best Available Technology (BAT) for reducing many of these contaminants to acceptable levels. Finally, a discussion of expected disinfection requirements and the regulation of disinfection by-products (DBP) is made. Treatment techniques for controlling DBPs are briefly described

  8. Comparison of microbial community shifts in two parallel multi-step drinking water treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiajiong; Tang, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Hong

    2017-07-01

    Drinking water treatment processes remove undesirable chemicals and microorganisms from source water, which is vital to public health protection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treatment processes and configuration on the microbiome by comparing microbial community shifts in two series of different treatment processes operated in parallel within a full-scale drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) in Southeast China. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of water samples demonstrated little effect of coagulation/sedimentation and pre-oxidation steps on bacterial communities, in contrast to dramatic and concurrent microbial community shifts during ozonation, granular activated carbon treatment, sand filtration, and disinfection for both series. A large number of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at these four treatment steps further illustrated their strong shaping power towards the drinking water microbial communities. Interestingly, multidimensional scaling analysis revealed tight clustering of biofilm samples collected from different treatment steps, with Nitrospira, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, noted at higher relative abundances in biofilm compared to water samples. Overall, this study provides a snapshot of step-to-step microbial evolvement in multi-step drinking water treatment systems, and the results provide insight to control and manipulation of the drinking water microbiome via optimization of DWTP design and operation.

  9. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 30 CFR 71.601 - Drinking water; quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drinking water; quality. 71.601 Section 71.601... Water § 71.601 Drinking water; quality. (a) Potable water provided in accordance with the provisions of § 71.600 shall meet the applicable minimum health requirements for drinking water established by the...

  11. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance with...

  12. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  13. Drinking Water Quality Assessment in Tetova Region

    OpenAIRE

    B. H. Durmishi; M. Ismaili; A. Shabani; Sh. Abduli

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The quality of drinking water is a crucial factor for human health. The objective of this study was the assessment of physical, chemical and bacteriological quality of the drinking water in the city of Tetova and several surrounding villages in the Republic of Macedonia for the period May 2007-2008. The sampling and analysis are conducted in accordance with State Regulation No. 57/2004, which is in compliance with EU and WHO standards. A total of 415 samples were taken for ...

  14. Electrochemically activated water as an alternative to chlorine for decentralized disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Ghebremichael, Kebreab A.; Muchelemba, E.; Petruševski, Branislav; Amy, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemically activated (ECA) water is being extensively studied and considered as an alternative to chlorine for disinfection. Some researchers claim that ECA is by and large a chlorine solution, while others claim the presence of reactive

  15. The determination and fate of disinfection by-products from ozonation of polluted raw water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.-J.; Fang, G.-C.; Wang, C.-C.

    2005-01-01

    The major disinfection by-products (DBPs) resulting from ozone treatment of polluted surface water were investigated. By-products of either health concern or which may contribute to biological instability of treated drinking water were investigated. The major DBPs were analyzed in two fractions: carbonyl compounds and brominated organic compounds. The natural organic matter (NOM) was also isolated and fractionated from polluted water for subsequent ozonation and DBPs identification under conditions of typical drinking treatment. The main identified carbonyl compounds were low molecular weight carboxylic acids, benzoic compounds, aliphatic aldehydes and odorous aldehydes, respectively. Brominated organics were also found in ozonated water, including bromoform (CHBr 3 ), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), 2,4-dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN), respectively. It was also found that the characteristic of organic precursors have significant influences on brominated organic by-products formation. Humic acid demonstrated the highest CHBr 3 , DBAA and 2,4-DBP formations, whereas hydrophilic neutral produced less CHBr 3 and 2,4-DBP than the rest of the organic fractions but produced the highest amount of DBAN. In addition to the other target compounds, a total of 59 different organic compounds were detected by means of gas chromatograph/high-resolution electron-impact mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) detection and tentatively identified using mass spectral library searching, mainly aromatics, acids/esters, alcohols, aldehydes, phthalates and amines/amino acids were analyzed. The percentage of elimination or formation levels reached during ozonation is also discussed in this study

  16. Microbial quality of swimming pool water with treatment without disinfection, with ultrafiltration, with UV-based treatment and with chlorination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuten, M.G.A.; Peters, M.C.F.M.; van Dijk, J.C.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2017-01-01

    Swimming pools are traditionally disinfected with a residual disinfectant such as sodium hypochlorite. Nowadays, swimming water without a residual disinfectant is increasingly popular, as can be seen by the growing number of (natural) swimming ponds (Weilandt 2015), but health risks for bathers do

  17. Inequalities in microbial contamination of drinking water supplies in urban areas: the case of Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye-Ansah, Akosua Sarpong; Ferrero, Giuliana; Rusca, Maria; van der Zaag, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Over past decades strategies for improving access to drinking water in cities of the Global South have mainly focused on increasing coverage, while water quality has often been overlooked. This paper focuses on drinking water quality in the centralized water supply network of Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. It shows how microbial contamination of drinking water is unequally distributed to consumers in low-income (unplanned areas) and higher-income neighbourhoods (planned areas). Microbial contamination and residual disinfectant concentration were measured in 170 water samples collected from in-house taps in high-income areas and from kiosks and water storage facilities in low-income areas between November 2014 and January 2015. Faecal contamination (Escherichia coli) was detected in 10% of the 40 samples collected from planned areas, in 59% of the 64 samples collected from kiosks in the unplanned areas and in 75% of the 32 samples of water stored at household level. Differences in water quality in planned and unplanned areas were found to be statistically significant at p inequalities in microbial contamination of drinking water are produced by decisions both on the development of the water supply infrastructure and on how this is operated and maintained.

  18. Potential Effects of Organic Carbon Production on Ecosystems and Drinking Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of tidal wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta is an important component of the Ecosystem Restoration Program of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED. CALFED is a collaborative effort among state and federal agencies to restore the ecological health and improve water management of the Delta and San Francisco Bay (Bay. Tidal wetland restoration is intended to provide valuable habitat for organisms and to improve ecosystem productivity through export of various forms of organic carbon, including both algae and plant detritus. However, the Delta also provides all or part of the drinking water for over 22 million Californians. In this context, increasing sources of organic carbon may be a problem because of the potential increase in the production of trihalomethanes and other disinfection by-products created during the process of water disinfection. This paper reviews the existing information about the roles of organic carbon in ecosystem function and drinking water quality in the Bay-Delta system, evaluates the potential for interaction, and considers major uncertainties and potential actions to reduce uncertainty. In the last 10 years, substantial progress has been made on the role of various forms of organic carbon in both ecosystem function and drinking water quality; however, interactions between the two have not been directly addressed. Several ongoing studies are beginning to address these interactions, and the results from these studies should reduce uncertainty and provide focus for further research.

  19. Prevalence, quantification and typing of adenoviruses detected in river and treated drinking water in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, J; Ehlers, M M; Heim, A; Grabow, W O K

    2005-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAds), of which there are 51 serotypes, are associated with gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary tract and eye infections. The importance of water in the transmission of HAds and the potential health risks constituted by HAds in these environments are widely recognized. Adenoviruses have not previously been quantified in river and treated drinking water samples. In this study, HAds in river water and treated drinking water sources in South Africa were detected, quantified and typed. Adenoviruses were recovered from the water samples using a glass wool adsorption-elution method followed by polyethylene glycol/NaCl precipitation for secondary concentration. The sensitivity and specificity of two nested PCR methods were compared for detection of HAds in the water samples. Over a 1-year period (June 2002 to July 2003), HAds were detected in 5.32% (10/188) of the treated drinking water and 22.22% (10/45) of river water samples using the conventional nested PCR method. The HAds detected in the water samples were quantified using a real-time PCR method. The original treated drinking water and river water samples had an estimate of less than one copy per litre of HAd DNA present. The hexon-PCR products used for typing HAds were directly sequenced or cloned into plasmids before sequencing. In treated drinking water samples, species D HAds predominated. In addition, adenovirus serotypes 2, 40 and 41 were each detected in three different treated drinking water samples. Most (70%) of the HAds detected in river water samples analysed were enteric HAds (serotypes 40 and 41). One HAd serotype 2 and two species D HAds were detected in the river water. Adenoviruses detected in river and treated drinking water samples were successfully quantified and typed. The detection of HAds in drinking water supplies treated and disinfected by internationally recommended methods, and which conform to quality limits for indicator bacteria, warrants an investigation of the

  20. Modelling of Non-Linear Pilot Disinfection Water System: A Bond Graph Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoufel ZITOUNI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet (UV irradiations are used to solve the bacteriological problem of the drinking water quality. A discharge-gas lamp is used to produce this type of irradiation. The UV lamp is fed by photovoltaic (PV energy via electronic ballast composed by an inverter, a transformer and resonant circuit (RLC. The aim of this work is to give a useful global model of the system. In particular, we introduce the complicated UV lamp model and the water disinfection kinetics, where the radiant energy flux emitted by the discharge-gas lamp and the arc voltage are a complex functions of the current and time. This system is intended to be mainly used in rural zones, the photovoltaic modules as source of energy is an adequate solution. To optimise the power transfer from the PV array to ballast and UV lamp, a Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT device may be located between PV array and the loads. In this paper, we developed a bond-graph model which gives the water quality from UV flow, gas type, pressure, lamp current and geometrical characteristic. Finally reliable simulations are established and compared with experimental tests.

  1. Private drinking water quality in rural Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobeloch, Lynda; Gorski, Patrick; Christenson, Megan; Anderson, Henry

    2013-03-01

    Between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, Wisconsin health departments tested nearly 4,000 rural drinking water supplies for coliform bacteria, nitrate, fluoride, and 13 metals as part of a state-funded program that provides assistance to low-income families. The authors' review of laboratory findings found that 47% of these wells had an exceedance of one or more health-based water quality standards. Test results for iron and coliform bacteria exceeded safe limits in 21% and 18% of these wells, respectively. In addition, 10% of the water samples from these wells were high in nitrate and 11% had an elevated result for aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, or strontium. The high percentage of unsafe test results emphasizes the importance of water quality monitoring to the health of nearly one million families including 300,000 Wisconsin children whose drinking water comes from a privately owned well.

  2. Drinking water-a pipe dream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    Every third person deprived of clean drinking water in the world is an Indian, according to a report based on studies conducted by the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), Nagpur. The study further states that almost 70 per cent of our available water is polluted. This causes deaths of about 15 Iakh Indian children every year. A WHO report says that 80 per cent of the illnesses in India could be prevented if safe potable water was available to our entire population. The Union Ministry of Rural Development aims at providing at least one source of safe drinking water supply to each of 5.75 Iakh villages. Each source is expected to be about 0.5 km away from the village and will supply 70 liters of water per person everyday.

  3. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Jennifer L.; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; van der Fels-Klerx, H.J. (Ine)

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer. PMID:26213953

  4. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Banach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer.

  5. Materiales de construcción de las redes de agua caliente y fría sanitaria y resistencia frente a los tratamientos de desinfección Construction materials for hot water and drinking water systems and its resistance in front of disinfection treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcó Gratacós

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El Real Decreto 865/2003 por el que se establecen los criterios higiénico-sanitarios para la prevención y control de la legionelosis obliga a realizar un tratamiento adecuado del agua en todas las instalaciones de riesgo para evitar la proliferación de Legionella.Los tratamientos que se están realizando para la desinfección de estos circuitos se basan normalmente en la adición de biocidas y en la elevación de la temperatura. Estos tratamientos, en determinadas instalaciones han demostrado ser muy agresivos para los circuitos produciendo importantes procesos de corrosión que, por otra parte, impiden la eficacia de la desinfección.Por todo ello es muy importante conocer las características de cada tratamiento y sus posibles interacciones con los diversos materiales existente con el fin de poder seleccionar los más adecuados para garantizar la eliminación de Legionella y mantener el circuito en perfecto estado de higiene.The Royal Decree 865/2003 that establishes the hygienic and sanitary conditions to prevent and control legionellosis, requires that all risk installations shall have a suitable water treatment to prevent Legionella growth.Treatments that are normally carried out for disinfection are usually based on a biocide addition or on a temperature increase.These treatments in many cases may be very aggressive for the circuit components and result in important corrosion processes that, on the other hand, avoid the disinfection effectiveness.For all this, it is very important to know the characteristics of each treatment and their possible interactions with the existing materials in order to select the most appropriate not only to guarantee Legionella prevention but, in addition, to maintain the circuit under perfect sanitary conditions.

  6. Drinking water quality concerns and water vending machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McSwane, D.Z.; Oleckno, W.A.; Eils, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Drinking water quality is a vital public health concern to consumers and regulators alike. This article describes some of the current microbiological, chemical, and radiological concerns about drinking water and the evolution of water vending machines. Also addressed are the typical treatment processes used in water vending machines and their effectiveness, as well as a brief examination of a certification program sponsored by the National Automatic Merchandising Association (NAMA), which provides a uniform standard for the design and construction of food and beverage vending machines. For some consumers, the water dispensed from vending machines is an attractive alternative to residential tap water which may be objectionable for aesthetic or other reasons

  7. Chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant for Ralstonia solanacearum control in water, storage and equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown rot or bacterial wilt caused by bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is the main limiting factor in potato production. Quarantine measures are necessary to avoid spread of disease to disease-free areas. R. solanacearum has been shown to contaminate watercourses from which crop irrigation is then prohibited causing further potential losses in yield and quality. The bacteria also spread via surfaces that diseased seed potatoes come into contact with. This study showed bactericidal activity of chlorine dioxide (CIO2 on R. solanacearum for disinfection of water, surface and equipment. The results showed that CIO2 solution at concentration of 2 ppm at 30 minutes of exposure time had bactericidal effect for disinfection of water. For surface and equipment disinfection, concentration of 50 ppm showed total efficacy at 30 min and 5 sec exposure time, respectively. Results suggest that use of CIO2 as a disinfectant has a potential for control of brown rot pathogen in water, storage and equipment.

  8. Evaluating Nanoparticle Breakthrough during Drinking Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalew, Talia E. Abbott; Ajmani, Gaurav S.; Huang, Haiou

    2013-01-01

    Background: Use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer products is resulting in NPs in drinking water sources. Subsequent NP breakthrough into treated drinking water is a potential exposure route and human health threat. Objectives: In this study we investigated the breakthrough of common NPs—silver (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO)—into finished drinking water following conventional and advanced treatment. Methods: NPs were spiked into five experimental waters: groundwater, surface water, synthetic freshwater, synthetic freshwater containing natural organic matter, and tertiary wastewater effluent. Bench-scale coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation simulated conventional treatment, and microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) simulated advanced treatment. We monitored breakthrough of NPs into treated