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  1. Esmeralda Energy Company, Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008. Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, DOE GRED III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymonaz, John [Fish Lake Green Power Co. (United States); Hulen, Jeffrey B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geosciences Inst.; Nash, Gregory D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geosciences Inst.; Schriener, Alex [Earth Systems Southwest (United States)

    2008-01-22

    The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327⁰ F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

  2. Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

  3. Lake Van deep drilling project PALEOVAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Thomas; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-11-01

    A complete succession of the lacustrine sediment sequence deposited during the last ˜600,000 years in Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) was drilled in 2010 supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Based on a detailed seismic site survey, two sites at a water depth of up to 360 m were drilled in summer 2010, and cores were retrieved from sub-lake-floor depths of 140 m (Northern Basin) and 220 m (Ahlat Ridge). To obtain a complete sedimentary section, the two sites were multiple cored in order to investigate the paleoclimate history of a sensitive semi-arid region between the Black, Caspian, and Mediterranean seas. This introductory paper provides background information of the deep drilling project and an overview of the studies presented in this special volume by the PALEOVAN science team dealing with chronology, paleomagnetism, paleoenvironmental proxies, geophysical and petrophysical investigations as well as pore-water and fluid transport.

  4. The Newberry Deep Drilling Project (NDDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, A.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Petty, S.; Schultz, A.; Sorle, C.; Asanuma, H.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Jaupart, C. P.; Moran, S. C.; de Natale, G.

    2017-12-01

    We present the arguments to drill a deep well to the ductile/brittle transition zone (T>400°C) at Newberry Volcano, central Oregon state, U.S.A. The main research goals are related to heat and mass transfer in the crust from the point of view of natural hazards and geothermal energy: enhanced geothermal system (EGS supercritical and beyond-brittle), volcanic hazards, mechanisms of magmatic intrusions, geomechanics close to a magmatic system, calibration of geophysical imaging techniques and drilling in a high temperature environment. Drilling at Newberry will bring additional information to a very promising field of research initiated by ICDP in the Deep Drilling project in Iceland with IDDP-1 on Krafla in 2009, followed by IDDP-2 on the Reykjanes ridge in 2016, and the future Japan Beyond-Brittle project and Krafla Magma Testbed. Newberry Volcano contains one of the largest geothermal heat reservoirs in the western United States, extensively studied for the last 40 years. All the knowledge and experience collected make this an excellent choice for drilling a well that will reach high temperatures at relatively shallow depths (< 5000 m). The large conductive thermal anomaly (320°C at 3000 m depth), has already been well-characterized by extensive drilling and geophysical surveys. This will extend current knowledge from the existing 3000 m deep boreholes at the sites into and through the brittle-ductile transition approaching regions of partial melt like lateral dykes. The important scientific questions that will form the basis of a full drilling proposal, have been addressed during an International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) workshop held in Bend, Oregon in September 2017. They will be presented and discussed as well as the strategic plan to address them.

  5. The DOE Thermal Regimes Drilling Program through 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    In response to strong endorsement from the scientific community, in the form of a report by the Continental Scientific Drilling Committee of the National Academy of Sciences (CSDC, 1984), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the DOE undertook a program of investigations of young magmatic intrusions and their associated thermal systems. To date, the effort has encompassed the first phases of a program to investigate the roots of active hydrothermal systems and has also investigated the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior of geologically recent (less than 600 years) magmatic extrusions. Shallow to intermediate-depth holes have been drilled and cored into hydrothermal systems in the silicic Valles and Long Valley calderas and at the crustal spreading center of the Salton Trough. These projects are briefly summarized here and are covered in greater detail in the accompanying appendices.

  6. Geologic report on the Oakville-Goliad drilling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benfer, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    This project consisted of 12 drill holes having a cumulative depth of 28,646 feet. These holes tested the stratigraphy and uranium favorability of the Coliad Formation, the Oakville Formation, and in some cases the Catahoula Formation. The project area is largely coincident with Brooks County, located near the southern tip of Texas, and it is situated in the gulf coastal region about 60 miles southwest of Corpus Christi. Falfurrias, located at the northern end of Brooks County, is the only town of any size within the 1350-square-mile project area. The project area lies within the Laredo and McAllen 2 0 Quadrangles. David L. Norton, DOE regional geologist in Austin, proposed in April 1978 that a NURE drilling program be conducted in the Brooks County area to obtain subsurface data to be used to improve uranium resource estimates. At that time, the Department of Energy estimated that 22,500 tons U 3 O 8 of possible potential resources, in the $50-per-pound forward-cost category, were contained in the Goliad and Oakville Formations within the resource areas. This report presents geologic data generated by the drilling, coring, and logging conducted in 1979 and 1980. Included herein are interpretative lithologic and geophysical logs of each hole. Selected drill cuttings from OG-2 and OG-17, only, were analyzed petrographically and chemically by the BFEC petrology and chemistry laboratories with the results appended. All core obtained, totaling approximately 700 feet, was studied and described by William Galloway and collegues at the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (Galloway and Morton, in preparation). Table 1 is a summary of drill-hole data obtained

  7. COST ESTIMATING RELATIONSHIPS IN ONSHORE DRILLING PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Melo e Silva Accioly

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimating relationships (CERs are very important tools in the planning phases of an upstream project. CERs are, in general, multiple regression models developed to estimate the cost of a particular item or scope of a project. They are based in historical data that should pass through a normalization process before fitting a model. In the early phases they are the primary tool for cost estimating. In later phases they are usually used as an estimation validation tool and sometimes for benchmarking purposes. As in any other modeling methodology there are number of important steps to build a model. In this paper the process of building a CER to estimate drilling cost of onshore wells will be addressed.

  8. DOE HIGH-POWER SLIM-HOLE DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. William C. Maurer; John H. Cohen; J. Chris Hetmaniak; Curtis Leitko

    1999-09-01

    This project used a systems approach to improve slim-hole drilling performance. A high power mud motor, having a double-length power section, and hybrid PDC/TSP drill bit were developed to deliver maximum horsepower to the rock while providing a long life down hole. This high-power slim-hole drilling system drills much faster than conventional slim-hole motor and bit combinations and holds significant potential to reduce slim-hole drilling costs. The oil and gas industries have been faced with downward price pressures since the 1980s. These pressures are not expected to be relieved in the near future. To maintain profitability, companies have had to find ways to reduce the costs of producing oil and gas. Drilling is one of the more costly operations in the production process. One method to reduce costs of drilling is to use smaller more mobile equipment. Slim holes have been drilled in the past using this principle. These wells can save money not only from the use of smaller drilling equipment, but also from reduced tubular costs. Stepping down even one casing size results in significant savings. However, slim holes have not found wide spread use for three reasons. First, until recently, the price of oil has been high so there were no forces to move the industry in this direction. Second, small roller bits and motors were not very reliable and they drilled slowly, removing much of the economic benefit. The third and final reason was the misconception that large holes were needed everywhere to deliver the desired production. Several factors have changed that will encourage the use of slim holes. The industry now favors any method of reducing the costs of producing oil and gas. In addition, the industry now understands that large holes are not always needed. Gas, in particular, can have high production rates in smaller holes. New materials now make it possible to manufacture improved bits and motors that drill for long periods at high rates. All that remains is to

  9. Interim report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Concern for the environment and cost reduction are the driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. Preliminary activities included surveying the directional drilling access needs of various DOE sites, identifying an existing class of machinery that could be enhanced for environmental work through development, and establishing a mutually beneficial working relationship with an industry partner. Since that time the project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, and SNL. The project continues to test and develop the machinery and technique refinements needed for future applications at DOE, DOD, and private sector sites. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of ``cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid`` to an environmental problem site. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and ultimately should result in commercial availability of the machinery. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques will be a final project goal.

  10. DOE Robotics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  11. Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project Completes Coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the Scientific Staff of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project (CBIS Project completed its coring operations during September–December 2005 and April–May 2006. Cores were collected continuously to a total depth of 1766 m. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of impactites beneath 444 m of post-impact continental shelf sediments.The CBIS Project is a joint venture of the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS. Project activities began with a planning workshop in September 2003 attended by sixtythree scientists from ten countries. Field operations began with site preparation in July 2005, and coring began in September 2005. Drilling, Observation and Sampling of theEarth’s Continental Crust (DOSECC was the general contractor for the drilling operations throughout 2005.

  12. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  13. Drilling through the largest magma chamber on Earth: Bushveld Igneous Complex Drilling Project (BICDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Veksler, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    A scientific drilling project in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa has been proposed to contribute to the following scientific topics of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP): large igneous provinces and mantle plumes, natural resources, volcanic systems and thermal regimes, and deep life. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from eight countries met in Johannesburg to exchange ideas about the scientific objectives and a drilling strategy to achieve them. The workshop identified drilling targets in each of the three main lobes of the Bushveld Complex, which will integrate existing drill cores with new boreholes to establish permanently curated and accessible reference profiles of the Bushveld Complex. Coordinated studies of this material will address fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of parental Bushveld magma(s), the magma chamber processes that caused layering and ore formation, and the role of crust vs. mantle in the genesis of Bushveld granites and felsic volcanic units. Other objectives are to study geophysical and geodynamic aspects of the Bushveld intrusion, including crustal stresses and thermal gradient, and to determine the nature of deep groundwater systems and the biology of subsurface microbial communities.

  14. Fifth DOE symposium on enhanced oil and gas recovery and improved drilling technology. Volume 3. Gas and drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linville, B. [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Volume 3 contains papers from the sessions on natural gas supporting research, western gas sands project, drilling technology, and environmental effects. Individuals were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  15. Examination of the relationship between project management critical success factors and project success of oil and gas drilling projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagba, Tonye J.

    Oil and gas drilling projects are the primary means by which oil companies recover large volumes of commercially available hydrocarbons from deep reservoirs. These types of projects are complex in nature, involving management of multiple stakeholder interfaces, multidisciplinary personnel, complex contractor relationships, and turbulent environmental and market conditions, necessitating the application of proven project management best practices and critical success factors (CSFs) to achieve success. Although there is some practitioner oriented literature on project management CSFs for drilling projects, none of these is based on empirical evidence, from research. In addition, the literature has reported alarming rates of oil and gas drilling project failure, which is attributable not to technical factors, but to failure of project management. The aim of this quantitative correlational study therefore, was to discover an empirically verified list of project management CSFs, which consistent application leads to successful implementation of oil and gas drilling projects. The study collected survey data online, from a random sample of 127 oil and gas drilling personnel who were members of LinkedIn's online community "Drilling Supervisors, Managers, and Engineers". The results of the study indicated that 10 project management factors are individually related to project success of oil and gas drilling projects. These 10 CSFs are namely; Project mission, Top management support, Project schedule/plan, Client consultation, Personnel, Technical tasks, Client acceptance, Monitoring and feedback, Communication, and Troubleshooting. In addition, the study found that the relationships between the 10 CSFs and drilling project success is unaffected by participant and project demographics---role of project personnel, and project location. The significance of these findings are both practical, and theoretical. Practically, application of an empirically verified CSFs list to oil

  16. Superhot Drilling in Iceland, the Experience of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Fowler, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project aims to improve geothermal economics by producing supercritical fluids (www.iddp.is). Supercritical wells could yield an order of magnitude more usable energy than that from conventional geothermal wells because of higher enthalpy and enhanced flow properties. In 2009, the IDDP-1 well failed to reach supercritical conditions in the Krafla caldera in NE Iceland, after encountering rhyolite magma at only 2.1 km depth. The completed geothermal well became the world's hottest and produced superheated steam with a wellhead temperature of 452°C and flow sufficient to generate 35 MWe. The IDDP next moved SW to the Reykjanes Peninsula, the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where it is possible to study an analog of the roots of a black smoker. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in being recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406°C at 298 bars. Drilling began by deepening an existing 2.5 km deep production well to 3 km depth, and then angling it towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4,659 m. Total circulation losses were encountered below 3 km that could not be cured by lost circulation materials or by multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to total depth without return of drill cuttings. We attempted 13 core runs below 3 km depth, only half of which recovered core. The cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from lower greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies, suggesting formation temperatures >450°C. After the end of drilling in January 2017, following only six days of heating, supercritical conditions (426°C at 340 bars) were measured in the well at a depth of 4.5 km. The well has not yet been allowed to equilibrate to full in situ temperature. A perforated liner was inserted to 4,570 m, depth to facilitate temperature cycling to enhance permeability at depth through thermal cracking. In 2018 this will be followed by a

  17. Environmental auditing for oil drilling projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Solarte, Hugo Ibsen; Olaya Amaya, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The enforcement of legal regulations on the environment requires some mechanisms related to preservation and conservation of natural resources, as well as paleontological and archaeological wealth, in order to allow their use without endangering their integrity. This article reviews legal regulations, activities and performance indicators, which should be taken into account by Environmental Auditors in oil projects. Additionally, a Plan for Environmental management is analyzed with its main components and procedures for performing the environmental auditing

  18. DOE Energy Challenge Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Murray; Michael Schaepe

    2009-04-24

    Project Objectives: 1. Promote energy efficiency concepts in undergraduate and graduate education. 2. Stimulate and interest in pulp and paper industrial processes, which promote and encourage activities in the area of manufacturing design efficiency. 3. Attract both industrial and media attention. Background and executive Summary: In 1997, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy developed a university design competition with an orientation to the Forest Products Industry. This university design competition is in direct alignment with DOE’s interests in instilling in undergraduate education the concepts of developing energy efficient processes, minimizing waste, and providing environmental benefits and in maintaining and enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S. forest products industry in a global environment. The primary focus of the competition is projects, which are aligned with the existing DOE Agenda 2020 program for the industry and the lines of research being established with the colleges comprising the Pulp and Paper Education and Research Alliance (PPERA). The six design competitions were held annually for the period 1999 through 2004.

  19. Health Impact Assessment of an oil drilling project in California

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay C. McCallum; Kathleen Souweine; Mary McDaniel; Bart Koppe; Christine McFarland; Katherine Butler; Christopher A. Ollson

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The Health Impact Assessment (HIA) was conducted to evaluate the potential community health implications of a proposed oil drilling and production project in Hermosa Beach, California. The HIA considered 17 determinants of health that fell under 6 major categories (i.e., air quality, water and soil quality, upset conditions, noise and light emissions, traffic, and community livability). Material and Methods: This paper attempts to address some of the gaps within the HIA practice b...

  20. Relevance of East African Drill Cores to Human Evolution: the Case of the Olorgesailie Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, R.

    2016-12-01

    Drill cores reaching the local basement of the East African Rift were obtained in 2012 south of the Olorgesailie Basin, Kenya, 20 km from excavations that document key benchmarks in the origin of Homo sapiens. Sediments totaling 216 m were obtained from two drilling locations representing the past 1 million years. The cores were acquired to build a detailed environmental record spatially associated with the transition from Acheulean to Middle Stone Age technology and extensive turnover in mammalian species. The project seeks precise tests of how climate dynamics and tectonic events were linked with these transitions. Core lithology (A.K. Behrensmeyer), geochronology (A. Deino), diatoms (R.B. Owen), phytoliths (R. Kinyanjui), geochemistry (N. Rabideaux, D. Deocampo), among other indicators, show evidence of strong environmental variability in agreement with predicted high-eccentricity modulation of climate during the evolutionary transitions. Increase in hominin mobility, elaboration of symbolic behavior, and concurrent turnover in mammalian species indicating heightened adaptability to unpredictable ecosystems, point to a direct link between the evolutionary transitions and the landscape dynamics reflected in the Olorgesailie drill cores. For paleoanthropologists and Earth scientists, any link between evolutionary transitions and environmental dynamics requires robust evolutionary datasets pertinent to how selection, extinction, population divergence, and other evolutionary processes were impacted by the dynamics uncovered in drill core studies. Fossil and archeological data offer a rich source of data and of robust environment-evolution explanations that must be integrated into efforts by Earth scientists who seek to examine high-resolution climate records of human evolution. Paleoanthropological examples will illustrate the opportunities that exist for connecting evolutionary benchmarks to the data obtained from drilled African muds. Project members: R. Potts, A

  1. Oman Drilling Project Phase I Borehole Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Pezard, P. A.; Henry, G.; Brun, L.; Célérier, B.; Lods, G.; Robert, P.; Benchikh, A. M.; Al Shukaili, M.; Al Qassabi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) drilled six holes at six sites in the Samail ophiolite in the southern Samail and Tayin massifs. 1500-m of igneous and metamorphic rocks were recovered at four sites (GT1, GT2, GT3 and BT1) using wireline diamond core drilling and drill cuttings at two sites (BA1, BA2) using air rotary drilling, respectively. OmanDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, NASA, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, and with in-kind support in Oman from Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University and the German University of Technology. A comprehensive borehole geophysical survey was conducted in all the OmanDP Phase I boreholes shortly after drilling in April 2017. Following geophysical wireline logs, using slim-hole borehole logging equipment provided and run by the Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Université de Montpellier/ Géosciences Montpellier, and logging trucks from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, were collected in most of the holes: electrical resistivity (dual laterolog resistivity, LLd and LLs), spectral gamma ray (K, U, and Th contents), magnetic susceptibility, total natural gamma ray, full waveform sonic (Vp and Vs), acoustic borehole wall imaging, optical borehole wall imaging, borehole fluid parameters (pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox potential, non-polarized spontaneous electrical potential), and caliper (borehole diameter). In addition, spinner flowmeter (downhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) and heatpulse flow meter logs (dowhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) were collected in BA1 to characterize downhole fluid flow rates along borehole axis. Unfortuantely, only incomplete wireline logs are available for

  2. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Vancouver (Canada); Smith, Nicole [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  3. Uranium Geologic Drilling Project, Sand Wash Basin, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This environmental assessment of drill holes in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado considered the current environment; potential impacts from site preparation, drilling operations, and site restoration; coordination among local, state and federal plans; and consideration of alternative actions for this uranium drilling project

  4. Barberton drilling project - Buck Reef Chert core BARB3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Axel; Karykowski, Bartosz; Mason, Paul; Chunnet, Gordon; Arndt, Nick

    2013-04-01

    As part of the ICDP-sponsored Barberton drilling project a single drill core (BARB3) with a total length of 899 m was obtained from the c. 3.4 Ga old Buck Reef Chert (BRC). The BRC is an unusually thick (up to 350 m) sequence of predominantly black-and-white banded chert and banded ferruginous chert that are steeply dipping. It overlies a shallow intrusive to extrusive sequence of dacitic volcanic rocks of the Hooggenoeg Formation and is separated from ultramafic lapillistone of the Kromberg Formation by a >150 m thick ultramafic sill. Drilling commenced in the ultramafic sill at an angle of c. 45° and c. 200 m of serpentinized peridotite were intersected. The remaining c. 700 m of the core include a great variety of chert lithofacies and minor intrusive mafic to intermediate igneous rocks. The base of the BRC was not intersected. Geophysical logging was done up to a depth of 847 m and included acoustic televiewer, gamma ray, resistivity, magnetic field and caliper logs. Stratigraphic and geophysical logs will be presented that will form the basis of follow-up studies on the BARB3 core. Abundance of organic matter, sulphides and Fe-bearing carbonates in specific intervals or associated with specific facies of the chert succession reflect changes in the oceanic, environmental and/or hydrothermal conditions in a shallow marine early Archaean setting. Evaluating the different processes will require a combined sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical approach that will provide insights into the habitat of early life, geochemical cycles and marine/hydrothermal conditions.

  5. High Temperature Venus Drill and Sample Delivery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We proposed to design, build and test a high temperature Pneumatic Drill and Trencher system for Venus subsurface exploration. The Venus Drill and Trencher will be...

  6. Health Impact Assessment of an oil drilling project in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Lindsay C; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary; Koppe, Bart; McFarland, Christine; Butler, Katherine; Ollson, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The Health Impact Assessment (HIA) was conducted to evaluate the potential community health implications of a proposed oil drilling and production project in Hermosa Beach, California. The HIA considered 17 determinants of health that fell under 6 major categories (i.e., air quality, water and soil quality, upset conditions, noise and light emissions, traffic, and community livability). This paper attempts to address some of the gaps within the HIA practice by presenting the methodological approach and results of this transparent, comprehensive HIA; specifically, the evaluation matrix and decision-making framework that have been developed for this HIA and form the basis of the evaluation and allow for a clear conclusion to be reached in respect of any given health determinant (i.e., positive, negative, neutral). There is a number of aspects of the project that may positively influence health (e.g., increased education funding, ability to enhance green space), and at the same time there have been potential negative effects identified (e.g., odor, blowouts, property values). Except for upset conditions, the negative health outcomes have been largely nuisance-related (e.g., odor, aesthetics) without irreversible health impacts. The majority of the health determinants, that had been examined, have revealed that the project would have no substantial effect on the health of the community. Using the newly developed methodology and based on established mitigation measures and additional recommendations provided in the HIA, the authors have concluded that the project will have no substantial effect on community health. This approach and methodology will assist practitioners, stakeholders and decision-makers in advancing the HIA as a useful, reproducible, and informative tool. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Health Impact Assessment of an oil drilling project in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay C. McCallum

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Health Impact Assessment (HIA was conducted to evaluate the potential community health implications of a proposed oil drilling and production project in Hermosa Beach, California. The HIA considered 17 determinants of health that fell under 6 major categories (i.e., air quality, water and soil quality, upset conditions, noise and light emissions, traffic, and community livability. Material and Methods: This paper attempts to address some of the gaps within the HIA practice by presenting the methodological approach and results of this transparent, comprehensive HIA; specifically, the evaluation matrix and decision-making framework that have been developed for this HIA and form the basis of the evaluation and allow for a clear conclusion to be reached in respect of any given health determinant (i.e., positive, negative, neutral. Results: There is a number of aspects of the project that may positively influence health (e.g., increased education funding, ability to enhance green space, and at the same time there have been potential negative effects identified (e.g., odor, blowouts, property values. Except for upset conditions, the negative health outcomes have been largely nuisance-related (e.g., odor, aesthetics without irreversible health impacts. The majority of the health determinants, that had been examined, have revealed that the project would have no substantial effect on the health of the community. Conclusions: Using the newly developed methodology and based on established mitigation measures and additional recommendations provided in the HIA, the authors have concluded that the project will have no substantial effect on community health. This approach and methodology will assist practitioners, stakeholders and decision-makers in advancing the HIA as a useful, reproducible, and informative tool.

  8. Deep-Time drilling in the Australian Archean: the Agouron Institute geobiological drilling project. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Agouron Institute has sponsored deep-time drilling across the South African Archean-Proterozoic boundary, investigating the rise of oxygen over an onshore-offshore environmental transect. It is now supporting a drilling program in the Australian Archean of the Pilbara Craton, addressing a similar theme but with the added goal of resolving controversy over the age and origin of hydrocarbon biomarker molecules in ancient kerogenous shales. As these have been claimed to provide evidence for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis long before the rise of atmospheric oxygen to persistently high levels during the ~2.3 Ga “Great Oxidation Event”, their syngenesis with their host shales is thus of critical importance for the interpretation of Earth’s early oxygenation history. During the first drilling season, 3 holes were drilled using techniques and equipment to minimize organic geochemical contamination (new drill-string components cleaned before drilling potentially biomarker-bearing rocks, pre-contamination of drilling fluid with a synthetic organic compound of similar geochemical characteristics to biomarkers, sterile cutting and storage of samples immediately upon retrieval from the core-barrel). The initial hole was a blank control for organic geochemistry, drilled into rocks too metamorphosed to retain biomarker molecules. These rocks, cherts, carbonates and pelites of the 3.52 Ga Coucal Formation, Coonterunah Group, have been metamorphosed to upper greenschist facies at temperatures near 500°C and so should have had any ancient soluble hydrocarbons destroyed. However, because they contain both carbonate and organic carbon, these rocks can instead provide isotopic information about the earliest evolution of biological metabolism as they possess residues of both the reactant and product sides of the carbon-fixation reaction. The second hole sampled an on-shore section of carbonates and kerogenous shales in the ~2.65 Ga Carawine Dolomite and Lewin Shale

  9. Final report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D.; Staller, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Concern for the environment and cost reduction are driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. The project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, Charles Machine Works (CMW), and SNL at several sites (Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford, SNL, Kirtland AFB (KAFB), CMW), successfully installed usable horizontal environmental test wells at SRS and SNL/KAFB, and functioned as a clearing house for information regarding application of existing commercial machinery to a variety of governmental and commercial sites. The project has continued to test and develop machinery in FY 94. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of {open_quotes}cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid{close_quotes} to an environmental problem site. This technology will be very cost-effective where applicable. Technology transfer and commercialization by CMW is ongoing and will continue into FY 95. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and reflected in increasing machinery sales to environmental contractors. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring of appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques continues to be a long-range goal.

  10. Final report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D.; Staller, G.E.; Layne, R.R.

    1994-11-01

    Concern for the environment and cost reduction are driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. The project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, Charles Machine Works (CMW), and SNL at several sites (Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford, SNL, Kirtland AFB (KAFB), CMW), successfully installed usable horizontal environmental test wells at SRS and SNL/KAFB, and functioned as a clearing house for information regarding application of existing commercial machinery to a variety of governmental and commercial sites. The project has continued to test and develop machinery in FY 94. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of open-quotes cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluidclose quotes to an environmental problem site. This technology will be very cost-effective where applicable. Technology transfer and commercialization by CMW is ongoing and will continue into FY 95. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and reflected in increasing machinery sales to environmental contractors. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring of appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques continues to be a long-range goal

  11. Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

  12. The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project — basin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, David C.; Martini, Nicole; Buness, Hermann; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2010-05-01

    Within the context of the Heidelberg Basin Project (Gabriel et al. 2008), we present the first results of three-dimensional structural modelling of the basin, based on interpretation of reflection seismics and decompaction using porosity data measured from core material. Firstly, we interpreted six horizons (Base Quaternary, Internal and Base Pliocene, Base Upper Miocene, Internal and Base Mid Miocene Hydrobien beds) from all available industrial (ca. 100 km) and our own reflection seismic sections (ca. 15 km), which lie within a 8 km radius around the Heidelberg UniNord 1/2 boreholes. This data was used to construct a three-dimensional geometrical model of the Heidelberg Basin. Using 300 core samples, we determined the porosity of the Quaternary sediments and constructed an exponential porosity/depth relationship for these rocks, which were then attributed to the model. Lower strata were given values from the literature. The model shows that the Heidelberg basin has a N-S and E-W areal extent of only 10 × 6 km, directly abutting the eastern fault boundary of the Upper Rhine Graben. The strongest synsedimentary tectonic subsidence occurred during the Upper Miocene, Upper Pliocene, and Quarternary. Faults are not seen within the basin at this level, but a NW-SE striking strike-slip structure is recorded to the west of the basin. Furthermore, the sedimentary depocentre shifted 2 km northwards over time to the present location, directly below the city of Heidelberg. We determined that Quaternary sediments have porosities of over 60% at the surface, but at the Base Quaternary porosity is less than 35%. This strong decrease means that 740 m of sediments were compacted to produce the present ca. 500 m thickness of Quaternary strata. Gabriel, G., Ellwanger, D., Hoselmann, C. & Weidenfeller, M. (2008): The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project. -- Quaternary Science Journal, 57, 3-4, 253-260.

  13. Drill pipe protector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

  14. The JABE project: geological studies with a backpack drilling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Alban; van Vynckt, Delphine; de Crombrugghe, Guerric; Denies, Jonathan; Le Maire, Victor; Reydams, Marc

    Besides those geological surveys, we will also study how this drilling system could be used to fix some installations on the ground. As part of the JUMP mission we are also developing a cosmic ray detector and a radio telescope. Those experiments have to be securely fixed and this is what we will try to do using the backpack drilling system and EVA's suits. We shall report on the science and technical results, and implications for Earth-Mars compar-ative studies.

  15. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Heat-flow and lateral seismic-velocity heterogeneities near Deep Sea Drilling Project-Ocean Drilling Program Site 504

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Stephen, Ralph A.

    1991-11-01

    Both conductive heat-flow and seismic-velocity data contain information relating to the permeability of the oceanic crust. Deep Sea Drilling Project-Ocean Drilling Program Site 504 is the only place where both detailed heat-flow and seismic-velocity field studies have been conducted at the same scale. In this paper we examine the correlation between heat flow and lateral heterogeneities in seismic velocity near Site 504. Observed heterogeneities in seismic velocity, which are thought to be related to variations in crack density in the upper 500 m of the basaltic crust, show little correlation with the heat-flow pattern. This lack of correlation highlights some of the current difficulties in using seismic-velocity data to infer details of spatial variations in permeability that are significant in controlling hydrothermal circulation.

  17. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

    2008-07-01

    In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other

  18. Make-up wells drilling cost in financial model for a geothermal project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviani Purwaningsih, Fitri; Husnie, Ruly; Afuar, Waldy; Abdurrahman, Gugun

    2017-12-01

    After commissioning of a power plant, geothermal reservoir will encounter pressure decline, which will affect wells productivity. Therefore, further drilling is carried out to enhance steam production. Make-up wells are production wells drilled inside an already confirmed reservoir to maintain steam production in a certain level. Based on Sanyal (2004), geothermal power cost consists of three components, those are capital cost, O&M cost and make-up drilling cost. The make-up drilling cost component is a major part of power cost which will give big influence in a whole economical value of the project. The objective of this paper it to analyse the make-up wells drilling cost component in financial model of a geothermal power project. The research will calculate make-up wells requirements, drilling costs as a function of time and how they influence the financial model and affect the power cost. The best scenario in determining make-up wells strategy in relation with the project financial model would be the result of this research.

  19. Lower crustal section of the Oman Ophiolite drilled in Hole GT1A, ICDP Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, S.; Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J. M.; Coggon, J. A.; Takazawa, E.; Michibayashi, K.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hole GT1A (22° 53.535'N, 58° 30.904'E) was drilled by the Oman Drilling Project (OmDP) into GT1A of the Samail ophiolite, Oman. OmDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, with in-kind support in Oman from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University, and the German University of Technology. Hole GT1A was diamond cored in 22 Jan to 08 Feb 2017 to a total depth of 403.05 m. The outer surfaces of the cores were imaged and described on site before being curated, boxed and shipped to the IODP drill ship Chikyu, where they underwent comprehensive visual and instrumental analysis. Hole GT1A drilled the lower crustal section in the southern Oman Ophiolite and recovered 401.52 m of total cores (99.6% recovery). The main lithology is dominated by olivine gabbro (65.9%), followed in abundance by olivine-bearing gabbro (21.5%) and olivine melagabbro (3.9%). Minor rock types are orthopyroxene-bearing olivine gabbro (2.4%), oxide-bearing olivine gabbro (1.5%), gabbro (1.1%), anorthositic gabbro (1%), troctolitic gabbro (0.8%); orthopyroxene-bearing gabbro (0.5%), gabbronorite (0.3%); and dunite (0.3%). These rocks are divided into Lithologic Unit I to VII at 26.62 m, 88.16 m, 104.72 m, 154.04 m, 215.22 m, 306.94 m in Chikyu Curated Depth in descending order; Unit I and II consist of medium-grained olivine gabbro with lower olivine abundance in Unit II. Unit III is medium-grained olivine melagabbros, marked by an increase in olivine. Unit IV is relatively homogenous medium-grained olivine gabbros with granular textures. Unit V is identified by the appearance of fine-grained gabbros, but the major rocktypes are medium grained olivine gabbros. Unit VI is medium-grained olivine gabbro, marked by appearance of orthopyroxene. Unit VII

  20. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrates drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Shelander, D.; Dai, J. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States); McConnell, D. [AOA Geophysics Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Frye, M. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Boswell, R.; Rose, K. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Jones, E.; Latham, T. [Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science; Wood, W. [United States Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico shift from shallow water to deeper water targets, operators are encountering sediments with pressure-temperature regimes for gas hydrate stability. The Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) on methane hydrates was formed in 2001 to study the hazards associated with drilling these types of hydrate-bearing sediments and to assess the capacity of geological and geophysical tools to predict gas hydrate distributions and concentrations. Selected reservoirs units with high concentrations of gas hydrate were sampled to obtain physical data on hydrate bearing sediments. The JIP work validates methods devised to estimate gas hydrate distribution and concentrations in order to analyze the resource potential of these hydrate-bearing sediments. This paper described the geologic and geophysical setting of 3 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that contain hydrate-bearing reservoir sands. The three sites that will undergo exploratory drilling and a logging campaign in late spring 2008 include the Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system characterized with seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets sheet sands and associated channel deposits within a small basin. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. 39 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  1. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  2. Geologic summary of the Owens Valley drilling project, Owens and Rose Valleys, Inyo County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaer, D.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Owens Valley Drilling Project consists of eight drill holes located in southwest Inyo County, California, having an aggregate depth of 19,205 feet (5853 m). Project holes penetrated the Coso Formation of upper Pliocene or early Pleistocene age and the Owens Lake sand and lakebed units of the same age. The project objective was to improve the reliability of uranium-potential-resource estimates assigned to the Coso Formation in the Owens Valley region. Uranium-potential-resource estimates for this area in $100 per pound U 3 O 8 forward-cost-category material have been estimatd to be 16,954 tons (15,384 metric tons). This estimate is based partly on project drilling results. Within the Owens Valley project area, the Coso Formation was encountered only in the Rose Valley region, and for this reason Rose Valley is considered to be the only portion of the project area favorable for economically sized uranium deposits. The sequence of sediments contained in the Owens Valley basin is considered to be largely equivalent but lithologically dissimilar to the Coso Formation of Haiwee Ridge and Rose Valley. The most important factor in the concentration of significant amounts of uranium in the rock units investigated appears to be the availability of reducing agents. Significant amounts of reductants (pyrite) were found in the Coso Formation. No organic debris was noted. Many small, disconnected uranium occurrences, 100 to 500 ppM U 3 O 8 , were encountered in several of the holes

  3. The snake geothermal drilling project. Innovative approaches to geothermal exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shervais, John W. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Evans, James P. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Liberty, Lee M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Schmitt, Douglas R. [University of Alberta, Canada; Blackwell, David D. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-02-21

    The goal of our project was to test innovative technologies using existing and new data, and to ground-truth these technologies using slim-hole core technology. The slim-hole core allowed us to understand subsurface stratigraphy and alteration in detail, and to correlate lithologies observed in core with surface based geophysical studies. Compiled data included geologic maps, volcanic vent distribution, structural maps, existing well logs and temperature gradient logs, groundwater temperatures, and geophysical surveys (resistivity, magnetics, gravity). New data included high-resolution gravity and magnetic surveys, high-resolution seismic surveys, three slimhole test wells, borehole wireline logs, lithology logs, water chemistry, alteration mineralogy, fracture distribution, and new thermal gradient measurements.

  4. Best practices in core and data management for lake drilling projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren, A. J.; Brady, K. L.; Myrbo, A.; Ito, E.

    2009-12-01

    LacCore, the National Lacustrine Core Facility, was founded a decade ago by the US National Science Foundation and the University of Minnesota in part to support lake drilling projects made possible by the parallel advent of the Global Lake Drilling (GLAD) platform and tools. Since that time, LacCore has participated in 8 of the 11 GLAD projects, assisting with planning, field, lab, and archival phases as required by each project. This experience has informed work on future projects, for which we encourage science groups to utilize existing, proven resources and relationships within ICDP, DOSECC, and LacCore to achieve project goals efficiently. Bringing people from these groups together early in the planning process is critical to obtaining a thorough understanding of the resources available to projects, and for identifying new project-specific needs. In the planning stage, this experience allows for rapid generation of supplies lists and budget estimates, and avoidance of costly logistical mistakes. In the field, LacCore personnel serve as an effective interface among drillers and scientists, and provide critical institutional memory between projects with different PIs and drillers. Standard procedures and equipment for core handling and data capture at the drill site vastly simplify core and data management downstream. In the lab, optimization of core processing techniques, an array of high-end instrumentation, and ample personnel and both work- and storage space maximize the efficiency of core processing and sampling. Unique project-specific requirements drive continual adaptation and expansion of the resources available to subsequent groups. These established resources free PIs from some of the enormous logistical burden created by these large-scale projects.

  5. Archive of Core and Site/Hole Data and Photographs from the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) operated the D/V GLOMAR CHALLENGER from 1968-1983, drilling 1,112 holes at 624 sites worldwide. The DSDP was funded by the US...

  6. Uncovering a Salt Giant. Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian Events (DREAM) multi-phase drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aoisi, Vanni; Lofi, Johanna; Hübscher, Christian; deLange, Gert; Flecker, Rachel; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Gorini, Christian; Gvirtzman, Zohar; Krijgsman, Wout; Lugli, Stefano; Makowsky, Yizhaq; Manzi, Vinicio; McGenity, Terry; Panieri, Giuliana; Rabineau, Marina; Roveri, Marco; Sierro, Francisco Javier; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, the DREAM MagellanPlus Workshop was held in Brisighella (Italy). The initiative builds from recent activities by various research groups to identify potential sites to perform deep-sea scientific drilling in the Mediterranean Sea across the deep Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) sedimentary record. In this workshop three generations of scientists were gathered: those who participated in formulation of the deep desiccated model, through DSDP Leg 13 drilling in 1973; those who are actively involved in present-day MSC research; and the next generation (PhD students and young post-docs). The purpose of the workshop was to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the several open questions still existing about the causes, processes, timing and consequences at local and planetary scale of an outstanding case of natural environmental change in the recent Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. The product of the workshop is the identification of the structure of an experimental design of site characterization, riser-less and riser drilling, sampling, measurements, and down-hole analyses that will be the core for at least one compelling and feasible multiple phase drilling proposal. Particular focus has been given to reviewing seismic site survey data available from different research groups at pan-Mediterranean basin scale, to the assessment of additional site survey activity including 3D seismics, and to ways of establishing firm links with oil and gas industry. The scientific community behind the DREAM initiative is willing to proceed with the submission to IODP of a Multi-phase Drilling Project including several drilling proposals addressing specific drilling objectives, all linked to the driving objectives of the MSC drilling and understanding . A series of critical drilling targets were identified to address the still open questions

  7. Fault Zone Resistivity Structure and Monitoring at the Taiwan Chelungpu Drilling Project (TCDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taiwan Chelungpu-fault drilling project (TCDP has undertaken scientific drilling and directly sampled the sub-surface rupture of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT measurements were used to investigate electrical resistivity structure at the TCDP site from 2004 - 2006. These data show a geoelectric strike direction of N15°E to N30°E. Inversion and forward modeling of the AMT data were used to generate a 1-D resistivity model that has a prominent low resistivity zone (< 10 ohm-m between depths of 1100 and 1500 m. When combined with porosity measurements, theAMT measurements imply that the ground water has a resistivity of 0.55 ohm-m at the depth of the fault zone.

  8. A different challenge: the directional drilled crossing for the Yacuiba - Rio Grande Gas Line Project - GASYRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Wayne; Garcia, Francisco [Bolinter Ltda., Santa Cruz (Bolivia); Montano, Ruben [Transierra, Santa Cruz (Bolivia)

    2003-07-01

    The Rio Grande River's directional drilling, 2002 m. long and 25 m. deep was a great challenge for Transierra - Owner - as well as Laney - Bolinter - Contractor - to accomplish a feat yet to be done in the entire world. The dedication of the people involved showed their degree of professionalism that these companies have obtained and the determination in doing the job overcoming unforeseen obstacles and still being able to finish on time, mitigating environmental impacts and leaving a first class crossing. This document presents a description of the technical, logistic and construction factors that were involved in the project and which allowed to perform 7 directional drillings, including Rio Grande River, which during the pull got the last 60 m. of pipe stuck, being freed only after using a pneumatic hammer. (author)

  9. Deep drilling KLX 02. Drilling and documentation of a 1700 m deep borehole at Laxemar, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, O.

    1994-08-01

    In this report the preparation and execution of the deep core drilling KLX 02 is described. The hole was drilled with the wireline methods, NQ dimension (diameter 76 mm), to a final depth of 1700.5 m. Prior to core drilling a diameter 215 mm pilot hole was pre drilled to 200 m with controlled hammer drilling (DTH). In this hole casing and air-lift equipment was installed with the aim to support the circulation of drilling fluid. During core drilling there was a measurement of major drilling parameters and drilling fluid in and out of hole. As a fluid tracer uranine was used. Each 300 m of core drilling air-lift pump tests were performed. After completion a flow-meter log was run to finalize the project phase. It can be concluded that both the pre drilling and core drilling methods used proved to be successful. No severe technical problem occurred. However, potential risks have been pointed at in the report. The air-lift system functioned only partly and has to be modified for further use. Also the technique for monitoring of drilling parameters needs improvement as does the method for air-lift pump tests with packer. The organisation model for planning and realization functioned satisfactory and can be recommended for similar future projects. 9 refs, numerous tabs and figs

  10. Does Anteromedial Portal Drilling Improve Footprint Placement in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arno, Sally; Bell, Christopher P; Alaia, Michael J; Singh, Brian C; Jazrawi, Laith M; Walker, Peter S; Bansal, Ankit; Garofolo, Garret; Sherman, Orrin H

    2016-07-01

    Considerable debate remains over which anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique can best restore knee stability. Traditionally, femoral tunnel drilling has been done through a previously drilled tibial tunnel; however, potential nonanatomic tunnel placement can produce a vertical graft, which although it would restore sagittal stability, it would not control rotational stability. To address this, some suggest that the femoral tunnel be created independently of the tibial tunnel through the use of an anteromedial (AM) portal, but whether this results in a more anatomic footprint or in stability comparable to that of the intact contralateral knee still remains controversial. (1) Does the AM technique achieve footprints closer to anatomic than the transtibial (TT) technique? (2) Does the AM technique result in stability equivalent to that of the intact contralateral knee? (3) Are there differences in patient-reported outcomes between the two techniques? Twenty male patients who underwent a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft were recruited for this study, 10 in the TT group and 10 in the AM group. Patients in each group were randomly selected from four surgeons at our institution with both groups demonstrating similar demographics. The type of procedure chosen for each patient was based on the preferred technique of the surgeon. Some surgeons exclusively used the TT technique, whereas other surgeons specifically used the AM technique. Surgeons had no input on which patients were chosen to participate in this study. Mean postoperative time was 13 ± 2.8 and 15 ± 3.2 months for the TT and AM groups, respectively. Patients were identified retrospectively as having either the TT or AM Technique from our institutional database. At followup, clinical outcome scores were gathered as well as the footprint placement and knee stability assessed. To assess the footprint placement and knee stability, three-dimensional surface models of the femur, tibia, and ACL

  11. 500,000 Years of Environmental History in Eastern Anatolia: The PALEOVAN Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Glombitza, and Jens Kallmeyer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP drilled a complete succession of the lacustrine sediment sequence deposited during the last ~500,000 years in Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia (Turkey. Based on a detailed seismic site survey, two sites at a water depth of up to 360 m were drilled in summer 2010, and cores were retrieved from sub-lake-floor depths of 140 m (Northern Basin and 220 m (Ahlat Ridge. To obtain a complete sedimentary section, the two sites were multiple-cored in order to investigate the paleoclimate history of a sensitive semi-arid region between theBlack, Caspian, and Mediterranean seas. Further scientific goals of the PALEOVAN project are the reconstruction of earthquake activity, as well as the temporal, spatial, and compositional evolution of volcanism as reflected in the deposition of tephra layers. The sediments host organic matter from different sources and hence composition, which will be unravelled using biomarkers. Pathways for migration of continental and mantle-derived noble gases will be analyzed in pore waters. Preliminary 40Ar/39Ar single crystal dating of tephra layers and pollen analyses suggest that the AhlatRidge record encompasses more than half a million years of paleoclimate and volcanic/geodynamic history, providing the longest continental record in the entire Near East to date.

  12. 500,000 Years of Environmental History in Eastern Anatolia: The PALEOVAN Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, T.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Baumgarten, H.; Beer, J.; Cagatay, N.; Cukur, D.; Damci, E.; Glombitza, C.; Haug, G.; Heumann, G.; Kallmeyer, H.; Kipfer, R.; Krastel, S.; Kwiecien, O.; Meydan, A. F.; Orcen, S.; Pickarski, N.; Randlett, M.-E.; Schmincke, H.-U.; Schubert, C. J.; Sturm, M.; Sumita, M.; Stockhecke, M.; Tomonaga, Y.; Vigliotti, L.; Wonik, T.; Paleovan Scientific Team

    2012-09-01

    International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) drilled a complete succession of the lacustrine sediment sequence deposited during the last ~500,000 years in Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia (Turkey). Based on a detailed seismic site survey, two sites at a water depth of up to 360 m were drilled in summer 2010, and cores were retrieved from sub-lake-floor depths of 140 m (Northern Basin) and 220 m (Ahlat Ridge). To obtain a complete sedimentary section, the two sites were multiple-cored in order to investigate the paleoclimate history of a sensitive semi-arid region between the Black, Caspian, and Mediterranean seas. Further scientific goals of the PALEOVAN project are the reconstruction of earthquake activity, as well as the temporal, spatial, and compositional evolution of volcanism as reflected in the deposition of tephra layers. The sediments host organic matter from different sources and hence composition, which will be unravelled using biomarkers. Pathways for migration of continental and mantle-derived noble gases will be analyzed in pore waters. Preliminary 40Ar/39Ar single crystal dating of tephra layers and pollen analyses suggest that the Ahlat Ridge record encompasses more than half a million years of paleoclimate and volcanic/geodynamic history, providing the longest continental record in the entire Near East to date. doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.14.02.2012

  13. Integrated core-log interpretation of Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project borehole 4 (WFSD-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Pan, Heping; Ma, Huolin; Qin, Zhen; Traoré, Alhouseiny

    2017-08-01

    Understanding slip behavior of active fault is a fundamental problem in earthquake investigations. Well logs and cores data provide direct information of physical properties of the fault zones at depth. The geological exploration of the Wenchuan earthquake Scientific Fault drilling project (WFSD) targeted the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault and the Guanxian Anxian fault, respectively. Five boreholes (WFSD-1, WFSD-2, WFSD-3P WFSD-3 and WFSD-4) were drilled and logged with geophysical tools developed for the use in petroleum industry. WFSD-1, WFSD-2 and WFSD-3 in situ logging data have been reported and investigated by geoscientists. Here we present for the first time, the integrated core-log studies in the Northern segment of Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (WFSD-4) thereby characterizing the physical properties of the lithologies(original rocks), fault rocks and the presumed slip zone associated with the Wenchuan earthquake. We also present results from the comparison of WFSD-4 to those obtained from WFSD-1, WFSD-3 and other drilling hole in active faults. This study show that integrated core-log study would help in understanding the slip behavior of active fault.

  14. The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP): Understanding the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic context of human origins through continental drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Campisano, Christopher; Asrat, Asfawossen; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Deino, Alan; Feibel, Craig; Hill, Andrew; Kingston, John; Lamb, Henry; Lowenstein, Tim; Olago, Daniel; Bernhart Owen, R.; Renaut, Robin; Schabitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The influence of climate and environmental history on human evolution is an existential question that continues to be hotly debated, in part because of the paucity of high resolution records collected in close proximity to the key fossil and archaeological evidence. To address this issue and transform the scientific debate, the HSPDP was developed to collect lacustrine sediment drill cores from basins in Kenya and Ethiopia that collectively encompass critical time intervals and locations for Plio-Quaternary human evolution in East Africa. After a 17 month campaign, drilling was completed in November, 2014, with over 1750m of core collected from 11 boreholes from five areas (1930m total drilling length, avg. 91% recovery). The sites, from oldest to youngest, include 1) N. Awash, Ethiopia (~3.5-2.9Ma core interval); 2) Baringo-Tugen Hills, Kenya (~3.3-2.5Ma); 3) West Turkana, Kenya (~1.9-1.4Ma); L. Magadi, Kenya (0.8-0Ma) and the Chew Bahir Basin, Ethiopia (~0.5-0Ma). Initial core description (ICD) and sampling for geochronology, geochemistry and paleoecology studies had been completed by mid2014, with the two remaining sites (Magadi and Chew Bahir) scheduled for ICD work in early 2015. Whereas the primary scientific targets were the lacustrine deposits from the hominin-bearing basin depocenters, many intervals of paleosols (representative of low lake stands and probable arid periods) were also encountered in drill cores. Preliminary analyses of drill core sedimentology and geochemistry show both long-term lake level changes and cyclic variability in lake levels, both of which may be indicative of climatic forcing events of interest to paleoanthropologists. Authors of this abstract also include the entire HSPDP field team.

  15. Healy Clean Coal Project: A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-09-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program is to provide the energy marketplace with advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization options by conducting demonstrations of new technologies. These demonstration projects are intended to establish the commercial feasibility of promising advanced coal technologies that have been developed to a level at which they are ready for demonstration testing under commercial conditions. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), selected under Round III of the CCT Program, and described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy, 1991). The desire to demonstrate an innovative power plant that integrates an advanced slagging combustor, a heat recovery system, and both high- and low-temperature emissions control processes prompted the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) to submit a proposal for this project. In April 1991, AIDEA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. Other team members included Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA), host and operator; Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc., coal supplier; TRW, Inc., Space & Technology Division, combustor technology provider; Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. (S&W), engineer; Babcock & Wilcox Company (which acquired the assets of Joy Environmental Technologies, Inc.), supplier of the spray dryer absorber technology; and Steigers Corporation, provider of environmental and permitting support. Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation supplied the boiler. GVEA provided oversight of the design and provided operators during demonstration testing. The project was sited adjacent to GVEA's Healy Unit No. 1 in Healy, Alaska. The objective of this CCT project was to demonstrate the ability of the TRW Clean Coal Combustion System to operate on a blend of run-of-mine (ROM) coal and waste coal, while meeting strict

  16. Listvenite logging on D/V CHIKYU: Hole BT1B, Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Beinlich, A.; Morishita, T.; Greenberger, R. N.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Lafay, R.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.; Phase I Science Party, T. O. D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Listvenite, quartz-carbonate altered ultramafic rock containing minor fuchsite (Cr-muscovite) forms by complete carbonation of peridotite and is thus an attractive objective for carbon mitigation studies. However, reaction controls and evolution of listvenite are still enigmatic. Here we present the first results of Phase 1 of the ICDP (International Continental Drilling Program) Oman Drilling Project and subsequent core logging using the analytical facilities on board the research vessel D/V CHIKYU. Hole BT1B contains 300 m of continuous drill core intersecting alluvium, listvenite-altered serpentinite, serpentinite, ophicarbonate and the underlying metamorphic sole of the Semail ophiolite, Oman. The drill core has been systematically investigated by visual core description, thin section petrography, X-ray fluorescence core logging, X-ray diffractometry, visible-shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy and X-ray Computer Tomography. Our observations show that listvenite is highly variable in texture and color on the mm to m scale. Listvenite was visually categorized into 5 principal color groups: the dominant dark red (47 %), light red (19 %), orange (14 %), pale (2 %) and green (16 %). The presence of hematite/goethite results in dark reddish, red and orange hues. Light grey or pale colored listvenite lacks hematite and/or goethite veins and may represent the `true' listvenite. Green listvenite is characterized by the presence of cm-sized quartz-fuchsite intergrowths. Five zones of serpentinite, which vary in thickness between several tens of cm and 4 m, are intercalated within the massive listvenite of Hole BT1B. Gradational listvenite-serpentinite transition zones contain the ophicarbonate assemblage (magnesite + serpentine) and sometimes additional talc, representing intermediate carbonation reaction progress. Preservation of the former mesh texture and bastite after orthopyroxene in the listvenite suggest that the listvenite precursor had already been

  17. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Kamalesh [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Aaron, Dick [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Macpherson, John [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Many countries around the world, including the USA, have untapped geothermal energy potential. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology is needed to economically utilize this resource. Temperatures in some EGS reservoirs can exceed 300°C. To effectively utilize EGS resources, an array of injector and production wells must be accurately placed in the formation fracture network. This requires a high temperature directional drilling system. Most commercial services for directional drilling systems are rated for 175°C while geothermal wells require operation at much higher temperatures. Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) projects have been initiated to develop a 300°C capable directional drilling system, the first developing a drill bit, directional motor, and drilling fluid, and the second adding navigation and telemetry systems. This report is for the first project, “High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System, including drill bit, directional motor and drilling fluid, for enhanced geothermal systems,” award number DE-EE0002782. The drilling system consists of a drill bit, a directional motor, and drilling fluid. The DOE deliverables are three prototype drilling systems. We have developed three drilling motors; we have developed four roller-cone and five Kymera® bits; and finally, we have developed a 300°C stable drilling fluid, along with a lubricant additive for the metal-to-metal motor. Metal-to-metal directional motors require coatings to the rotor and stator for wear and corrosion resistance, and this coating research has been a significant part of the project. The drill bits performed well in the drill bit simulator test, and the complete drilling system has been tested drilling granite at Baker Hughes’ Experimental Test Facility in Oklahoma. The metal-to-metal motor was additionally subjected to a flow loop test in Baker Hughes’ Celle Technology Center in Germany, where it ran for more than 100

  18. Messinian Salinity Crisis - DREAM (Deep-sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian events) drilling projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofi, Johanna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    About 6 My ago the Mediterranean Sea was transformed into a giant saline basin. This event, commonly referred to as the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), changed the chemistry of the global ocean and had a permanent impact on both the terrestrial and marine ecosystems of a huge area surrounding the Mediterranean area. The first fascinating MSC scenario was proposed following DSDP Leg XIII in 1970 and envisaged an almost desiccated deep Mediterranean basin with a dramatic ~1,500 m drop of sea level, the incision of deep canyons by rivers on the continental margins, and a final catastrophic flooding event when the connections between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic were re-established ~5.33 My ago. In spite of 40 years of multi-disciplinary research conducted on the MSC, modalities, timing, causes, chronology and consequence at local and planetary scale are still not yet fully understood, and the MSC event remains one of the longest-living controversies in Earth Science. Key factor for the controversy is the lack of a complete record of the MSC preserved in the deepest Mediterranean basins. Anywhere else, the MSC mostly generated a sedimentary/time lag corresponding to a widespread erosion surface. Correlations with the offshore depositional units are thus complex, preventing the construction of a coherent scenario linking the outcropping MSC evaporites, the erosion on the margins, and the deposition of clastics and evaporites in the abyssal plains. Recent activity by various research groups in order to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the open questions still existing about the MSC has culminated in two DREAM Magellan+ Workshops held in 2013 and 2014. A strategy and work plan have been established in order to submit an IODP Multi-phase Drilling Project("Uncovering A Salt Giant")including several site-specific drilling proposals addressing different scientific

  19. Optimization of Process Parameters During Drilling of Glass-Fiber Polyester Reinforced Composites Using DOE and ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Mohan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-based composite material possesses superior properties such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight ratio and good corrosive resistance and therefore, is attractive for high performance applications such as in aerospace, defense and sport goods industries. Drilling is one of the indispensable methods for building products with composite panels. Surface quality and dimensional accuracy play an important role in the performance of a machined component. In machining processes, however, the quality of the component is greatly influenced by the cutting conditions, tool geometry, tool material, machining process, chip formation, work piece material, tool wear and vibration during cutting. Drilling tests were conducted on glass fiber reinforced plastic composite [GFRP] laminates using an instrumented CNC milling center. A series of experiments are conducted using TRIAC VMC CNC machining center to correlate the cutting parameters and material parameters on the cutting thrust, torque and surface roughness. The measured results were collected and analyzed with the help of the commercial software packages MINITAB14 and Taly Profile. The surface roughness of the drilled holes was measured using Rank Taylor Hobson Surtronic 3+ instrument. The method could be useful in predicting thrust, torque and surface roughness parameters as a function of process variables. The main objective is to optimize the process parameters to achieve low cutting thrust, torque and good surface roughness. From the analysis it is evident that among all the significant parameters, speed and drill size have significant influence cutting thrust and drill size and specimen thickness on the torque and surface roughness. It was also found that feed rate does not have significant influence on the characteristic output of the drilling process.

  20. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a flexible reamer were included in this study. The control group was comprised of 50 patients all of who underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a rigid reamer. All femoral tunnels were drilled through a medial portal to ensure anatomic tunnel placement. The FTA was determined from post-operative anterior-to-posterior (AP) radiographs by two independent observers. A 5° difference between the two mean FTA was considered clinically significant. The average FTA, when drilled with a rigid reamer, was 42.0° ± 7.2°. Drilling with a flexible reamer resulted in a mean FTA of 44.7° ± 7.0°. The mean difference of 2.7° was not statistically significant. The intraclass correlation coefficient for inter-tester reliability was 0.895. The FTA can be reliably determined from post-operative AP radiographs and provides a useful and reproducible metric for characterizing femoral tunnel position after both rigid and flexible femoral tunnel drilling. This has implications for post-operative evaluation and preoperative treatment planning for ACL revision surgery. IV.

  1. Paleomagnetism of the Oman Ophiolite: New Results from Oman Drilling Project Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, A. J.; Till, J. L.; Koornneef, L.; Usui, Y.; Kim, H.; Morris, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project drilled holes at four sites in a transect through the southern massifs of the Samail ophiolite, and recovered 1500 m of igneous and metamorphic rocks. We focus on three sites from the oceanic crustal section including lower layered gabbros (GT1A), the mid-crustal layered to foliated gabbro transition (GT2A), and the shallower transition from sheeted dikes to varitextured gabbros (GT3A). Detailed core descriptions, analyses, and paleomagnetic measurements, were made on D/V Chikyu from July to September 2017 to utilize the core laboratory facilities similar to IODP expeditions. Shipboard measurements included anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and alternating field and thermal demagnetization of 597 discrete samples. Sample demagnetization behavior is varied from each of the cores, with some revealing multiple components of magnetization, and others yielding nearly univectorial data. The interpretation of results from the lower crustal cores is complicated by the pervasive presence of secondary magnetite. In almost all samples, a stable component was resolved (interpreted as a characteristic remanent magnetization) after removal of a lower-coercivity or lower unblocking-temperature component. The inclinations of the stable components in the core reference frame are very consistent in Hole GT1A. However, a transition from negative to positive inclinations in GT2A suggests some structural complexity, possibly as a result of intense late faulting activity. Both abrupt and gradual transitions between multiple zones of negative and positive inclinations occur in Hole GT3A. Interpretation and direct comparison of remanence between drill sites is difficult as recovered core pieces currently remain azimuthally unoriented, and GT2A was drilled at a plunge of 60°, whereas GT1A and GT3A were both drilled vertically. Work is ongoing to use borehole imagery to reorient the core pieces and paleomagnetic data into a geographic in situ reference

  2. HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

    2008-03-31

    Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole

  3. Paleoenvironments, Evolution, and Geomicrobiology in a Tropical Pacific Lake: The Lake Towuti Drilling Project (TOWUTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Hendrik; Russell, James M.; Bijaksana, Satria; Fowle, David; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stevenson, Janelle; Watkinson, Ian; Marwoto, Ristiyanti; Melles, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Haffner, Doug; King, John

    2013-04-01

    stability, and modes of speciation (sympatric, allopatric). We established an international science team, reviewed datasets from the site survey, and selected three drill sites that are best suited to address the objectives of the TOWUTI project during an ICDP and NSF sponsored workshop held in Bandung, Indonesia in March 2012. Important milestones concerning the operational and logistical preparation of a deep drilling at Lake Towuti have been achieved by the PI team in close collaboration with DOSECC, local authorities and businesses in Indonesia, and ICDP. A drilling proposal has been submitted to ICDP in January 2013 and proposals for matching funds will be submitted to national funding agencies in the course of 2013. Drilling operations are envisaged to commence in early 2015.

  4. Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life (IPBSL), a drilling project in a geochemical Mars terrestrial analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, R.; Fernández-Remolar, D. C.; Parro, V.; Manfredi, J. A.; Timmis, K.; Oggerin, M.; Sánchez-Román, M.; López, F. J.; Fernández, J. P.; Omoregie, E.; Gómez-Ortiz, D.; Briones, C.; Gómez, F.; García, M.; Rodríguez, N.; Sanz, J. L.

    2012-09-01

    Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life (IPBSL) is a drilling project specifically designed to characterize the subsurface ecosystems operating in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), in the area of Peña de Hierro, and responsible of the extreme acidic conditions existing in the Rio Tinto basin [1]. Rio Tinto is considered a good geochemical terrestrial analogue of Mars [2, 3]. A dedicated geophysical characterization of the area selected two drilling sites (4) due to the possible existence of water with high ionic content (low resistivity). Two wells have been drilled in the selected area, BH11 and BH10, of depths of 340 and 620 meters respectively, with recovery of cores and generation of samples in anaerobic and sterile conditions. Preliminary results showed an important alteration of mineral structures associated with the presence of water, with production of expected products from the bacterial oxidation of pyrite (sulfates and ferric iron). Ion chromatography of water soluble compounds from uncontaminated samples showed the existence of putative electron donors (ferrous iron, nitrite in addition of the metal sulfides), electron acceptors (sulfate, nitrate, ferric iron) as well as variable concentration of metabolic organic acids (mainly acetate, formate, propionate and oxalate), which are strong signals of the presence of active subsurface ecosystem associated to the high sulfidic mineral content of the IPB. The system is driven by oxidants that appear to be provided by the rock matrix, only groundwater is needed to launch microbial metabolism. The geological, geomicrobiological and molecular biology analysis which are under way, should allow the characterization of this ecosystem of paramount interest in the design of an astrobiological underground Mars exploration mission in the near future.

  5. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in

  6. Summary geologic report on the Missoula/Bitterroot Drilling Project, Missoula/Bitterroot Basins, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramiuk, I.N.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the drilling project was to obtain information to assess the favorability of the Tertiary sedimentary units in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys for uranium potential. The group of Montana Tertiary basins, including the Missoula and Bitterroot Basins, has been assigned a speculative uranium potential of 46,557 tons of U 3 O 8 at $100/lb by the 1980 National Uranium Resource Evaluation report. The seven drill holes, two in the Missoula Valley and five in the Bitterroot Valley, verified observations made during surface studies and provided additional information about the subsurface that was previously unknown. No uranium was found, although of the two localities the Bitterroot Valley is the more favorable. Three stratigraphic units were tentatively identified on the basis of lithology: pre-Renova clastic units, Renova Formation equivalents, and Sixmile Creek Formation equivalents. Of the three, the Renova Formation equivalents in the Bitterroot Valley appear to be the most favorable for possible uranium occurrences and the pre-Renova clastic units the least favorable

  7. Integrated Approach to Drilling Project in Unconventional Reservoir Using Reservoir Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Jerzy; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Wojnarowski, Paweł; Janiga, Damian; Skrzypaszek, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Accumulation and flow mechanisms in unconventional reservoir are different compared to conventional. This requires a special approach of field management with drilling and stimulation treatments as major factor for further production. Integrated approach of unconventional reservoir production optimization assumes coupling drilling project with full scale reservoir simulation for determine best well placement, well length, fracturing treatment design and mid-length distance between wells. Full scale reservoir simulation model emulate a part of polish shale - gas field. The aim of this paper is to establish influence of technical factor for gas production from shale gas field. Due to low reservoir permeability, stimulation treatment should be direct towards maximizing the hydraulic contact. On the basis of production scenarios, 15 stages hydraulic fracturing allows boost gas production over 1.5 times compared to 8 stages. Due to the possible interference of the wells, it is necessary to determine the distance between the horizontal parts of the wells trajectories. In order to determine the distance between the wells allowing to maximize recovery factor of resources in the stimulated zone, a numerical algorithm based on a dynamic model was developed and implemented. Numerical testing and comparative study show that the most favourable arrangement assumes a minimum allowable distance between the wells. This is related to the volume ratio of the drainage zone to the total volume of the stimulated zone.

  8. Summary geologic report on the Missoula/Bitterroot Drilling Project, Missoula/Bitterroot Basins, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramiuk, I.N. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the drilling project was to obtain information to assess the favorability of the Tertiary sedimentary units in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys for uranium potential. The group of Montana Tertiary basins, including the Missoula and Bitterroot Basins, has been assigned a speculative uranium potential of 46,557 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at $100/lb by the 1980 National Uranium Resource Evaluation report. The seven drill holes, two in the Missoula Valley and five in the Bitterroot Valley, verified observations made during surface studies and provided additional information about the subsurface that was previously unknown. No uranium was found, although of the two localities the Bitterroot Valley is the more favorable. Three stratigraphic units were tentatively identified on the basis of lithology: pre-Renova clastic units, Renova Formation equivalents, and Sixmile Creek Formation equivalents. Of the three, the Renova Formation equivalents in the Bitterroot Valley appear to be the most favorable for possible uranium occurrences and the pre-Renova clastic units the least favorable.

  9. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. The "DREAM" IODP project to drill the Mediterranean Salt Giant on the Balearic Promontory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofi, Johanna; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aloisi, Giovanni; Maillard, Agnès; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Huebscher, Christian; Kuroda, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    Salt giants preserving kilometer-thick evaporite layers are the sedimentary expression of extreme environmental events of global relevance. Despite their global occurrence and general importance on Earth, there is currently no complete stratigraphic record through an un-deformed salt giant of marine origin. Similarly, there is a significant lack of knowledge about the factors controlling salt giants deposition, their early evolution, the impact they exert on the isostatic response of continental margins and on sub-salt formations, and the unprecedented deep biosphere they may harbor. The Mediterranean Messinian salt giant, which formed 5.5 Myrs ago, is one of the youngest salt giant on Earth and is currently lying below the Plio-Quaternary cover in a relatively un-deformed state close to its original depositional configuration. This salt giant is thus accessible by drilling and forms an ideal case study that could be used as a reference for older salt giants. However, since its discovery in 1970 during the DSDP Leg XIII, and despite 40 years or multi-disciplinary researches, this salt giant is still not fully understood and remains one of the longest-living controversies in Earth Science. In this context, the IODP DREAM project aims at exploring the Mediterranean salt giant by drilling with the JOIDES Resolution a transect of 4 sites on the southern margin of the Balearic promontory (Western Mediterranean). We identified this area as likely the only place in the Mediterranean where we could implement a shallow-to-deep transect of non-riser drilling sites. Due to the geological history and pre-structuration of the Promontory, MSC deposits are found preserved in a series of sedimentary basins lying at different water depths between the present-day coastline and the deep central salt basins. DREAM thus offers a unique opportunity to sample several hundred of meters of material forming the Mediterranean salt giant in varied water depths. This unique sedimentary record

  12. High Resolution Mineral Mapping of the Oman Drilling Project Cores with Imaging Spectroscopy: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, R. N.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Kelemen, P. B.; Manning, C. E.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Harris, M.; Michibayashi, K.; Takazawa, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the formation and alteration of oceanic crust and peridotite. Key to answering the main questions of the project are a characterization of the primary and secondary minerals present within the drill core and their spatial relationships. To that end, we used the Caltech imaging spectrometer system to scan the entire 1.5-km archive half of the core from all four gabbro and listvenite boreholes (GT1A, GT2A, GT3A, and BT1B) at 250 µm/pixel aboard the JAMSTEC Drilling Vessel Chikyu during the ChikyuOman core description campaign. The instrument measures the visible and shortwave infrared reflectance spectra of the rocks as a function of wavelength from 0.4 to 2.6 µm. This wavelength range is sensitive to many mineral groups, including hydrated minerals (phyllosilicates, zeolites, amorphous silica polytypes), carbonates, sulfates, and transition metals, most commonly iron-bearing mineralogies. To complete the measurements, the core was illuminated with a halogen light source and moved below the spectrometer at 1 cm/s by the Chikyu's Geotek track. Data are corrected and processed to reflectance using measurements of dark current and a spectralon calibration panel. The data provide a unique view of the mineralogy at high spatial resolution. Analysis of the images for complete downhole trends is ongoing. Thus far, a variety of minerals have been identified within their petrologic contexts, including but not limited to magnesite, dolomite, calcite, quartz (through an Si-OH absorption due to minor H2O), serpentine, chlorite, epidote, zeolites, mica (fuchsite), kaolinite, prehnite, gypsum, amphibole, and iron oxides. Further analysis will likely identify more minerals. Results include rapidly distinguishing the cations present within carbonate minerals and identifying minerals of volumetrically-low abundance within the matrix and veins of core samples. This technique, for example, accurately identifies

  13. DOE-EPSCOR SPONSORED PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jianting

    2010-03-11

    Concern over the quality of environmental management and restoration has motivated the model development for predicting water and solute transport in the vadose zone. Soil hydraulic properties are required inputs to subsurface models of water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone. Computer models are now routinely used in research and management to predict the movement of water and solutes into and through the vadose zone of soils. Such models can be used successfully only if reliable estimates of the soil hydraulic parameters are available. The hydraulic parameters considered in this project consist of the saturated hydraulic conductivity and four parameters of the water retention curves. To quantify hydraulic parameters for heterogeneous soils is both difficult and time consuming. The overall objective of this project was to better quantify soil hydraulic parameters which are critical in predicting water flows and contaminant transport in the vadose zone through a comprehensive and quantitative study to predict heterogeneous soil hydraulic properties and the associated uncertainties. Systematic and quantitative consideration of the parametric heterogeneity and uncertainty can properly address and further reduce predictive uncertainty for contamination characterization and environmental restoration at DOE-managed sites. We conducted a comprehensive study to assess soil hydraulic parameter heterogeneity and uncertainty. We have addressed a number of important issues related to the soil hydraulic property characterizations. The main focus centered on new methods to characterize anisotropy of unsaturated hydraulic property typical of layered soil formations, uncertainty updating method, and artificial neural network base pedo-transfer functions to predict hydraulic parameters from easily available data. The work also involved upscaling of hydraulic properties applicable to large scale flow and contaminant transport modeling in the vadose zone and

  14. Gas supply for independent power projects: Drilling programs and reserve acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.D.; Walker, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Developers of gas-fired independent power projects, although drawn to gas as the fuel of choice for economic and environmental reasons, are finding the problem of cost-effective gas supply to be intractable. By one estimate, there are $6 billion worth of gas-fired projects languishing in the planning stage for want of long-term gas supply that is acceptable to project lenders. Worse still, as the authors are aware, some currently operating gas-fired projects lack such a supply, thus forcing the developer to rely on the spot market for gas as an interim (and unsatisfactory) solution. Although spot market prices in the deregulated natural gas industry have remained relatively low over several years, long-term gas supply has become problematic, particularly for power projects whose economics typically require an assured supply at a determined price over a multiyear period. In short, while there is an increasing demand for gas as a preferred source of fuel supply for power projects, there are discontinuities in the approaches taken to contracting for that supply by producers and developers. These concern primarily allocation of the risk of commodity-driven price increases during the term of the fuel supply contract. Without a means of accommodating price-related risk, the parties will inevitably find themselves at an impasse in contract negotiations. If there is a barrier to the independent power generation industry's vertical integration into gas production, it is the fundamental insularity of the two industries. As they have discovered, it may be indispensable for gas producers and power developers to employ intermediaries familiar with both industries in order to consummate appropriate joint-venture drilling programs and reserve acquisitions. Given the economic consequences of doing so successfully, however, they believe such programs and acquisitions may become an integral part of independent power developers' business strategy in the 1990s and beyond

  15. First Results from HOTSPOT: The Snake River Plain Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Shervais

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available HOTSPOT is an international collaborative effort to understand the volcanic history of the Snake River Plain (SRP. The SRP overlies a thermal anomaly, the Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot, that is thought to represent a deep-seated mantle plume under North America. Theprimary goal of this project is to document the volcanic and stratigraphic history of the SRP, which represents the surface expression of this hotspot, and to understand how it affected the evolution of continental crust and mantle. An additional goal is to evaluate the geothermal potential of southern Idaho.Project HOTSPOT has completed three drill holes. (1 The Kimama site is located along the central volcanic axis of the SRP; our goal here was to sample a long-term record of basaltic volcanism in the wake of the SRP hotspot. (2 The Kimberly site is located near the margin of the plain; our goal here was to sample a record of high-temperaturerhyolite volcanism associated with the underlying plume. This site was chosen to form a nominally continuous record of volcanism when paired with the Kimama site. (3 The Mountain Home site is located in the western plain; our goal here was to sample the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition in lake sediments at this site and to sample older basalts that underlie the sediments.We report here on our initial results for each site, and on some of the geophysical logging studies carried out as part of this project.

  16. Trans-Amazon Drilling Project (TADP): origins and evolution of the forests, climate, and hydrology of the South American tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P.A.; Fritz, S.C.; Silva, C.G.; Rigsby, C.A.; Absy, M.L.; Almeida, R.P.; Caputo, Maria C.; Chiessi, C.M.; Cruz, F.W.; Dick, C.W.; Feakins, S.J.; Figueiredo, J.; Freeman, K.H.; Hoorn, C.; Jaramillo, C.A.; Kern, A.; Latrubesse, E.M.; Ledru, M.P.; Marzoli, A.; Myrbo, A.; Noren, A.; Piller, W.E.; Ramos, M.I.F.; Ribas, C.C.; Trinadade, R.; West, A.J.; Wahnfried, I.; Willard, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the scientific rationale for an ambitious ICDP drilling project to continuously sample Late Cretaceous to modern sediment in four different sedimentary basins that transect the equatorial Amazon of Brazil, from the Andean foreland to the Atlantic Ocean. The goals of this project are to document the evolution of plant biodiversity in the Amazon forests and to relate biotic diversification to changes in the physical environment, including climate, tectonism, and the surface landscape. These goals require long sedimentary records from each of the major sedimentary basins across the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, which can only be obtained by drilling because of the scarcity of Cenozoic outcrops. The proposed drilling will provide the first long, nearly continuous regional records of the Cenozoic history of the forests, their plant diversity, and the associated changes in climate and environment. It also will address fundamental questions about landscape evolution, including the history of Andean uplift and erosion as recorded in Andean foreland basins and the development of west-to-east hydrologic continuity between the Andes, the Amazon lowlands, and the equatorial Atlantic. Because many modern rivers of the Amazon basin flow along the major axes of the old sedimentary basins, we plan to locate drill sites on the margin of large rivers and to access the targeted drill sites by navigation along these rivers.

  17. Trans-Amazon Drilling Project (TADP): origins and evolution of the forests, climate, and hydrology of the South American tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P. A.; Fritz, S. C.; Silva, C. G.; Rigsby, C. A.; Absy, M. L.; Almeida, R. P.; Caputo, M.; Chiessi, C. M.; Cruz, F. W.; Dick, C. W.; Feakins, S. J.; Figueiredo, J.; Freeman, K. H.; Hoorn, C.; Jaramillo, C.; Kern, A. K.; Latrubesse, E. M.; Ledru, M. P.; Marzoli, A.; Myrbo, A.; Noren, A.; Piller, W. E.; Ramos, M. I. F.; Ribas, C. C.; Trnadade, R.; West, A. J.; Wahnfried, I.; Willard, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the scientific rationale for an ambitious ICDP drilling project to continuously sample Late Cretaceous to modern sediment in four different sedimentary basins that transect the equatorial Amazon of Brazil, from the Andean foreland to the Atlantic Ocean. The goals of this project are to document the evolution of plant biodiversity in the Amazon forests and to relate biotic diversification to changes in the physical environment, including climate, tectonism, and the surface landscape. These goals require long sedimentary records from each of the major sedimentary basins across the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, which can only be obtained by drilling because of the scarcity of Cenozoic outcrops. The proposed drilling will provide the first long, nearly continuous regional records of the Cenozoic history of the forests, their plant diversity, and the associated changes in climate and environment. It also will address fundamental questions about landscape evolution, including the history of Andean uplift and erosion as recorded in Andean foreland basins and the development of west-to-east hydrologic continuity between the Andes, the Amazon lowlands, and the equatorial Atlantic. Because many modern rivers of the Amazon basin flow along the major axes of the old sedimentary basins, we plan to locate drill sites on the margin of large rivers and to access the targeted drill sites by navigation along these rivers.

  18. The Hans Tausen drill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, excellent results from the GRIP and GISP2 deep drilling projects in Greenland opened up funding for continued ice-coring efforts in Antarctica (EPICA) and Greenland (NorthGRIP). The Glaciology Group of the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, was assigned the task...... had been introduced. The Berkner Island (Antarctica) drill is also an extended HT drill capable of drilling 2 m long cores. The success of the mechanical design of the HT drill is manifested by over 12 km of good-quality ice cores drilled by the HT drill and its derivatives since 1995. Udgivelsesdato...

  19. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  20. Development of a risk-based environmental management tool for drilling discharges. Summary of a four-year project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singsaas, I.; Rye, H.; Frost, T.K.; Smit, M.G.D.; Garpestad, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the ERMS project and presents the developed model by showing results from environmental fates and risk calculations of a discharge from offshore drilling operations. The developed model calculates environmental risks for the water column and sediments resulting from

  1. The ``Adopt A Microbe'' project: Web-based interactive education connected with scientific ocean drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Bowman, D.; Turner, A.; Inderbitzen, K. E.; Fisher, A. T.; Peart, L. W.; Iodp Expedition 327 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    We launched the "Adopt a Microbe" project as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 327 in Summer 2010. This eight-week-long education and outreach effort was run by shipboard scientists and educators from the research vessel JOIDES Resolution, using a web site (https://sites.google.com/site/adoptamicrobe) to engage students of all ages in an exploration of the deep biosphere inhabiting the upper ocean crust. Participants were initially introduced to a cast of microbes (residing within an ‘Adoption Center’ on the project website) that live in the dark ocean and asked to select and virtually ‘adopt’ a microbe. A new educational activity was offered each week to encourage learning about microbiology, using the adopted microbe as a focal point. Activities included reading information and asking questions about the adopted microbes (with subsequent responses from shipboard scientists), writing haiku about the adopted microbes, making balloon and fabric models of the adopted microbes, answering math questions related to the study of microbes in the ocean, growing cultures of microbes, and examining the gases produced by microbes. In addition, the website featured regular text, photo and video updates about the science of the expedition using a toy microbe as narrator, as well as stories written by shipboard scientists from the perspective of deep ocean microbes accompanied by watercolor illustrations prepared by a shipboard artist. Assessment methods for evaluating the effectiveness of the Adopt a Microbe project included participant feedback via email and online surveys, website traffic monitoring, and online video viewing rates. Quantitative metrics suggest that the “Adope A Microbe” project was successful in reaching target audiences and helping to encourage and maintain interest in topics related to IODP Expedition 327. The “Adopt A Microbe” project mdel can be adapted for future oceanographic expeditions to help connect the

  2. Interaction between drilled shaft and mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) wall : project summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Drilled shafts are being constructed within the reinforced zone of mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls (Figure 1). The drilled shafts may be subjected to horizontal loads and push against the front of the wall. Distress of MSE wall panels has b...

  3. Drilling the leading edge of the mantle wedge and the underlying metamorphic sole of the Samail Ophiolite: Hole BT1B, Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, T.; Kelemen, P. B.; Coggon, J. A.; Harris, M.; Matter, J. M.; Michibayashi, K.; Takazawa, E.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hole BT1B (23°21.861' N, 58°10.957' E) was drilled by the Oman Drilling Project (OmDP) on the north side of Wadi Mansah in the Samail ophiolite, Oman. OmDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, with in-kind support in Oman from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University, and the German University of Technology. Hole BT1B was cored from 6 to 23 March 2017, to a depth of 300.05 m. The outer surfaces of the cores were imaged and described onsite before being curated, boxed and shipped to the IODP drill ship Chikyu. Hole BT1B sampled carbonated peridotite (listvenite), 2 carbonate-veined serpentinite bands at 80-100 and 180-185 m depth, a few cm of ultracataclasite and 70 cm of fault gouge at 197 m depth, followed by 103 m metamorphic sole. Onboard Chikyu, BT1B underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) and multi-sensor logging, imaging and spectroscopy, macroscopic and thin section observations, physical properties measurements, and XRF, XRD and ICP-MS analyses. 1st authors of abstracts reporting initial results are Beinlich (matrix characteristics), de Obeso (modeling mass transfer), Godard (XRF and ICP-MS whole rock data), Greenberger (infrared spectroscopy), Johnson (XRF core scanner), Kelemen (overall petrology), Manning (veins), and Michibayashi (X-ray CT). Listvenite is composed of carbonate + quartz + Fe-oxyhydroxides, + minor relict spinel ± chromian mica (fuchsite). The mineralogy suggests formation at < 150°C. The bulk rock density is similar to that of gabbro but the P-wave velocity is generally higher. Rock textures suggest viscous deformation, while additional brittle deformation is recorded by older veins and younger breccias and faults. The metamorphic sole consists of fine-grained to microcrystalline

  4. Final Technical Report for “A Heliportable Sonic Drilling Platform for Microhole Drilling and Exploration”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, Peter [Resodyn Corporation, Butte, MT (United States)

    2008-05-05

    Exploration and development of new energy resources in remote and environmentally sensitive areas can benefit greatly from a reduction in the size of drilling equipment and the associated equipment for its operation. In particular, microhole sonic drilling technology can significantly reduce costs for: 1.) drilling equipment size, 2.) well construction, 3.) placement of subterranean instrumentation and 4.) exploratory drilling costs. The ultimate goal of the project is to provide reliable, small footprint, instrumentation deployment systems that can operate at lower costs and in environmentally sensitive areas that are not accessible to conventional drilling systems. Sonic drilling, combined with an advanced control technology, termed ResonantSonic Tracking™ (RST™) is proposed as a method to meet the DOE requirements.

  5. The Towuti Drilling Project: A new, long Pleistocene record of Indo-Pacific Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James M.; Vogel, Hendrik; Bijaksana, Satria; Melles, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lake Towuti is the largest tectonic lake in Indonesia, and the longest known terrestrial sediment archive in Southeast Asia. Lake Towuti's location in central Indonesia provides an important opportunity to reconstruct long-term changes in terrestrial climate in the Western Pacific warm pool, heart of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Lake Towuti has extremely high rates of floral and faunal endemism and is surrounded by one of the most diverse tropical forests on Earth making it a hotspot of Southeast Asian biodiversity. The ultramafic rocks and soils surrounding Lake Towuti provide high concentrations of metals to the lake and its sediments that feed a diverse, exotic microbial community. From May - July, 2015, the Towuti Drilling Project, consisting of more than 30 scientists from eight countries, recovered over 1,000 meters of new sediment core from 3 different drill sites in Lake Towuti, including cores through the entire sediment column to bedrock. These new sediment cores will allow us to investigate the history of rainfall and temperature in central Indonesia, long-term changes in the composition of the region's rainforests and diverse aquatic ecosystems, and the micro-organisms living in Towuti's exotic, metal-rich sediments. The Indo-Pacific region plays a pivotal role in the Earth's climate system, regulating critical atmospheric circulation systems and the global concentration of atmospheric water vapor- the Earth's most important greenhouse gas. Changes in seasonal insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations, ice volume, and local sea level are each hypothesized to exert a dominant control on Indo-Pacific hydroclimate variations through the Pleistocene. Existing records from the region are short and exhibit fundamental differences and complexity in orbital-scale climate patterns that limit our understanding of the regional climate responses to climate boundary conditions. Our sediment cores, which span much of the past 1 million years, allow new tests of

  6. The DIS, the CODD, IGSNs and DOIs: Tools you need to succeed with your ocean and continental scientific drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgas, Thomas; Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Wilkens, Roy; Lyle, Mitchell; Westerhold, Thomas; Drury, Anna Joy; Tian, Jun; Hahn, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Scientific ocean drilling over the past >40 years and corresponding efforts on land (by now for more than >20 years) has led to the accumulation of an enormous amount of valuable petrophysical, geochemical, biological and geophysical data obtained through laboratory and field experiments across a multitude of scale-and time dimensions. Such data can be utilized comprehensively in a holistic fashion, and thereby provide base toward an enhanced "Core-Log-Integration", modeling small-scale basin processes to large-scale Earth phenomena, while also storing and managing all relevant information in an "Open Access" fashion. Since the early 1990's members of our team have acquired and measured a large dataset of physical and geochemical properties representing both terrestrial and marine geological environments. This dataset cover a variety of both macro-to-microscale dimensions, and thereby allowing this type of interdisciplinary data examination. Over time, data management and processing tools have been developed and were recently merged with modern data publishing methods, which allow identifying and tracking data and associated publications in a trackable and concise manner. Our current presentation summarizes an important part of the value chain in geosciences, comprising: 1) The state-of-the-art in data management for continental and lake drilling projects performed with and through ICDP's Drilling Information System (DIS). 2) The CODD (Code for Ocean Drilling Data) as numerical-based, programmable data processing toolbox and applicable for both continental and marine drilling projects. 3) The implementation of Persistent Identifiers, such as the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) to identify and track sample material as part of Digital-Object-Identifier (DOI)-tagged operation reports and research publications. 4) A list of contacts provided for scientists with an interest in learning and applying methods and techniques we offer in form of basic and advanced

  7. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  8. Does Lean & Agile Project Management Help Coping with Project Complexity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalali Sohi, A.; Hertogh, M.J.C.M.; Bosch-Rekveldt, M.G.C.; Blom, R.; Serpell, A.; Ferrada, X.

    2016-01-01

    Still, projects in the construction sector are delivered with time delays and cost overruns. One of the reasons for poor performance was assigned to project complexity. A combination of lean construction and agile project management are hypothesized as a possible solution to cope with project

  9. The Lake Towuti Drilling Project: A New, 1-Million Year Record of Indo-Pacific Hydroclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Vogel, H.; Melles, M.; Crowe, S.; Fajar, S. J.; Hasberg, A. K.; Ivory, S.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kelly, C. S.; Kirana, K. H.; Morlock, M.; Tamuntuan, G. H.; Wicaksono, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    ­The Indo-Pacific region plays an integral role in the Earth's climate system. Changes in local insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations, ice volume, and local sea level are each hypothesized to exert a dominant control on Indo-Pacific hydroclimate variations through the Pleistocene, yet existing records from the region are generally short and exhibit fundamental differences in orbital-scale patterns that limit our understanding of the regional climate responses to these global forcings. New paleoclimate records spanning multiple glacial-interglacial cycles are therefore required to document the region's hydroclimatic response to the full range of global climate boundary conditions observed during the late Quaternary. Lake Towuti is located in central Indonesia and is the only known terrestrial sedimentary archive in the region that spans multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. From May - July, 2015, the Towuti Drilling Project, consisting of nearly 40 scientists from eight countries, recovered over 1,000 meters of new sediment core from Lake Towuti. This includes cores though the entire sediment column to bedrock, which likely provide a >1-million-year records of regional hydroclimate. On-site borehole and sediment core logging data document major shifts in sediment composition, including transitions from lake clays to peats, calcareous sediments, and gravels. These data show excellent agreement with major lithological transitions recorded in seismic reflection data, and indicate large changes in lake levels and hydroclimate through the late Quaternary. Prior work on Lake Towuti indicated a dominant control by global ice volume on regional hydroclimate, a hypothesis we aim to test through the analysis of these new cores. This presentation will review existing records from the region and show the first long geochemical and sedimentological records from Lake Towuti to understand orbital-scale hydrologic change during the last ~1 million years.

  10. Drilling techniques presently in use by the Geothermal Studies Project, US Geological Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, T.H. Jr.; Sass, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The heat-flow studies program has evolved from one in which holes drilled for other purposes (mining and oil exploration, nuclear tests, hydrologic studies, etc.) provided the bulk of the data to a program in which the free holes, while still providing cost-effective and useful data, are being supplemented increasingly by holes drilled specifically for heat-flow determinations at locations where thermal data of high quality are needed, and where nobody else is interested in drilling. Ideally, heat-flow holes should be located in areas with moderate local relief and should be completed so that vertical water movement is inhibited. The most satisfactory test media for heat-flow determinations are crystalline rocks (particularly granites) and unconsolidated sediments; carbonate rocks and volcanic terranes can provide useful heat-flow data, but they present greater challenges both in drilling and interpretation. Drilling techniques have evolved from that of the continuously cored diamond-drilled hole (adapted from mining exploration) to adaptations of the shot-hole and blast-hole techniques used in petroleum exploration, water-well construction, and quarry operations. Spot cores are obtained where necessary to provide specific petrologic, geochemical, and physical data, but primary reliance is placed on ditch samples from rotary or percussion drilling for routine measurements of thermal conductivity and heat production. In shallow (50 to 100 m) holes in low temperature environments, plastic casing is used to maintain access for later temperature measurements. For deeper holes, steel casing is preferred. The annulus between casing and borehole wall in the lowermost 50 to 80 meters of heat-flow holes is routinely grouted off with a specially designed mixture of cement, bentonite, salt, and water to prevent vertical water movement.

  11. Engineering report on drilling in the Owens Lake area, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The Owens Lake Drilling Project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of eight drill holes ranging in depth from 420 to 3.500 feet (128.02 to 1,066.80 m). A total of 19,205 feet (5,853.68 m) was drilled, of which 135.5 feet (41.30 m) were cored. The purpose of the Owens Lake project was to test the uranium potential of the Coso formation, Pliocene (upper) and Pleistocene (lower) in areas downdip from known zones of mineralization. This project started on June 22, 2979 and continued until February 21, 1980. Restoration and seeding started on February 22, 1980 and was completed on March 1, 1980. Engineering details, statistics, individual borehole histories, and geophysical logs of the eight holes drilled in Owens Lake, California drilling program are presented

  12. Does Lean & Agile Project Management Help Coping with Project Complexity?

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali Sohi, A.; Hertogh, M.J.C.M.; Bosch-Rekveldt, M.G.C.; Blom, R.; Serpell, A.; Ferrada, X.

    2016-01-01

    Still, projects in the construction sector are delivered with time delays and cost overruns. One of the reasons for poor performance was assigned to project complexity. A combination of lean construction and agile project management are hypothesized as a possible solution to cope with project complexity. In this paper we aim to understand if the implicit usage of lean and agile help coping with complexity. The research was done by means of correlation analysis on data gathered from a structur...

  13. X-ray CT core imaging of Oman Drilling Project on D/V CHIKYU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michibayashi, K.; Okazaki, K.; Leong, J. A. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Greenberger, R. N.; Manning, C. E.; Harris, M.; de Obeso, J. C.; Abe, N.; Hatakeyama, K.; Ildefonse, B.; Takazawa, E.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Coggon, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    We obtained X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) images for all cores (GT1A, GT2A, GT3A and BT1A) in Oman Drilling Project Phase 1 (OmanDP cores), since X-ray CT scanning is a routine measurement of the IODP measurement plan onboard Chikyu, which enables the non-destructive observation of the internal structure of core samples. X-ray CT images provide information about chemical compositions and densities of the cores and is useful for assessing sample locations and the quality of the whole-round samples. The X-ray CT scanner (Discovery CT 750HD, GE Medical Systems) on Chikyu scans and reconstructs the image of a 1.4 m section in 10 minutes and produces a series of scan images, each 0.625 mm thick. The X-ray tube (as an X-ray source) and the X-ray detector are installed inside of the gantry at an opposing position to each other. The core sample is scanned in the gantry with the scanning rate of 20 mm/sec. The distribution of attenuation values mapped to an individual slice comprises the raw data that are used for subsequent image processing. Successive two-dimensional (2-D) slices of 512 x 512 pixels yield a representation of attenuation values in three-dimensional (3-D) voxels of 512 x 512 by 1600 in length. Data generated for each core consist of core-axis-normal planes (XY planes) of X-ray attenuation values with dimensions of 512 × 512 pixels in 9 cm × 9 cm cross-section, meaning at the dimensions of a core section, the resolution is 0.176 mm/pixel. X-ray intensity varies as a function of X-ray path length and the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of the target material is a function of the chemical composition and density of the target material. The basic measure of attenuation, or radiodensity, is the CT number given in Hounsfield units (HU). CT numbers of air and water are -1000 and 0, respectively. Our preliminary results show that CT numbers of OmanDP cores are well correlated to gamma ray attenuation density (GRA density) as a function of chemical

  14. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  15. The ICDP-Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP): new data from the Chew Bahir site in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan; Asrat, Asfawossen; Cohen, Andrew; Foerster, Verena; Just, Janna; Klasen, Nicole; Lamb, Henry; Schäbitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin; Viehberg, Finn; Wagner, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    There are currently few long, continuous, Pleistocene records from East Africa, meaning it has been difficult to establish the relative influence of low- versus high-latitude forcing on East African climate and climatic conditions at the time of anatomically modern human origin and subsequent dispersal. We have been attempting to address these gaps in our knowledge by analysing lake sediments taken from Chew Bahir, an area of playa mudflats in southern Ethiopia close to the site of the oldest-known anatomically modern human fossils at Omo-Kibish. In March 2014, Chew Bahir was cored to a depth of ~40 metres, and the resulting sediment sequence is estimated to cover the last ~115ka. In December 2014, a nearby site was drilled to a depth of ~280 metres as part of the International Continental scientific Drilling Programme - Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP). The oxygen and carbon isotope composition of endogenic calcite and other data from these cores will be presented. The data show some significant changes in water balance variability, the period prior to 70ka appears very unstable with some significant periods of drought and flood. Between 70-20ka the lake was stable and evaporative. The last 20ka years was wetter.

  16. Microbial diversity in ultra-high-pressure rocks and fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Xu, Zhiqin; Zhao, Donggao; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2005-06-01

    Microbial communities in ultra-high-pressure (UHP) rocks and drilling fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project were characterized. The rocks had a porosity of 1 to 3.5% and a permeability of approximately 0.5 mDarcy. Abundant fluid and gas inclusions were present in the minerals. The rocks contained significant amounts of Fe2O3, FeO, P2O5, and nitrate (3 to 16 ppm). Acridine orange direct counting and phospholipid fatty acid analysis indicated that the total counts in the rocks and the fluids were 5.2 x 10(3) to 2.4 x 10(4) cells/g and 3.5 x 10(8) to 4.2 x 10(9) cells/g, respectively. Enrichment assays resulted in successful growth of thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria from the fluids, and some of these bacteria reduced Fe(III) to magnetite. 16S rRNA gene analyses indicated that the rocks were dominated by sequences similar to sequences of Proteobacteria and that most organisms were related to nitrate reducers from a saline, alkaline, cold habitat; however, some phylotypes were either members of a novel lineage or closely related to uncultured clones. The bacterial communities in the fluids were more diverse and included Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, gram-positive bacteria, Planctomycetes, and Candidatus taxa. The archaeal diversity was lower, and most sequences were not related to any known cultivated species. Some archaeal sequences were 90 to 95% similar to sequences recovered from ocean sediments or other subsurface environments. Some archaeal sequences from the drilling fluids were >93% similar to sequences of Sulfolobus solfataricus, and the thermophilic nature was consistent with the in situ temperature. We inferred that the microbes in the UHP rocks reside in fluid and gas inclusions, whereas those in the drilling fluids may be derived from subsurface fluids.

  17. Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Perry

    2009-04-30

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger

  18. Milliken Clean Coal Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal-utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage

  19. PGE-Re concentrations in carbonaceous siltstones from the Barberton Drilling Project: Sources and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammensee, Philipp; Aulbach, Sonja

    2014-05-01

    The emergence, diversification and disappearance of Earth's life forms are closely tied to the redox state of the oceans, and the sources and sinks of metabolically cycled metals. It is generally accepted that the early terrestrial atmosphere contained extremely low levels of free oxygen [1]. While a significant change to atmospheric oxygen levels has been constrained to ca. 2.45 Ga ago, the details of the complex prior redox evolution of the oceans and atmosphere, and their influence on continental weathering, are still blurry [1]. Among the trace metals that have been applied to this problem, Re and the platinum-group elements (PGE) have variable redox chemistry that has been successfully exploited to identify detrital vs. hydrogenous sources and the presence of oxic vs. suboxic or euxinic conditions both in young and ancient sediments, including predominantly outcrop samples from the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) [2,3]. As 187Re decays to 187Os, the Re-Os isotope system can additionally be used to date the deposition of carbonaceous shales through construction of isochrons and obtain the initial Os isotope composition, which is a tracer for continental input of radiogenic Os [4]. The sampling approach here was to choose 8+ samples from narrow intervals (≤1 m, to avoid initial Os isotope heterogeneity) from the Barberton Drilling Project (two depths in core BARB5/Fig Tree Group and one interval in core BARB3/Buck Reef Chert. We are currently finalising institution of the sample preparation and analytical techniques, involving (1) high-pressure asher digestion and (2) low-temperature leaching of presumably hydrogenous, acid-soluble components of spiked samples, followed by solvent extraction of Os and cation exchange column chromatography to isolate PGE-Re from the residue, further purification with BPHA and measurement of Ru-Pd-Ir-Pt by ICPMS and of Re-Os by MC-ICPMS. Preliminary tests with the SDO-1 standard have revealed that concentrations of Ir and Pt in

  20. Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of$438 million

  1. 2018 DOE Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2018-01-31

    The 2018 Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio provides an overview of all SSL projects that have been funded by DOE since 2000. Projects that were active during 2017 are found in the main body of this report, and all historic projects can be found in the appendix. Within these sections, project profiles are sorted by technology type (i.e., LED or OLED) and then by performer name. A profile is provided on each project. Each profile includes a brief technical description, as well as information about project partners, funding, and the research period. This report is updated annually, although the research described in the Portfolio changes periodically as new projects are initiated and existing ones are concluded.

  2. Project Deep Drilling KLX02 - Phase 2. Methods, scope of activities and results. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekman, L.

    2001-04-01

    Geoscientific investigations performed by SKB, including those at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, have so far comprised the bedrock horizon down to about 1000 m. The primary purposes with the c. 1700 m deep, φ76 mm, sub vertical core borehole KLX02, drilled during the autumn 1992 at Laxemar, Oskarshamn, was to test core drilling technique at large depths and with a relatively large diameter and to enable geoscientific investigations beyond 1000 m. Drilling of borehole KLX02 was fulfilled very successfully. Results of the drilling commission and the borehole investigations conducted in conjunction with drilling have been reported earlier. The present report provides a summary of the investigations made during a five year period after completion of drilling. Results as well as methods applied are described. A variety of geoscientific investigations to depths exceeding 1600 m were successfully performed. However, the investigations were not entirely problem-free. For example, borehole equipment got stuck in the borehole at several occasions. Special investigations, among them a fracture study, were initiated in order to reveal the mechanisms behind this problem. Different explanations seem possible, e.g. breakouts from the borehole wall, which may be a specific problem related to the stress situation in deep boreholes. The investigation approach for borehole KLX02 followed, in general outline, the SKB model for site investigations, where a number of key issues for site characterization are studied. For each of those, a number of geoscientific parameters are investigated and determined. One important aim is to erect a lithological-structural model of the site, which constitutes the basic requirement for modelling mechanical stability, thermal properties, groundwater flow, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes. The investigations in borehole KLX02 resulted in a thorough lithological-structural characterization of the rock volume near the borehole. In order to

  3. The Lake Petén Itzá Scientifi c Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ariztegui

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar ice cores provide us with high-resolution records of past climate change at high latitudes on both glacial-to-interglacial and millennial timescales. Paleoclimatologists and climate modelers have focused increasingly on the tropics, however, as a potentially important driver of global climate change because of the region’s role in controlling the Earth’s energy budget and in regulating the water vapor content of the atmosphere. Tropical climate change is often expressed most strongly as variations in precipitation, and closed-basin lakes are sensitive recorders of the balance between precipitation and evaporation. Recent advances in fl oating platformsand drilling technology now offer the paleolimnological community the opportunity to obtain long sediment records from lowland tropical lakes, as illustrated by the recent successful drilling of Lakes Bosumtwi and Malawi in Africa (Koeberl et al., 2005; Scholz et al., 2006. Tropical lakes suitable for paleoclimatic research were sought in Central America to complement the African lake drilling. Most lakes in the Neotropics are shallow, however, and these basins fell dry during the Late Glacial period because the climate in the region was more arid than today. The search for an appropriate lake to study succeeded in 1999 when a bathymetric survey of Lake Petén Itzá, northern Guatemala, revealed a maximum depth of 165 m, making itthe deepest lake in the lowlands of Central America (Fig. 1 .Although the lake was greatly reduced in volume during the Late Glacial period, the deep basin remained submerged and thus contains a continuous history of lacustrine sediment deposition. A subsequent seismic survey of Lake Petén Itzá in 2002 showed a thick sediment package overlying basement, with several subbasins containing up to 100 m of sediment (Anselmetti et al., 2006.

  4. El'gygytgyn impact crater, Chukotka, Arctic Russia: Impact cratering aspects of the 2009 ICDP drilling project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Pittarello, Lidia; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Raschke, Ulli; Brigham-Grette, Julie; Melles, Martin; Minyuk, Pavel; Spray, John

    2013-07-01

    The El'gygytgyn impact structure in Chukutka, Arctic Russia, is the only impact crater currently known on Earth that was formed in mostly acid volcanic rocks (mainly of rhyolitic, with some andesitic and dacitic, compositions). In addition, because of its depth, it has provided an excellent sediment trap that records paleoclimatic information for the 3.6 Myr since its formation. For these two main reasons, because of the importance for impact and paleoclimate research, El'gygytgyn was the subject of an International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) drilling project in 2009. During this project, which, due to its logistical and financial challenges, took almost a decade to come to fruition, a total of 642.3 m of drill core was recovered at two sites, from four holes. The obtained material included sedimentary and impactite rocks. In terms of impactites, which were recovered from 316.08 to 517.30 m depth below lake bottom (mblb), three main parts of that core segment were identified: from 316 to 390 mblb polymict lithic impact breccia, mostly suevite, with volcanic and impact melt clasts that locally contain shocked minerals, in a fine-grained clastic matrix; from 385 to 423 mblb, a brecciated sequence of volcanic rocks including both felsic and mafic (basalt) members; and from 423 to 517 mblb, a greenish rhyodacitic ignimbrite (mostly monomict breccia). The uppermost impactite (316-328 mblb) contains lacustrine sediment mixed with impact-affected components. Over the whole length of the impactite core, the abundance of shock features decreases rapidly from the top to the bottom of the studied core section. The distinction between original volcanic melt fragments and those that formed later as the result of the impact event posed major problems in the study of these rocks. The sequence that contains fairly unambiguous evidence of impact melt (which is not very abundant anyway, usually less than a few volume%) is only about 75 m thick. The reason for

  5. Paleoenvironments, Evolution, and Geomicrobiology in a Tropical Pacific Lake: The Lake Towuti Drilling Project (TOWUTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Hendrik; Russell, James M.; Bijaksana, Satria; Crowe, Sean; Fowle, David; Haffner, Douglas; King, John; Marwoto, Ristiyanti; Melles, Martin; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stevenson, Janelle; Watkinson, Ian; Wattrus, Nigel

    2014-05-01

    Lake Towuti (2.5°S, 121°E) is a, 560 km2, 200-m deep tectonic lake at the downstream end of the Malili lake system, a set of five, ancient (1-2 MYr) tectonic lakes in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Lake Towuti's location in central Indonesia provides a unique opportunity to reconstruct long-term paleoclimate change in a crucially important yet understudied region- the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP), heart of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. The Malili Lakes have extraordinarily high rates of floral and faunal endemism, and the lakes are surrounded by one of the most diverse tropical forests on Earth. Drilling in Lake Towuti will identify the age and origin of the lake and the environmental and climatic context that shaped the evolution of this unique lacustrine and terrestrial ecosystem. The ultramafic (ophiolitic) rocks and lateritic soils surrounding Lake Towuti provide metal substrates that feed a diverse, exotic microbial community, analogous to the microbial ecosystems that operated in the Archean Oceans. Drill core will provide unique insight into long-term changes in this ecosystem, as well as microbial processes operating at depth in the sediment column. High-resolution seismic reflection data (CHIRP and airgun) combined with numerous long sediment piston cores collected from 2007-2013 demonstrate the enormous promise of Lake Towuti for an ICDP drilling campaign. Well-stratified sequences of up to 150 m thickness, uninterrupted by unconformities or erosional truncation, are present in multiple sub-basins within Towuti, providing ideal sites for long-term environmental, climatic, and limnological reconstructions. Multiproxy analyses of our piston cores document a continuous and detailed record of moisture balance variations in Lake Towuti during the past 60 kyr BP. In detail our datasets show that wet conditions and rainforest ecosystems in central Indonesia persisted during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3) and the Holocene, and were interrupted by severe

  6. Synchronizing early Eocene deep-sea and continental records - cyclostratigraphic age models for the Bighorn Basin Coring Project drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, Thomas; Röhl, Ursula; Wilkens, Roy H.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Clyde, William C.; Wing, Scott L.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Kraus, Mary J.

    2018-03-01

    A consistent chronostratigraphic framework is required to understand the effect of major paleoclimate perturbations on both marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Transient global warming events in the early Eocene, at 56-54 Ma, show the impact of large-scale carbon input into the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we provide the first timescale synchronization of continental and marine deposits spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and the interval just prior to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM-2). Cyclic variations in geochemical data come from continental drill cores of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP, Wyoming, USA) and from marine deep-sea drilling deposits retrieved by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). Both are dominated by eccentricity-modulated precession cycles used to construct a common cyclostratigraphic framework. Integration of age models results in a revised astrochronology for the PETM in deep-sea records that is now generally consistent with independent 3He age models. The duration of the PETM is estimated at ˜ 200 kyr for the carbon isotope excursion and ˜ 120 kyr for the associated pelagic clay layer. A common terrestrial and marine age model shows a concurrent major change in marine and terrestrial biota ˜ 200 kyr before ETM-2. In the Bighorn Basin, the change is referred to as Biohorizon B and represents a period of significant mammalian turnover and immigration, separating the upper Haplomylus-Ectocion Range Zone from the Bunophorus Interval Zone and approximating the Wa-4-Wa-5 land mammal zone boundary. In sediments from ODP Site 1262 (Walvis Ridge), major changes in the biota at this time are documented by the radiation of a second generation of apical spine-bearing sphenolith species (e.g., S. radians and S. editus), the emergence of T. orthostylus, and the marked decline of D. multiradiatus.

  7. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  8. Milliken Clean Coal Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-08-15

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal-utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage.

  9. Linking downhole logging data and clay mineralogy analysis in the ICDP Lake Junín drilling Project, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdominici, S.; Schleicher, A.; Kueck, J.; Rodbell, D. T.; Abbott, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    The lake Junin drilling project, co-funded by the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), is located at 4000 m a.s.l. in the tropical Andes of Peru. Several boreholes were drilled with the goal to obtain both high-resolution paleoclimate records from lacustrine sediments and to reconstruct the history of the continental records covering the glacial-interglacial cycles. Lake Junín is characterized by a thick package of lacustrine sediments (> 125 m) deposited at a high rate (0.2 to 1.0 mm yr-1), and it is one of the few lakes in the tropical Andes that is hundreds of thousands of years old with a continuous sedimentation rate preserving a very long and continuous record of past ice age cycles. The boreholes reached a maximum depth of 110.08 m and continuous coring was performed at three sites with 11 boreholes. Additionally, an extensive geophysical downhole logging campaign was performed on five boreholes (1A, 1C, 1D, 2A and 3B) by the Operational Support Group of ICDP. Downhole logging measurements comprise total and spectrum gamma ray, magnetic susceptibility, borehole geometry, temperature, and sonic p-wave velocity. In order to fit the downhole logging depths to the composite profile depths, each borehole was depth-matched with the core data. Interpreting the downhole logging data permits to establish a complete lithological log, to characterize the in-situ physical properties of drilled lacustrine sediments, to determine sedimentary structures and to obtain evidences about palaeoclimatic conditions during up to 200 ka. Th and K values are used as a proxy for a first estimate and characterization of clay content in the sediments, which are present as montmorillonite, smectite, illite, and kaolinite in different amounts. Linking the clay minerals that occur in the core material with the downhole logging data allows assessing the geological history of the lake and the relationship to climate change processes. Additional laboratory analysis will be

  10. A Novel Approach for Evaluation of Projects Using an Interval–Valued Fuzzy Additive Ratio Assessment (ARAS Method: A Case Study of Oil and Gas Well Drilling Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Heidary Dahooie

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st-century resulted in a more developed multi-attribute decision-making (MADM tool and inspired new application areas that have resulted in discoveries in sustainable construction and building life cycle analysis. Construction and civil engineering stand for the central axis of a body consisting of a multidisciplinary (multi-dimensional world with ties to disciplines constituting the surface, and with the disciplines, as a consequence, tied to each other. When dealing with multi-attribute decision-making problems generally multiple solutions exist, especially when there is a large number of attributes, and the concept of Pareto-optimality is inefficient. The symmetry and structural regularity are essential concepts in many natural and man-made objects and play a crucial role in the design, engineering, and development of the world. The complexity and risks inherent in projects along with different effective indicators for success and failure may contribute to the difficulties in performance evaluation. In such situations, increasing the importance of uncertainty is observed. This paper proposes a novel integrated tool to find a balance between sustainable development, environmental impact and human well-being, i. e. to find symmetry axe with respect to goals, risks, and constraints (attributes to cope with the complicated problems. The concept of “optimal solution” as the maximum degree of implemented goals (attributes is very important. The model is built using the most relevant variables cited in the reviewed project literature and integrates two methods: the Step-Wise Weight Assessment Ratio Analysis (SWARA method and a novel interval-valued fuzzy extension of the Additive Ratio Assessment (ARAS method. This model was used to solve real case study of oil and gas well drilling projects evaluation. Despite the importance of oil and gas well drilling projects, there is lack of literature that describes and evaluates

  11. Geologic cross section, gas desorption, and other data from four wells drilled for Alaska rural energy project, Wainwright, Alaska, coalbed methane project, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur C.; Roberts, Stephen B.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Energy costs in rural Alaskan communities are substantial. Diesel fuel, which must be delivered by barge or plane, is used for local power generation in most off-grid communities. In addition to high costs incurred for the purchase and transport of the fuel, the transport, transfer, and storage of fuel products pose significant difficulties in logistically challenging and environmentally sensitive areas. The Alaska Rural Energy Project (AREP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Land Management Alaska State Office along with State, local, and private partners. The project is designed to identify and evaluate shallow (Regional Corporation, and the Olgoonik Corporation, drilled and tested a 1,613 ft continuous core hole in Wainwright, Alaska, during the summer of 2007 to determine whether CBM represents a viable source of energy for the community. Although numerous gas-bearing coal beds were encountered, most are contained within the zone of permafrost that underlies the area to a depth of approximately 1,000 ft. Because the effective permeability of permafrost is near zero, the chances of producing gas from these beds are highly unlikely. A 7.5-ft-thick gas-bearing coal bed, informally named the Wainwright coal bed, was encountered in the sub-permafrost at a depth of 1,242 ft. Additional drilling and testing conducted during the summers of 2008 and 2009 indicated that the coal bed extended throughout the area outlined by the drill holes, which presently is limited to the access provided by the existing road system. These tests also confirmed the gas content of the coal reservoir within this area. If producible, the Wainwright coal bed contains sufficient gas to serve as a long-term source of energy for the community.

  12. Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of$438 million. Construction for the demonstration project was started in July 1993. Pre-operational tests were initiated in August 1995, and construction was completed in November 1995. Commercial operation began in November 1995, and the demonstration period was completed in December

  13. Casing drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenan, D. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviewed the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling several wells using only casings as the drill stem. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig called the Casing Drilling {sup TM} system. The system could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of coalbed methane (CBM) reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead, along wire line retrieval, can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core which is typically required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or underbalanced wells with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while simultaneously finding gas. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling {sup TM} could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 9 figs.

  14. Rangitoto Volcano Drilling Project: Life of a Small 'Monogenetic' Basaltic Shield in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, P. A. R.; Linnell, T.; Lindsay, J. M.; Smith, I. E.; Augustinus, P. M.; Cronin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rangitoto is a small basaltic shield volcano representing the most recent and most voluminous episode of volcanism in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Auckland City is built on the field, and hence, Rangitoto's importance in hazard-risk modelling. The symmetrical edifice, ~6 km wide and 260 m high, has volume of 1.78 km3. It comprises summit scoria cones and a lava field. However, the lack of deep erosion dissection has prevented the development of an eruptive stratigraphy. Previous studies suggested construction in a relatively short interval at 550-500 yrs BP. However, microscopic tephra have been interpreted as evidence of intermittent activity from 1498 +/- 140 to 504 +/- 6 yrs BP, a longevity of 1000 years. A 150-m-deep hole was drilled through the edifice in February 2014 to obtain a continuous core record. The result is an unparalleled stratigraphy of the evolution of a small shield volcano. The upper 128 m of core comprises at least 27 lava flows with thicknesses in the range 0.3-15 m, representing the main shield-building phase. Underlying marine sediments are interbedded with 8 m of pyroclastic lapilli, and a thin lava flow, representing the explosive phreatomagmatic birth of the volcano. Preliminary geochemical analyses reveal suite of relatively uniform transitional basalts (MgO = 8.1 to 9.7 wt %). However, 4 compositional groups are distinguished that were erupted in sequential order. High-MgO magmas were erupted first, followed by a two more heterogeneous groups displaying differentiation trends with time. Finally, distinct low-MgO basalts were erupted. Each magma type appears to represent a new magma batch. The core places the magma types in a time series, which can be correlated to the surface lava field. Hence, allowing a geometrical reconstruction of the shield growth. Additional petrologic investigations are providing insight to magmatic ascent processes, while radiocarbon and paleomagnetic secular variation studies will reveal the

  15. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linville, B. (ed.)

    1983-07-01

    Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

  16. DOE Heat Pump Centered Integrated Community Energy Systems Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The Heat Pump Centered Integrated Community Energy Systems (HP-ICES) Project is a multiphase undertaking seeking to demonstrate one or more operational HP-ICES by the end of 1983. The seven phases include System Development, Demonstration Design, Design Completion, HP-ICES Construction, Operation and Data Acquisition, HP-ICES Evaluation, and Upgraded Continuation. This project is sponsored by the Community Systems Branch, Office of Buildings and Community Systems, Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Solar Applicaions, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is part of the Community Systems Program and is managed by the Energy and Environmental Systems Division of Argonne Natinal Laboratory.

  17. The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-03-15

    This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall

  18. The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL(reg s ign) Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL(reg s ign) Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL(reg s ign) mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL(reg s ign) was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL(reg s ign) was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of$90,664,000. ENCOAL(reg s ign) operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC(trademark)) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF(trademark)) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL(trademark)). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall

  19. Seismic site characterization for the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP), Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Preliminary results from the WIZARD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Feenstra, J.; Lord, N.; O'Brien, G.; Pesicek, J. D.; Bannister, S. C.; Townend, J.

    2012-12-01

    In support of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) on the Alpine Fault, UW-Madison (UW) and RPI, with assistance from Victoria University of Wellington (VUW) and GNS Science (GNS), deployed a 20-station seismic array in January 2012 around the planned drill site for the DFDP-2 boreholes in the Whataroa Valley on New Zealand's South Island. Half of the stations are short-period PASSCAL instruments deployed by helicopter in remote sites; the other half are UW broadband instruments deployed in the lowland areas. All are being continuously recorded at 100 samples per second. In combination with the SAMBA array operated by VUW, ALFA'12 stations deployed by GNS, and regional GeoNet stations, there is now excellent seismic coverage of a ~100 km stretch of the Alpine Fault. At present, data are in hand from the first ~2 months of WIZARD array operation. As expected based on previous studies in the region, most of the local seismic activity lies outside the perimeter of the WIZARD array, mainly to the north and east. Included in this activity are swarms of similar earthquakes near the northeastern edge of the array. Earthquake swarms have also been reported by Boese et al. (2012) within the SAMBA array to the southwest. In addition, we identify explosions from tunneling operations associated with a hydropower tunnel construction project in the northern part of the WIZARD array. These explosions should prove useful for constraining the shallow P-wave velocity structure. For our initial tomographic analysis, we will merge new data from the WIZARD, SAMBA, and ALFA'12 arrays with the regional dataset of Eberhart-Phillips and Bannister (2002) for the Southern Alps region of the South Island. The regional dataset includes active-source data from the SIGHT offshore-onshore project as well as arrival times from about 300 earthquakes. In this presentation, we present an update of Eberhart-Phillips and Bannister's (2002) regional 3D P-wave velocity model and preliminary 3D P- and S

  20. Considerations for the Estimation of the Risk of Environmental Contamination Due to Blow Out in Offshore Exploratory Drilling Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, A.; Eguilior, S.; Recreo, F.

    2015-01-01

    From the consideration of a contemporary society based on the need of a high-level complex technology with a high intrinsic level of uncertainty and its relationship with risk assessment, this analysis, conducted in late 2014, was developed from that that led the Secretary of State for the Environment to the Resolution of 29 May 2014, by which the Environmental Impact Statement of the Exploratory Drilling Project in the hydrocarbons research permits called ''Canarias 1-9// was set out and published in the Spanish Official State Gazette number 196 on 13rd August 2014. The aim of the present study is to analyze the suitability with which the worst case associated probability is identified and defined and its relation to the total risk estimate from a blow out. Its interest stems from the fact that all risk management methodologically rests on two pillars, i.e., on a sound risk analysis and evaluation. This determines the selection of management tools in relation to its level of complexity, the project phase and its potential impacts on the health, safety and environmental contamination dimensions.

  1. Drilling contract issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, G.B.; Worden, D.R.; Borbridge, G.K.D.

    1997-01-01

    Some selected issues which are facing both operators and contractors in drilling for oil and gas, such as the allocation of risk by contract and by statute and the implementation of new technologies, were discussed. There are three varieties of written drilling contracts used in Canada: (1) day work and meterage contracts, (2) master drilling agreements, and (3) contracts that are used in construction projects that do not specifically relate to drilling. Issues relevant to the contractual allocation of risk, to implementing new drilling technologies, to reconciling contract and statute liability, and the formation of strategic alliances for mutual benefit, and the factors contributing to the success of such alliances were explored. 12 refs

  2. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Institute. Status report, March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.

    1997-12-31

    The National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) program is intended to pool support, talent, and technologies of the industries dependent upon drilling and excavation technologies to initiate, coordinate, and sustain programs capable of developing substantial technological advances. The NADET Institute has been funded by the DOE Office of Geothermal Technologies and is now supporting seven projects aimed at advanced geothermal drilling technologies. The Institute seeks to broaden its base of funding and technological support from both government and industry sources. Encouraging progress has been made with the support of dues-paying industrial members and industrial sponsorship of a substantial drilling research study.

  3. Final Report for DOE Project: Portal Web Services: Support of DOE SciDAC Collaboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Thomas, PI; Geoffrey Fox, Co-PI; Gannon, D; Pierce, M; Moore, R; Schissel, D; Boisseau, J

    2007-10-01

    Grid portals provide the scientific community with familiar and simplified interfaces to the Grid and Grid services, and it is important to deploy grid portals onto the SciDAC grids and collaboratories. The goal of this project is the research, development and deployment of interoperable portal and web services that can be used on SciDAC National Collaboratory grids. This project has four primary task areas: development of portal systems; management of data collections; DOE science application integration; and development of web and grid services in support of the above activities.

  4. The strontium isotopic composition of interstitial waters from sites 245 and 336 of the deep sea drilling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkesworth, C.J.; Elderfield, H.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of interstitial waters from leg 25, site 245 and leg 38, site 336 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project show that the enrichment of Sr 2+ with depth is caused both by the alteration of volcanic material and by the introduction of strontium derived from calcium carbonate. 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios range from 0.70913 to 0.70794 at site 245 and from 0.70916 to 0.70694 at site 336. The low ratios compared with contemporaneous seawater reflect the release of Sr from a volcanic source having, according to material-balance calculations, a 87 Se/ 86 Sr ratio of about 0.7034 at site 336. At this site the source appears to be volcanic ash and not basaltic basement which acts as a sink for Sr 2+ during in situ low-temperature weathering. The volcanic contribution to the strontium enrichment in the basal interstitial waters varies from 50% at site 336. The remaining Sr 2+ is derived from Sr-rich biogenic carbonate during diagenetic recrystallization to form Sr-poor calcite. (Auth.)

  5. Caribbean Reef Response to Plio-Pleistocene Climate Change: Results of the Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Diaz, V.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.

    2014-12-01

    Caribbean reefs changed profoundly in taxonomic composition, diversity, and dominance structure during late Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic change. These changes coincide with protracted climatic deterioration and cooling between 2.0 to 0.8 Ma, and the onset of high amplitude sea-level fluctuations ~400 ka. The Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP) was initiated to determine how climate change and global high-amplitude sea level changes influenced depositional patterns in Pliocene to Recent reef systems of the Caribbean. A transect of 7 core borings (~700 m total depth) were collected along the southern coast of the DR. New age constraints based on U/Th geochronometry and radiogenic Sr isotopes, combined with depositional lithofacies, faunal indicators, and stable isotope profiles have allowed us to correlate between wells and define the internal anatomy and stratal geometry of the individual reef sigmoids and sigmoid sets. Faunal records suggest most extinction occurred prior to ~1 Ma. Following this extinction, fringing reef margins of the Caribbean display a characteristic zonation in which Acropora palmata dominates shallow high-energy reef crests and Acropora cervicornis calmer fore-reef slopes and backreef lagoons. The dominance of acroporids across this zonation has been attributed to growth rates 5-100 times faster than other corals.

  6. Core Description and Characteristics of Fault Zones from Hole-A of the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Chao Yeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project was conducted in drill site Dakeng, Taichung City of central western Taiwan during 2004 - 2005 principally to investigate the rupture mechanism in the northern segment of the Chi-Chi earthquake of 21 September 1999, and also to examine regional stratigraphy and tectonics. Core examination (500 - 1800 m of Hole-A gave profound results aiding in illustrating the lithologic column, deformation structure, and architectural pattern of fault zones along the borehole. Lithology column of Hole-A was identified downward as the Cholan Formation (500 - 1027 m, Chinshui Shale (1027 - 1268 m, Kueichulin Formation (1268 - 1712 m, and back to the Cholan Formation (1712 - 2003 m again. A dramatic change is observed regarding sedimentation age and deformation structure around 1712 m. Along the core, most bedding dips _ _ Around 1785 m, bedding dip jumps up to _ the bottom of borehole. Five structure groups of different orientations (dip direction/dip are observed throughout the core. Based on the orientation and sense of shear, they are categorized as thrust (105/30, left-lateral fault (015/30 - 80, right-lateral fault (195/30 - 80, normal fault (105/5 - 10, and backthrust (285/40 - 50. Ten fault zones have been recognized between 500 and 2003 m. We interpret the fault zone located at around 1111 m as being the most likely candidate for rupture deformation during Chi-Chi earthquake. The fault zone seated around 1712 m is recognized as the Sanyi fault zone which is 600 m beneath the Chelungpu fault zone. Ten fault zones including thrust faults, strike-slip faults and backthrust are classified as the Chelungpu Fault System (1500 m. According to the deformation textures within fault zones, the fault zones can be categorized as three types of deformation: distinct fracture deformation, clayey-gouge deformation, and soft-rock deformation. Fracture deformation is dominant within the Chelungpu Fault System and abother two

  7. The SCOPSCO Deep Drilling Project: a 1.3 million-year palaeoenvironmental reconstruction from Lake Ohrid using stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Jack; Leng, Melanie; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Wagner, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Lake Ohrid is a large, ancient lake situated on the Balkan Peninsula in the central northern Mediterranean region. The lake hosts a world-class degree of endemic biodiversity and an extensive sedimentary archive. In 2013, an extremely successful International Continental scientific Drilling Program deep drilling campaign was conducted as part of the transdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project and recovered over 2100 m of sediment from the lake. The main target site in the central basin provided a 584-m composite record covering at least 1.3 million years. Here, we present new oxygen and carbon isotope data (δ18O and δ13C) from carbonate for the entire lacustrine sequence (upper 430 m) of the SCOPSCO cores spanning Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 41-1, based on chronological information derived from tephrostratigraphy, palaeomagnetic analyses, and orbital tuning of biogeochemical proxies. Contemporary monitoring data suggest variations in δ18O are primarily a function of changes in regional water balance. This is confirmed through the Holocene where the isotope dataset shows a stable transition from wetter conditions in the Early Holocene to a drier climate in the Late Holocene, which is consistent with a regional pattern of aridification. At the onset of deep-water lacustrine conditions around 1.3 Ma, very low δ18O are comparable to measured values for surface inflow today and infer that Lake Ohrid had a greatly reduced residence time and volume. Multiple rapid shifts to higher values in long-term average δ18O are observed in the early lake history, most likely associated with lake ontogeny and the progressive deepening of Lake Ohrid. After MIS 10, the observed variability between glacial and interglacial δ18O increases dramatically concomitant with a lower reconstructed lake level, suggesting a more pronounced sensitivity to hydroclimate change. A trend to higher interglacial δ18O through this time

  8. NASA/DOE automotive Stirling engine project. Overview 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beremand, D.G.; Shaltens, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project is reviewed and its technical progress and status are presented. Key technologies in materials, seals, and piston rings are progressing well. Seven first-generation engines, and midifications thereto, have accumulated over 15 000 hr of test time, including 1100 hr of in-vehicle testing. Results indicate good progress toward the program goals. The first second-generation engine is now undergoing initial testing. It is expected that the program goal of a 30-percent improvement in fuel economy will be achieved in tests of a second-generation engine in a Celebrity vehicle.

  9. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. [First Annual Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  10. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. First annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  11. Overview of DOE Oil and Gas Field Laboratory Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromhal, G.; Ciferno, J.; Covatch, G.; Folio, E.; Melchert, E.; Ogunsola, O.; Renk, J., III; Vagnetti, R.

    2017-12-01

    America's abundant unconventional oil and natural gas (UOG) resources are critical components of our nation's energy portfolio. These resources need to be prudently developed to derive maximum benefits. In spite of the long history of hydraulic fracturing, the optimal number of fracturing stages during multi-stage fracture stimulation in horizontal wells is not known. In addition, there is the dire need of a comprehensive understanding of ways to improve the recovery of shale gas with little or no impacts on the environment. Research that seeks to expand our view of effective and environmentally sustainable ways to develop our nation's oil and natural gas resources can be done in the laboratory or at a computer; but, some experiments must be performed in a field setting. The Department of Energy (DOE) Field Lab Observatory projects are designed to address those research questions that must be studied in the field. The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a suite of "field laboratory" test sites to carry out collaborative research that will help find ways of improving the recovery of energy resources as much as possible, with as little environmental impact as possible, from "unconventional" formations, such as shale and other low permeability rock formations. Currently there are three field laboratories in various stages of development and operation. Work is on-going at two of the sites: The Hydraulic Fracturing Test Site (HFTS) in the Permian Basin and the Marcellus Shale Energy and Environmental Lab (MSEEL) project in the Marcellus Shale Play. Agreement on the third site, the Utica Shale Energy and Environmental Lab (USEEL) project in the Utica Shale Play, was just recently finalized. Other field site opportunities may be forthcoming. This presentation will give an overview of the three field laboratory projects.

  12. Archaeological survey and monitoring of initial excavations within the basalt waste isolation project reference repository location and associated drill borehole site locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    This letter report concerns cultural resources studies undertaken in November 1982 for the exploratory shaft starter hole and surface facilities for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). These studies were carried out under the provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act, the amended National Historic Preservation Act, and the Archaeological Resources Act. This report concludes that neither cultural nor palentological resources are being affected by the BWIP during the present phase of construction work and test drilling. 4 refs., 10 figs

  13. Design aspects to consider during drilling and completion of wells of the pilot test in the in situ combustion project, Bare field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, D.; Garcia, J. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Exploration and Production; PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP; Rodriguez, J.; Reverol, H. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Exploration and Production

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed an in situ combustion demonstration project in Venezuela's Orinoco oil belt. Unconventional drilling and completion techniques are being implemented in order to assess well performance during different phases of the combustion process. Drilling, well completion and monitoring techniques planned in each of the project's wells were described. The purpose of the project is to minimize formation damage, reduce corrosion, and prevent formation sand production. Numerical analyses, sampling studies, and laboratory experiments will be conducted in order to define well arrangement and to select completion equipment. Thermocouples, pressure chambers, and fiber optics will be used to monitor temperature and pressure rates. To date, the analyses have demonstrated that the horizontal section of the production wells must be drilled with special directional and geo-navigational tools. The selected completion equipment must allow for the installation of high capacity mechanical pumping systems. Completion equipment must be capable of performing in high temperatures and with the corrosive gases produced during the combustion process. It was concluded that casings for the wells must be centralized in order to ensure good cement placement. Real time monitoring will be conducted to control firefloods. 3 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  14. Use of spectral gamma ray as a lithology guide for fault rocks: A case study from the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project Borehole 4 (WFSD-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara Konaté, Ahmed; Pan, Heping; Ma, Huolin; Qin, Zhen; Guo, Bo; Yevenyo Ziggah, Yao; Kounga, Claude Ernest Moussounda; Khan, Nasir; Tounkara, Fodé

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific drilling project (WFSD) was to produce an in-depth borehole into the Yingxiu-Beichuan (YBF) and Anxian-Guanxian faults in order to gain a much better understanding of the physical and chemical properties as well as the mechanical faulting involved. Five boreholes, namely WFSD-1, WFSD-2, WFSD-3P, WFSD-3 and WFSD-4, were drilled during the project entirety. This study, therefore, presents first-hand WFSD-4 data on the lithology (original rocks) and fault rocks that have been obtained from the WFSD project. In an attempt to determine the physical properties and the clay minerals of the lithology and fault rocks, this study analyzed the spectral gamma ray logs (Total gamma ray, Potassium, Thorium and Uranium) recorded in WFSD-4 borehole on the Northern segment of the YBF. The obtained results are presented as cross-plots and statistical multi log analysis. Both lithology and fault rocks show a variability of spectral gamma ray (SGR) logs responses and clay minerals. This study has shown the capabilities of the SGR logs for well-logging of earthquake faults and proves that SGR logs together with others logs in combination with drill hole core description is a useful method of lithology and fault rocks characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Edwards, B.

    1992-01-01

    Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology

  16. Response to the independent technical review of the UMTRA Project procedures and practices for well drilling and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This report is a response to the findings and recommendations contained in the ITR report. The text of this document summarizes each ITR finding and recommendation, presents the TAC response, and concludes that implementation of many of the recommendations would benefit the UMTRA Project. Implementation of the recommendations represents ongoing improvement to the TAC well installation and development procedures and will result, in lower overall project costs. Appendix B is an implementation plan that groups similar or complementary action items, provides a schedule for implementation, identifies the group or people responsible for the changes, and estimates hours to implement the changes. The four major action items are as follows: (1) ITR Reevaluation, (2) Well Installation SOP Review and Revision, (3) Well Installation Contract Review and Revision, and (4) TAC and DOE Communications Improvement. The hours listed to implement the improvements are intended to be estimates for budgeting and planning purposes for the remainder of this fiscal year and the upcoming fiscal year

  17. Response to the independent technical review of the UMTRA Project procedures and practices for well drilling and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This report is a response to the findings and recommendations contained in the ITR report. The text of this document summarizes each ITR finding and recommendation, presents the TAC response, and concludes that implementation of many of the recommendations would benefit the UMTRA Project. Implementation of the recommendations represents ongoing improvement to the TAC well installation and development procedures and will result, in lower overall project costs. Appendix B is an implementation plan that groups similar or complementary action items, provides a schedule for implementation, identifies the group or people responsible for the changes, and estimates hours to implement the changes. The four major action items are as follows: (1) ITR Reevaluation, (2) Well Installation SOP Review and Revision, (3) Well Installation Contract Review and Revision, and (4) TAC and DOE Communications Improvement. The hours listed to implement the improvements are intended to be estimates for budgeting and planning purposes for the remainder of this fiscal year and the upcoming fiscal year.

  18. A Tropical Template for D-O Events During MIS 3? Results From the Lake Malawi Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. T.; Johnson, T. C.; Scholz, C. A.; King, J. W.; Cohen, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the Lake Malawi Drilling Project we have undertaken a 1 cm-scale resolution (ca. 20 yr) XRF scanning study of core from site 2A in the Northern Basin of the lake. We have focused on certain parameters, including Fe, Zr:Ti, and Si:Ti; these may be interpreted to represent changing input of terrigenous sediments (delivered to the lake by rivers), soils developed from weathered volcanic ash (delivered more effectively under drier windier conditions), and biogenic silica, respectively. We present here a record of East African climate since 55 ka that indicates rapid shifts between discrete climate modes that appear to be related to abrupt warming (Dansgaard- Oeschger) and cooling (Heinrich) events observed in Greenland. The events in Malawi appear to correspond to episodes of dry conditions and increased northerly winds. Such conditions may occur at times that southward excursion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone brings the tropical rain belt to the south of the study area. Although the timing of the Malawi events cannot be determined exactly, our independent age model, based on 25 radiocarbon dates and stratigraphic correlations to events dated in a nearby at 63 and 75 ka, implies that they occur prior to their Greenland counterparts, consistent with southward excursions of the ITCZ during Greenland stadials. The magnitude and form of each of the events recorded in Malawi sediments corresponds to the scale of the subsequent Greenland warming. This suggests that a tropical component of climate sets a template for abrupt high northern latitude climate fluctuations associated with the bipolar seesaw.

  19. The Changing Face of Plio-Pleistocene Reef Margins: Results of the Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Díaz, V.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.; Grasmueck, M.; Eberli, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fringing reef margins of the Caribbean display a characteristic zonation in which Acropora palmata dominates shallow high-energy reef crests and Acropora cervicornis calmer fore-reef slopes and backreef lagoons. The dominance of acroporids across this zonation has been attributed to growth rates 5-100 times faster than other corals. However, the dominance and high accretion potential of acroporid reefs has a relatively recent geologic origin. Caribbean reefs changed profoundly in taxonomic composition, diversity, and dominance structure during late Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic change. These changes coincide with protracted climatic deterioration and cooling between 2.0 to 0.8 Ma, and the onset of high amplitude sea-level fluctuations ~400 ka. The Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP) was initiated to determine how climate change and global high-amplitude sea level changes influenced depositional patterns in Pliocene to Recent reef systems of the Caribbean. A transect of 7 core borings (~700 m total depth) were collected along a transect of the southern coast of the DR in conjunction with over 20 km of ground penetrating radar (GPR) lines. New age constraints based on U/Th geochronometry and radiogenic Sr isotopes, combined with depositional lithofacies, faunal indicators, stable isotope profiles and GPR data have allowed us to correlate between wells and define the internal anatomy and stratal geometry of the individual reef sigmoids and sigmoid sets. The stacking of these sigmoid-shaped reefs produce lateral progradation of approximately 15 km with geometries that generally follow the highstand systems tract model of Pomar and Ward (1994). Based on existing age models eccentricity (high amplitude 100 kyr) sigmoids display increased aggradation and progradation potential compared to reef cycles driven by obliquity (41 kyr).

  20. Chew Bahir: A Key Site within the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project, towards a Half Million-Year Climate Record from Southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaebitz, F.; Asrat, A.; Lamb, H. F.; Trauth, M. H.; Foerster, V. E.; Junginger, A.; Raub, T. D.; Gromig, R.; Viehberg, F. A.; Roberts, H. M.; Cohen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chew Bahir, a saline mudflat today, is one of the five sites in East Africa, drilled within the framework of HSPDP (Hominin Site and Paleolakes Drilling Project). It is also one of the key sites of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC-806) "Our way to Europe" aiming at the reconstruction of environmental conditions in the source region of modern man (H. sapiens). It is suggested that a changing environment could have triggered the mobility and dispersal of modern man. The oldest known fossils of anatomical modern humans (~195 ka BP) were found in the Omo basin, not more than 90km westwards of our drill site. The deposits in the tectonic basin of Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia were cored in Nov. 2014 in two boreholes down to 280 m and 260 m below surface respectively. The overlapping long cores (drilled ~20 m apart from each other), were opened, scanned, described and sampled in low resolution in April 2015. The recovered sediments mostly contain green-greyish to light coloured and brown to reddish clays and silty clays, interbedded with some laminated mica-rich sand layers and occurrences of carbonate concretions and nodules, which decrease upcore. Here we will present a first set of results on the composite core, comprising mainly lithology and magnetic susceptibility (MS). Based on known sedimentation rates from pre-studies performed on short cores across the basin, we anticipate the deep drilled cores to cover at least 500 ka BP. Moreover, new insights into the role of post-depositional alteration, especially of clay minerals and zeolites, will be presented as a contribution to an improved understanding of formation processes. The results support the identification of wet and dry climate periods in the past. Those pronounced variations of moisture availability, are thought to have influenced the evolution and mobility of Homo sapiens sapiens.

  1. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  2. ND-REAP/DOE cooperative project: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The impacts of energy-related developments in North Dakota are having profound effects on the state. Among the most significant of these effects are those on the state's economy and its population. Knowledge of the total environmental effects of development is a necessary prerequisite for effective planning and decision making. This final report addresses the conceptual design and functional evolution of the Regional Environmental Assessment Program, the results of the REAP/DOE Cooperative Effort, as well as evolution of the REAP/DOE effort and recommendations for future directions. The Economic Demographic (E-D) Model was developed to give North Dakota decision makers a tool with which to evaluate the impacts of coal development. It projects social, economic, and characteristics of North Dakota. Refinements and expansion of the model are discussed in Section 1. Section 2 provides an evaluation of the model as applied to other states. Section 3 identifies and evaluates the use of REAP data and capabilities to date. The REAP Resources Reference System R/sup 3/S was developed to provide access to information systems and to past research and present studies about aspects of North Dakota. It is a computer-based library reference system. Its status and expansion potential is covered in Section 4. Section 5 makes recommendations for future efforts.

  3. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Kea volcano: Results from the initial phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J.C.; DePaolo, D.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Mauna Kea lavas recovered by the first drilling phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. These lavas, which range in age from ???200 to 400 ka, provide a detailed record of chemical and isotopic changes in basalt composition during the shied/postshield transition and extend our record of Mauna Kea volcanism to a late-shield period roughly equivalent to the last ???100 ka of Mauna Loa activity. Stratigraphic variations in isotopic composition reveal a gradual shift over time toward a more depleted source composition (e.g., higher 143Nd/144Nd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 3He/4He). This gradual evolution is in sharp contrast with the abrupt appearance of alkalic lavas at ???240 ka recorded by the upper 50 m of Mauna Kea lavas from the core. Intercalated tholeiitic and alkalic lavas from the uppermost Mauna Kea section are isotopically indistinguishable. Combined with major element evidence (e.g., decreasing SiO2 and increasing FeO) that the depth of melt segregation increased during the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism, the isotopic similarity of tholeiitic and alkalic lavas argues against significant lithosphere involvement during melt generation. Instead, the depleted isotopic signatures found in late shield-stage lavas are best explained by increasing the proportion of melt generated from a depleted upper mantle component entrained and heated by the rising central plume. Direct comparison of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas erupted at equivalent stages in these volcanoes' life cycles reveals persistent chemical and isotopic differences independent of the temporal evolution of each volcano. The oldest lavas recovered from the drillcore are similar to modern Kilauea lavas, but are distinct from Mauna Loa lavas. Mauna Kea lavas have higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb and lower 87Sr/86Sr. Higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements in primary magmas, lower SiO2, and higher FeO also

  4. Preliminary report on the geology of the Red River Valley drilling project, eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-two wells, 26 of which penetrated the Precambrian, were drilled along the eastern edge of the Williston Basin in the eastern tier of counties in North Dakota and in nearby counties in northwestern Minnesota. These tests, along the Red River Valley of the North, were drilled to study the stratigraphy and uranium potential of this area. The drilling program was unsuccessful in finding either significant amounts of uranium or apparently important shows of uranium. It did, however, demonstrate the occurrence of thick elastic sections in the Ordovician, Jurassic and Cretaceous Systems, within the Red River Valley, along the eastern margins of the Williston Basin which could serve as host rocks for uranium ore bodies.

  5. Overview of DOE/ONS criticality safety projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.W.; Brown, B.P.; Hopper, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of Federal involvement with nuclear criticality safety has traversed through the 1940's and early 1950's with the Manhattan Engineering District, the 1950's and 1960's with the Atomic Energy Commission, the early 1970's with the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the late 1970's to date with the US Department of Energy. The importance of nuclear criticality safety has been maintained throughout these periods; however, criticality safety has received shifting emphases in research/applications, promulgations of regulations/standards, origins of fiscal support and organization. In June 1981 the Office of Nuclear Safety was established in response to a Department of Energy study of the impact of the March 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The organizational structure of the ONS, its program for establishing and maintaining a progressive nuclear criticality safety program, and associated projects, and current history of ONS's fiscal support of program projects is presented. With the establishment of the ONS came concomitant missions to develop and maintain nuclear safety policy and requirements, to provide independent assurance that nuclear operations are performed safely, to provide resources and management for DOE responses to nuclear accidents, and to provide technical support. In the past four years, ONS has developed and initiated a continuing Department Nuclear Criticality Safety Program in such areas as communications and information, physics of criticality, knowledge of factors affecting criticality, and computational capability

  6. Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance--Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2003-10-01

    This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2002 through September 2002. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit--fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. Accomplishments to date include the following: 4Q 2002--Project started; Industry Team was assembled; Kick-off meeting was held at DOE Morgantown; 1Q 2003--Engineering meeting was held at Hughes Christensen, The Woodlands Texas to prepare preliminary plans for development and testing and review equipment needs; Operators started sending information regarding their needs for deep drilling challenges and priorities for large-scale testing experimental matrix; Aramco joined the Industry Team as DEA 148 objectives paralleled the DOE project; 2Q 2003--Engineering and planning for high pressure drilling at TerraTek commenced; 3Q 2003--Continuation of engineering and design work for high pressure drilling at TerraTek; Baker Hughes INTEQ drilling Fluids and Hughes Christensen commence planning for Phase 1 testing--recommendations for bits and fluids.

  7. A Reference Section through the Lower Fast-spreading Oceanic Crust in the Wadi Gideah (Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate Oman): Drill Sites GT1A and GT2A within the ICDP Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Koepke, J.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; Müller, T.; Mock, D.; Strauss, H.; Schuth, S.; Ildefonse, B.

    2017-12-01

    In the absence of a complete profile through fast-spreading oceanic crust in modern oceans, we established a reference profile through the whole paleocrust of the Sumail Ophiolite (Oman), which is regarded as the best analogue for fast-spreading oceanic crust on land. For establishing a coherent data set, we sampled the Wadi Gideah in the Wadi-Tayin massif from the mantle section up to the pillow basalts and performed different analytical and structural investigations on the same suite of samples (pool sample concept). The whole sample set contains about 400 samples focusing on both primary magmatic rocks and hydrothermal fault zones to characterize initial formation processes and cooling of the crust. The Wadi Gideah hosts the sites GT1A (lower crust) and GT2A (foliated / layered gabbro transition) where 400 m long cores have been drilled in the frame of the ICDP Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP). Thus, the Wadi Gideah crustal transect is well-suited for providing a reference frame for these two drill cores. Major and trace element data on minerals and rocks reveal in-situ crystallization in the deep crust, thus strongly supporting a hybrid accretion model that is characterized by sheeted sill intrusion in the lower part of the plutonic crust and gabbro glacier features in the upper section. This hybrid model is also supported by results on crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of the minerals within the gabbros, which call for distinct formation mechanisms in the upper and lower gabbro sections. A requirement for our hybrid model is significant hydrothermal cooling in the lower crust for the consumption of the latent heat of crystallization. This was facilitated by channelled hydrothermal flow zones, preserved today in faulted zones of extensively altered gabbro cutting both layered and foliated gabbros. These gabbros show higher Sr87/Sr86 ratios if compared to the background gabbro, the presence of late stage minerals (amphibole, oxides, orthopyroxene

  8. Incentive drilling contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moomjian, C.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Incentive drilling contracts historically have been based on the footage and turnkey concepts. Because these concepts have not been used widely in the international and offshore arenas, this paper discusses other innovative approaches to incentive contracts. Case studies of recently completed or current international and offshore contracts are presented to describe incentive projects based on a performance bonus (Case 1), lump sum per well (Case 2), target time and cap for a specified hole section (Case 3), and per-well target time (Case 4). This paper concludes with a review and comparison of the case studies and a general discussion of factors that produce successful innovative incentive programs that enhance drilling efficiency

  9. Does Personality Influence Project Participation? Evidence from Rural Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jonas Helth; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    Development projects often target the poor and vulnerable households for good reasons. However, project participation also tends to be voluntary leading to a high degree of self-selection among project beneficiaries. In addition, project success is likely to depend upon the type of people...

  10. Project Execution Plan Project 98L-EWW-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling DOE No. 98-D-453

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLSTEIN, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) describes the management methods and responsibilities of the project participants. Project W-460 is sufficiently large to warrant a stand alone PEP. This project specific PEP describes the relationships and responsibilities of the project team and identifies the technical, schedule, and cost baselines that have been established for the project. The Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Works (Hanford), at Richland, WA., currently does not have a system capable of stabilizing or packaging large quantities of plutonium-bearing solids to meet DOE technical standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This project will allow Hanford to meet this standard by installing stabilization and packaging equipment (SPE). The SPE is capable of stabilizing and packaging the current inventory of greater than 50 percent plutonium-bearing materials currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) vaults into 3013 storage containers. The scope of this project is to procure and install the SPE via a Hanford contract and coordination with the Savannah River Site. In addition, the project will modify PFP vaults and upgrade the PFP Laboratory measurement systems. The Facility infrastructure will be modified to support the new SPE system and the new standardized storage container configuration. Use of this document is described in the Project Hanford Policy and Procedure System under HNF-PRO-1999, Construction Program Conceptual Phase

  11. Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: A 500,000-year climate record from Chew Bahir, a key site in southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Verena E.; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa S.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Dean, Jonathan R.; Deino, Alan; Günter, Christina; Junginger, Annett; Lamb, Henry F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Roberts, Helen M.; Schaebitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin H.

    2017-04-01

    What is the environmental context of human evolution and dispersal? In order to evaluate the impact that different timescales and magnitude of climatic shifts have had on the living conditions of anatomically modern humans, the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) has cored five predominantly-lacustrine sequences to investigate climate change in East Africa (Cohen et al., 2016). The five high-priority areas in Ethiopia and Kenya are located in close proximity to key paleoanthropological sites covering various steps in evolution. One of the five cores is from Chew Bahir. Chew Bahir is a deep tectonically-bound basin in the southern Ethiopian rift, close to the Lower Omo valley, site of the earliest known fossil of anatomically modern humans. As part of the deep drilling initiative between ICDP-HSPDP and the Collaborative Research Center (CRC806), the Chew Bahir sedimentary deposits were cored in late 2014, yielding in two parallel cores reaching 280 m depth and which cover the last 550 ka of environmental history. We present the initial results of on-going lithologic and stratigraphic investigation of the composite core, the results of high resolution MSCL and XRF scanning data, as well as the first results of detailed multi-proxy analysis of the Chew Bahir cores. These analyses are based on more than 14,000 discrete subsamples. An initial chronology, based on Ar/Ar and OSL dating, allows the first reconstructions of dry-wet cycles during the last 550 ka. Both geochemical and sedimentological results show that the Chew Bahir deposits are sensitive recorders of changes in moisture, sediment influx, provenance, transport and diagenetic processes. The core records will allow tests of the various hypotheses regarding the impact of climate variability -from climate flickers to orbital driven transitions- on the evolution and dispersal of anatomically modern humans. References: Cohen, A. et al., 2016. The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project

  12. Project Execution Plan Project 98L-EWW-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling DOE 98-D-453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCGRATH, G.M.

    2000-06-21

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) describes the management methods and responsibilities of the project participants. Project W-460 is sufficiently large to warrant a stand alone PEP. This project specific PEP describes the relationships and responsibilities of the project team and identifies the technical, schedule, and cost baselines that have been established for the project. The Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Works (Hanford), at Richland, Wa. currently does not have a system capable of stabilizing or packaging large quantities of plutonium-bearing solids to meet DOE technical standard DOE-STD-3013-99. This project will allow Hanford to meet this standard by installing stabilization and packaging equipment (SPE). The SPE is capable of stabilizing and packaging the current inventory of greater than 30 percent plutonium-bearing materials currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) vaults into 3013 storage containers. The scope of this project is to procure and install the SPE via a Hanford contract and coordination with the Savannah River Site. In addition, the project will modify PFP vaults and upgrade the PFP Laboratory measurement systems. The Facility infrastructure will be modified to support the new SPE system and the new standardized storage container configuration.

  13. Project Execution Plan Project 98L-EWW-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling DOE 98-D-453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLSTEIN, W.A.

    1999-08-01

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) describes the management methods and responsibilities of the project participants. Project W-460 is sufficiently large to warrant a stand alone PEP. This project specific PEP describes the relationships and responsibilities of the project team and identifies the technical, schedule, and cost baselines that have been established for the project. The Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Works (Hanford), at Richland Wa. currently does not have a system capable of stabilizing or packaging large quantities of plutonium-bearing solids to meet DOE technical standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This project will allow Hanford to meet this standard by installing stabilization and packaging equipment (SPE). The SPE is capable of stabilizing and packaging the current inventory of greater than 50 percent plutonium-bearing materials currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) vaults into 3013 storage containers. The scope of this project is to procure and install the SPE via a Hanford contract and coordination with the Savannah River Site. In addition, the project will modify PFP vaults and upgrade the PFP Laboratory measurement systems. The Facility infrastructure will be modified to support the new SPE system and the new standardized storage container configuration.

  14. Project Execution Plan Project 98L-EWW-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling DOE 98-D-453

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCGRATH, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) describes the management methods and responsibilities of the project participants. Project W-460 is sufficiently large to warrant a stand alone PEP. This project specific PEP describes the relationships and responsibilities of the project team and identifies the technical, schedule, and cost baselines that have been established for the project. The Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Works (Hanford), at Richland, Wa. currently does not have a system capable of stabilizing or packaging large quantities of plutonium-bearing solids to meet DOE technical standard DOE-STD-3013-99. This project will allow Hanford to meet this standard by installing stabilization and packaging equipment (SPE). The SPE is capable of stabilizing and packaging the current inventory of greater than 30 percent plutonium-bearing materials currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) vaults into 3013 storage containers. The scope of this project is to procure and install the SPE via a Hanford contract and coordination with the Savannah River Site. In addition, the project will modify PFP vaults and upgrade the PFP Laboratory measurement systems. The Facility infrastructure will be modified to support the new SPE system and the new standardized storage container configuration

  15. Synchronizing early Eocene deep-sea and continental records – cyclostratigraphic age models for the Bighorn Basin Coring Project drill cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Westerhold

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A consistent chronostratigraphic framework is required to understand the effect of major paleoclimate perturbations on both marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Transient global warming events in the early Eocene, at 56–54 Ma, show the impact of large-scale carbon input into the ocean–atmosphere system. Here we provide the first timescale synchronization of continental and marine deposits spanning the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM and the interval just prior to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM-2. Cyclic variations in geochemical data come from continental drill cores of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP, Wyoming, USA and from marine deep-sea drilling deposits retrieved by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP. Both are dominated by eccentricity-modulated precession cycles used to construct a common cyclostratigraphic framework. Integration of age models results in a revised astrochronology for the PETM in deep-sea records that is now generally consistent with independent 3He age models. The duration of the PETM is estimated at ∼ 200 kyr for the carbon isotope excursion and ∼ 120 kyr for the associated pelagic clay layer. A common terrestrial and marine age model shows a concurrent major change in marine and terrestrial biota ∼ 200 kyr before ETM-2. In the Bighorn Basin, the change is referred to as Biohorizon B and represents a period of significant mammalian turnover and immigration, separating the upper Haplomylus–Ectocion Range Zone from the Bunophorus Interval Zone and approximating the Wa-4–Wa-5 land mammal zone boundary. In sediments from ODP Site 1262 (Walvis Ridge, major changes in the biota at this time are documented by the radiation of a second generation of apical spine-bearing sphenolith species (e.g., S. radians and S. editus, the emergence of T. orthostylus, and the marked decline of D. multiradiatus.

  16. The top of the Olduvai subchron in a high-resolution magnetostratigraphy from the West Turkana core WTK13, Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, Mark; Langereis, Cor; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Feibel, Craig; Jordeens, Jose; van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Beck, Catherine; Olago, Daniel; Cohen, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding the evolution of our own species is identifying the role climate change has played in the evolution of earlier hominin species. To clarify the influence of climate, we need long and continuous high-resolution paleoclimate records, preferably obtained from hominin-bearing sediments, that are well-dated by tephro- and magnetostratigraphy and other methods. This is hindered, however, by the fact that fossil-bearing sediments are often discontinuous, and subject to weathering, which may lead to oxidation and remagnetization. To obtain fresh, unweathered sediments, the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) collected a 216- meter core (WTK13) in 2013 from deposits of Early Pleistocene paleolake Lorenyang in the western Turkana Basin (Kenya). Here, we present the magnetostratigraphy of the core. Rock magnetic analyses reveal the presence of iron sulphides carrying the remanent magnetizations. To recover polarity orientation from the near-equatorial WTK13 core drilled at 5°N, we developed and successfully applied two independent drill-core reorientation methods taking advantage of (1) the sedimentary fabric as expressed in the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) and (2) the occurrence of a viscous component oriented in the present day field. The reoriented directions reveal a normal to reversed polarity reversal identified as the top of the Olduvai subchron. From this excellent record, we find no evidence for the 'Vrica subchron' previously reported in the area. We suggest that outcrop-based interpretations supporting the presence of the Vrica subchron have been affected by the oxidation of iron sulphides initially present in the sediments as evident in the core record, and by subsequent remagnetization. Based on our new high-resolution magnetostratigraphy and stratigraphic markers, we provide constraints for an initial age model of the WTK13 core. We discuss the implications of the observed geomagnetic

  17. Geothermal Energy Research and Development Program; Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1994-03-01

    This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program document. This document contains summaries of projects related to exploration technology, reservoir technology, drilling technology, conversion technology, materials, biochemical processes, and direct heat applications. [DJE-2005

  18. Bucket drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezverkhiy, V.M.; Nabokov, I.M.; Podoksik, D.Z.; Sadovskiy, S.S.; Shanyukevich, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The bucket drill including a cylindrical housing with bottom, ground intake windows and cutting knives is hinged to the housing, the mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives including rods connected by the cutter knives, and drive shaft is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the effectiveness of drilling by automatic change in the angle of cutting depending on the strength of the drillable rock, the drill is equipped with elastic elements and cap with annular slits in which there are elastic elements. The mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives is equipped with levers hinged to the housing, pins with shaft and rocker arm. The rods are made with a slit and from one end are rigidly connected to the cutting knives, and from the other end to the levers by means of pins which are arranged in slits of the rod with the possibility of movement. The upper ends of the levers are installed with the possibility of movement in the pins whose shafts are arranged with the possibility of rotation in the rocker arm rigidly connected to the drive shaft. The drive shaft is equipped with cantilevers installed in the cap with the possibility of rotation and interaction with the elastic elements.

  19. Drilling Specifications: Well Installations in the 300 Area to Support PNNL's Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2008-01-01

    Part of the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) will be installation of a network of high density borings and wells to monitor migration of fluids and contaminants (uranium), both in groundwater and vadose zone, away from an surface infiltration plot (Figure A-1). The infiltration plot will be located over an area of suspected contamination at the former 300 Area South Process Pond (SPP). The SPP is located in the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site, within the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the support of FH shall stake the well locations prior to the start of drilling. Final locations will be based on accessibility and will avoid any surface or underground structures or hazards as well as surface contamination

  20. Westinghouse GOCO conduct of casualty drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, C.P.

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to provide Westinghouse Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Facilities with information that can be used to implement or improve drill programs. Elements of this guide are highly recommended for use when implementing a new drill program or when assessing an existing program. Casualty drills focus on response to abnormal conditions presenting a hazard to personnel, environment, or equipment; they are distinct from Emergency Response Exercises in which the training emphasis is on site, field office, and emergency management team interaction. The DOE documents which require team training and conducting drills in nuclear facilities and should be used as guidance in non-nuclear facilities are: DOE 5480.19 (Chapter 1 of Attachment I) and DOE 5480.20 (Chapter 1, paragraphs 7 a. and d. of continuing training). Casualty drills should be an integral part of the qualification and training program at every DOE facility

  1. How does technological regime affect performance of technology development projects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Michael; Hooshangi, Soheil; Zhao, Y. Lisa; Halman, Johannes I.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine how technological regime affects the performance of technology development projects (i.e., project quality, sales, and profit). Technological regime is defined as the set of attributes of a technological environment where the innovative activities of firms take place.

  2. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Drilling 1976-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the second in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in drilling and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  3. DOE outfits two laboratories for particle-physics project

    CERN Multimedia

    Hampton, T

    2003-01-01

    Scheduled for operation in early 2005, a new facility will help researchers study elusive subatomic neutrinos by projecting a particle stream from Illinois to Minnesota - through 460 miles of solid earth (1 page).

  4. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  5. Reconstruction of 3.2 GA Ocean Floor Environment from Cores of Dxcl Drilling Project, Pilbara, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, R.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Naraoka, H.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Suganuma, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The 3.2Ga low-grade Dixon Island and the Cleaverville Formations lie at coastal Pilbara greenstone belt of Western Australia. In 2007 summer, we conducted scientific drilling (DXCL) in the Cleaverville Beach to understand relative deep marine environments in Mesoarchean. In DXCL, we obtained three fresh drill cores (DX, CL2 and CL1 in ascending order). The DX, totally 100m long and covers the upper part of the Dixon Island Formation, is composed of black shale, gray chert and pyrite. The gray chert contains very fine lamination of siliceous-black organic matters. Thin pyrite layers in DX are divided into two types, massive and graded layers. Massive layer shows pinch and swell structure that is tensioned parallel to bedding. Graded layer shows gradually increase in the amount of pyrite crystals. Pyrite crystals have three different shapes; spherical, hollow and cubic types. Spherical type is observed in both massive and graded layers. Hollow type has a small spherical hollow in the center and typically found in the massive layer. Cubic type has inner hollow and coexists with hollow type at the edges of massive layer. CL1 and CL2, which are totally 100m long, contain massive black shale, banded pyrite and thin volcanic sandstone, with graded pyrite layers. Massive black shale in CL is thicker than that in DX and is composed of siltstone with organic matter. Partially preserved thin pyroclasitic layers were composed of fine grain volcaniclastis with cross-lamination. Lithological variations from DX to CL cores are characterized by black shale layers thickening upward from DX to CL1 with pyrite layers in DX thinning upward from bottom to the top. In addition, CL contains few thinner layers and thin volcaniclastic layers in the upper part. The δ34S values are -1.9 to +12.9 ‰ in DX, +1.7 to +24.9 ‰ in CL1 and +4.4 to +26.8 ‰ in CL2. Such δ34S values, ranging more than 27 ‰ in total, indicate very active microbial sulfate reduction at ocean floor where supply

  6. Mississippi graduate trainee project for DOE EPSCoR. Summary report for year No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Three research clusters were selected for emphasis in the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR project: Fossil fuel pollutants, enhanced oil recovery, and power systems and conservation. Brief progress reports are given.

  7. Long hole waterjet drilling for gas drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Stockwell; M. Gledhill; S. Hildebrand; S. Adam; Tim Meyer [CMTE (Australia)

    2003-04-01

    In-seam drilling for gas drainage is now an essential part of operations at many Australian underground coalmines. The objective of this project is to develop and trial a new drilling method for the accurate and efficient installation of long inseam boreholes (>1000 metres). This involves the integration of pure water-jet drilling technology (i.e. not water-jet assisted rotary drilling) developed by CMTE with conventional directional drilling technology. The system was similar to conventional directional drilling methods, but instead of relying on a down-hole-motor (DHM) rotating a mechanical drill bit for cutting, high pressure water-jets were used. The testing of the system did not achieve the full objectives set down in the project plan. A borehole greater than 1000 metres was not achieved. The first trial site had coal that was weathered, oxidized and dry. These conditions significantly affected the ability of the drilling tool to stay 'in-seam'. Due to the poor conditions at the first trial, many experimental objectives were forwarded to the second field trial. In the second trial drilling difficulties were experienced, this was due to the interaction between the confinement of the borehole and the dimensions of the down hole drilling assembly. This ultimately reduced the productivity of the system and the distance that could be drilled within the specified trial periods. Testing in the first field trial did not show any indication that the system would have this difficulty.

  8. Quaternary glaciation and hydrologic variation in the South American tropics as reconstructed from the Lake Titicaca drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Baker, Paul A.; Seltzer, Geoffrey O.; Ballantyne, Ashley; Tapia, Pedro; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2007-11-01

    A 136-m-long drill core of sediments was recovered from tropical high-altitude Lake Titicaca, Bolivia-Peru, enabling a reconstruction of past climate that spans four cycles of regional glacial advance and retreat and that is estimated to extend continuously over the last 370,000 yr. Within the errors of the age model, the periods of regional glacial advance and retreat are concordant respectively with global glacial and interglacial stages. Periods of ice advance in the southern tropical Andes generally were periods of positive water balance, as evidenced by deeper and fresher conditions in Lake Titicaca. Conversely, reduced glaciation occurred during periods of negative water balance and shallow closed-basin conditions in the lake. The apparent coincidence of positive water balance of Lake Titicaca and glacial growth in the adjacent Andes with Northern Hemisphere ice sheet expansion implies that regional water balance and glacial mass balance are strongly influenced by global-scale temperature changes, as well as by precessional forcing of the South American summer monsoon.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

    2001-07-01

    Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed

  10. does road safety projects relate to community capacity building?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Key words: AARSI road safety projects, capacity building, capacity building interventions, community ... claimed that their CSR based programmes are toward community capacity building-. CCB. The CSR practices by these ... promote sustainable community development-SCD by connecting social capital to community and ...

  11. Continental Scientific Drilling (CSD): Technology Barriers to Deep Drilling Studies in Thermal Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstad, George A.; Rowley, John C.

    1987-01-16

    This report is the proceedings of a workshop. The primary thrust of these discussion was to identify the major key technology barriers to the Department of Energy (DOE) supported Thermal Regimes CSD projects and to set priorities for research and development. The major technological challenge is the high temperature to be encountered at depth. Specific problems derived from this issue were widely recognized among the participants and are reflected in this summary. A major concern for the projected Thermal Regimes CSD boreholes was the technology required for continuous coring, in contrast to that required for drilling without core or spot coring. Current commercial technology bases for these two techniques are quite different. The DOE has successfully fielded projects that used both technologies, i.e, shallow continuous coring (Inyo Domes and Valles Caldera) and deeper drilling with spot cores (Imperial Valley-SSSDP). It was concluded that future scientific objectives may still require both approaches, but continuous coring is the most likely requirement in the near term. (DJE-2005)

  12. DOE Contribution to the 2015 US CLIVAR Project Office Budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWeaver, Eric [National Science Foundation (NSF), Washington, DC (United States); Patterson, Michael [US CLIVAR Project Office (USCPO),Washington DC (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The primary goal of the US Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) Project Office is to enable science community planning and implementation of research to understand and predict climate variability and change on intraseasonal-to-centennial timescales, through observations and modeling with emphasis on the role of the ocean and its interaction with other elements of the Earth system, and to serve the climate community and society through the coordination and facilitation of research on outstanding climate questions.

  13. DOE Project 353: TAMS Prototype and production coupling alignment units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, K.V.

    1996-02-01

    TAMS is an electronic measurement system used to determine the alignment of turbine-generator shafts at the coupling interface. The displacement transducer is a strain gage based sensor mounted in a portable probe. The measurement system was experiencing zero input drift and temperature induced drift. This project endeavored to determine the source of these problems and to revise a unit to be returned to a customer, Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE), within a period of five weeks.

  14. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  15. 76 FR 2903 - Interconnection of the Proposed Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project (DOE/EIS-0461), and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Wind Energy Center Project (DOE/EIS-0461), and Proposed Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project (DOE... to prepare environmental impact statements (EISs) for the Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project and the Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project in the Federal Register on November 30, 2010. Both...

  16. The Chinese Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling Project in the Songliao Basin, NE China: Organic-rich source rock evaluation with geophysical logs from Borehole SK-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Zou, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Cretaceous strata have been recognized as an important target of oil or gas exploration in the Songliao Basin, northeast China. The second borehole (SK-2) of the Chinese Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling Project in the Songliao Basin (CCSD-SK) is the first one to drill through the Cretaceous continental strata in the frame of ICDP. It was designed not only to solve multiple scientific problems (including the Cretaceous paleoenvironment and paleoclimate, as well as deep resources exploration of the Songliao Basin), but also to expect to achieve new breakthroughs in oil and gas exploration. Based on the project, various geophysical log data (including gamma, sonic, resistivity, density etc.) and core samples have been collected from Borehole SK-2. We do research on organic-rich source rocks estimation using various geophysical log data. Firstly, we comprehensively analyzed organic-rich source rocks' geophysical log response characteristics. Then, source rock's identification methods were constructed to identify organic-rich source rocks with geophysical logs. The main identification methods include cross-plot, multiple overlap and Decision Tree method. Finally, the technique and the CARBOLOG method were applied to evaluate total organic carbon (TOC) content from geophysical logs which provide continuous vertical profile estimations (Passey, 1990; Carpentier et al., 1991). The results show that source rocks are widely distributed in Borehole SK-2, over a large depth strata (985 5700m), including Nenjiang, Qingshankou, Denglouku, Yingcheng, Shahezi Formations. The organic-rich source rocks with higher TOC content occur in the Qingshankou (1647 1650m), Denglouku (2534 2887m) and Shahezi (3367 5697m) Formations. The highest TOC content in these formations can reach 10.31%, 6.58%, 12.79% respectively. The bed thickness of organic-rich source rocks in the these formations are totally up to 7.88m, 74.34m, 276.60m respectively. These organic-rich rocks in the

  17. 1990 DOE/SANDIA crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, D.S. (ed.)

    1990-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Cell Research Division and Photovoltaic Technology Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held August 7 through 9, 1990 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, concentrator 3-5 cell research, and concentrating collector development.

  18. When does activating diversity alleviate, when does it increase intergroup bias? An ingroup projection perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie C Steffens

    Full Text Available The question how intergroup bias can be alleviated is of much theoretical and practical interest. Whereas diversity training and the multiculturalism ideology are two approaches prominent in practice, most theoretical models on reducing intergroup bias are based on social-identity theory and self-categorization theory. This social-identity perspective assumes that similar processes lead to intergroup bias in very different intergroup contexts if people identify with the respective social groups. A recent prominent model based on these theories is the ingroup-projection model. As this model assumes, an ingroup's norms and standards are applied to outgroups included in a common superordinate category (this is called ingroup projection. Intergroup bias results because the outgroup fulfils these norms and standards less than the ingroup. Importantly, if the diversity of the superordinate category is induced as the norm, ingroup projection and thus intergroup bias should be reduced. The present research delineates and tests how general this process is. We propose that ingroup prototypicality is not only an outcome variable, as the ingroup-projection model originally assumes, but can also be an important moderator. We hypothesize that for members considering their ingroup highly prototypical ("pars pro toto", large majorities, the superordinate group's diversity may question their ingroup's position and thus elicit threat and intergroup bias. In contrast, for members who consider their group as less prototypical (one among several, or "una inter pares" groups, activating diversity should, as originally assumed in the ingroup-projection model, reduce intergroup bias. Three experiments (total N = 345 supported these predictions in the contexts of groups defined by gender or nationality. Taken together, the ingroup-projection model can explain under which conditions activating superordinate-category diversity induces tolerance, and when it may backfire

  19. When does activating diversity alleviate, when does it increase intergroup bias? An ingroup projection perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Melanie C.; Reese, Gerhard; Ehrke, Franziska; Jonas, Kai J.

    2017-01-01

    The question how intergroup bias can be alleviated is of much theoretical and practical interest. Whereas diversity training and the multiculturalism ideology are two approaches prominent in practice, most theoretical models on reducing intergroup bias are based on social-identity theory and self-categorization theory. This social-identity perspective assumes that similar processes lead to intergroup bias in very different intergroup contexts if people identify with the respective social groups. A recent prominent model based on these theories is the ingroup-projection model. As this model assumes, an ingroup’s norms and standards are applied to outgroups included in a common superordinate category (this is called ingroup projection). Intergroup bias results because the outgroup fulfils these norms and standards less than the ingroup. Importantly, if the diversity of the superordinate category is induced as the norm, ingroup projection and thus intergroup bias should be reduced. The present research delineates and tests how general this process is. We propose that ingroup prototypicality is not only an outcome variable, as the ingroup-projection model originally assumes, but can also be an important moderator. We hypothesize that for members considering their ingroup highly prototypical (“pars pro toto”, large majorities), the superordinate group’s diversity may question their ingroup’s position and thus elicit threat and intergroup bias. In contrast, for members who consider their group as less prototypical (one among several, or “una inter pares” groups), activating diversity should, as originally assumed in the ingroup-projection model, reduce intergroup bias. Three experiments (total N = 345) supported these predictions in the contexts of groups defined by gender or nationality. Taken together, the ingroup-projection model can explain under which conditions activating superordinate-category diversity induces tolerance, and when it may backfire. We

  20. Does the projected pathway to global warming targets matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärring, Lars; Strandberg, Gustav

    2018-02-01

    Since the ‘Paris agreement’ in 2015 there has been much focus on what a +1.5 °C or +2 °C warmer world would look like. Since the focus lies on policy relevant global warming targets, or specific warming levels (SWLs), rather than a specific point in time, projections are pooled together to form SWL ensembles based on the target temperature rather than emission scenario. This study uses an ensemble of CMIP5 global model projections to analyse how well SWL ensembles represent the stabilized climate of global warming targets. The results show that the SWL ensembles exhibit significant trends that reflect the transient nature of the RCP scenarios. These trends have clear effect on the timing and clustering of monthly cold and hot extremes, even though the effect on the temperature of the extreme months is less visible. In many regions there is a link between choice of RCP scenario used in the SWL ensemble and climate change signal in the highest monthly temperatures. In other regions there is no such clear-cut link. From this we conclude that comprehensive analyses of what prospects the different global warming targets bring about will require stabilization scenarios. Awaiting such targeted scenarios we suggest that prudent use of SWL scenarios, taking their characteristics and limitations into account, may serve as reasonable proxies in many situations.

  1. Project chariot remediation - the use of DOE's observational approach for environmental restoration with elements of the new DOE safer approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, A.; Stewart, C.; Cabble, K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of Project Chariot was to investigate the technical problems and assess the effect of the proposed harbor excavation using nuclear explosives in Alaska. However, no nuclear devices were brought to the Project Chariot site. Between 1959 and 1961 various environmental tests were conducted. During the course of these environmental studies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) granted the use of up to 5 curies of radioactive material at the Chariot site in Cape Thompson, Alaska; however only 26 millicuries were ever actually used. The tests were conducted in 12 test plots which were later gathered together and were mixed with in situ-soils generating approximately 1,600 cubic feet of soil. This area was then covered with four feet of clean soil, creating a mound. In 1962, the site was abandoned. A researcher at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks obtained in formation regarding the tests conducted and the materials left at the Project Chariot site. In response to concerns raised through the publication of this information, it was decided by the Department of Energy (DOE) that total remediation of the mound be completed within the year. During the summer of 1993, IT Corporation carried out the assessment and remediation of the Project Chariot site using a streamlined approach to waste site decision making called the Observational Approach (OA), and added elements of the new DOE Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER). This remediation and remediation approach is described

  2. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  3. Frictional properties of fault rocks along the shallow part of the Japan Trench décollement: insights from samples recovered during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Project Expedition 343 (the JFAST project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remitti, Francesca; Smith, Steven; Gualtieri, Alessandro; Di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST), Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, successfully located and sampled the shallow slip zone of the Mw =9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake where the largest coseismic slip occurred (c. 50 m). Logging-while-drilling, core-sample observations and the analysis of temperature data recovered from a third borehole show that a thin (fraction has also been calculated and it is close to the detection limit. Each experiment used 3.5 g of loosely disaggregated gouge, following sieving to a particle size fraction distilled water added to the gouge layers) at 3.5 MPa normal stress. Slip velocities ranged over nearly seven orders of magnitude (10-5 - 3 m s-1). Total displacement is always less than 1 m. The peak and steady-state frictional strengths of the gouges are significantly lower under water-dampened conditions, with mean steady-state friction coefficients (μ, shear stress/normal stress) at all investigated velocities of 0.04 0.1 m s-1. Instead, under water-dampened conditions, the gouge is velocity-neutral to velocity-weakening at all investigated velocities. In other words, the intermediate-velocity strengthening, which would probably act as a "barrier" to rupture propagation in the dry gouges, disappears in water-dampened gouges. This result is compatible with propagation of the Tohoku rupture to the trench, and also with large coseismic slip at shallow depths. Quantitative phase analysis using the combined Rietveld and R.I.R. method has been performed also on six post-experiment gouges for the determination of both the crystalline and amorphous fractions. Preliminary results show that the mineralogical assemblage is basically the same after the experiments, with both smectite and illite phases preserved, this suggests that the weakening mechanism operating in this material is active at low temperature.

  4. X-ray Fluorescence Core Scanning of Oman Drilling Project Holes BT1B and GT3A Cores on D/V CHIKYU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. T. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Michibayashi, K.; Greenberger, R. N.; Koepke, J.; Beinlich, A.; Morishita, T.; Jesus, A. P. M.; Lefay, R.

    2017-12-01

    The JEOL JSX-3600CA1 energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence core logger (XRF-CL) on the D/V Chikyu provides quantitative element concentrations of scanned cores. Scans of selected intervals are made on an x-y grid with point spacing of 5 mm. Element concentrations for Si, Al, Ti, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Na, K, Cr, Ni, S and Zn are collected for each point on the grid. Accuracy of element concentrations provided by the instrument software is improved by applying empirical correction algorithms. Element concentrations were collected for 9,289 points from twenty-seven core intervals in Hole BT1B (basal thrust) and for 6,389 points from forty core intervals in Hole GT3A (sheeted dike-gabbro transition) of the Oman Drilling Project on the D/V Chikyu XRF-CL during Leg 2 of the Oman Drilling Project in August-September, 2017. The geochemical data are used for evaluating downhole compositional details associated with lithological changes, unit contacts and mineralogical variations and are particularly informative when plotted as concentration contour maps or downhole concentration diagrams. On Leg 2 additional core scans were made with X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) and infrared images from the visible-shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy (IR) systems on board. XRF-CL, X-ray CT and IR imaging plots used together provide detailed information on rock compositions, textures and mineralogy that assist naked eye visual observations. Examples of some uses of XRF-CL geochemical maps and downhole data are shown. XRF-CL and IR scans of listvenite clearly show zones of magnesite, dolomite and the Cr-rich mica, fuchsite that are subdued in visual observation, and these scans can be used to calculate variations in proportions of these minerals in Hole BT1B cores. In Hole GT3A XRF-CL data can be used to distinguish compositional changes in different generations of sheeted dikes and gabbros and when combined with visual observations of intrusive relationships the detailed geochemical

  5. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-08-31

    The AFGD process as demonstrated by Pure Air at the Bailly Station offers a reliable and cost-effective means of achieving a high degree of SO{sub 2} emissions reduction when burning high-sulfur coals. Many innovative features have been successfully incorporated in this process, and it is ready for widespread commercial use. The system uses a single-loop cocurrent scrubbing process with in-situ oxidation to produce wallboard-grade gypsum instead of wet sludge. A novel wastewater evaporation system minimizes effluents. The advanced scrubbing process uses a common absorber to serve multiple boilers, thereby saving on capital through economies of scale. Major results of the project are: (1) SO{sub 2} removal of over 94 percent was achieved over the three-year demonstration period, with a system availability exceeding 99.5 percent; (2) a large, single absorber handled the combined flue gas of boilers generating 528 MWe of power, and no spares were required; (3) direct injection of pulverized limestone into the absorber was successful; (4) Wastewater evaporation eliminated the need for liquid waste disposal; and (5) the gypsum by-product was used directly for wallboard manufacture, eliminating the need to dispose of waste sludge.

  6. How Does a Project Manager's Level of Development Influence Conceptualizations of Project Management and the Project Development Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the meaning project managers (PMs) make of their project environment, how they lead their teams and have incorporate complexity into their project management approach. The exploration of the PM's developmental level and meaning making offers a different angle on the project management and leadership literature. The study…

  7. Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

    1999-01-01

    The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled

  8. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Jeffrey I.; Chapman, Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  9. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  10. CASING DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Casing drilling is an alternative option to conventional drilling and uses standard oilfield casing instead of drillstring. This technology is one of the greatest developments in drilling operations. Casing drilling involves drilling and casing a well simultaneously. In casing driling process, downhole tools can be retrieved, through the casing on wire-line, meaning tool recovery or replacement of tools can take minutes versus hours under conventional methods. This process employs wireline-retrievable tools and a drill-lock assembly, permitting bit and BHA changes, coring, electrical logging and even directional or horizontal drilling. Once the casing point is reached, the casing is cemented in place without tripping pipe.

  11. Alteration of Basalt and Hyaloclastite in the Project Hotspot MHC-2 Core with Some Comparison to Hyaloclastites of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Program #2 (HSDP) Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, A. W.; Walker, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Project Hotspot's 1821m coring operation at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho (MHC), sought to examine interaction of hotspot magmas with continental crust and evaluate geothermal resources. Subsurface temperature increased at a gradient of 76˚/km. Alteration was uniform and not intense over the upper part of the core and at the bottom, but differed markedly in an anomalous zone (AZ) from 1700 to 1800m. The MHC core contains diatomite, basalt lava and minor hyaloclastite. Olivine (Ol) in lavas is more-or-less altered to iddingsite. Plagioclase (Plag) has altered to smectite along cleavage planes and fractures except in the AZ, where it is intensely altered to corrensite. Clinopyroxene (CPX, pinkish in thin section) is little altered, as are apatite and opaque minerals (probably ilmenite with magnetite or pyrite in different samples). Interstitial material is converted to smectite or, in the AZ, to corrensite. Phyllosilicate lines vesicles, and calcite, zeolite and phyllosilicate fill them. Pore-lining phillipsite is common shallow in the core, with vesicle-filling analcime and heulandite at greater depth. A fibrous zeolite, probably stilbite, is also present. Hyaloclasts are altered to concentrically layered masses of smectite. MHC hyaloclastites do not display the microbial traces and palagonite ("gel-palagonite") alteration common in Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project #2 (HSDP) samples. HSDP samples do contain pore-lining phillipsite, but pore fillings are chabazite. Calcite is absent in HSDP hyaloclastites. Neither Ol nor Plag were altered in HSDP hyaloclastites. HSPD glasses are less silicic and Ti-rich than MHC lavas, containing Ol rather than CPX as a dominant mafic. However the differences in alteration of hyaloclastites probably reflect either the fact that the HSDP core was collected at temperatures equivalent to those at the top of the MHC-2 core or HSDP samples were from beds that were in modified marine pore water, rather than continental waters.

  12. 'Advancement of KHPS to DOE TRL 7/8' Project - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonizio, Mary Ann [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Corren, Dean [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Smith, Ron [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Colby, Jonathan [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Hernandez, Aaron [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Final Report describing activities performed under the 'Advancement of the KHPS to DOE TRL 7/8' project, including the development of critical component test protocols, testing and analysis of the Gen5 KHPS main shaft seal, and continuing compliance work on approved operational environmental monitoring plans in anticipation of KHPS turbine installation at Verdant Power's Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) Project site in New York, NY.

  13. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.; Contos, L.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. These data were collected by implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension, dated August 1988. This document is the fifth EMP status report to be published and presents the data generated during November and December 1990, and January 1991. These reports review a three or four month period and have been published since the project's start in October 1989. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of ''emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of ''in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as ''post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). 5 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. These data were collected by implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension, dated August 1988. This document is the fifth EMP status report to be published and presents the data generated during November and December 1990, and January 1991. These reports review a three or four month period and have been published since the project's start in October 1989. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  16. Drilling for energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

  17. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, Thomas C.; Strom, Dean; Beulow, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  18. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  19. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  20. 75 FR 2133 - Construction and Operation of the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project, La Paz County, AZ (DOE/EIS-0440)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... Quartzsite Solar Energy Project, La Paz County, AZ (DOE/EIS-0440) AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration... proposed Quartzsite Solar Energy Project (Project) in La Paz County, near Quartzsite, Arizona. Quartzsite Solar Energy, LLC (QSE) has applied to Western to interconnect the proposed Project to Western's power...

  1. Study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhaojun; Li Wei; Chen Yanhong; Wang Lijiang

    1998-01-01

    A study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling is described. Under the experimental conditions of this study it is observed, from reliability testing and the fitting of a life-distribution function, that the lives of micro-drills under ordinary drilling follow the log-normal distribution and the lives of micro-drills under vibrating drilling follow the Weibull distribution. Calculations for reliability analysis show that vibrating drilling can increase the lives of micro-drills and correspondingly reduce the scatter of drill lives. Therefore, vibrating drilling increases the reliability of micro-drills

  2. HydroPulse Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  3. Universal drill jig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    Inexpensive jig can steadily guide drill at selected angles to flat plane from any direction. Jig uses two mutually perpendicular bevel bodies, each corresponding to interval settings. Drill block has spline on one side to engage groove on bevel body at selected angle. Angles are set by loosening wing nuts, tilting drill block to desired angle until spline engages groove, and tightening nuts.

  4. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project 4.5 km deep well, IDDP-2, in the seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal field in SW Iceland has successfully reached its supercritical target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ó.; Elders, Wilfred A.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Stefánsson, Ari; Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Weisenberger, Tobias B.; Harðarson, Björn S.; Mesfin, Kiflom G.

    2017-11-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project research well RN-15/IDDP-2 at Reykjanes, Iceland, reached its target of supercritical conditions at a depth of 4.5 km in January 2017. After only 6 days of heating, the measured bottom hole temperature was 426 °C, and the fluid pressure was 34 MPa. The southern tip of the Reykjanes peninsula is the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Iceland. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in that it is recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406 °C at 29.8 MPa. The geologic setting and fluid characteristics at Reykjanes provide a geochemical analog that allows us to investigate the roots of a mid-ocean ridge submarine black smoker hydrothermal system. Drilling began with deepening an existing 2.5 km deep vertical production well (RN-15) to 3 km depth, followed by inclined drilling directed towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4659 m ( ˜ 4.5 km vertical depth). Total circulation losses of drilling fluid were encountered below 2.5 km, which could not be cured using lost circulation blocking materials or multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to the total depth without return of drill cuttings. Thirteen spot coring attempts were made below 3 km depth. Rocks in the cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from upper greenschist facies to amphibolite facies, suggesting that formation temperatures at depth exceed 450 °C. High-permeability circulation-fluid loss zones (feed points or feed zones) were detected at multiple depth levels below 3 km depth to bottom. The largest circulation losses (most permeable zones) occurred between the bottom of the casing and 3.4 km depth. Permeable zones encountered below 3.4 km accepted less than 5 % of the injected water. Currently, the project is attempting soft stimulation to increase deep permeability. While it is too early to speculate on the energy potential of this well and its economics, the IDDP

  5. Deploying innovative technologies to improve DOE D ampersand D project baselines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    The insertion of innovative technologies to replace baseline technologies used in cost estimation and planning of DOE D ampersand D projects is considered a high risk endeavor by project and programmatic decision makers. It is almost always considered safer to go with the open-quotes devil you knowclose quotes than use a new or untried technology, methodology or system. The decision on the specific technology to be utilized to remediate a problem is often made months or years in advance of execution, and the highly proscriptive documentation of agreements necessary to obtain stakeholder and regulator approval of remedial plans is often counterproductive to considering improved technologies

  6. Meeting the requirements for a DOE environmental restoration project. The Fernald strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanoss, R.L.; Risenhoover, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental Restoration (ER) of five Operable Units (OU) at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) includes compliance with the requirements of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE Orders. Each regulatory driver has differing procedural requirements for documenting calculations, decisions, and actions involved in site cleanup. Integration of documentation and avoidance of duplication can save time and money. Such savings are being achieved by OU specific application of supporting studies, revised procedures, and guidance documents. Each OU is seeking appropriate opportunities to produce single documents that simultaneously fulfill the important requirements of the other regulations and DOE orders. These opportunities are evaluated at all phases of decision making, remedial design, and remedial action. Three essential processes precede environmental restoration/remedial action at a DOE site/project: 1. Completion of decision-making documents required by governing or applicable statutes. 2. Completion of important scientific and engineering analyses of remedial alternatives, and design and implementation of the remedial solution established in the CERCLA Record of Decision (ROD). 3. Preparation of DOE-mandated documentation to record engineering evaluations and cost estimates required for budgeting, decision making, and project management. Methodology and requirements for each process have developed from long, successful practice, but independently of each other. FERMCO, as new DOE contractor at Fernald and first Environmental Restoration Management Contractor (ERMC), is committed to a process of Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI). A major reevaluation of documentation and processes for support of environmental decision-making and design of cleanup activities to remediate the five OUs at the FEMP is being undertaken

  7. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Progress Center)

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  8. Drilling contracts and incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmundsen, Petter; Sorenes, Terje; Toft, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Shortages of rigs and personnel have encouraged discussion of designing incentive contracts in the drilling sector. However, for the drilling contracts, there are not a large variety of contract types in use. This article describes and analyses incentives for drilling contractors. These are directly represented by the compensation formats utilised in the present and in the consecutive drilling contracts. Indirectly, incentives are also provided by the evaluation criteria that oil companies use for awarding drilling assignments. Changes in contract format pose a number of relevant questions relating to resource management, and the article takes an in-depth look at some of these. Do evaluation criteria for awarding drilling assignments encourage the development of new technology and solutions? How will a stronger focus on drilling efficiency influence reservoir utilisation?

  9. The ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project: An overview and the potential for high-resolution records of floods and droughts in the Levant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, I.; Brauer, A.; Schwab, M. J.; Frank, U.; Dulski, P.; Waldmann, N.; Enzel, Y.; Ariztegui, D.; Hadzhiivanova, E.; Dsddp Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records are essential for a detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the Levant, which is tightly related to the origin, dispersal and evolution of modern human civilisations. Holocene and late Pleistocene sediments of the Dead Sea are unique archives of the climatic, environmental and tectonic history of the Levant and hence a focus of research. Therefore, during winter of 2010-11 an ICDP-drilling project in the Dead Sea (DSDDP) recovered approximately 720 metres of sediment cores from two deep and several short boreholes with the longest core located in the deepest part of the northern basin reaching 456 m below the lake-floor (at ~710 m below mean lake level). Based on initial geophysical and geochemical analyses of this core, we estimate the record to comprise ca the last 200 ka including the Zeelim (Holocene), Lisan (last Glacial) (Stein, 2001) and Samra (last Interglacial; Waldmann et al., 2009) formations and the later part of the penultimate Glacial (Amora Fm.; Torfstein et al., 2009). Magnetic susceptibility values strongly fluctuate during Interglacial periods, but remain constantly lower in Glacial intervals. Deposition of sediments in the Dead Sea basin is strongly related to precipitation (Enzel et al., 2008) favouring sedimentation of alternated detrital clay and authigenic aragonite during wetter intervals and evaporites (e.g., halite and gypsum) in times of increased aridity and lower lake stands. Detailed initial facies analyses focused on two intervals in the deep core: 1) the upper Lisan Formation from ca 17 to 15 ka BP, and 2) the upper Zeelim Formation from ca 4 to 2 ka BP. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, µXRF element scanning and thin section microscopy allow high-resolution analyses at sub-annual timescales. These combined micro-facies analyses demonstrate the great potential for depicting small-scale variability of climate and even single droughts or flood events. Enzel et al., 2008. Global and

  10. Transformation of Serpentinite to Listvenite as Recorded in the Vein History of Rocks From Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.; Urai, J. L.; de Obeso, J. C.; Jesus, A. P. M.; Zeko, D.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B intersected 191 m of listvenite (magnesite + quartz rock) and serpentinite in the hanging wall of the basal thrust of the Oman ophiolite. Recovery was 100%. Listvenite is the dominant lithology in the upper plate rocks (166 m). Its shows wide color and textural variation, including pseudomorphic replacement of serpentinized peridotite. Serpentinite was encountered in two main contiguous intervals totaling 25 m. In light of the strongly metasomatic nature for the origin of listvenite, a substantial portion of the core description effort was dedicated to characterization of the complex veining history recorded in the hole. Dense veining is recorded in both lithologies. The density of 200/m. The density of veins >1 mm was 50-100/m, with somewhat higher densities recorded in serpentinite than in listvenite. In order of oldest to youngest, the main vein types in serpentinite are microscopic mesh-textured serpentine veins, macroscopic serpentine veins, carbonate-oxide veins, and carbonate veins. The vein paragenesis in listvenite is: early carbonate-oxide veins, followed by carbonate and carbonate-quartz veins, then late carbonate veins. The carbonate-oxide and carbonate veins are shared by the lithologies and hold clues to the transformation of ultramafic rocks to listvenite. Carbonate-oxide veins form a distinctive set that is interpreted to be the earliest record of carbonate formation in serpentinite. They contain Fe-oxide, usually hematite, on a medial line, with antitaxial magnesite crystals growing outward and showing terminations against wall rock minerals. Antitaxial textures may be evidence of positive reaction volumes. In serpentinite, secondary serpentine after earlier serpentine is common at vein margins. Carbonate-oxide veins are the earliest observed in listvenite, where they may form isolated veins to dense, aligned networks that impart a foliated texture. In some cases, they appear to predate replacement of serpentine by

  11. Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project. Chew Bahir, southern Ethiopia: How to get from three tonnes of sediment core to > 500 ka of continuous climate history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Verena; Asrat, Asfawossen; Cohen, Andrew S.; Gromig, Raphael; Günter, Christina; Junginger, Annett; Lamb, Henry F.; Schaebitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin H.

    2016-04-01

    In search of the environmental context of the evolution and dispersal of Homo sapiens and our close relatives within and beyond the African continent, the ICDP-funded Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) has recently cored five fluvio-lacustrine archives of climate change in East Africa. The sediment cores collected in Ethiopia and Kenya are expected to provide valuable insights into East African environmental variability during the last ~3.5 Ma. The tectonically-bound Chew Bahir basin in the southern Ethiopian rift is one of the five sites within HSPDP, located in close proximity to the Lower Omo River valley, the site of the oldest known fossils of anatomically modern humans. In late 2014, the two cores (279 and 266 m long respectively, HSPDP-CHB14-2A and 2B) were recovered, summing up to nearly three tonnes of mostly calcareous clays and silts. Deciphering an environmental record from multiple records, from the source region of modern humans could eventually allow us to reconstruct the pronounced variations of moisture availability during the transition into Middle Stone Age, and its implications for the origin and dispersal of Homo sapiens. Here we present the first results of our analysis of the Chew Bahir cores. Following the HSPDP protocols, the two parallel Chew Bahir sediment cores have been merged into one single, 280 m long and nearly continuous (>90%) composite core on the basis of a high resolution MSCL data set (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray density, color intensity transects, core photographs). Based on the obvious cyclicities in the MSCL, correlated with orbital cycles, the time interval covered by our sediment archive of climate change is inferred to span the last 500-600 kyrs. Combining our first results from the long cores with the results from the accomplished pre-study of short cores taken in 2009/10 along a NW-SE transect across the basin (Foerster et al., 2012, Trauth et al., 2015), we have developed a hypothesis

  12. The Italian drilling project of the Mont Blanc road tunnel in the late fifties: an example of no geological care and lack of ethics in carrying out a big work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosso, Guido; Croce, Giuseppe; Matteucci, Ruggero; Peppoloni, Silvia; Piacente, Sandra; Wasowski, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    In the first decade after the Second World War Italy was rushing to recover a positive role among European countries; basic needs as road communications with European neighbours became main priorities. The necessity of a rapid connection with South-eastern France, a subject already debated between the two nations over more than 50 years, appeared then on first line; the two countries convened on a joint investment for the construction of a tunnel across the international border of Mont Blanc, along the shortest track between Courmayeur and Chamonix. The political agreements were in favour of the quickest start of the drilling operations and such obligation imposed on the Italian side an impoverishment of the project content, specially concerning geological issues. No surveys were performed on fracture systems, cataclastic zones and faults, on the few rock ridges standing above the tunnel line and outcropping through thick talus cones, moraines, ice tongues and their related ice plateaus. Metasediments, migmatites and poorly foliated granites were to be drilled. Three Italian academics were allowed by the drilling company to track the working progress and collect rocks for comparison with other Alpine types; they mapped the lithology and the fault zonesall along the freshly excavated tunnel; the results of such survey appeared after the end of works. Geologists from Florence University published the surface granite faulting pattern 20 years after the road tunnel became operative. Such geological cares could have located the risky zones in time for the tunnel project, mitigating the catastrophic effects of sudden drainage of subglacial water from the Vallée Blanche ice plateau (Ghiacciaio del Gigante) at progression 3800m, that caused dramatic accidents and affected negatively the economy of the drilling. Also the wallrock temperature drops, measured during the drill, should have warned the company management on the location of dangerous fracture zones. Anxiety of

  13. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  14. Drilling technology advances on four fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2002-01-01

    Trends and advances in drilling technology are discussed. Four different major trends have been identified. One of these is proprietary case drilling which is said to allow operators to simultaneously drill, case, and evaluate oil and gas wells. In proprietary case drilling, the well is drilled with standard oil field casing which remains in the hole all the time, eliminating the need for tripping. Drill bits and other downhole tools are lowered via wireline inside the casing and latched to the last joint of casing. Wells are drilled either by rotating the casing or by using a downhole mud motor for steering, using conventional directional tools. This technology was introduced by Tesco and is marketed in 25 countries along with a full range of drilling products and services. Super single rigs are an other trend which, owing to their versatility, combined with relatively small environmental footprint have become the rig of choice in a growing number of drilling programs. Super single rigs use 45-ft. joints of drill pipe, more versatile top drives and they have an automated pipe handling system. Super singles can be used on both vertical and slant wells and offer advantages of lower costs, higher efficiencies and greater drilling depths. Given their low environmental impact hydraulic capability, super singles also find application where zero disturbance rules are in effect, as for example, in some parts of southern Alberta. Directional drilling and MWD are most associated with SAGD projects but they also have been used and made significant difference in other spheres of oil recovery as well. The fact is that about 35 percent of wells drilled today are drilled with some form of directional drilling; this will stimulate the growth of ever more advanced MWD technology. Northern rigs are in a class of their own in that here the emphasis is on keeping the crew warm, as opposed to lots of gadgets. The most immediately-visible heat-conserving modification is the 60-ft wind

  15. GBRN/DOE Project: Dynamic enhanced recovery technologies. Quarterly technical report, January 1994--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.N.

    1994-04-15

    Global Basins Research Network will perform a field demonstration of their ``Dynamic Enhanced Recovery Technology`` to test the concept that the growth faults in EI-330 field are conduits through which producing reservoirs are charged and that enhanced production can be developed by producing directly from the fault zone. The site, operated by Penzoil, is located in 250 feet of water the productive depth intervals include 4000 to 9000 feet. Previous work, which incorporated pressure, temperature, fluid flow, heat flow, seismic, production, and well log data, indicated active fluid flow along fault zones. The field demonstration will be accomplished by drilling and production test of growth fault systems associated with the EI-330 field. The project utilizes advanced 3-D seismic analysis, geochemical studies, structural and stratigraphic reservoir characterization, reservoir simulation, and compact visualization systems. The quarterly progress reports contains accomplishments to date for the following tasks: Management start-up; database management; field and demonstration equipment; reservoir characterization, modeling; geochemistry; and data integration.

  16. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W.; Newman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included

  17. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work

  18. Implementation Plan for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE Review Draft:)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-09-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that identifies and evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), as defined by the State of Hawaii in its 1990 proposal to Congress (DBED 1990). The location of the proposed project is shown in Figure 1.1. The EIS is being prepared pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021), effective May 26, 1992. The State's proposal for the four-phase HGP consists of (1) exploration and testing of the geothermal resource beneath the slopes of the active Kilauea volcano on the Island of Hawaii (Big Island), (2) demonstration of deep-water power cable technology in the Alenuihaha Channel between the Big Island and Mau, (3) verification and characterization of the geothermal resource on the Big Island, and (4) construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Big Island, with overland and submarine transmission of electricity from the Big Island to Oahu and possibly other islands. DOE prepared appropriate NEPA documentation for separate federal actions related to Phase 1 and 2 research projects, which have been completed. This EIS will consider Phases 3 and 4, as well as reasonable alternatives to the HGP. Such alternatives include biomass coal, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, and construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Island of Hawaii (for exclusive use on the Big Island). In addition, the EIs will consider the reasonable alternatives among submarine cable technologies, geothermal extraction, production, and power generating technologies; pollution control technologies; overland and submarine power transmission routes; sites reasonably suited to

  19. Quality in drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, E.; Gervais, I. [Sedco Forex Jacintoport Facility, Channelview, TX (United States); Le Moign, Y.; Pangarkar, S.; Stibbs, B. [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); McMorran, P. [Sedco Forex, Pau (France); Nordquist, E. [Dubai Petroleum Company, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Pittman, T. [Sedco Forex, Perth (Australia); Schindler, H. [Sedco Forex, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Scott, P. [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Driven by cost and profitability pressures, quality has taken on new meaning and importance in the oil field during the past decade. In drilling operations, new initiatives have led to cooperative team efforts between operators and drilling contractors to enhance quality. In this article examples are given of how one drilling contractor, by adopting a quality culture, is reaping major benefits for its clients as well as its employees. 22 figs., 19 refs.

  20. Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

    1981-07-01

    Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

  1. Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

    2000-02-01

    This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

  2. Fifteen years of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqin; Yang, Jingsui; Wang, Chengshan; An, Zhisheng; Li, Haibing; Wang, Qin; Su, Dechen

    2017-05-01

    Continental scientific drilling can be regarded as a telescope into the Earth's interior because it provides process insight and uncompromised samples of rocks, fluids, and even sampled from the deep biosphere from the Earth's surface to great depths. As one of the three founding members of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), ICDP China has made great achievements in many scientific drilling-related research fields. Based on the ICDP participation it attracted global attention of scientists and set up not only the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) Program in 2001 but also a growing number of ambitious drilling projects in the country. The 5158 m deep borehole of the CCSD project at Donghai County in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terrain demonstrates that large amounts of crustal rocks of the South China Block have been subducted to at least 120 km, followed by rapid uplift. After successful completion of drilling at Donghai, several continental scientific drilling projects were conducted with funding of the Chinese government and partially with support of ICDP, resulting in a total drilling depth of more than 35 000 m. These projects encompass the Continental Environmental Scientific Drilling Program of China, the Scientific Drilling Project of Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone, the Continental Scientific Drilling Project of Cretaceous Songliao Basin, and the Program of Selected Continental Scientific Drilling and Experiments. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the ICDP and the 15th anniversary of the CCSD Program, this paper reviews the history and major progress of the CCSD Program.

  3. Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western Well Tool

    2007-07-09

    In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a

  4. Advanced drilling systems study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  5. Hydraulic rotary drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacy, J.; Pochaba, K.

    1987-06-01

    Presents a novel patented hydraulic drill for use in soft and medium hard rock. Indicates its numerous advantages resulting mainly from the driving method employing water/oil emulsion or hydraulic systems of heading machines or cutter loaders in mines. Provides technical data of the new drill and compares it with the PWR and OWRO drills used until now. The drill has a feed pressure of 15-25 bar, maximum rotation (at 25 bar pressure) of 1400 per minute, maximum moment of inertia 200 Nm, working medium - 5% emulsion, hydraulic oil, weight - 14 kg. Describes applications of the drill which has been approved for operation in environments of the IVth methane hazard category.

  6. Drill-motor holding fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  7. Drilling technologies in hydrogeological survey

    OpenAIRE

    Vorlíček, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the drilling technologies used in hydrogeology. The main aim of the work is to explore types of drilling technologies used at hydrogeological drilling wells and modern technologies that could potentially be used in the future. The work also summarizes a historical development of drilling techniques, a drilling process procedure, information obtained from boreholes and the most common types of drilling fluids.

  8. Parcperdue geopressure-geothermal project. Study a geopressured reservoir by drilling and producing a well in a limited geopressured water sand. Final technical report, September 28, 1979-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.R.; Stanley, J.G. (eds.)

    1984-01-15

    The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow rate to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.

  9. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project 4.5 km deep well, IDDP-2, in the seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal field in SW Iceland has successfully reached its supercritical target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ó. Friðleifsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Iceland Deep Drilling Project research well RN-15/IDDP-2 at Reykjanes, Iceland, reached its target of supercritical conditions at a depth of 4.5 km in January 2017. After only 6 days of heating, the measured bottom hole temperature was 426 °C, and the fluid pressure was 34 MPa. The southern tip of the Reykjanes peninsula is the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Iceland. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in that it is recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406 °C at 29.8 MPa. The geologic setting and fluid characteristics at Reykjanes provide a geochemical analog that allows us to investigate the roots of a mid-ocean ridge submarine black smoker hydrothermal system. Drilling began with deepening an existing 2.5 km deep vertical production well (RN-15 to 3 km depth, followed by inclined drilling directed towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4659 m ( ∼  4.5 km vertical depth. Total circulation losses of drilling fluid were encountered below 2.5 km, which could not be cured using lost circulation blocking materials or multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to the total depth without return of drill cuttings. Thirteen spot coring attempts were made below 3 km depth. Rocks in the cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from upper greenschist facies to amphibolite facies, suggesting that formation temperatures at depth exceed 450 °C. High-permeability circulation-fluid loss zones (feed points or feed zones were detected at multiple depth levels below 3 km depth to bottom. The largest circulation losses (most permeable zones occurred between the bottom of the casing and 3.4 km depth. Permeable zones encountered below 3.4 km accepted less than 5 % of the injected water. Currently, the project is attempting soft stimulation to increase deep permeability. While it is too early to speculate on the

  10. Model-Based Fault Detection and Diagnosis System for NASA Mars Subsurface Drill Prototype

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Drilling Automation for Mars Environment (DAME) project, led by NASA Ames Research Center, is aimed at developing a lightweight, low-power drill prototype that...

  11. A vision for drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millheim, K. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    The future of drilling lies in its relationship with the oil and gas industry. This paper examines how the future of drilling is seen from the view point of the exploration manager, the drilling contractor, the drilling engineer and the company president or managing director. The various pressures on the oil and gas industry are examined, such as environmental issues, alternative energy sources, and the price of oil which determines how companies are run. Exploration activity is driven by the price of oil and gas. The development of wells with multiple horizontal wells or multiple horizontal wells with tributaries will reduce the cost of exploration. Companies will rely less and less on reservoir simulation and more on cheap well-bores, multi-lateral well-bores and will exploit oil that could not be exploited before. The cost of exploratory drilling will need to be kept down so that in the future the industry will get better at economically finding fields at the 10 million to 20 million barrel range that would not have been possible before. The future is expected to see drilling contractors tunnelling, making sewerage lines and drilling 10,000 foot wells with purpose built rigs. Franchising will become a feature of the industry as will the use of databases to answer key technical questions. Offshore platforms will be built to be moveable and disposable. The industry is capable of solving problems, meeting challenges and making ideas work, providing much hope for the future. 10 figs., 1 photo.

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  13. 75 FR 54912 - Drill Pipe and Drill Collars From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe and Drill Collars From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of drill pipe and drill... the Act (19 U.S.C. 1671b) are being provided to manufacturers, producers, or exporters in China of...

  14. 75 FR 10501 - Drill Pipe and Drill Collars from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe and Drill Collars from China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... injury by reason of imports from China of drill pipe and drill collars, provided for in subheadings 7304... Government of China.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f) of the Commission's Rules of Practice and...

  15. Final Report for DOE Project DE-FC07-99CH11010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jed Randall; Robert Kean

    2003-10-22

    Department of Energy award number DE-FC07-99CH11010, Enhanced Utilization of Corn Based Biomaterials, supported a technology development program sponsored by Cargill Dow LLC from September 30, 1999 through June 30, 2003. The work involved fundamental scientific studies on poly lactic acid (PLA), a new environmentally benign plastic material from renewable resources. DOE funds supported academic research at the Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and industry cost share was directed towards applied research into new product development utilizing the fundamental information generated by the academic partners. Under the arrangement of the grant, the fundamental information is published so that other companies can utilize it in evaluating the applicability of PLA in their own products. The overall project objective is to increase the utilization of PLA, a renewable resource based plastic, currently produced from fermented corn sugar.

  16. Stinger Enhanced Drill Bits For EGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrand, Christopher J. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Skeem, Marcus R. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Crockett, Ron B. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Hall, David R. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States)

    2013-04-29

    The project objectives were to design, engineer, test, and commercialize a drill bit suitable for drilling in hard rock and high temperature environments (10,000 meters) likely to be encountered in drilling enhanced geothermal wells. The goal is provide a drill bit that can aid in the increased penetration rate of three times over conventional drilling. Novatek has sought to leverage its polycrystalline diamond technology and a new conical cutter shape, known as the Stinger®, for this purpose. Novatek has developed a fixed bladed bit, known as the JackBit®, populated with both shear cutter and Stingers that is currently being tested by major drilling companies for geothermal and oil and gas applications. The JackBit concept comprises a fixed bladed bit with a center indenter, referred to as the Jack. The JackBit has been extensively tested in the lab and in the field. The JackBit has been transferred to a major bit manufacturer and oil service company. Except for the attached published reports all other information is confidential.

  17. Subsurface drill string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, William L [Rigby, ID; Clark, Don T [Idaho Falls, ID; Grover, Blair K [Idaho Falls, ID; Mathewson, Rodney O [Idaho Falls, ID; Seymour, Craig A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  18. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  19. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oski Energy, LLC,

    2013-03-28

    A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

  20. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Final report, May--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. [Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program of ``emerging clean coal technologies`` under the categories of ``in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen`` as well as ``post-combustion clean-up.`` The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  1. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  2. How does one develop the right quality assurance program for waste management projects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, D.

    1988-01-01

    The quality assurance requirements in use today for radioactive waste facilities, geologic repositories and hazardous waste projects were developed initially for the nuclear power plant industry, and their intent is being applied to regulations and guidance documents to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. The wording of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) quality assurance (QA) requirements in Appendix B of 10CFR50, the related guidance documents and the industry's ANSI/ASME NQA-1 were developed over a period of several years to address quality assurance for the design and construction of the complex and interactive systems to produce electrical power using nuclear fuel. Now, those same documents are the basis for the quality assurance requirements and guidance for waste management facilities and repositories. The intent of Appendix B of 10CFR50 and NQA-1 can easily be applied to waste projects providing one understands and uses the intent of the requirements. This paper describes the intent of existing QA requirements as they apply to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. Methods of ensuring that the quality assurance program design will be acceptable to DOE and regulatory agencies are illustrated

  3. Calibrating the Truax Rough Rider seed drill for restoration plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren St. John; Brent Cornforth; Boyd Simonson; Dan Ogle; Derek Tilley

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to provide a step-by-step approach to calibrating the Truax Rough Rider range drill, a relatively new, state-of-the-art rangeland drill. To achieve the desired outcome of a seeding project, an important step following proper weed control and seedbed preparation is the calibration of the seeding equipment to ensure the recommended...

  4. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  5. Workshop on Marine Research Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia

    2009-06-01

    Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environments (COCARDE): A Pilot Industry-Academia Partnership in Marine Research Drilling; Fribourg, Switzerland, 21-24 January 2009; Cold-water carbonate mounds supporting cold-water coral ecosystems, often dominated by Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, are widespread along the Atlantic margins from Norway to Mauritania. During the past 10 years, the scientific community has accumulated new insights on their occurrence and development and identified their potential role in reservoir formation, thus establishing a framework for collaboration with the hydrocarbon industry. A Magellan workshop, sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF; http://www.esf.org/), was held in Switzerland in January. The workshop gathered 35 scientists from 10 European and two extra-European countries (Canada and Morocco), representing 20 research teams, including members of two Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) proposals. Some of the participants were also involved with two ESF European Collaborative Research (EUROCORES) projects [Microbial Diversity and Functionality in Cold-Water Coral Reef Ecosystems (MiCROSYSTEMS) and Mid-Latitude Carbonate Systems: Complete Sequences From Cold-Water Coral Carbonate Mounds in the Northeast Atlantic (CARBONATE)], and the European Union Framework Program 6 integrated project Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas (HERMES).

  6. The New Jersey Margin Scientific Drilling Project (IODP Expedition 313: Untangling the Record of Global and Local Sea-Level Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jean-Noël Proust

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Much of the world is currently experiencing shoreline retreat due to global sea level rising at the rate of 3–4 mm yr -1. This rate will likely increase and result in a net rise to roughly 1 m above present sea-level by the year 2100 (e.g., Rahmstorf, 2007; Solomon et al., 2007, with significant consequences for coastal populations, infrastructures, and ecosystems. Preparing for this future scenario calls for careful study of past changes in sea level and a solid understanding of processes that govern the shoreline response to thesechanges. One of the best ways to assemble this knowledge is to examine the geologic records of previous global sea-level changes. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 313 set out to do this by recovering a record of global and local sea-level change in sediments deposited along the coast of eastern North America during the Icehouse world of the past 35 m.y. What we learn from this record—the factors driving sea-level changes, and the impact of thischange on nearshore environments—will help us understand what lies ahead in a warming world.

  7. Drilling fluid technologies : what goes in must come out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polczer, S.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of drilling wastes contaminated with invert drilling muds was discussed. The tight emulsion properties which make invert drilling muds useful are the same properties that make their disposal so difficult. Potential long-term liability associated with inverts is another reason for reluctance to use these products. Inverts are toxic and highly mobile in the environment, and must therefore be handled with care. Often the costs associated with their disposal are greater than their potential benefits. Petro-Canada Lubricants has formulated a new, non-diesel based product called Drill Mud Oil HT40N which completely eliminates toxic aromatic molecules. It is composed of 98 per cent plus of cyclic and branched isoparaffins with an average carbon number of C16. The level of polynuclear aromatics is reduced to parts per billion levels. Drill Mud Oil HT40N was being used at Hibernia until an even newer product, IPAR3 synthetic drill mud oil, was developed exclusively for offshore use. Drill Mud Oil HT40N is less prone to flash fires, is odourless and is more likely to be used in places such as the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Drill Mud Oil HT40N works almost exactly the same as a diesel-based drill mud oil but has many advantages in terms of safety and ease of disposal, particularly in landfarming operations. Drill Mud Oil HT40N does not irritate the skin or release toxic fumes. The cost of Drill Mud Oil HT40N is higher than conventional diesel-based drilling muds. 2 figs

  8. Evacuation drill at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont-Sagorin and Christoph Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    Training personnel, including evacuation guides and shifters, checking procedures, improving collaboration with the CERN Fire Brigade: the first real-life evacuation drill at CMS took place on Friday 3 February from 12p.m. to 3p.m. in the two caverns located at Point 5 of the LHC.   CERN personnel during the evacuation drill at CMS. Evacuation drills are required by law and have to be organized periodically in all areas of CERN, both above and below ground. The last drill at CMS, which took place in June 2007, revealed some desiderata, most notably the need for a public address system. With this equipment in place, it is now possible to broadcast audio messages from the CMS control room to the underground areas.   The CMS Technical Coordination Team and the GLIMOS have focused particularly on preparing collaborators for emergency situations by providing training and organizing regular safety drills with the HSE Unit and the CERN Fire Brigade. This Friday, the practical traini...

  9. Petrographic drill cutting analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, R. [Core Laboratories Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Some of the diagnostic tools which are available to determine valuable reservoir rock information from drill cuttings were described. For example, valuable information can be obtained from drill cuttings and petrographic thin sections regarding mineralogy, facies, pore systems, reservoir quality and fluid sensitivity. This paper described the best ways to pick representative drill cuttings from vials. Colour and texture are among the most important determining factors. New guidelines from the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board have made it possible to obtain thin sections from drill cuttings from a competitor`s wells. Up to 12 chips from each vial can be removed for thin section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of drill chips is not recommended because it is usually not possible to obtain enough sample material. Another powerful tool to investigate and characterize pore systems is the Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure technique. This technique makes it possible to characterize the pore system and to determine pore throat size distribution, permeability/porosity, producible reserves, capillary pressure, effective versus non-effective porosity, irreducible water saturation, and height above free water. The most reliable and valuable information is obtained from sandstone and carbonate aggregate chips in which the pore system is preserved. It was also noted that core porosity can be empirically derived if a trend line is constructed using sections prepared from an equivalent cored zone. Permeability can be derived in much the same way. 9 figs.

  10. High Performance Steel for Percussive Drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Mikael; Åkerlund, Elin; Åberg, Jakob; Österberg, Patrik; Havo, Rebecka

    2017-01-01

    Atlas Copco Secoroc AB are searching after new bulk materials for drill heads that are used in percussive drilling in order to improve their strength and durability. The aim of this project is to assist Atlas Copco in this search and provide them with further information regarding material properties, alloying elements, suppliers, etc. A literary study was carried out in order to identify materials that had UTS and KIC more than or equal to 1700 MPa and 70 MPa*m^1/2, respectively. Materials t...

  11. THIS IS A DRILL (HANFORD EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER IN ACTION)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNELL, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    ''This is a drill'', these are the words that we're directed to say before and after any verbal communication with other personnel while participating in training exercises for the Hanford Site Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The EOC has multiple components and many personnel outside of the EOC participate in training exercises. ''This is a drill'', describes the operations of the EOC Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC) and the tools used by personnel operating the UDAC. The functions and composition of the EOC, UDAC and related organizations are governed by the Hanford Emergency Management Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) (DOE/RL-94-02, Hanford Emergency Management Plan). This plan presents--in a single document--an overview of the emergency-management program for the entire Hanford Site. At the heart of the UDAC operations is the question, ''How, and in what direction, would a plume of radioactivity potentially disperse in the event of an accident that released radioactive material?'' Key elements of projecting or predicting the impact are the source term (what materials and how much have been released), the details of the current and projected weather conditions, and analyses models that will calculate the predicted movement of the material. ''This is a drill'' loosely describes the organization of the UDAC, the way the personnel go about doing their jobs, and the tools they use to get the answers required by those managing the exercise or event. Key tools are used to evaluate and predict the consequences of a release of hazardous materials: maps and atlases; environmental databases such as the Waste Information Data System (WIDS); scenario-driven weather conditions (or real weather-station information provided by personnel from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]); and analysis codes like MetView (Meteorological Display and Assessment Tool) and APGEMS (models

  12. 34 CFR 658.10 - For what kinds of projects does the Secretary assist institutions of higher education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... institutions of higher education? 658.10 Section 658.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Program? § 658.10 For what kinds of projects does the Secretary assist institutions of higher education? (a) The Secretary may provide assistance to an institution of higher education, a consortium of...

  13. 23 CFR 636.119 - How does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public-private partnership? 636.119 Section 636.119 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership? (a) In order for a... Federal-aid procurement procedures will depend on the nature of the public-private agreement. (1) If the...

  14. How does your kindergarten classroom affect your earnings? Evidence from Project Star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Raj; Friedman, John N; Hilger, Nathaniel; Saez, Emmanuel; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore; Yagan, Danny

    2011-01-01

    In Project STAR, 11,571 students in Tennessee and their teachers were randomly assigned to classrooms within their schools from kindergarten to third grade. This article evaluates the long-term impacts of STAR by linking the experimental data to administrative records. We first demonstrate that kindergarten test scores are highly correlated with outcomes such as earnings at age 27, college attendance, home ownership, and retirement savings. We then document four sets of experimental impacts. First, students in small classes are significantly more likely to attend college and exhibit improvements on other outcomes. Class size does not have a significant effect on earnings at age 27, but this effect is imprecisely estimated. Second, students who had a more experienced teacher in kindergarten have higher earnings. Third, an analysis of variance reveals significant classroom effects on earnings. Students who were randomly assigned to higher quality classrooms in grades K–3—as measured by classmates' end-of-class test scores—have higher earnings, college attendance rates, and other outcomes. Finally, the effects of class quality fade out on test scores in later grades, but gains in noncognitive measures persist.

  15. Report about drilling works made in 13 Anomaly de Taylor and in the N- NE of its, around Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district): Uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H.

    1983-01-01

    The perforations were carried out to investigate in depth denominated anomaly 13 detected during the Taylor Mission (1975) and extended the punch area of study during you are suitable DINAMIGE-BRGM (Project the present report details the activities realised in the environs Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district) by the command team of perforations of the uranium project. Previously and contemporarily to the executed works, prospection became geophysical ground geochemistry geology and, works. (Uranium)

  16. Drilled Shaft Foundations for Noise Barrier Walls and Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This research project is focused on two primary objectives. The first objective relates to the development of a methodology for using the SPT (Standard Penetration Test) results to design the laterally loaded drilled shafts. The second objective aims...

  17. Field testing the effectiveness of pumping to remove sulfur hexafluoride traced drilling air from a prototype borehole near superior, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, C.A.; Striffler, P.; Yang, I.C.; Ferarese, J.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to provide hydrologic, hydrochemical, and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear-waste repository. The USGS unsaturated-zone hydrochemistry study involves the collection of gas and water samples from the unsaturated zone for chemical and isotopic analyses. Results from these analyses will aid in the understanding of the movement of gas and water in the rock units at Yucca Mountain. A prototype borehole designated USW UZP5 was drilled by the US Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office (DOE, YMSCPO) in June 1990 in the Apache Leap Tuff of southcentral Arizona. The hole was dry drilled with air using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) as a tracer. This drilling method simulated that which will be used to drill boreholes for the collection of gas and water samples at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of tracing the drilling air is to quantify its removal by pumping, prior to sampling of in situ gases. The objectives of our work in Arizona were to: (1) Determine the amount of time and the pumping rates required to remove the SF 6 -enriched drilling air without inducing additional atmospheric contamination; (2) collect core samples for uniaxial compression to determine the amount of SF 6 gas that penetrated the core during drilling; (3) test the effectiveness of the SF 6 injection and sampling system; (4) test the installation and effectiveness of the prototype packer system; and (5) test the effectiveness of several core sealing methods. 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Evaluation of an air drilling cuttings containment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westmoreland, J.

    1994-04-01

    Drilling at hazardous waste sites for environmental remediation or monitoring requires containment of all drilling fluids and cuttings to protect personnel and the environment. At many sites, air drilling techniques have advantages over other drilling methods, requiring effective filtering and containment of the return air/cuttings stream. A study of. current containment methods indicated improvements could be made in the filtering of radionuclides and volatile organic compounds, and in equipment like alarms, instrumentation or pressure safety features. Sandia National Laboratories, Dept. 61 11 Environmental Drilling Projects Group, initiated this work to address these concerns. A look at the industry showed that asbestos abatement equipment could be adapted for containment and filtration of air drilling returns. An industry manufacturer was selected to build a prototype machine. The machine was leased and put through a six-month testing and evaluation period at Sandia National Laboratories. Various materials were vacuumed and filtered with the machine during this time. In addition, it was used in an actual air drive drilling operation. Results of these tests indicate that the vacuum/filter unit will meet or exceed our drilling requirements. This vacuum/filter unit could be employed at a hazardous waste site or any site where drilling operations require cuttings and air containment.

  19. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17-21, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team's findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ''US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements'' to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA's VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status

  20. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  1. Texas Solar Collaboration DOE Rooftop Solar Challenge City of Houston Project Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronk, Jennifer [Houston Advanced Research Center, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14

    The City of Houston is committed to achieving a sustainable solar infrastructure. In 2008, Houston was named a United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America City. As a Solar America City, Houston teamed with the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia), industry, and academia, to implement the Solar Houston Initiative and prepare the Solar Houston Plan. The Solar Houston initiative was focused on identifying and overcoming barriers associated with establishing a solar infrastructure that is incorporated into the City of Houston’s overall energy plan. A broad group of Houston area stakeholders, facilitated by HARC, came together to develop a comprehensive solar plan that went beyond technology to address barriers and establish demonstrations, public outreach, education programs and other activities. The plan included proposed scopes of work in four program areas: policies, solar integration, public outreach, and education. Through the support of the DOE SunShot Rooftop Solar Challenge (RSC) grant to the Texas Collaboration (San Antonio, Austin, and Hosuton), Houston has been able to implement several of the recommendations of the Solar Houston Plan. Specific recommendations that this project was able to support include; Working with the other Texas Solar America Cities (San Antonio and Austin), to harmonize permitting and inspection processes to simplify for installers and lower soft costs of installation; Participating in state level solar policy groups such as the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TRIEA); Continued coordination with the local transmission and distribution utility (CenterPoint) and retail electric providers (REP); Identification of opportunities to improve permitting and interconnection; Providing training on PV systems to City inspectors; Educating the public by continuing outreach, training, and workshops, particularly using the the Green Building Resources Center; Evaluating methods of

  2. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  3. Measurement Space Drill Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-30

    calendar within the CoBP SharePoint portal but it is not updated or maintained. The center Ops are notified if they are hosting the event since a...Recommendation: It is recommended that the center operations office within TRAC maintain the SharePoint calendar with upcoming MS drills and notify other

  4. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

    2012-01-01

    This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the

  5. Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Leslie

    2008-12-31

    Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force

  6. Robotic and Human-Tended Collaborative Drilling Automation for Subsurface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian; Cannon, Howard; Stoker, Carol; Davis, Kiel

    2005-01-01

    , either between a robotic drill and humans on Earth, or a human-tended drill and its visiting crew. The Mars Analog Rio Tinto Experiment (MARTE) is a current project that studies and simulates the remote science operations between an automated drill in Spain and a distant, distributed human science team. The Drilling Automation for Mars Exploration (DAME) project, by contrast: is developing and testing standalone automation at a lunar/martian impact crater analog site in Arctic Canada. The drill hardware in both projects is a hardened, evolved version of the Advanced Deep Drill (ADD) developed by Honeybee Robotics for the Mars Subsurface Program. The current ADD is capable of 20m, and the DAME project is developing diagnostic and executive software for hands-off surface operations of the evolved version of this drill. The current drill automation architecture being developed by NASA and tested in 2004-06 at analog sites in the Arctic and Spain will add downhole diagnosis of different strata, bit wear detection, and dynamic replanning capabilities when unexpected failures or drilling conditions are discovered in conjunction with simulated mission operations and remote science planning. The most important determinant of future 1unar and martian drilling automation and staffing requirements will be the actual performance of automated prototype drilling hardware systems in field trials in simulated mission operations. It is difficult to accurately predict the level of automation and human interaction that will be needed for a lunar-deployed drill without first having extensive experience with the robotic control of prototype drill systems under realistic analog field conditions. Drill-specific failure modes and software design flaws will become most apparent at this stage. DAME will develop and test drill automation software and hardware under stressful operating conditions during several planned field campaigns. Initial results from summer 2004 tests show seven identifi

  7. Gel Evolution in Oil Based Drilling Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvold, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Drilling fluids make up an essential part of the drilling operation. Successful drilling operations rely on adequate drilling fluid quality. With the development of new drilling techniques such as long deviated sections and drilling in ultra-deep waters, the standard of required performance of the drilling fluids continue to increase. Narrow pressure margins and low tolerance for barite sag requires accurate prediction of the gel evolution in drilling fluids. Increased knowledge of how dri...

  8. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this

  9. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review—Biodiesel Cellulosic Ethanol Research Project (Hendry County Sustainable Biofuels Center)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capece, John [Intelligentsia International Inc., LaBelle, FL (United States)

    2013-05-22

    The presentation provides an overview of the Biodiesel Cellulosic Ethanol Research Project (Hendry County Sustainable Biofuels Center). It summarizes the project history, timeline, budget, partners, objectives, goals, future plans and in closer detail reviews the used approaches and technical accomplishments. The main project goals were (1) developing strategies and tools that assist in the creation of economically and environmentally sustainable bioenergy industries within ecologically-sensitive regions such as South Florida and, in particular, the greater Everglades, (2) using these bioenergy strategies and tools in evolving the existing agricultural, urban, and ecological sectors towards more sustainable structures and practices and (3) using bioenergy as a focal point in the larger effort to mitigate climate change and sea level rise, realities with particularly catastrophic consequences for South Florida. The project started on Oct 1, 2010 and ended on Feb 28, 2013. It yearly average budget was $369,770, with the Dept. of Energy annual cost share of $317,167. The main project partners were Hendry County, University of Florida - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Intelligentsia International, Inc., Edison State College and University of South Florida. Used approaches, main accomplishments and results in the categories of (1) technical research, (2) education and (3) business development are presented in detail. The project uniqueness is mainly related to the use of system approaches and integrating several systems analyses. Relevance of the project applicable to sustainability of bioenergy, food production, & restoration is explained, critical success factors are challenges are outlined and future work drafted. Finally, the main publications and presentations catalogue list is presented.

  10. Final Report on DOE Project entitled Dynamic Optimized Advanced Scheduling of Bandwidth Demands for Large-Scale Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramamurthy, Byravamurthy [University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    2014-05-05

    In this project, developed scheduling frameworks for dynamic bandwidth demands for large-scale science applications. In particular, we developed scheduling algorithms for dynamic bandwidth demands in this project. Apart from theoretical approaches such as Integer Linear Programming, Tabu Search and Genetic Algorithm heuristics, we have utilized practical data from ESnet OSCARS project (from our DOE lab partners) to conduct realistic simulations of our approaches. We have disseminated our work through conference paper presentations and journal papers and a book chapter. In this project we addressed the problem of scheduling of lightpaths over optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We published several conference papers and journal papers on this topic. We also addressed the problems of joint allocation of computing, storage and networking resources in Grid/Cloud networks and proposed energy-efficient mechanisms for operatin optical WDM networks.

  11. Drilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansure, Arthur James; Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona

    2010-11-30

    A system for forming a wellbore includes a drill tubular. A drill bit is coupled to the drill tubular. One or more cutting structures are coupled to the drill tubular above the drill bit. The cutting structures remove at least a portion of formation that extends into the wellbore formed by the drill bit.

  12. Method of drilling with magnetorheological fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitha, P.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A method of drilling a bore hole into a stratum, wherein via the drill hole drilling fluid is introduced and fed to the drill head. In order to avoid dilution or leak-off of the drilling fluid the same is in accordance with the invention a magnetorheological drilling fluid, and when an undesirable

  13. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF STATE DATA RELATED TO ABANDONED CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Seay Nance

    2003-03-01

    This 2003 Spring Semi-Annual Report contains a summary of the Final Technical Report being prepared for the Soil Remediation Requirements at Commercial and Centralized Drilling-Fluid Disposal (CCDD) Sites project funded by the United States Department of Energy under DOE Award No. DE-AC26-99BC15225. The summary describes (1) the objectives of the investigation, (2) a rationale and methodology of the investigation, (3) sources of data, assessment of data quality, and data availability, (4) examples of well documented centralized and commercial drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites and other sites where drilling fluid was disposed of, and (5) examples of abandoned sites and measures undertaken for their assessment and remediation. The report also includes most of the figures, tables, and appendices that will be included in the final report.

  14. Workshop on Requirements for Robotic Underwater Drills in U.S. Marine Geoscience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.; Johnson, H. P.; Dick, H.; Fryer, P.

    2001-05-01

    At present, subsurface hard rock samples and sediment cores deeper than ~30 m must be acquired using a drill ship, but a drill ship has severe limitations: high cost, limited availability, and poor performance in some lithologies. Many marine geoscience studies require more sampling than can be provided by the drill ship, samples from those problem lithologies, or samples from locations where the drill ship cannot go. Robotic underwater drills may help satisfy this need. Twenty-five scientists and engineers, representing a variety of academic institutions and scientific interests, met on November 3 and 4, 2000, to discuss how to bring about the ready access to robotic underwater drills for scientists engaged in academic research. The workshop considered what science programs would benefit from robotic drills, how many drills of what specifications are needed, and how such drills should be supported. The consensus was that there is a widespread need for a several drills. Most scientists wish for a Robotic Ocean-Bottom drill (ROBO-drill) that can core 50-100 m below the seafloor, with either rotary diamond bits or hydraulic corer, and retrieve cores >5 cm diameter from water depths up to ~4500 m. Although this big ROBO-drill has the widest application, attendees also favored three "niche" drills with different configurations. On the smaller end, there is a need for mini-ROBO-drill that is simple, can work in deeper water, is easily shipped and maintained, and would likely have a single core barrel 1-2 m in length. This drill would be for projects in which small penetration is adequate but cost is a primary concern. An ROV-based drill is also needed, attached to a widely available platform. With high maneuverability and excellent imaging capability, the ROV-drill would be the equivalent of a geologist roaming the seafloor with a rock hammer. There also may be a need for a slightly larger, single-barrel drill that can core up to ~5 m depth to reach below small sediment

  15. 34 CFR 426.21 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use for the Demonstration Projects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...— (1) Bases the proposed project on successfully designed, established, and operated model vocational... and is appropriate to the project; (2) To the extent possible, is objective and will produce data that... Demonstration Projects? 426.21 Section 426.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of...

  16. Guide for prioritizing power plant productivity improvement projects: modification and simplification of the DOE/MRI methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    In recent years, the subject of public utility power plant productivity and reliability has received significant attention from both federal and state agencies and from within the utilities. One study was a FEA-sponsored program that had as its purpose the development of improved techniques for assessing cause of power plant unavailability. The results of this study have become widely known as the DOE/MRI methodology for calculating increased power plant equivalent availability resulting from instituting improvement projects. To further the development of the DOE/MRI methodology for assessing and quantifying the effect of improvement projects, the DOE initiated studies with two states to demonstrate the methodology in operating plants. These studies were focused on applying the methodology to specific power plants (fossil-fueled and nuclear) and on identifying any difficulties in using the method. In the course of these investigations, several problems were uncovered. Various recommendations were made for both eliminating the identified deficiencies in the methodology and for simplifying several of the calculations needed to evaluate proposed plant improvements. The information provided here describes four major modifications to the DOE/MRI methodology which eliminate previously uncovered deficiencies and simplify calculational methods

  17. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates

  18. Benthic foraminiferal responses to operational drill cutting discharge in the SW Barents Sea - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard-Sørensen, Steffen; Junttila, Juho; Dijkstra, Noortje

    2016-04-01

    Petroleum related exploration activities started in the Barents Sea 1980, reaching 97 exploration wells drilled per January 2013. The biggest operational discharge from drilling operations in the Barents Sea is the release of drill cuttings (crushed seabed and/or bedrock) and water based drilling muds including the commonly used weighing material barite (BaSO4). Barium (Ba), a constituent of barite, does not degrade and can be used to evaluate dispersion and accumulation of drill waste. The environmental impact associated with exploration drilling within the Goliat Field, SW Barents Sea in 2006 was evaluated via a multiproxy investigation of local sediments. The sediments were retrieved in November 2014 at ~350 meters water depth and coring sites were selected at distances of 5, 30, 60, 125 and 250 meters from the drill hole in the eastward downstream direction. The dispersion pattern of drill waste was estimated via measurements of sediment parameters including grain size distribution and water content in addition to heavy metal and total organic carbon contents. The environmental impact was evaluated via micro faunal analysis based on benthic foraminiferal (marine shell bearing protists) fauna composition and concentration changes. Observing the sediment parameters, most notably Ba levels, reveals that dispersion of drill waste was limited to <125 meters from the drill site with drill waste thicknesses decreasing downstream. The abruptness and quantity of drill waste sedimentation initially smothered the foraminiferal fauna at ≤ 30 meters from the drill site, while at a distance of 60 meters, the fauna seemingly survived and bioturbation persisted. Analysis of the live (Nov 2014) foraminiferal fauna reveals a natural species composition at all distances from the drill site within the top sediments (0-5 cm core depth). Furthermore, the fossil foraminiferal fauna composition found within post-impacted top sediment sections, particularly in the cores situated at

  19. Drilling activity down but not out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, R.

    1983-09-01

    ''The drilling contractor and his customers are in trouble, but so is all basic industry. Steel production is down to about 50% of capacity, automobile sales are off drastically, and railroads are saying they must have help to continue to exist.'' That is a quote from the July 1958 issue of PETROLEUM ENGINEER International, but substitute ''airlines'' for ''railroads'' and the 25-year-old statement is just as true today as it was back then. There is a tendency today, however, to regard the current drilling slump as the worst ever, even for an industry that has traditionally had its peaks and valleys. Granted, the drop in drilling rig activity during 1982 was the steepest of all time. But it must be remembered that it came at the end of the greatest increase in the history of U.S. rig activity - a phenomenon that created what will go down in oilpatch lore as the Mount Everest of drilling peaks. But the downside should not be remembered as Death Valley because, even at its lowest point, rig activity in the U.S. since the end of 1981 has been higher than it was at any time during the 14-year period from 1962 to 1976. All that, of course, is small consolation for drilling contractors who are desperately trying to remain afloat until the tide turns again. Although they may be buoyed by the fact that history tells us the tide is sure to turn eventually, the bad news is that history does not tell us when.

  20. The rock melting approach to drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  1. EIA completes corrections to drilling estimates series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapmann, W.; Shambaugh, P.

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of US oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status. They are assessed directly for trends, as well as in combination with other measures to assess the productivity and profitability of upstream industry operations. They are major reference points for federal and state policymakers. EIA does not itself collect drilling activity data. Instead, it relies on an external source for data on oil, bas, and dry well completions. These data are provided to EIA monthly on an as reported basis. During a recent effort to enhance EIA's well completion data system, the detection of unusual patterns in the well completion data as received led to an expanded examination of these data. Substantial discrepancies between the data as received by EIA and correct record counts since 1987 were identified. For total wells by year, the errors ranged up to more than 2,300 wells, 11% of the 1995 total, and the impact of these errors extended backward in time to at least the early 1980s. When the magnitude and extent of the as reported well completion data problem were confirmed, EIA suspended its publication and distribution of updated drilling data. EIA staff proceeded to acquire replacement files with the as reported records and then revise the statistical portion of its drilling data system to reflect the new information. The replacement files unfortunately also included erroneous data based on the improper allocation of wells between exploration and development. EIA has now resolved the two data problems and generated revised time series estimates for well completions and footage drilled. The paper describes the problems in the data, differences between the series, and maintaining future data quality

  2. Is equity confined to the shorter term projects - and if not, what does it need?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryan, T.

    1996-01-01

    There are two types of equity investor generally found in shorter term energy projects: energy project developers or sponsors who view a given project as buying or building a business; and financial investors who have viewed an investment as buying a stream of cash flows. This article examines the objectives and needs of these two investor groups, and discusses the principal issues which govern their respective decision-making process. (author)

  3. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  4. Drilling the North Anatolian Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aktar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An international workshop entitled “GONAF: A deep Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault”, was held 23–27 April 2007 in Istanbul, Turkey. The aim of this workshop was to refine plans for a deep drilling project at the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ in northwestern Turkey. The current drilling target is located in the Marmara Sea offshore the megacity of Istanbul in the direct vicinity of the main branch of the North Anatolian Fault on the PrinceIslands (Figs. 1 and 2.The NAFZ represents a 1600-km-long plate boundary that slips at an average rate of 20–30 mm·yr-1 (McClusky et al., 2000. It has developed in the framework of the northward moving Arabian plate and the Hellenic subduction zone where the African lithosphere is subducting below the Aegean. Comparison of long-term slip rates with Holocene and GPS-derived slip rates indicate an increasing westwardmovement of the Anatolian plate with respect to stable Eurasia. During the twentieth century, the NAFZ has ruptured over 900 km of its length. A series of large earthquakes starting in 1939 near Erzincan in Eastern Anatolia propagated westward towards the Istanbul-Marmara region in northwestern Turkey that today represents a seismic gap along a ≥100-km-long segment below the Sea of Marmara. This segment did not rupture since 1766 and, if locked, may have accumulated a slip deficit of 4–5 m. It is believed being capable of generating two M≥7.4 earthquakes within the next decades (Hubert-Ferrari et al., 2000; however, it could even rupture in a large single event (Le Pichon et al., 1999.

  5. 78 FR 28841 - Quartzsite Solar Energy Project Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0440)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Quartzsite Solar Energy Project Record of...), received a request from Quartzsite Solar Energy, LLC (QSE) to interconnect its proposed Quartzsite Solar... (PRMPA) for Quartzsite Solar Energy Project was published in the Federal Register (77 FR 75632). After...

  6. Drill string gas data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, E.R.

    1998-05-12

    Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

  7. Chemical and benthos data collected from CTD, bottle, and other instruments in the Chukchi Sea in 2009-2010 as part of the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area - Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA-CAB) project (NODC Accession 0095566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains physical, chemical, and biological data collected during research cruises for the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area (Chemical...

  8. Technical Analysis of Projects Being Funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward G. Skolnik

    2006-02-10

    In July 2000, Energetics began a project in which we performed site-visit based technical analyses or evaluations on hydrogen R&D projects for the purpose of providing in-depth information on the status and accomplishments of these projects to the public, and especially to hydrogen stakeholders. Over a three year period, 32 site-visit analyses were performed. In addition two concepts gleaned from the site visits became subjects of in depth techno-economic analyses. Finally, Energetics produced a compilation document that contains each site-visit analysis that we have performed, starting in 1996 on other contracts through the end of Year One of the current project (July 2001). This included 21 projects evaluated on previous contracts, and 10 additional ones from Year One. Reports on projects visited in Years One and Two were included in their respective Annual Reports. The Year Two Report also includes the two In-depth Analyses and the Compilation document. Reports in Year three began an attempt to perform reviews more geared to hydrogen safety. This Final Report contains a summary of the overall project, all of the 32 site-visit analyses and the two In-depth Analyses.

  9. Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force report: A joint FERC/DOE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of the FERC/DOE Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force Report was threefold: (1) to review current deliverability data for utility, accuracy, and timeliness; (2) to identify mechanisms for closing significant gaps in information resulting from changing market structures; and (3) to ensure that technologies are available to meet the needs of the emerging, competitive natural gas industry

  10. Final report of DOE project "Detection, Localization and Diagnosis of Performance Problems Using PerfSONAR"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrolis, Konstantinos [Georgia Tech

    2014-04-15

    We present the development of a middleware service, called Pythia, that is able to detect, localize, and diagnose performance problems in the network paths that interconnect research sites that are of interest to DOE. The proposed service can analyze perfSONAR data collected from all participating sites.

  11. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard [Boston U.; Christ, Norman [Columbia U.; DeTar, Carleton [Utah U.; Edwards, Robert [Jefferson Lab; Mackenzie, Paul [Fermilab

    2017-10-30

    In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020's. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  12. Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Oglesby

    2008-12-01

    An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

  13. Management and financing of e-Government projects in India: Does financing strategy add value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Ojha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available How do managers structure e-government projects and address challenges of risks, lack of technical expertise, and mitigation of strategic error for preventing loss of investments? Our aim was to compare the traditional finance approach and the strategy-driven, innovative financing approaches under the PPP model, to examine their managerial value-addition. We found that e-government projects require a carefully crafted structuring strategy and that innovative financing is more suitable in facilitating flexible decision making, building core capabilities, managing and sharing project risks, providing funds needed for growth and innovation, and customising tailor-made project governance strategy. Based on our findings, we develop five theoretical propositions.

  14. How does sustainability certification affect the design process? Mapping final design projects at an architectural office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgren, Mathilde; Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2017-01-01

    , derived from the sustainability certification system itself, and to apply it even in the early design process. This perspective emphasises all phases of the life cycle of a building. The goal of the present study was to map how a Danish architectural office approached sustainability in the projects...... they undertook in the course of a year. All the projects concerned were intended to conform to the German Sustainability Certification System DGNB. We developed a mapping tool to document these case projects and found that different sets of certification criteria were used in each project. This demonstrates...... process and informing the industry of them. This has led to optimised design processes such as Integrated Energy Design, in which many decisions related to energy consumption and indoor climate are made in the early design stages. The current tendency is to use an expanded notion of sustainability...

  15. Drilling gas hydrates with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Tim; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Wefer, Gerold

    2015-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are bound in marine gas hydrate deposits. Local conditions like pressure, temperature, gas and pore water compositions define the boundaries of gas hydrate stability within the ocean sediments. Depending on those conditions gas hydrates can occur within marine sediments at depth down to several hundreds of meters up to sea floor. These oceanic methane deposits are widespread along continental margins. By forming cement in otherwise soft sediments gas hydrates are stabilizing the seafloor on continental slopes. Drilling operations are required for understanding the distribution of gas hydrates as well as for sampling them to study the composition, microstructure and its geomechanical and geophysical properties. The sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo200 has the capability to drill down to 200 m below sea floor well within the depth of major gas hydrate occurrences at continental margins. This drill rig is a transportable sea floor drill rig that can be deployed from a variety of multi-purpose research vessels. It is deployed on the sea bed and controlled from the vessel. It is the second generation MeBo (Freudenthal and Wefer, 2013) and was developed from 2011 to 2014 by MARUM in cooperation with BAUER Maschinen GmbH. Long term experiences with the first generation MeBo70 that was operated since 2005 on 15 research expeditions largely contributed to the development of MeBo200. It was first tested in October 2014 from the research vessel RV SONNE in the North Sea. In this presentation the suitability of MARUM-MeBo for drilling marine gas hydrates is discussed. We report on experiences drilling gas hydrates on two research expeditions with MeBo70. A research expedition for sampling gas hydrates in the Danube Paleodelta with MeBo200 as well as technical developments for improving the suitability of MeBo for gas hydrate exploration works are planned within the project SUGAR3 funded by the Federal Government for Economy and Energy (BMWi). Freudenthal

  16. Does age matter? Multigenerational Teams as a challenge in project management

    OpenAIRE

    DWIECZOREK ESC, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine project management within the framework of a multi-generational workforce. Conducted analysis showed the gap between Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The process of socialization of each group, which took place at different time periods, developed in representatives from each of generation different values, skills and approaches to the work. Project manager should understand and distinguish each of the generational perspectives i...

  17. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  18. Drilling comparison in "warm ice" and drill design comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, L.; Motoyama, H.; Wilhelms, F.

    2007-01-01

    For the deep ice-core drilling community, the 2005/06 Antarctic season was an exciting and fruitful one. In three different Antarctic locations, Dome Fuji, EPICA DML and Vostok, deep drillings approached bedrock (the ice-water interface in the case of Vostok), emulating what had previously been a...

  19. 30 CFR 33.34 - Drilling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling test. 33.34 Section 33.34 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.34 Drilling test. (a) A drilling test shall consist of drilling a set of 10 test holes, without...

  20. Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products. Topical report, September 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medley, G.H., Jr; Maurer, W.C.; Liu, G.; Garkasi, A.Y.

    1995-09-01

    Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses the development and testing of two products designed to advance the application of underbalanced drilling techniques. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment. The program predicts pressure and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test well measurements, and field data. This model does not handle air or mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. An incompressible drilling fluid was developed that utilizes lightweight solid additives (hollow glass spheres) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. This fluid is designed for underbalanced drilling situations where compressible lightweight fluids are inadequate. In addition to development of these new products, an analysis was performed to determine the market potential of lightweight fluids, and a forecast of underbalanced drilling in the USA over the next decade was developed. This analysis indicated that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30 percent of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the USA within the next ten years.

  1. Permeability and seismic velocity and their anisotropy across the Alpine Fault, New Zealand: An insight from laboratory measurements on core from the Deep Fault Drilling Project phase 1 (DFDP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. J.; Tatham, D.; Faulkner, D. R.; Mariani, E.; Boulton, C.

    2017-08-01

    The Alpine Fault, a transpressional plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, is known to rupture quasiperiodically with large magnitude earthquakes (Mw 8). The hydraulic and elastic properties of fault zones are thought to vary over the seismic cycle, influencing the nature and style of earthquake rupture and associated processes. We present a suite of laboratory permeability and P (Vp) and S (Vs) wave velocity measurements performed on fault lithologies recovered during the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1), which sampled principal slip zone (PSZ) gouges, cataclasites, and fractured ultramylonites, with all recovered lithologies overprinted by abundant secondary mineralization, recording enhanced fluid-rock interaction. Core material was tested in three orthogonal directions, orientated relative to the down-core axis and, when present, foliation. Measurements were conducted with pore pressure (H2O) held at 5 MPa over an effective pressure (Peff) range of 5-105 MPa. Permeabilities and seismic velocities decrease with proximity to the PSZ with permeabilities ranging from 10-17 to 10-21 m2 and Vp and Vs ranging from 4400 to 5900 m/s in the ultramylonites/cataclasites and 3900 to 4200 m/s at the PSZ. In comparison with intact country rock protoliths, the highly variable cataclastic structures and secondary phyllosilicates and carbonates have resulted in an overall reduction in permeability and seismic wave velocity, as well as a reduction in anisotropy within the fault core. These results concur with other similar studies on other mature, tectonic faults in their interseismic period.

  2. Case drilling - an innovative approach to reducing drilling costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Tessari, R. M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Warren, T. [Tesco Drilling Technology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Casing drilling is introduced as a new drilling technique that uses standard oil field casing to simultaneously drill and case the well. The technology includes both rig and downhole equipment, customized to function effectively as an integrated drilling system. This paper describes the testing program designed to identify and overcome technical challenges. Although not fully optimized, it appears that the system is functional. Test results indicate the need for improvements in the pump down cement float equipment and the tools and procedures for drilling up the cement plugs. The pump down latch and retrieval system also needs to be further developed and tested for high angle directional applications. Cost savings in the range of 10 to 15 per cent are expected for trouble-free wells. By eliminating the cost of unscheduled events encountered in troublesome wells, cost savings may reach as high as 30 per cent. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Horizontal drilling assessment in Western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catania, Peter; Wilson, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    The first horizontal well was drilled in Saskatchewan in 1987. Since then, the number of horizontal wells drilled has escalated rapidly, averaging approximately 500 per year since 1993. When combined with horizontal wells drilled in Alberta, the major Canadian oil-producing province, the total number drilled in 1995 was 978. This total exceeds the National Energy Board (NEB) projected maximum of 816 wells per year. The NEB projections were based on a break-even point for the drilling of horizontal wells of a return of CDN $285,000 using a discount rate of 15%. This corresponded to a cumulative production from each individual well of some 11,000 m 3 . The introduction of a royalty-free production volume of 12,000 m 3 per horizontal well in Saskatchewan was instrumental in stimulating the rapid expansion in the use of horizontal wells and helping Canada to exceed the forecasted drilling level. Within Saskatchewan, daily production from 1964 active horizontal wells is in excess of 20,000 m 3 . Comparative analysis indicates that the average daily production per well has increased from approximately by 40% with the advent of horizontal wells. In total production terms, provincial production has increased from 11.7 million cubic metres in 1989 to 20.9 million m 3 in 1996. This represents an increase of almost 79% based primarily on the extensive use of horizontal wells. In 1996, horizontal wells produced 36% of the province's oil from 12% of the active wells. In the southeastern producing areas of Saskatchewan, the Williston Basin, declining oil-production has jumped 100%, with horizontal wells accounting for approximately 50% of total regional production. Pay zones in this areas, as in most of the province, tend to be relatively thin, with net pay frequently less that 5 m. The modest investment of some CDN $5 million in government research funding 10 years ago to stimulate the development of horizontal wells, combined with a favourable royalty structure, has been at

  4. How much does it cost? The LIFE Project - Costing Models for Digital Curation and Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Davies

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Digital preservation is concerned with the long-term safekeeping of electronic resources. How can we be confident of their permanence, if we do not know the cost of preservation? The LIFE (Lifecycle Information for E-Literature Project has made a major step forward in understanding the long-term costs in this complex area. The LIFE Project has developed a methodology to model the digital lifecycle and to calculate the costs of preserving digital information for the next 5, 10 or 100 years. National and higher education (HE libraries can now apply this process and plan effectively for the preservation of their digital collections. Based on previous work undertaken on the lifecycles of paper-based materials, the LIFE Project created a lifecycle model and applied it to real-life digital collections across a diverse subject range. Three case studies examined the everyday operations, processes and costs involved in their respective activities. The results were then used to calculate the direct costs for each element of the digital lifecycle. The Project has made major advances in costing preservation activities, as well as making detailed costs of real digital preservation activities available. The second phase of LIFE (LIFE2, which recently started, aims to refine the lifecycle methodology and to add a greater range and breadth to the project with additional exemplar case studies.

  5. Casing and liners for drilling and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Byrom, Ted G

    2007-01-01

    The Gulf Drilling Series is a joint project between Gulf Publishing Company and the International Association of Drilling Contractors. The first text in this Series presents casing design and mechanics in a concise, two-part format. The first part focuses on basic casing design and instructs engineers and engineering students how to design a safe casing string. The second part covers more advanced material and special problems in casing design in a user-friendly format. Learn how to select sizes and setting depths to achieve well objectives, determine casing loads for design purposes, design casing properties to meet burst, collapse and tensile strength requirements and conduct casing running operations safely and successfully.

  6. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  7. Uranium project. Borehole cutting with drill core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H.

    1984-01-01

    The topics included in these report are: explanatory note, number of wells and perforated length, key for the location of areas of perforation for the uranium prospection, maps of location of areas of perforation. The list of the drawn perforations and the references and drawings of the perforations

  8. Ultrasonic rotary-hammer drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Kassab, Steve (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism for drilling or coring by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill includes a hammering section with a set of preload weights mounted atop a hammering actuator and an axial passage through the hammering section. In addition, a rotary section includes a motor coupled to a drive shaft that traverses the axial passage through the hammering section. A drill bit is coupled to the drive shaft for drilling by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill bit includes a fluted shaft leading to a distal crown cutter with teeth. The bit penetrates sampled media by repeated hammering action. In addition, the bit is rotated. As it rotates the fluted bit carries powdered cuttings helically upward along the side of the bit to the surface.

  9. Database system for analysing and managing coiled tubing drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.; Choe, J.

    2009-05-01

    This study present a prototype of database system for analysing and managing petrophysical data from coiled tubing drilling in the oil and gas industry. The characteristics of coiled tubing drilling data from cores were analyzed and categorized according to the whole drilling process and data modeling including object relation diagram, class diagram was carried out to design the schema of effective database system such as the relationships between tables and key index fields to create the relationships. The database system called DrillerGeoDB consists of 22 tables and those are classified with 4 groups such as project information, stratum information, drilling/logging information and operation evaluate information. DrillerGeoDB provide all sort of results of each process with a spreadsheet such as MS-Excel via application of various algorithm of logging theory and statistics function of cost evaluation. This presentation describes the details of the system development and implementation.

  10. Drilling waste makes concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosfjord, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article deals with a method of drilling waste reclamation by utilizing the converted oil-containing cuttings from the North Sea in the concrete production in Norway. The oil content is to be removed in an incineration process by heating the cuttings to about 800 o C. The output capacity from the exhaust gas water cooling system is 7500 kW/hour, and is to be used in different industrial heating processes. The remaining content of pollutants in the cleaned exhaust gas outlet corresponds to the required limits with the exception of SO 2 and HCl. In addition, an exhaust gas washing plant is to be installed in the near future designed for the further reduction of pollutants by 90%. The converted raw materials are used as a supplement for lessening the demand of sand and cement in the production of concrete-made pipes. 1 fig

  11. The Chew Bahir Drilling Project (HSPDP). Deciphering climate information from the Chew Bahir sediment cores: Towards a continuous half-million year climate record near the Omo - Turkana key palaeonanthropological Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Verena E.; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa S.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Dean, Jonathan R.; Deino, Alan; Günter, Christina; Junginger, Annett; Lamb, Henry F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Roberts, Helen M.; Schaebitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin H.

    2017-04-01

    As a contribution towards an enhanced understanding of human-climate interactions, the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) has successfully completed coring five dominantly lacustrine archives of climate change during the last 3.5 Ma in East Africa. All five sites in Ethiopia and Kenya are adjacent to key paleoanthropological research areas encompassing diverse milestones in human evolution, dispersal episodes, and technological innovation. The 280 m-long Chew Bahir sediment records, recovered from a tectonically-bound basin in the southern Ethiopian rift in late 2014, cover the past 550 ka of environmental history, a time period that includes the transition to the Middle Stone Age, and the origin and dispersal of modern Homo sapiens. Deciphering climate information from lake sediments is challenging, due to the complex relationship between climate parameters and sediment composition. We will present the first results in our efforts to develop a reliable climate-proxy tool box for Chew Bahir by deconvolving the relationship between sedimentological and geochemical sediment composition and strongly climate-controlled processes in the basin, such as incongruent weathering, transportation and authigenic mineral alteration. Combining our first results from the long cores with those from a pilot study of short cores taken in 2009/10 along a NW-SE transect of the basin, we have developed a hypothesis linking climate forcing and paleoenvironmental signal-formation processes in the basin. X-ray diffraction analysis of the first sample sets from the long Chew Bahir record reveals similar processes that have been recognized for the uppermost 20 m during the pilot-study of the project: the diagenetic illitization of smectites during episodes of higher alkalinity and salinity in the closed-basin lake induced by a drier climate. The precise time resolution, largely continuous record and (eventually) a detailed understanding of site specific proxy formation

  12. Does risk management contribute to IT project success? A meta-analysis of empirical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, K.F.C.; Boonstra, A.; Wortmann, J.C.

    The question whether risk management contributes to IT project success is considered relevant by people from both academic and practitioners' communities already for a long time. This paper presents a meta-analysis of the empirical evidence that either supports or opposes the claim that risk

  13. How does an ICT-competent mathematics teacher benefit from an ICT-integrative project?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skott, Charlotte Krog; Østergaard, Camilla Hellsten

    2016-01-01

    We investigate an ICT-competent mathematics teacher’s potentials for professional development as she participates in a sixth-grade statistics project aimed at developing practices that integrate ICTs. This is a critical case study, partly because the teacher is not challenged by the proposed ICTs...

  14. 76 FR 78916 - Rice Solar Energy Project Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0439)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... regarding impacts to aquatic and biological resources, ephemeral washes, desert tortoise, and impacts to... subsequently held a public hearing on the document in Palm Desert, California, on January 5, 2011. Following... the No Project/No Action Alternative, and the North of Desert Center Alternative. The CEC decided that...

  15. 78 FR 28842 - Searchlight Wind Energy Project Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0413)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... will abide by the Biological Opinion issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and as conditioned by BLM in its right-of-way authorization for the proposed Project. Western will abide by the Biological... include requirements for site environmental clearances prior to construction, desert tortoise fencing...

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch ICF above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running ERV. The house has a dual-fuel heat pump, an instantaneous condensing water heater, and 4.5-kW solar shingles.

  17. Surgical drilling: design and performance of an improved drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Pal, S; Albright, J A

    1982-08-01

    The majority of twist drills used in orthopaedics are very similar to chisel pointed metal drilling bits. Modifications usually observed are reduction of the point angle to 90 deg and sometimes grinding of the entire cutting lip at 0 deg rake angle, which appeared to have been made arbitrarily without any advantage. We have attempted to design a surgical drill bit with the objective of minimization of the drilling thrust and temperature and effective removal of bone chips. Our results showed that the presence of the chisel edge was mainly responsible for increasing the thrust force and the temperature developed. The effects of a constant feed rate and thrust on the peak temperature were also examined. The combined effect of the helix and the point angles on the rake angle which in turn determines the cutting efficiency was analyzed for various types of surgical bits. Based on our results and previously published data from the literature an optimized drill bit was designed with a split point, a point angle of 118 deg, a parabolic flute, and a helix angle of 36 deg and its performance was compared with other existing surgical drill bits. For drilling in compact bone, the new design decreased the thrust load by 45 percent an the peak temperature rise by 41 percent. Similar improvements were also recorded for drilling bone cement. The time of drilling a bone cortex was also significantly reduced and "walking" on the curved bone surface was eliminated and dimensional tolerance on hole sizes was improved. The new design is likely to reduce the time of surgery and also minimize the tissue damage.

  18. DOE's performance evaluation project for mixed low-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.D.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Gruebel, M.M.; Lee, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A performance evaluation (PE) is an analysis that estimates radionuclide concentration limits for 16 potential Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low-level waste (ULLW) disposal sites based on the analysis of two environmental exposure pathways (air and water) to an off-site individual and an inadvertent-intruder exposure pathway. Sites are analyzed for their ability to attenuate concentrations of specific radionuclides that could be released from wastes in a hypothetical ULLW disposal facility. Site-specific data and knowledge are used within a generic framework that is consistent across all sites being evaluated. After estimates of waste concentrations for the three pathways are calculated, the minimum of the waste concentration values is selected as the permissible waste concentration for each radionuclide. The PE results will be used as input to the process for DOE's ULLW disposal configuration. Preliminary comparisons of results from the PE and site-specific performance assessments indicate that the simple PE results generally agree with results of the performance assessments, even when site conditions are complex. This agreement with performance-assessment results increases confidence that similar results can be obtained at other sites that have good characterization data. In addition, the simple analyses contained in the PE illustrate a potential method to satisfy the needs of many regulators and the general public for a simple, conservative, defensible, and easily understandable analysis that provides results similar to those of more complex analyses

  19. Recommendations of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1997-12-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories convened a group of drilling experts in Berkeley, CA, on April 15-16, 1997, to discuss advanced geothermal drilling systems. The objective of the workshop was to develop one or more conceptual designs for an advanced geothermal drilling system that meets all of the criteria necessary to drill a model geothermal well. The drilling process was divided into ten essential functions. Each function was examined, and discussions were held on the conventional methods used to accomplish each function and the problems commonly encountered. Alternative methods of performing each function were then listed and evaluated by the group. Alternative methods considered feasible or at least worth further investigation were identified, while methods considered impractical or not potentially cost-saving were eliminated from further discussion. This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. For each of the ten functions, the conventional methods, common problems, and recommended alternative technologies and methods are listed. Each recommended alternative is discussed, and a description is given of the process by which this information will be used by the U.S. DOE to develop an advanced geothermal drilling research program.

  20. The 1991 DOE/Sandia Crystalline Photovoltaic Technology Project Review Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, M. L.

    1991-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the manual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Technology Research Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held July 30 through 31, 1991 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, and concentrating collector development.

  1. Drilling the Thuringian Syncline, Germany: core processing during the INFLUINS scientific deep drilling campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abratis, Michael; Methe, Pascal; Aehnelt, Michaela; Kunkel, Cindy; Beyer, Daniel; Kukowski, Nina; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Deep drilling of the central Thuringian Syncline was carried out in order to gather substantial knowledge of subsurface fluid dynamics and fluid rock interaction within a sedimentary basin. The final depth of the borehole was successfully reached at 1179 m, just a few meters above the Buntsandstein - Zechstein boundary. One of the aspects of the scientific drilling was obtaining sample material from different stratigraphic units for insights in genesis, rock properties and fluid-rock interactions. Parts of the section were cored whereas cuttings provide record of the remaining units. Coring was conducted in aquifers and their surrounding aquitards, i.e. parts of the Upper Muschelkalk (Trochitenkalk), the Middle Muschelkalk, the Upper Buntsandstein (Pelitrot and Salinarrot) and the Middle Buntsandstein. In advance and in cooperation with the GFZ Potsdam team "Scientific Drilling" core handling was discussed and a workflow was developed to ensure efficient and appropriate processing of the valuable core material and related data. Core curation including cleaning, fitting, marking, measuring, cutting, boxing, photographing and unrolled scanning using a DMT core scanner was carried out on the drilling site in Erfurt. Due care was exercised on samples for microbiological analyses. These delicate samples were immediately cut when leaving the core tube and stored within a cooling box at -78°C. Special software for data input was used developed by smartcube GmbH. Advantages of this drilling information system (DIS) are the compatibility with formats of international drilling projects from the IODP and ICDP drilling programs and thus options for exchanges with the international data bases. In a following step, the drill cores were brought to the national core repository of the BGR in Berlin Spandau where the cores were logged for their physical rock properties using a GeoTek multi sensor core logger (MSCL). After splitting the cores into a working and archive half, the

  2. Does assessing project work enhance the validity of qualifications? The case of GCSE coursework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Crisp

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins by describing current views on validity and how certain assessment forms, such as school-based project work, may enhance validity. It then touches on debates about the dependability of assessment by teachers. GCSEs and GCSE coursework are then described along with the reasons for the inclusion of coursework in many GCSEs. Crooks, Kane and Cohen’s (1996 chain model of eight linked stages of validity enquiry is then used as a structure within which to consider the validity of project work assessments, and specifically GCSE coursework assessment, drawing on the available literature. Strengths for validity include the ability to assess objectives that are difficult to test in written examinations, promoting additional skills such as critical thinking, creativity and independent thinking, and improving motivation. Possible threats to validity include the potential for internet and other types of plagiarism, tasks becoming overly structured and formulaic thus reducing the positive impact on learning, and the potentially heavy workload for teachers and students. The paper concludes by describing current policy changes in the UK with regard to GCSE coursework and relates this to strong and weak validity links for project work as a mode of assessment.

  3. Design of a diesel exhaust-gas purification system for inert-gas drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    To combat the serious oxygen corrosion of drill pipe when a low density drilling fluid (air or mist) is used in geothermal drilling, a system has been designed that produces an inert gas (essentially nitrogen) to be substituted for air. The system fits on three flatbed trailers, is roadable and produces 2000 scfm of gas. The projected cost for gas is slightly less than $2.00 per thousand standard cubic feet.

  4. ISO 50001 for Commercial Buildings: Lessons Learned From U.S. DOE Pilot Project: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Punjabi, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the U.S., the ISO 50001 Standard, which establishes energy management systems (EnMSs) and processes, has shown uptake primarily in the industrial sector. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) undertook a pilot program to explore ISO 50001 implementation in commercial buildings. Eight organizations participated as pilots, with technical assistance provided by DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). This paper shares important lessons learned from the pilot. Staff time was the most critical resource required to establish effective EnMSs in commercial buildings. The pilot also revealed that technical support and template/example materials were essential inputs. Crucial activities included evaluating performance, identifying goals, making connections, communicating operational controls, and tracking/reviewing progress. Benefits realized included enhanced intra-organizational connections, greater energy awareness, increased process efficiencies, and improved ability to make business cases. Incremental benefits for ISO 50001 certification were greater accountability, assurance of best practices, public relations opportunities, and potential to unlock verified savings credits or incentive money. Incremental certification costs included more staff/consultant time, money for certification, and a tendency to limit EnMS scope in order to ensure favorable audit results. Five best practices were identified - utilizing expert technical assistance, training, and other resources; focusing on implementation over documentation; keeping top management involved; considering organizational structure when selecting EnMS scope; and matching the implementation level to an EnMS's scope and scale. The last two practices are particularly relevant to the commercial buildings sector.

  5. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  6. Combining conventional and thermal drilling in order to increase speed and reduce costs of drilling operations to access deep geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Edoardo; Kant, Michael A.; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Saar, Martin O.

    2017-04-01

    The exploitation of deep geothermal resources for energy production relies on finding cost effective solutions to increase the drilling performance in hard rocks. Conventional rotary drilling techniques, based on mechanical rock exportation, result in high rates of drilling tool wearing, causing significant costs. Additionally, rotary drilling results in low drilling speeds in the typically hard crystalline basement rocks targeted for enhanced geothermal energy utilization technologies. Furthermore, even lower overall drilling rates result, when considering tripping times required to exchange worn drill tools. Therefore, alternative drilling techniques, such as hammering, thermal drilling, plasma drilling, and jetting processes are widely investigated in order to provide cost-effective alternatives to conventional drilling methods. A promising approach, that combines conventional rotary and thermal drilling techniques, is investigated in the present work. Here, the rock material is thermally weakened before being exported by conventional cutters. Heat is locally provided by a flame, which moves over the rock surface, heat-treating the material. Besides reducing the rock strength, an in-depth smoothening effect of the mechanical rock properties is observed due to the thermal treatment. This results in reduced rates of drill bit wearing and higher rates of penetration, which in turn decreases drilling costs significantly, particularly for deep-drilling projects. Due to the high heating rates, rock-hardening, commonly observed at moderate temperatures, can be avoided. The flame action can be modelled as a localized, high heat transfer coefficient flame treatment, which results in orders of magnitude higher heating rates than conventional oven treatments. Therefore, we analyse rock strength variations after different maximum temperatures, flame-based heating rates, and rock confinement pressures. The results show that flame treatments lead to a monotonous decrease of

  7. Towards a distributed infrastructure for research drilling in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevel, C.; Gatliff, R.; Ludden, J.; Camoin, G.; Horsfield, B.; Kopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    The EC-funded project "Deep Sea and Sub-Seafloor Frontier" (DS3F) aims at developing seafloor and sub seafloor sampling strategies for enhanced understanding of deep-sea and sub seafloor processes by connecting marine research in life and geosciences, climate and environmental change, with socio-economic issues and policy building. DS3F has identified access to sub seafloor sampling and instrumentation as a key element of this approach. There is a strong expertise in Europe concerning direct access to the sub seafloor. Within the international program IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program), ECORD (European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling) has successfully developed the concept of mission specific platforms (MSPs), contracted on a project basis to drill in ice covered and shallow water areas. The ECORD Science Operator, lead by the British Geological Survey (BGS) has build a internationally recognized expertise in scientific ocean drilling, from coring in challenging environment, through down hole measurements and laboratory analysis to core curation and data management. MARUM, at the Bremen University in Germany, is one of the three IODP core repositories. Europe is also at the forefront of scientific seabed drills, with the MeBo developed by MARUM as well as the BGS seabed rocks drills. Europe also plays a important role in continental scientific drilling and the European component of ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) is strengthening, with the recent addition of France and foreseen addition of UK. Oceanic and continental drilling have very similar scientific objectives. Moreover, they share not only common technologies, but also common data handling systems. To develop an integrated approach to technology development and usage, a move towards a a distributed infrastructure for research drilling in Europe has been initiated by these different groups. Built on existing research & operational groups across Europe, it will

  8. Acoustical properties of drill strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Deepwater drilling; Jakten paa de store dyp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Recent technological development has made it possible to drill for oil and gas at the impressive depth of 3000 metres. An increasing part of the world's oil and gas discoveries are made in deep or ultra deep waters. Ultra deep waters are those exceeding 1500 metres. Since drilling at more than 500 metres started at the end of the 1970s, 32 discoveries of about 500 million barrels of extractable oil or gas have been made. These finds amount to almost 60 thousand millions barrels of oil equivalents. Most of the effort has been made in the coasts between Brazil, West Africa and the Gulf of Mexico. Deepwater projects have been a field of priority for Norwegian oil companies in their search for international commissions. It is frequently time-consuming, expensive and technologically challenging to drill at great depths. The article describes the Atlantis concept, which may reduce the complexities and costs of deepwater activities. This involves making an artificial sea bottom, which in the form of an air-filled buoy is anchored at a depth of 200 - 300 metres. Production wells or exploration wells and risers are extended from the real bottom to the artificial one.

  10. Deep drilling for geothermal energy in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    There is a societal request to find renewable CO2-free energy resources. One of the biggest such resources is provided by geothermal energy. In addition to shallow ground heat already extensively used in Finland, deep geothermal energy provides an alternative so far not exploited. Temperatures are high at depth, but the challenge is, how to mine the heat? In this presentation, the geological and geophysical conditions for deep geothermal energy production in Finland are discussed as well as challenges for drilling and conditions at depth for geothermal energy production. Finland is located on ancient bedrock with much lower temperatures than geologically younger volcanically and tectonically active areas. In order to reach sufficiently high temperatures drilling to depths of several kilometres are needed. Further, mining of the heat with, e.g., the principle of Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) requires high hydraulic conductivity for efficient circulation of fluid in natural or artificial fractures of the rock. There are many issues that must be solved and/or improved: Drilling technology, the EGS concept, rock stress and hydraulic fracturing, scale formation, induced seismicity and ground movements, possible microbial activity, etc. An industry-funded pilot project currently in progress in southern Finland is shortly introduced.

  11. Polymer Drilling Fluid with Micron-Grade Cenosphere for Deep Coal Seam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional shallow coal seam uses clean water, solid-free system, and foam system as drilling fluid, while they are not suitable for deep coal seam drilling due to mismatching density, insufficient bearing capacity, and poor reservoir protection effect. According to the existing problems of drilling fluid, micron-grade cenosphere with high bearing capacity and ultralow true density is selected as density regulator; it, together with polymer “XC + CMC” and some other auxiliary agents, is jointly used to build micron-grade polymer drilling fluid with cenosphere which is suitable for deep coal seam. Basic performance test shows that the drilling fluid has good rheological property, low filtration loss, good density adjustability, shear thinning, and thixotropy; besides, drilling fluid flow is in line with the power law rheological model. Compared with traditional drilling fluid, dispersion stability basically does not change within 26 h; settlement stability evaluated with two methods only shows a small amount of change; permeability recovery rate evaluated with Qinshui Basin deep coal seam core exceeds 80%. Polymer drilling fluid with cenosphere provides a new thought to solve the problem of drilling fluid density and pressure for deep coal seam drilling and also effectively improves the performance of reservoir protection ability.

  12. Does like seek like?: The formation of working groups in a programming project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Sanou Gozalo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In a course of the degree of computer science, the programming project has changed from individual to teamed work, tentatively in couples (pair programming. Students have full freedom to team up with minimum intervention from teachers. The analysis of the couples made indicates that students do not tend to associate with students with a similar academic performance, maybe because general cognitive parameters do not govern the choice of academic partners. Pair programming seems to give great results, so the efforts of future research in this field should focus precisely on how these pairs are formed, underpinning the mechanisms of human social interactions.

  13. DOE/Project SEED student scholars partnership. Final report, June 7, 1994--April 27, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-13

    Project SEED is an innovative career development activity administered by ACS for economically disadvantaged high school students. SEED students spend 10 weeks during the summer in an academic, industrial, or governmental research laboratory working under the supervision of a researcher. Intent is to attempt to overcome obstacles which have excluded the economically disadvantaged from professional careers. Students are required to prepare a technical summary, give presentations to their sponsoring groups, and design and display a poster session. Each student also completed a pre- and post-program survey.

  14. Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP) DOE EE0005985 Final Technical Report Rev 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietryk, Steven [Dominion, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2017-01-31

    The primary purpose of the VOWTAP was to advance the offshore wind industry in the United States (U.S.) by demonstrating innovative technologies and process solutions that would establish offshore wind as a cost-effective renewable energy resource. The VOWTAP Team proposed to design, construct, and operate a 12 megawatt (MW) offshore wind facility located approximately 27 statute miles (mi) (24 nautical miles [nm], 43 kilometers [km]) off the coast of Virginia. The proposed Project would consist of two Alstom Haliade™ 150-6 MW turbines mounted on inward battered guide structures (IBGS), a 34.5-kilovolt (kV) alternating current (AC) submarine cable interconnecting the WTGs (inter-array cable), a 34.5-kV AC submarine transmission cable (export cable), and a 34.5 kV underground cable (onshore interconnection cable) that would connect the Project with existing Dominion infrastructure located in Virginia Beach, Virginia (Figure 1). Interconnection with the existing Dominion infrastructure would also require an onshore switch cabinet, a fiber optic cable, and new interconnection station to be located entirely within the boundaries of the Camp Pendleton State Military Reservation (Camp Pendleton). The VOWTAP balanced technology innovation with commercial readiness such that turbine operations were anticipated to commence by 2018. Dominion, as the leaseholder of the Virginia Wind Energy Area (WEA), anticipated leveraging lessons learned through the VOWTAP, and applying them to future commercial-scale offshore wind development.

  15. Update on onshore disposal of offshore drilling wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1999-11-29

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing effluent limitations guidelines to govern discharges of cuttings from wells drilled using synthetic-based muds. To support this rulemaking, Argonne National Laboratory was asked by EPA and the US Department of Energy (DOE) to collect current information about those onshore commercial disposal facilities that are permitted to receive offshore drilling wastes. Argonne contacted state officials in Louisiana, Texas, California and Alaska to obtain this information. The findings, collected during October and November 1999, are presented by state.

  16. Operational results for the experimental DOE/NASA Mod-OA wind turbine project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, R. K.; Birchenough, A. G.

    The Mod-OA wind turbine project which was to gain early experience in the operation of large wind turbines in a utility environment is discussed. The Mod-OA wind turbines were a first generation design, and even though not cost effective, the operating experience and performance characteristics had a significant effect on the design and development of the second and third generation machines. The Mod-OA machines were modified as a result of the operational experience, particularly the blade development and control system strategy. The results of study to investigate the interaction of a Mod-OA wind turbine with an isolated diesel generation system are discussed. The machine configuration, its advantages and disadvantages and the machine performance and availability are discussed.

  17. Implementation of an Integrated Information Management System for the US DOE Hanford Tank Farms Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyner, William Scott; Knight, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    In its role as the Tank Operations Contractor at the U.S. Department of Energy's site in Hanford, WA, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC is implementing an integrated document control and configuration management system. This system will combine equipment data with technical document data that currently resides in separate disconnected databases. The new system will provide integrated information, enabling users to more readily identify the documents that relate to a structure, system, or component and vice-versa. Additionally, the new system will automate engineering work processes through electronic workflows, and where practical and feasible provide integration with design authoring tools. Implementation of this system will improve configuration management of the technical baseline, increase work process efficiencies, support the efficient design of future large projects, and provide a platform for the efficient future turnover of technical baseline data and information

  18. Implementation of an Integrated Information Management System for the US DOE Hanford Tank Farms Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyner, William Scott; Knight, Mark A.

    2013-11-14

    In its role as the Tank Operations Contractor at the U.S. Department of Energy's site in Hanford, WA, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC is implementing an integrated document control and configuration management system. This system will combine equipment data with technical document data that currently resides in separate disconnected databases. The new system will provide integrated information, enabling users to more readily identify the documents that relate to a structure, system, or component and vice-versa. Additionally, the new system will automate engineering work processes through electronic workflows, and where practical and feasible provide integration with design authoring tools. Implementation of this system will improve configuration management of the technical baseline, increase work process efficiencies, support the efficient design of future large projects, and provide a platform for the efficient future turnover of technical baseline data and information.

  19. Impacts on seafloor geology of drilling disturbance in shallow waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Iran C S; Toldo, Elírio E; Toledo, Felipe A L

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the effects of drilling disturbance on the seafloor of the upper continental slope of the Campos Basin, Brazil, as a result of the project Environmental Monitoring of Offshore Drilling for Petroleum Exploration--MAPEM. Field sampling was carried out surrounding wells, operated by the company PETROBRAS, to compare sediment properties of the seafloor, including grain-size distribution, total organic carbon, and clay mineral composition, prior to drilling with samples obtained 3 and 22 months after drilling. The sampling grid used had 74 stations, 68 of which were located along 7 radials from the well up to a distance of 500 m. The other 6 stations were used as reference, and were located 2,500 m from the well. The results show no significant sedimentological variation in the area affected by drilling activity. The observed sedimentological changes include a fining of grain size, increase in total organic carbon, an increase in gibbsite, illite, and smectite, and a decrease in kaolinite after drilling took place.

  20. Limit of crustal drilling depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep drilling is becoming the direct and the most efficient means in exploiting deep mineral resources, facilitating to understanding the earthquake mechanism and performing other scientific researches on the Earth's crust. In order to understand the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust, we first conducted tests on granite samples with respect to the borehole deformation and stability under high temperature and high pressure using the triaxial servo-controlled rock testing system. Then the critical temperature-pressure coupling conditions that result in borehole instability are derived. Finally, based on the testing results obtained and the requirements for the threshold values of borehole deformations during deep drilling, the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust is formulated with ground temperature.

  1. Geothermal drilling in Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A., Bernardo

    1982-08-10

    The number of characteristics of the different wells that have been drilled in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field to date enable one to summarize the basic factors in the applied technology, draw some conclusions, improve systems and procedures, and define some problems that have not yet been satisfactorily solved, although the existing solution is the best now available. For all practical purposes, the 100 wells drilled in the three areas or blocks into which the Cerro Prieto field has been divided have been completed. Both exploratory and production wells have been drilled; problems of partial or total lack of control have made it necessary to abandon some of these wells, since they were unsafe to keep in production or even to be used for observation and/or study. The wells and their type, the type of constructed wells and the accumulative meters that have been drilled for such wells are summarized.

  2. Drilling Damage in Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Miguel P. Durão

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of carbon fibre reinforced laminates have widened their use from aerospace to domestic appliances, and new possibilities for their usage emerge almost daily. In many of the possible applications, the laminates need to be drilled for assembly purposes. It is known that a drilling process that reduces the drill thrust force can decrease the risk of delamination. In this work, damage assessment methods based on data extracted from radiographic images are compared and correlated with mechanical test results—bearing test and delamination onset test—and analytical models. The results demonstrate the importance of an adequate selection of drilling tools and machining parameters to extend the life cycle of these laminates as a consequence of enhanced reliability.

  3. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

    1990-06-01

    The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a

  4. Development of a Drilling Simulator for Dental Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Nagahata, Masahiro; Takano, Naoki; Takemoto, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a dental implant surgery simulator that allows learners to experience the drilling forces necessary to perform an osteotomy in the posterior mandibular bone. The simulator contains a force-sensing device that receives input and counteracts this force, which is felt as resistance by the user. The device consists of an actuator, a load cell, and a control unit. A mandibular bone model was fabricated in which the predicted forces necessary to drill the cortical and trabecular bone were determined via micro CT image-based 3D finite element analysis. The simulator was evaluated by five dentists from the Department of Implantology at Tokyo Dental College. The ability of the evaluators to distinguish the drilling resistance through different regions of the mandibular bone was investigated. Of the five dentists, four sensed the change in resistance when the drill perforated the upper cortical bone. All five dentists were able to detect when the drill made contact with lingual cortical bone and when the lingual bone was perforated. This project successfully developed a dental implant surgery simulator that allows users to experience the forces necessary to drill through types of bone encountered during osteotomy. Furthermore, the researchers were able to build a device by which excessive drilling simulates a situation in which the lingual cortical bone is perforated--a situation that could lead to negative repercussions in a clinical setting. The simulator was found to be useful to train users to recognize the differences in resistance when drilling through the mandibular bone.

  5. Does air-sea coupling influence model projections of the effects of the Paris Agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingaman, Nicholas; Suckling, Emma; Sutton, Rowan; Dong, Buwen

    2017-04-01

    The 2015 Paris Agreement includes the long-term goal to hold global-mean temperature to "well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels", with the further stated aim of limiting the global-mean warming to 1.5°C, in the belief that this would "significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change". However, it is not clear which risks and impacts would be avoided, or reduced, by achieving a 1.5°C warming instead of a 2.0°C warming. Initial efforts to quantify changes in risk have focused on analysis of existing CMIP5 simulations at levels of global-mean warming close to 1.5°C or 2.0°C, by taking averages over ≈20 year periods. This framework suffers from several drawbacks, however, including the effect of model internal multi-decadal variability, the influence of coupled-model systematic errors on regional circulation patterns, and the presence of a warming trend across the averaging period (i.e., the model is not in steady state). To address these issues, the "Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts" (HAPPI) project is performing large ensembles of atmosphere-only experiments with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) for present-day and 1.5°C and 2.0°C scenarios. While these experiments reduce the complications from a limited dataset and coupled-model systematic errors, the use of atmosphere-only models neglects feedbacks between the atmosphere and ocean, which may have substantial effects on the representation of local and regional extremes, and hence on the response of these extremes to global-mean warming. We introduce a set of atmosphere-ocean coupled simulations that incorporate much of the HAPPI experiment design, yet retain a representation of air-sea feedbacks. We use the Met Office Unified Model Global Ocean Mixed Layer (MetUM-GOML) model, which comprises the MetUM atmospheric model coupled to many columns of the one-dimensional K Profile Parameterization mixed-layer ocean. Critically, the MetUM-GOML ocean mean

  6. Synthesis of engineering designs of drilling facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porozhsky, K.

    2018-03-01

    The article sets forth key principles of engineering of drilling equipment based on successive analysis of the goals of the production method, technologies of its implementation and conditions of mineral mining using a new approach to systematization of drilling methods. Potential advancement in the technologies and equipment of drilling is illustrated in terms of oil-well drilling.

  7. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  8. JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

    2003-05-01

    Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a

  9. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  10. DOE project review Massachusetts Photovoltaic Program. Annual report, June 1989--July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is the third year of operations for work under the Cooperative Agreement between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Photovoltaic Center and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a collaborative effort with shared resources, the activity at the Photovoltaic Center and the University of Lowell Photovoltaic Program has continued to advance the utilization and implementation of photovoltaic-powered systems into society. The programs and activities developed over the past three years have supported strategies that cover both international utilization as well as domestic application. Three major areas of activities have centered around the following themes: (1) The identification of market opportunities to enlarge sales potential for the photovoltaic industry. (2) The development of a knowledgeable infrastructure to support PV diffusion in Massachusetts, in the United States, and around the world. (3) The analysis of the physical, economic, and regulatory environment in which PV must compete with mature energy technologies. This past year has been an experience of contrasts for the Photovoltaic Center. Projects and activities have resulted in the successful completion of programs goals.

  11. Atacama Rover Astrobiology Drilling Studies: Roving to Find Subsurface Preserved Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B.; Davila, A.; Parro, V.; Quinn, R.; Willis, P.; Brinckerhoff, W.; DiRuggiero, J.; Williams, M.; Bergman, D.; Stoker, C.

    2016-05-01

    The ARADS project is a NASA PSTAR that will drill into a Mars analog site in search of biomarkers. Leading to a field test of an integrated rover-drill system with four prototype in-situ instruments for biomarker detection and analysis.

  12. Laser Drilling Development Trial Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1538-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hebbar, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    This project performed various laser drilling tests to demonstrate femtosecond laser drilling of fuel injector nozzles with minimal recast, minimal heat affected zone and no collateral damage. LLNL had extensive experience in ultra short-pulse laser systems and developed specialized hardware for these applications.

  13. Results of the marine biota monitoring during drilling activity on Campos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petta, Claudia Brigagao de; Bastos, Fabio; Danielski, Monica; Ferreira, Mariana; Gama, Mariana; Coelho, Ana Paula Athanazio; Maia, Decio [Aecom do Brasil Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Project (PMA) aims to report environmental changes arising from drilling activity, in relation to the marine fauna. This project can also help in the monitoring of accidental spills. Since the professionals spend six hours of the day monitoring the ocean around the rigs, they can locate and identify oil stains, notify the responsible onboard, and also help in the monitoring of the oil stain. Such Project has been developed onboard a drilling unit working in Campos Basin. The results presented here were collected during the drilling activity in Bijupira and Salema fields, by Shell Brasil Petroleo Ltda, from July 13th to October 8th, 2011.

  14. SNF project's MCO compliance assessment with DOE ''general design criteria,'' order 6430.1A and ''SNF project MCO additional NRC requirements,'' HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document is presented to demonstrate the MCOs compliance to the major design criteria invoked on the MCO. This document is broken down into a section for the MCO's evaluation against DOE Order 6430.1A General Design Criteria sixteen divisions and then the evaluation of the MCO against HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005 ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Multi-Canister Overpack Additional NRC Requirements.'' The compliance assessment is presented as a matrix in tabular form. The MCO is the primary container for the K-basin's spent nuclear fuel as it leaves the basin pools and through to the 40 year interim storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The MCO and its components interface with; the K basins, shipping cask and transportation system, Cold Vacuum Drying facility individual process bays and equipment, and CSB facility including the MCO handling machine (MHM), the storage tubes, and the MCO work stations where sampling, welding, and inspection of the MCO is performed. As the MCO is the primary boundary for handling, process, and storage, its main goals are to minimize the spread of its radiological contents to the outside of the MCO and provide for nuclear criticality control. The MCO contains personnel radiation shielding only on its upper end, in the form of a shield plug, where the process interfaces are located. Shielding beyond the shield plug is the responsibility of the using facilities. The design of the MCO and its components is depicted in drawings H-2-828040 through H-2-828075. Not every drawing number in the sequence is used. The first drawing number, H-2-828040, is the drawing index for the MCO. The design performance specification for the MCO is HW-S-0426, and was reviewed and approved by the interfacing design authorities, the safety, regulatory, and operations groups, and the local DOE office. The current revision for the design performance specification is revision 5. The designs of the MCO have been reviewed and approved in a similar way and the reports

  15. After Action Report: Specific Manufacturing Capability 2014 Evaluated Drill October 29, 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, V. Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    On October 29, 2014, the Specific Manufacturing Capability (SMC) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted its annual evaluated emergency drill. As a result, this after action report is required by DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The SMC facility, in coordination with other onsite organizations, and the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) conducted an annual facility emergency drill to demonstrate the ability to implement the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The INL contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) in coordination with other onsite organizations, conducted operations and demonstrated proper response measures to mitigate an event and protect the health and safety of onsite personnel, the environment, and property. Report data was collected from multiple sources, including documentation generated during drill response, critiques conducted immediately after terminating the drill, and evaluation critiques.

  16. Development of a system to provide diagnostics-while-drilling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Jack LeRoy; Jacobson, Ronald David; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2003-06-01

    This report describes development of a system that provides high-speed, real-time downhole data while drilling. Background of the project, its benefits, major technical challenges, test planning, and test results are covered by relatively brief descriptions in the body of the report, with some topics presented in more detail in the attached appendices.

  17. Berengario's drill: origin and inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorney, Michael A; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Craniotomies are among the oldest neurosurgical procedures, as evidenced by early human skulls discovered with holes in the calvaria. Though devices change, the principles to safely transgress the skull are identical. Modern neurosurgeons regularly use electric power drills in the operating theater; however, nonelectric trephining instruments remain trusted by professionals in certain emergent settings in the rare instance that an electric drill is unavailable. Until the late Middle Ages, innovation in craniotomy instrumentation remained stunted without much documented redesign. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi's (c. 1457-1530 CE) text Tractatus de Fractura Calvae sive Cranei depicts a drill previously unseen in a medical volume. Written in 1518 CE, the book was motivated by defeat over the course of Lorenzo II de'Medici's medical care. Berengario's interchangeable bit with a compound brace ("vertibulum"), known today as the Hudson brace, symbolizes a pivotal device in neurosurgery and medical tool design. This drill permitted surgeons to stock multiple bits, perform the craniotomy faster, and decrease equipment costs during a period of increased incidence of cranial fractures, and thus the need for craniotomies, which was attributable to the introduction of gunpowder. The inspiration stemmed from a school of thought growing within a population of physicians trained as mathematicians, engineers, and astrologers prior to entering the medical profession. Berengario may have been the first to record the use of such a unique drill, but whether he invented this instrument or merely adapted its use for the craniotomy remains clouded.

  18. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.

  19. Predicting drill well direction changes by regression model; Previsao de desvios na coluna de perfuracao via modelo de regressao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Areli Mesquita da [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos 25 da ANP]. E-mail: areli@dme.ufcg.edu.br; Souza, Francisco Antonio Morais de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)]. E-mail: fsouza@dme.ufcg.edu.br

    2004-07-01

    During the oil well perforation we are in concern to control its upright. Even when a well is projected to be vertical, we must have in mind that does not exist rigorously vertical well, a time that diverse factors contribute for the occurrence of deviance in the drill well. When these deviances exceed certain tolerance limits the well can reach the final depth in a position far away from the desired objective, making difficult its exploration. There are others aggravations for wells that deviate from the vertical line such as consuming for fatigue of the perforation pipes and retention of the commands at the moment of the withdrawal of the column beyond difficulties in the descending of covering columns. In this work, we consider to control the upright of the well through a regression model, having an angular variable as the dependent variable in the model. The objective consists in forecast deviance in the drill well, by using the hardness of the rock, the penetration rate and the weight on the drill. (author)

  20. The Application of Biodiesel as an Environmental Friendly Drilling Fluid to Drill Oil and Gas Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Abdul Razak

    2014-01-01

    The oil and gas industries need to use oil based drilling fluids to drill troublesome rock layers such as sensitive shale formation or to drill very deep oil and gas wells. However, using oil based drilling fluids will create pollution and therefore, environmental regulations on discharge of such drilling fluids have become more stringent because it will give tremendous impacts on the marine life and ecosystem. This research is conducted to formulate a new environmental friendly drilling flui...

  1. Drilling force and temperature of bone under dry and physiological drilling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linlin; Wang, Chengyong; Jiang, Min; He, Huiyu; Song, Yuexian; Chen, Hanyuan; Shen, Jingnan; Zhang, Jiayong

    2014-11-01

    Many researches on drilling force and temperature have been done with the aim to reduce the labour intensiveness of surgery, avoid unnecessary damage and improve drilling quality. However, there has not been a systematic study of mid- and high-speed drilling under dry and physiological conditions(injection of saline). Furthermore, there is no consensus on optimal drilling parameters. To study these parameters under dry and physiological drilling conditions, pig humerus bones are drilled with medical twist drills operated using a wide range of drilling speeds and feed rates. Drilling force and temperature are measured using a YDZ-II01W dynamometer and a NEC TVS-500EX thermal infrared imager, respectively, to evaluate internal bone damage. To evaluate drilling quality, bone debris and hole morphology are observed by SEM(scanning electron microscopy). Changes in drilling force and temperature give similar results during drilling such that the value of each parameter peaks just before the drill penetrates through the osteon of the compact bone into the trabeculae of the spongy bone. Drilling temperatures under physiological conditions are much lower than those observed under dry conditions, while a larger drilling force occurs under physiological conditions than dry conditions. Drilling speed and feed rate have a significant influence on drilling force, temperature, bone debris and hole morphology. The investigation of the effect of drilling force and temperature on internal bone damage reveals that a drilling speed of 4500 r/min and a feed rate of 50 mm/min are recommended for bone drilling under physiological conditions. Drilling quality peaks under these optimal parameter conditions. This paper proposes the optimal drilling parameters under mid- and high-speed surgical drilling, considering internal bone damage and drilling quality, which can be looked as a reference for surgeons performing orthopedic operations.

  2. Review of casing while drilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavković Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drilling methods have been plagued with huge operational and financial challenges, such as cost of purchasing, inspecting, handling, transporting the drill equipment and most importantly, tripping in-and-out of the drill string whenever the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA needs a replacement, needs of wiper trip or when total depth is reached. The tripping in-and-out of the drill string not only contributes to Non Productive Time (NPT but also leads to well control difficulties including wellbore instability and lost circulation. All this has led Oil and Gas industry, as well as any other engineering industry, to seek for new ways and methods in order to reduce these problems. Thanks to the advances in technical solutions and constant improvements of conventional drilling methods, a new drilling method - casing while drilling has been developed. Casing Drilling encompasses the process of simultaneously drilling and casing a well, using the active casing and thus optimizes the production. This paper presents a review of casing while drilling method (CwD and its practical usage in drilling wells. The comparison of conventional drilling method and casing while drilling is also presented. The CwD method achieves significantly better results than conventional drilling method.

  3. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified

  4. Chemical analyses of potash-bearing horizons from 21 exploratory holes drilled at a tentative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Eddy County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griswold, G.B.

    1977-09-01

    Sandia Laboratories drilled 21 potash drill holes over an 18,960-acre site in east-central Eddy County, New Mexico, to evaluate potash resources as part of their Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project. This report furnishes assay information on samples obtained from the drilling program

  5. Uranium prospecting by percussive drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Societe de developpent da la Baie James (SDBJ) is carrying out mineral exploration in the region surrounding its hydroelectric development, in partnership with several companies experienced in exploration. In 1977 one joint venture consisting of SDBJ, Eldorado Nuclear Ltd., and Seru Nucleaire (Canada) made use of percussive drilling techniques in its search for uranium, hoping to take advantage of the rapid progress and greater mobility offered by this method. Details of the equipment and techniques used, with particular adaptations made necessary by the remote and rugged terrain, are given. It was concluded that percussive drilling is a useful technique. It is capable of a depth of up to 150 meters; the cost is relatively low (around $11.40 per drilled foot); its mobility and the rapid emplacement of equipment are important factors; and productivity is good, ideally 10 meters per hour. (LL)

  6. Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, K.S. (ed.)

    1984-01-01

    The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

  7. Environmental assessment of exploration drilling off Nova Scotia: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The environmental assessment project of drilling offshore Nova Scotia covers year-around drilling conducted from jackup rigs, semi-submersible rigs, and drill ships that use the methods described in the project description on the Scotian Shelf, the Laurentian Channel and St, Pierre Bank. The assessment was sponsored by all the oil companies active in the area, namely Mobil Oil Canada, Shell Canada, Imperial Oil Resources, Gulf Canada Resources, Chevron Canada Resources, PanCanadian Petroleum, Murphy Oil Company and Norsk Hydro Canada Oil and Gas. This summary describes the impact assessment methodology used, provides a description of the project, reviews the cumulative impact, and the impacts of discrete activities such as noise and disturbances, operational discharges of oil, disruption of the benthos, garbage and waste disposal, and accidental oil spills, and outlines mitigation and monitoring activities to deal with the impacts. Mitigation measures encompass routine discharges, accidental oil spills, spill response, monitoring activities, contingency plans and an overall environmental protection plan. In addition to this generic assessment, the consultants recommend that individual exploration drilling programs that fall outside of the parameters outlined in the generic environmental assessment document, be required to undergo a program-specific assessment that focuses on those aspects of the proposed program that differ from the parameters prescribed in the present document. 9 refs

  8. Drilled Shaft Foundations for Noise Barrier Walls and Slope Stabilization : Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This research project is focused on two primary objectives. The first objective relates to the development of a methodology for using the SPT (Standard Penetration Test) results to design the laterally loaded drilled shafts. The second objective aims...

  9. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman r. Morrow

    2002-06-01

    This first semiannual report covers efforts to select the materials that will be used in this project. Discussions of crude oils, rocks, smooth mineral surfaces, and drilling mud additives are included in this report.

  10. Comparison of conventional and self-consolidating concrete for drilled shaft construction : [tech summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Significant anomalies have been observed in many of the recent drilled shaft construction projects throughout Louisiana. : The anomalies typically occur in the form of honeycombing within the zones of heavy reinforcement or sometimes at the : shaft b...

  11. Comparison of conventional and self-consolidating concrete for drilled shaft construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Many entities currently use self-consolidating concrete (SCC), especially for drilled shaft construction. This project investigated the use of SCC : and various test methods to assess the suitability of SCC in underwater placement conditions. Eight m...

  12. Modified Standard Penetration Test–based Drilled Shaft Design Method for Weak Rocks (Phase 2 Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-15

    In this project, Illinois-specific design procedures were developed for drilled shafts founded in weak shale or rock. In particular, a modified standard penetration test was developed and verified to characterize the in situ condition of weak shales ...

  13. Bit selection using field drilling data and mathematical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, M. S.; Ridha, S.; Hosseini, S. J.; Meyghani, B.; Emamian, S. S.

    2018-03-01

    A drilling process will not be complete without the usage of a drill bit. Therefore, bit selection is considered to be an important task in drilling optimization process. To select a bit is considered as an important issue in planning and designing a well. This is simply because the cost of drilling bit in total cost is quite high. Thus, to perform this task, aback propagation ANN Model is developed. This is done by training the model using several wells and it is done by the usage of drilling bit records from offset wells. In this project, two models are developed by the usage of the ANN. One is to find predicted IADC bit code and one is to find Predicted ROP. Stage 1 was to find the IADC bit code by using all the given filed data. The output is the Targeted IADC bit code. Stage 2 was to find the Predicted ROP values using the gained IADC bit code in Stage 1. Next is Stage 3 where the Predicted ROP value is used back again in the data set to gain Predicted IADC bit code value. The output is the Predicted IADC bit code. Thus, at the end, there are two models that give the Predicted ROP values and Predicted IADC bit code values.

  14. Semantic Approaches Applied to Scientific Ocean Drilling Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fils, D.; Jenkins, C. J.; Arko, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The application of Linked Open Data methods to 40 years of data from scientific ocean drilling is providing users with several new methods for rich-content data search and discovery. Data from the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) have been translated and placed in RDF triple stores to provide access via SPARQL, linked open data patterns, and by embedded structured data through schema.org / RDFa. Existing search services have been re-encoded in this environment which allows the new and established architectures to be contrasted. Vocabularies including computed semantic relations between concepts, allow separate but related data sets to be connected on their concepts and resources even when they are expressed somewhat differently. Scientific ocean drilling produces a wide range of data types and data sets: borehole logging file-based data, images, measurements, visual observations and the physical sample data. The steps involved in connecting these data to concepts using vocabularies will be presented, including the connection of data sets through Vocabulary of Interlinked Datasets (VoID) and open entity collections such as Freebase and dbPedia. Demonstrated examples will include: (i) using RDF Schema for inferencing and in federated searches across NGDC and IODP data, (ii) using structured data in the data.oceandrilling.org web site, (iii) association through semantic methods of age models and depth recorded data to facilitate age based searches for data recorded by depth only.

  15. Proceedings of the DOE/Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Radionuclde Adsorption Workshop at Los Alamos National Laboratory, September 11--12, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted a workshop on radionuclide adsorption for the Department of Energy (DOE)/Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project on September 11 and 12, 1990. The purpose of the workshop was to respond to a recommendation by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board that the DOE organize a radionuclide adsorption workshop to be attended by the DOE and its contractors involved in the measurement and modeling of such adsorption. The workshop would have two general purposes: (a) to determine the applicability of available radionuclide adsorption data on tuff and models for predicting such adsorption under existing and postclosure conditions at Yucca Mountain and (b) to establish what additional radionuclide adsorption research and model development are needed. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases

  16. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  17. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  18. Application of Ester based Drilling Fluid for Shale Gas Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauki, Arina; Safwan Zazarli Shah, Mohamad; Bakar, Wan Zairani Wan

    2015-05-01

    Water based mud is the most commonly used mud in drilling operation. However, it is ineffective when dealing with water-sensitive shale that can lead to shale hydration, consequently wellbore instability is compromised. The alternative way to deal with this kind of shale is using synthetic-based mud (SBM) or oil-based mud (OBM). OBM is the best option in terms of technical requirement. Nevertheless, it is toxic and will create environmental problems when it is discharged to onshore or offshore environment. SBM is safer than the OBM. The aim of this research is to formulate a drilling mud system that can carry out its essential functions for shale gas drilling to avoid borehole instability. Ester based SBM has been chosen for the mud formulation. The ester used is methyl-ester C12-C14 derived from palm oil. The best formulation of ester-based drilling fluid was selected by manipulating the oil-water ratio content in the mud which are 70/30, 80/20 and 90/10 respectively. The feasibility of using this mud for shale gas drilling was investigated by measuring the rheological properties, shale reactivity and toxicity of the mud and the results were compared with a few types of OBM and WBM. The best rheological performance can be seen at 80/20 oil-water ratio of ester based mud. The findings revealed that the rheological performance of ester based mud is comparable with the excellent performance of sarapar based OBM and about 80% better than the WBM in terms of fluid loss. Apart from that, it is less toxic than other types of OBM which can maintain 60% prawn's survival even after 96 hours exposure in 100,000 ppm of mud concentration in artificial seawater.

  19. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mese, Ali; Dvorkin, Jack; Shillinglaw, John

    2000-09-11

    This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for unconsolidated sands and clayey sands. The results of the project should provide the industry with a basis for wider use of oil base drilling fluids in water sensitive formations by implementing drill cutting injection into existing wells at abandoned formations and controlling fracture geometry to prevent ground water contamination.

  20. Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

    2007-06-30

    Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the

  1. Unique microbial community in drilling fluids from Chinese continental scientific drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Xu, Zhiqin; Eberl, Dennis D.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating drilling fluid is often regarded as a contamination source in investigations of subsurface microbiology. However, it also provides an opportunity to sample geological fluids at depth and to study contained microbial communities. During our study of deep subsurface microbiology of the Chinese Continental Scientific Deep drilling project, we collected 6 drilling fluid samples from a borehole from 2290 to 3350 m below the land surface. Microbial communities in these samples were characterized with cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the bacterial clone sequences related to Firmicutes became progressively dominant with increasing depth. Most sequences were related to anaerobic, thermophilic, halophilic or alkaliphilic bacteria. These habitats were consistent with the measured geochemical characteristics of the drilling fluids that have incorporated geological fluids and partly reflected the in-situ conditions. Several clone types were closely related to Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus, and Anaerobranca gottschalkii, an anaerobic metal-reducer, an extreme thermophile, and an anaerobic chemoorganotroph, respectively, with an optimal growth temperature of 50–68°C. Seven anaerobic, thermophilic Fe(III)-reducing bacterial isolates were obtained and they were capable of reducing iron oxide and clay minerals to produce siderite, vivianite, and illite. The archaeal diversity was low. Most archaeal sequences were not related to any known cultivated species, but rather to environmental clone sequences recovered from subsurface environments. We infer that the detected microbes were derived from geological fluids at depth and their growth habitats reflected the deep subsurface conditions. These findings have important implications for microbial survival and their ecological functions in the deep subsurface.

  2. Demonstration of Eastman Christensen horizontal drilling system -- Integrated Demonstration Site, Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    An innovative horizontal drilling system was used to install two horizontal wells as part of an integrated demonstration project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The SRS is located in south-central South Carolina in the upper Coastal Plain physiographic province. The demonstration site is located near the A/M Area, and is currently known as the Integated Demonstration Site. The Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in soils and groundwater at the SRS in 1989. The overall goal of the program is to demonstrate, at a single location, multiple technologies in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program

  3. El Paso County Geothermal Project at Fort Bliss. Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lear, Jon [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Bennett, Carlon [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Lear, Dan [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Jones, Phil L. [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Burdge, Mark [Evergreen Clean Energy Management, Provo, UT (United States); Barker, Ben [Evergreen Clean Energy Management, Provo, UT (United States); Segall, Marylin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Moore, Joseph [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Nash, Gregory [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Jones, Clay [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Simmons, Stuart [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Taylor, Nancy [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.

    2016-02-01

    The El Paso County Geothermal Project at Fort Bliss was an effort to determine the scale and scope of geothermal resources previously identified on Fort Bliss’ McGregor Range in southern Otero County, New Mexico. The project was funded with a $5,000,000 grant to El Paso County from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and a $4,812,500 match provided by private sector partners. The project was administered through the DOE Golden Field Office to awardee El Paso County. The primary subcontractor to El Paso County and project Principal Investigator - Ruby Mountain Inc. (RMI) of Salt Lake City, Utah - assembled the project team consisting of Evergreen Clean Energy Management (ECEM) of Provo, Utah, and the Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah (EGI) in Salt Lake City, UT to complete the final phases of the project. The project formally began in May of 2010 and consisted of two preliminary phases of data collection and evaluation which culminated in the identification of a drilling site for a Resource Confirmation Well on McGregor Range. Well RMI 56-5 was drilled May and June 2013 to a depth of 3,030 ft. below ground level. A string of slotted 7 inch casing was set in 8.75 inch hole on bottom fill at 3,017 ft. to complete the well. The well was drilled using a technique called flooded reverse circulation, which is most common in mineral exploration. This technique produced an exceptionally large and complete cuttings record. An exciting development at the conclusion of drilling was the suspected discovery of a formation that has proven to be of exceptionally high permeability in three desalinization wells six miles to the south. Following drilling and preliminary testing and analysis, the project team has determined that the McGregor Range thermal anomaly is large and can probably support development in the tens of megawatts.

  4. Characterization of Under-Building Contamination at Rocky Flats Implementing Environmental-Measurement While Drilling Process with Horizontal Directional Drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIAMS, CECELIA V.; LOCKWOOD, GRANT J.; NORMANN, RANDY A.; LINDSAY, THOMAS

    2001-01-01

    Characterization is required on thirty-one buildings at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or the Site) with known or suspected under building contamination. The Site has teamed with Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to deploy Environmental Measure-While-Drilling (EMWD) in conjunction with horizontal directional drilling (HDD) to characterize under building contamination and to evaluate the performance and applicability for future characterization efforts. The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental drill bit data during drilling operations. The project investigated two locations, Building 886 and Building 123. Building 886 is currently undergoing D and D activities. Building 123 was demolished in 1998; however, the slab is present with under building process waste lines and utilities. This report presents the results of the EMWD Gamma Ray Spectrometer logging of boreholes at these two sites. No gamma emitting contamination was detected at either location.(author)

  5. Additive to clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytenko, V.S.; Nekrasova, V.B.; Nikitinskiy, E.L.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the lubricating and strengthening properties of clay drilling muds. This goal is achieved because the lubricating and strengthening additive used is waste from the pulp and paper industry at the stage of reprocessing crude sulfate soap into phytosterol.

  6. Drilling azimuth gamma embedded design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yi Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded drilling azimuth gamma design, the use of radioactive measuring principle embedded gamma measurement while drilling a short section analysis. Monte Carlo method, in response to the density of horizontal well logging numerical simulation of 16 orientation, the orientation of horizontal well analysed, calliper, bed boundary location, space, different formation density, formation thickness, and other factors inclined strata dip the impact by simulating 137Cs sources under different formation conditions of the gamma distribution, to determine the orientation of drilling density tool can detect window size and space, draw depth of the logging methods. The data 360° azimuth imaging, image processing method to obtain graph, display density of the formation, dip and strata thickness and other parameters, the logging methods obtain real-time geo-steering. To establish a theoretical basis for the orientation density logging while drilling method implementation and application of numerical simulation in-depth study of the MWD azimuth and density log response factors of horizontal wells.

  7. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face

  8. Geothermal well drilling manual at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez P., A.; Flores S., M.

    1982-08-10

    The objective of the drilling manual is to solve all problems directly related to drilling during the construction of a well. In this case, the topics dealt which are drilling fluids and hydraulics to be applied in the field to improve drilling progress, eliminate risks and achieve good well-completion. There are other topics that are applicable such as drill bits and the drilling string, which are closely linked to drilling progress. On this occasion drilling fluid and hydraulics programs are presented, in addition to a computing program for a Casio FX-502P calculator to be applied in the field to optimize hydraulics and in the analysis of hydraulics for development and exploration wells at their different intervals.

  9. Facility for testing ice drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Delahunty, Chris; Goodge, John W.; Severinghaus, Jeffery P.

    2017-05-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) is designed for subsurface scientific investigations in Antarctica. Its objectives are to drill rapidly through ice, to core samples of the transition zone and bedrock, and to leave behind a borehole observatory. These objectives required the engineering and fabrication of an entirely new drilling system that included a modified mining-style coring rig, a unique fluid circulation system, a rod skid, a power unit, and a workshop with areas for the storage of supplies and consumables. An important milestone in fabrication of the RAID was the construction of a North American Test (NAT) facility where we were able to test drilling and fluid processing functions in an environment that is as close as possible to that expected in Antarctica. Our criteria for site selection was that the area should be cold during the winter months, be located in an area of low heat flow, and be at relatively high elevation. We selected a site for the facility near Bear Lake, Utah, USA. The general design of the NAT well (NAT-1) started with a 27.3 cm (10.75 in.) outer casing cemented in a 152 m deep hole. Within that casing, we hung a 14 cm (5.5 in.) casing string, and, within that casing, a column of ice was formed. The annulus between the 14 and 27.3 cm casings provided the path for circulation of a refrigerant. After in-depth study, we chose to use liquid CO2 to cool the hole. In order to minimize the likelihood of the casing splitting due to the volume increase associated with freezing water, the hole was first cooled and then ice was formed in increments from the bottom upward. First, ice cubes were placed in the inner liner and then water was added. Using this method, a column of ice was incrementally prepared for drilling tests. The drilling tests successfully demonstrated the functioning of the RAID system. Reproducing such a facility for testing of other ice drilling systems could be advantageous to other research programs in the future.

  10. Surgical drill system and surgical drill bit to be used therein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margallo Balbas, E.; Wieringa, P.A.; French, P.J.; Lee, R.A.; Breedveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical drill system comprising a mechanical drill bit and means for imaging the vicinity of the drill bit tip, said means comprising: at least one optical fiber having a distal end and a proximal end, said distal end being located adjacent said drill bit tip, an optical processing unit, said

  11. Final DOE-ASR Report for the Project “Advancing our Understanding and the Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, David [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Erfani, Ehsan [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Garnier, Anne [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Lawson, Paul [SPEC, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Morrison, Hugh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Avery, Melody [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2016-12-29

    This project has evolved during its execution, and what follows are the key project findings. This project has arguably provided the first global view of how cirrus cloud (defined as having cloud base temperature T < 235 K) nucleation physics (evaluated through satellite retrievals of ice particle number concentration Ni, effective diameter De and ice water content IWC) evolves with the seasons for a given temperature, latitude zone and surface type (e.g. ocean vs. land), based on a new satellite remote sensing method developed for this project. The retrieval method is unique in that it is very sensitive to the small ice crystals that govern the number concentration Ni, allowing Ni to be retrieved. The method currently samples single-layer cirrus clouds having visible optical depth ranging from about 0.3 to 3.0, using co-located observations from the Infrared Imaging Radiometer (IIR) and from the CALIOP (Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) polar orbiting satellite, employing IIR channels at 10.6 μm and 12.05 μm. Retrievals of Ni are primarily used to estimate the cirrus cloud formation mechanism; that is, either homo- or heterogeneous ice nucleation (henceforth hom and het). This is possible since, in general, hom produces more than an order of magnitude more ice crystals than does het. Thus the retrievals provide insight on how these mechanisms change with the seasons for a given latitude zone or region, based on the years 2008 and 2013. Using a conservative criterion for hom cirrus, on average, the sampled cirrus clouds formed through hom occur about 43% of the time in the Arctic and 50% of the time in the Antarctic, and during winter at mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, hom cirrus occur 37% of the time. Elsewhere (and during other seasons in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes), this hom cirrus fraction is lower, and it is lowest in the

  12. Automatic real time drilling support on Ekofisk utilizing eDrilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommetveit, Rolv; Bjorkevoll, Knut S.; Halsey, George W.; Kluge, Roald; Molde, Dag Ove; Odegard, Sven Inge [SINTEF Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway); Herbert, Mike [HITEC Products Drilling, Stavanger (Norway); ConocoPhillips Norge, Stavanger (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    eDrilling is a new and innovative system for real time drilling simulation, 3D visualization and control from a remote drilling expert centre. The concept uses all available real time drilling data (surface and downhole) in combination with real time modelling to monitor and optimize the drilling process. This information is used to visualize the wellbore in 3D in real time. eDrilling has been implemented in an Onshore Drilling Center in Norway. The system is composed of the following elements, some of which are unique and ground-breaking: an advanced and fast Integrated Drilling Simulator which is capable to model the different drilling sub-processes dynamically, and also the interaction between these sub-processes in real time; automatic quality check and corrections of drilling data; making them suitable for processing by computer models; real time supervision methodology for the drilling process using time based drilling data as well as drilling models / the integrated drilling simulator; methodology for diagnosis of the drilling state and conditions. This is obtained from comparing model predictions with measured data. Advisory technology for more optimal drilling. A Virtual Wellbore, with advanced visualization of the downhole process. Dat low and computer infrastructure. e-Drilling has been implemented in an Onshore Drilling Center on Ekofisk in Norway. The system is being used on drilling operations, and experiences from its use are presented. The supervision and diagnosis functionalities have been useful in particular, as the system has given early warnings on ECD and friction related problems. This paper will present the eDrilling system as well as experiences from its use. (author)

  13. REDUCTION OF AN ADVERSE IMPACT DURING WELL DRILLING BY MEANS OF DRILLING WASTE USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of drilling waste utilisation is assumed to be resolved through the implementation of the complex of environment protection production engineering measures. This includes, firstly, the usage in the process of well drilling of drilling mud on the basis of water-soluble biodegradable polymers and a four-stage drilling mud refining system. Secondly, the usage of the well site construction with trenching for allocation of expressed bore mud and a temporary ground tank for drilling waste water.

  14. Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

  15. GEO-ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF DRILLING WASTE DISPOSAL IN THE YAMAL PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreshkin Dmitrij Vladimirovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil and gas fields are located in remote areas known for their severe geological and climatic conditions that are aggravated by the presence of the paleocrystic frozen rock. Borehole drilling causes generation of the substantial amount of drilling waste. The sludge weighs millions of tons. Any rock is to remain frozen at any drilling site in the Yamal peninsula. Semifluid drilling waste occupies extensive areas around drilling sites; they prevent development of the surface infrastructure, they interfere with the work of drilling technicians and contribute to hazardous working conditions, they are a challenge to the local ecology. The above factors produce a negative impact on the environment and prevent sustainable development of the region. For example, disposal of drilling waste at condensed gas fields operated in the Yamal peninsula represents a substantial problem. Drilling waste contains drilling fluid used in the process of borehole drilling. It was discovered in the course of the preliminary research that drilling fluids were composite suspensions that contained bentonite, heavy spar, caustic soda, dilutants, and polymers. It was found out that the sludge was composed of silica, calcite, dolomite, aragonite, magnesite, some feldspars, heavy spar, gypsum and anhydrite, micas, hydromicas, clay minerals. Projections provided in the paper say that pre-neutralized sludge may be used in the manufacturing of building materials, such as bricks, claydite, small-size building units, etc. The authors argue that further research of the sludge elements and microstructure, as well as its chemical, mineral, granulometric and X-ray phase analyses need to be performed.

  16. Environmental issues and solutions for exploratory drilling in sensitive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Chevron USA Production Company (CPDN), the National Forest Service (FS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) successfully utilized a multi-disciplinary team approach to design and implement innovative environmental solutions to drill the 8,000 foot deep, Hunter Creek exploratory well. The project was located in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, less than 20 miles from Grand Teton National Park. Acquiring permission from the FS, the BLM, and ultimately, the public to drill the Hunter Creek well involved substantial teamwork in identifying many potential, environmental pitfalls. Creative, workable and cost-effective mitigation measures employed at Hunter Creek included: utilizing a helicopter and limiting vehicle use of an existing road, conducting environmental and safety training, an erosion control and reclamation plan, designing an environmentally friendly, near-zero-discharge drilling location, initiating a water quality monitoring program to establish baseline data and to ensure protection of surface and ground water, designing a waste minimization plan, identifying threatened and endangered and special status species possibly affected by project activities, and ensuring compliance with all mitigation measures and Federal and State regulations. The Hunter Creek project successfully demonstrates that oil and gas exploration can be conducted with a soft footprint in environmentally sensitive areas if mitigation measures are front-end loaded in the project and honored by all personnel involved. Teamwork, training and communication were found to be indispensable components of achieving success at Hunter Creek

  17. Electric drill-string telemetry

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, J M

    2003-01-01

    We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics of the drill-string/formation system. These properties are implicitly modeled by the series impedance and the shunt admittance of the transmission line. The differential equations are parabolic, since at low frequencies the wave field is diffusive. We use an explicit scheme for the solution of parabolic problems, based on a Chebyshev expansion of the evolution operator and the Fourier pseudospectral method to compute the spatial derivatives. The results are verified by comparison to analytical solutions obtained for the initial-value problem with a voltage source.

  18. The subsurface geology of Río Tinto: material examined during a simulated Mars drilling mission for the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Schutt, John; Sutter, Brad; Heldmann, Jennifer L; Bell, Mary Sue; Battler, Melissa; Cannon, Howard; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    The 2005 Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) project conducted a simulated 1-month Mars drilling mission in the Río Tinto district, Spain. Dry robotic drilling, core sampling, and biological and geological analytical technologies were collectively tested for the first time for potential use on Mars. Drilling and subsurface sampling and analytical technologies are being explored for Mars because the subsurface is the most likely place to find life on Mars. The objectives of this work are to describe drilling, sampling, and analytical procedures; present the geological analysis of core and borehole material; and examine lessons learned from the drilling simulation. Drilling occurred at an undisclosed location, causing the science team to rely only on mission data for geological and biological interpretations. Core and borehole imaging was used for micromorphological analysis of rock, targeting rock for biological analysis, and making decisions regarding the next day's drilling operations. Drilling reached 606 cm depth into poorly consolidated gossan that allowed only 35% of core recovery and contributed to borehole wall failure during drilling. Core material containing any indication of biology was sampled and analyzed in more detail for its confirmation. Despite the poorly consolidated nature of the subsurface gossan, dry drilling was able to retrieve useful core material for geological and biological analysis. Lessons learned from this drilling simulation can guide the development of dry drilling and subsurface geological and biological analytical technologies for future Mars drilling missions.

  19. Particles, processes and materials for modern energy needs: Development of a DOE-EPSCoR project in Puerto Rico. Final report for September 30, 1997 - August 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Brad R.

    2000-09-29

    Twenty-eight (28) faculty researchers focused on High Energy Particle Physics, Novel Thin Film Materials for Optoelectronic Applications, and Catalytic Processes for Energy Sources and Environmental Detoxification to address problems cited as priorities by the DOE and local agencies. The High Energy Particle Physics cluster has DOE-competitive funding, and the number of cluster investigators who have competitive mainstream funding has increased from 2 to 13 since the inception of the program. In this reporting period, 8 postdoctorals, 38 graduate studnets, and 23 undergraduates were involved in DOE projects, and 191 publications and 238 presentations were generated. The UPR-Arecibo Integrated Science Multi-Use Laboratory provided workshops and other activities that directly impacted 360 teachers and 600 students and indirectly impacted over 25,000 through the enhancement of teachers' skills and knowledge.

  20. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Quarterly report for the period of February, March and April 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. [Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Progress Center

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  1. Drilling Performance of Rock Drill by High-Pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rock drilling progress, the resistant force results in tools failure and the low drilling efficiency; thus, it is necessary to reduce the tools failure and enhance the drilling efficiency. In this paper, different configuration modes of drilling performance assisted with water jet are explored based on the mechanism and experiment analysis of rock drilling assisted with water jet. Moreover, the rotary sealing device with high pressure is designed to achieve the axial and rotation movement simultaneously as well as good sealing effect under high-pressure water jet. The results indicate that the NDB and NFB have better effects on drilling performance compared with that of NSB. Moreover, the high-pressure water jet is helpful not only to reduce the drill rod deflection, but also to reduce the probability of drill rod bending and improve the drill rod service life.

  2. Engineered zircaloy cladding modifications for improved accident tolerance of LWR fuel: US DOE NEUP Integrated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Brent

    2013-01-01

    An integrated research project (IRP) to fabricate and evaluate modified zircaloy LWR cladding under normal BWR/PWR operation and off-normal events has been funded by the US DOE. The IRP involves three US academic institutions, a US national laboratory, an intermediate stock industrial cladding supplier, and an international academic institution. A combination of computational and experimental protocols will be employed to design and test modified zircaloy cladding with respect to corrosion and accelerated oxide growth, the former associated with normal operation, the latter associated with steam exposure during loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and low-pressure core re-floods. Efforts will be made to go beyond design-base accident (DBA) scenarios (cladding temperature equal to or less than 1204 deg. C) during the experimental phase of modified zircaloy performance characterisation. The project anticipates the use of the facilities at ORNL to achieve steam exposure beyond DBA scenarios. In addition, irradiation of down-selected modified cladding candidates in the ATR may be performed. Cladding performance evaluation will be incorporated into a reactor system modelling effort of fuel performance, neutronics, and thermal hydraulics, thereby providing a holistic approach to accident-tolerant nuclear fuel. The proposed IRP brings together personnel, facilities, and capabilities across a wide range of technical areas relevant to the study of modified nuclear fuel and LWR performance during normal operation and off-normal scenarios. Two pathways towards accident-tolerant LWR fuel are envisioned, both based on the modification of existing zircaloy cladding. The first is the modification of the cladding surface by the application of a coating layer designed to shift the M + O→MO reaction away from oxide growth during steam exposure at elevated temperatures. This pathway is referred to as the 'surface coating' solution. The second is the modification of the bulk

  3. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 - 09/12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meggitt, Dallas J

    2012-11-09

    anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

  4. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

  5. Geologic investigations of drill hole sloughing problems, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Davies, W.J.; Gonzales, J.L.; Hawkins, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Severe sloughing zones encountered while drilling large diameter emplacement holes in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, have been identified, correlated and predicted through detailed geologic investigations. In central and southeastern Area 7 and in northern Area 3, the unstable zones are a very fine-grained, well-sorted, unconsolidated sand deposit, probably eolian in origin, which will readily flow into large diameter drill holes. Other areas exhibit hole erosion related to poor induration or extensive zeolitization of the Tertiary tuff units which are very friable and porous. By examining drill hole samples, geophysical logs, caliper logs and drilling histories, these problem zones can be characterized, correlated and then projected into nearby sites. Maps have been generated to show the depth, thickness and areal extent of these strata. In some cases, they are local and have a lenticular geometry, while in others they are quite extensive. The ability to predict such features can enhance the quality of the hole construction and completion operations to avoid costly delays and the loss of valuable testing real estate. The control of hole enlargements will also eliminate related containment concerns, such as stemming uncertainties

  6. 75 FR 2138 - Interconnection of the Proposed Hermosa West Wind Farm Project, Wyoming (DOE/EIS-0438)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... America Hotel, 2800 West Lincolnway, Cheyenne, Wyoming; and at Hilton Garden Inn and UW Conference Center.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Western is a Federal power marketing agency within the DOE that markets and delivers...

  7. Development of controlled drilling technology and measurement method in the borehole. Phase 2. Upgrading of drilling and measurement system and its application to the fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiho, Kenzo; Shin, Koichi; Ohtsu, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, the soft sedimentary rock of the Neogene tertiary is being focused as a host rock for High Level Waste (HLW) disposal. Especially, the soft sedimentary rock at the coastal area is thought to be one of the best candidates, since there is little driving force of the underground water. The measurement and logging of the bore hole in order to investigate the hydro-geological and geo-mechanical conditions of the host rock is a very important way to examine the potential of the disposal candidates. Since 2000, CRIEPI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry) has been conducting the project on controlled drilling and the logging/measurement technologies in its boreholes. Based on the results of phase 1(2000-2004), CRIEPI has been developing the drilling and logging/measurement technologies for fault zone during phase 2 (2005-2007). The drilling technology such as drilling for fault zone, horizontal drilling, long hole drilling, coring and locality detection was developed and these applicability was confirmed while drilling. The permeability/water-sampling/imaging tool was revised to apply wider borehole and longer measuring section. The WL-LWD was improved to be tougher in the hole. The borehole pressure meter and stress measurement tools were unified. Each tools necessary for the monitoring system is manufactured. The applicability of these tools and systems were verified in the borehole. After conducting surveys for the Omagari fault distributing at the Kami-horonobe area, the drilling site and borehole trace was decided in 2005. Considering the planned trace, the bore hole was drilled to the 683.5m long and its core recovery was 99.8%. Using borehole logging/measurement/survey, the geological, hydrological, geo-mechanical, geophysical and geochemical data were collected and the Omagari fault was characterized. (author)

  8. Going Online With Ocean Drilling Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, A. D.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2003-12-01

    distribution. And the CD-ROM product allows ODP to enhance the electronic resources available to researchers by including an index of all published IR/SR volume pairs on each CD, detailed site maps, movies, unlimited color images, and other supplementary data sets provided by authors. Our next venture is to digitize the older printed ODP volumes and the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) series and make these publications available online in HTML and PDF formats as well. This will provide the scientific community with more than 30 years of marine earth science research at the click of a mouse, a legacy that will be built upon by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) in the near future.

  9. Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch reg-sign) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion

  10. The Netherlands. Complex ground source heat drilling for horticultural works; Niederlande. Komplexe Erdwaermebohrung fuer Gartenbaubetriebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Dieter [DrillTec GUT GmbH, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    For the past six months, the Dutch gardening industry looked to Honselersdijk near Rotterdam with great expectations. There, five market gardening businesses planned to heat their greenhouses with geothermal heat instead of natural gas. After technically complex drilling operations, hot water is now flowing at a rate of up to 50 litres per second; the drilling project remained fascinating to the last for everybody involved.

  11. Exploration of the crystalline underground by extension drilling of the Urach 3 well in the framework of a feasibility study for a hot dry rock demonstration project; Erkundung des kristallinen Untergrunds mit der Vertiefungsbohrung Urach 3 im Rahmen einer Machbarkeitsstudie fuer ein Hot-Dry-Rock-Demonstrationsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenzer, H. [Stadtwerke Bad Urach (Germany); Genter, A.; Hottin, A.M. [BRGM/GIG, Orleans (France)

    1997-12-01

    The prerequisites for specific research into the use of Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy at great depths and temperatures of up to 147 C. In Europe were created with the drilling and completition of the 3334 m deep research drill hole Urach 3 in its phase I (1977/78), and its subsequent extension to 3488 m in phase II (1982/83) within the metamorphic gneiss rock of Urach. A single hole circulation system was tested. Basic results concerning the temperature field, joint system, stress field and hydraulic behavior of the rock were achieved. According to the European HDR guidelines data from depths were a mean reservoir temperature of 175-180 C prevails were necessary to carry out a HDR pilot project. Within the scope of a feasibility study the already existing drill hole Urach 3 was extended from 3488 m to 4445 m depth where the required rock temperature of >170 C was expected. The objective of the project was to determine rock parameters at depth of high temperatures. The bottom hole temperature at true vertical depth of 4394.72 m was determined with 170 C. It can be proved that the temperature gradient is constant with 2.9 K/100 m depth. Due to the results of the investigations it is proposed that the Urach site located in a widespread tectonic horizontal strike-slip system is suitable for a HDR demonstration project. The results can be applied in south German and northern Swiss regions and in other large regions of Europe. Many potential consumers of geothermal energy produced by the HDR concept are situated close around the Urach 3 drill site. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Forschungsarbeiten zur Weiterentwicklung des Hot-Dry-Rock-Verfahrens begannen am Standort Bad Urach im Jahr 1975. In einer ersten Phase wurde die Bohrung Urach 3 1977/78 auf 3334 m mit einer Gesteinstemperatur von 143 C abgeteuft. Umfangreiche Hydraulische Tests und Frac-Versuche erfolgten. Hiermit wurden die Voraussetzungen fuer die Erkundung des Hot-Dry-Rock-Konzeptes in grossen Tiefen und

  12. Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

  13. PDVSA INTEVEP Technologies in oil well drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, C.; Rafael, A.; Davila, Manuel A.

    1998-01-01

    The orimulsion, the generation of catalytic technologies and the development of HDH (process which transform heavy crudes in light crudes), are examples of some of the well known technologies developed by PDVSA INTEVEP. But the drilling oil wells technologies developed by the same entreprise, even though are very important, are less known all around the world. This document describes some products developed through those technologies: THIXOGAS T M which is an antimigratory aditive; INTEFLOW T M which is a fluid for drilling, complementation and rehabilitation of oil drills; INTERCAB T M which is an aditive for fluids in drilling; orimatita which is a denser for drilling fluids; CARBOLIG T M which is an aditive for drilling fluids; and many other products and technologies in development, impacted considerably the venezuelan economy by preserving the environment and saving quite an important amount of money in 1997 (Bs. 3.000 M M)

  14. Trends in the Drilling Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Czekaj

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum Industry is trying to achieve sustainable development goals. Each year new solutions are implemented to minimize the environmental impact of drilling operations. The paper presents trends in the drilling waste management caused by introducing the sustainable development into the petroleum industry. Old solutions such as the drilling waste disposal at the waste dump or dumping ground are not acceptable from the environmental point of view. The paper presents an analysis of new solutions as the sustainable solutions. The most important problem is the chemical pollution in cuttings and the waste drilling mud. The industrial solutions as well as the laboratory research on the pollution removing from drilling wastes are analysed. The most promising method seems to be the recycling and design for the environment of drilling mud.

  15. Design of the Acoustic Signal Receiving Unit of Acoustic Telemetry While Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal receiving unit is one of the core units of the acoustic telemetry system. A new type of acoustic signal receiving unit is designed to solve problems of the existing devices. The unit is a short joint in whole. It not only can receive all the acoustic signals transmitted along the drill string, without losing any signal, but will not bring additional vibration and interference. In addition, the structure of the amplitude transformer is designed, which can amplify the signal amplitude and improve the receiving efficiency. The design of the wireless communication module makes the whole device can be used in normal drilling process when the drill string is rotating. So, it does not interfere with the normal drilling operation.

  16. Deep drilling in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure lies buried at moderate depths below Chesapeake Bay and surrounding landmasses in southeastern Virginia, USA. Numerous characteristics made this impact structure an inviting target for scientific drilling, including the location of the impact on the Eocene continental shelf, its threelayer target structure, its large size (??85 km diameter), its status as the source of the North American tektite strewn field, its temporal association with other late Eocene terrestrial impacts, its documented effects on the regional groundwater system, and its previously unstudied effects on the deep microbial biosphere. The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project was designed to drill a deep, continuously cored test hole into the central part of the structure. A project workshop, funding proposals, and the acceptance of those proposals occurred during 2003-2005. Initial drilling funds were provided by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Supplementary funds were provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate, ICDP, and USGS. Field operations were conducted at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, by Drilling, Observation, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) and the project staff during September-December 2005, resulting in two continuously cored, deep holes. The USGS and Rutgers University cored a shallow hole to 140 m in April-May 2006 to complete the recovered section from land surface to 1766 m depth. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of crater materials and 444 m of overlying postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. The crater section consists of, from base to top: basement-derived blocks of crystalline rocks (215 m); a section of suevite, impact melt rock, lithic impact breccia, and cataclasites (154 m); a thin interval of quartz sand and lithic blocks (26 m); a

  17. Replacement team of mining drilling rigs

    OpenAIRE

    Hamodi, Hussan; Lundberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a practical model to calculate the optimal replacement time (ORT) of drilling rigs used in underground mining. As a case study, cost data for drilling rig were collected over four years from a Swedish mine. The cost data include acquisition, operating, maintenance and downtime costs when using a redundant rig. A discount rate is used to determine the value of these costs over time. The study develops an optimisation model to identify the ORT of a mining drilling rig which ...

  18. An Infrared Drill Borehole Spectrometer for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W.; Foote, M.; Johnson, E.; Daly, J.; Loges, P.; Puscasu, I.; Gorevan, S.; Chu, P.; Granahan, J.

    2005-08-01

    The best clues to Mars past may be hidden below the surface of Mars. Long exposure to the sun, high winds and dust storms, large diurnal temperature excursions, and eons of space weathering combine to render a greatly modified surface, in many instances remarkable for its appearance of uniform composition. Drilling can provide access to the layers in the caps, to the permafrost and possibly, to pristine crustal material. The drilling process is complex with high demand on support resources. It is vital to make the drilling process as efficient as possible. A most promising approach is to instrument the drill string itself, thereby avoiding the complexity of sample handling, speeding and simplifying drill operations, and allowing examination of freshly exposed surfaces within the borehole. A solid-state IR spectrometer is being integrated with a blackbody source into a package to fit within an existing Mars drill design. The borehole IR spectrometer is used to monitor facies encountered throughout the drilling process. The spectrometer/IR combination is used in reflectance spectrometer mode to monitor H2O and CO2 content, as well as iron and carbonate mineralogies. Integration required adapting the existing spectrometer to fit within the drill -- including attaching the detectors directly to the spectrometer waveguide, developing the techniques required to seal the micro-thermopile detectors to the waveguide, implementing miniaturized digital conversion electronics, combining the spectrometer with the IR source and coupling them to a suitable window, implementing a suitable sealed package to fit within the drill, integrating and testing the package on a drill, and establishing the proper gain for both stimulus and spectrometer to permit reasonable range of Mars soil analogs. Tests have shown that both sapphire and diamond windows perform well in the drilling environment. Testing of the integrated spectrometer and drill will be completed in the coming year.

  19. Use of genetic algorithms and virtual reality for the determination of the control cabin position in drilling rigs; O uso de algoritmos geneticos e realidade virtual na determinacao da posicao da cabine de controle em sondas de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Robson da Cunha [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Cunha, Gerson Gomes [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Civil

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a proposal for a system simulation, verification and optimized positioning, for driller's cabin of drilling rigs. It will be presented assumptions and studies on drilling operations, equipment specification, characteristics of a standard worker (anthropometric measures) and application of virtual reality techniques. During the project phase, it will be verified the sight of operator to simulate the drilling operations for an 'optimum' positioning suggested by the system. Tests were performed in driller's cabins of existing platforms, identifying positions where the operator does not have a complete vision of operations. In certain cases, it was necessary that the operator left the cabin to make some verification of the operations, reducing the efficiency and functionality of the existing system, and allowing occurrence of accidents. Based on genetic algorithms, as well as in techniques of computational geometry, it was developed an algorithm that suggests the best position of the cabin on drill floor, taking into account quantitative and qualitative analyses. Through the virtual reality, is simulated the sight field of the operator inside the cabin allowing to verify the interference between the sight field of the operator and other existing elements in the platform and determining if the position initially suggested by the positioning algorithm is adequate aiming to improve the safety, productivity, efficiency of the system and reduction of costs. (author)

  20. How Many Brains Does It Take to Build a New Light: Knowledge Management Challenges of a Transdisciplinary Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    della Chiesa, Bruno; Christoph, Vanessa; Hinton, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Center for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) carried out the "Learning Sciences and Brain Research" project (1999-2007) to investigate how neuroscience research can inform education policy and practice. This transdisciplinary project brought many challenges. Within the…

  1. Study on the influence of parameters of medical drill on bone drilling temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, Xianchun; Hu, Yahui; Han, Jingwang; Yue, Lin; Jiang, Wangbiao

    2018-03-01

    During surgical interventions, the temperature generated during cortical bone drilling can affect the activity of bone material, which may lead to necrosis. In this paper, with the purpose of reducing the temperature during cortical bone drilling, the influence of the parameters of medical drill were analyzed. The finite element model of the drilling process was established based on the parametric design of the dril. The relationship between the drill bit diameter, the point angle, and the helix angle to the drilling temperature was studied by the center composite experiment. The results showed that the drilling temperature is increased with the increase of drill diameter, vertex angle and helix angle in the range of certain research.

  2. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future

  3. Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  4. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  5. Effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, P.R.; Duke, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on drilling fluids, also called drilling muds, which are essential to drilling processes in the exploration and production of oil and gas from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). These fluids are usually discharged from drilling platforms into surrounding waters of the OCS and are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a program carried out by the EPA Environmental research Laboratory at Gulf Breeze, Florida, diverse marine species as well as microbiotic and macrobiotic communities were studied. Drilling fluids were toxic to marine organisms in certain concentrations and exposure regimes. Furthermore, the fluids adversely affected the benthos physically by burying them or by altering the substrates. Toxicity of the drilling-fluid components, used drilling fluids from active Gulf of Mexico sites, and laboratory-prepared drilling fluids varied considerably. for example 96-h LC 50 s were from 25 μ liter -1 to > 1500 μl liter -1 for clams, larval lobsters, mysids, and grass shrimp. In most instances, mortality was significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the diesel-oil content of the fluids collected from the Gulf of Mexico. Data and model simulations suggest a rapid dilution of drilling fluids released into OCS waters, resulting in concentrations below the acute-effect concentration for the water column organisms tested

  6. Drilling of polymer-matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaraj, Vijayan; Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites are recognised as good candidates for structural components due to their inherent properties. However, they present several kinds of damages while creating holes for assembly. Delamination is considered the most serious damage since it reduces service life of the component. Thrust and delamination can be controlled by proper drill point geometry. Drilling at high speed is also a current requirement of the aerospace industry. This book focus on drilling of polymer matrix composites for aerospace and defence applications. The book presents introduction to machining of polymer composites and discusses drilling as a processing of composites.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Foam Drilling Hydraulics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Baris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of foam as a drilling fluid was developed to meet a special set of conditions under which other common drilling fluids had failed. Foam drilling is defined as the process of making boreholes by utilizing foam as the circulating fluid. When compared with conventional drilling, underbalanced or foam drilling has several advantages. These advantages include: avoidance of lost circulation problems, minimizing damage to pay zones, higher penetration rates and bit life. Foams are usually characterized by the quality, the ratio of the volume of gas, and the total foam volume. Obtaining dependable pressure profiles for aerated (gasified fluids and foam is more difficult than for single phase fluids, since in the former ones the drilling mud contains a gas phase that is entrained within the fluid system. The primary goal of this study is to expand the knowledge-base of the hydrodynamic phenomena that occur in a foam drilling operation. In order to gain a better understanding of foam drilling operations, a hydrodynamic model is developed and run at different operating conditions. For this purpose, the flow of foam through the drilling system is modeled by invoking the basic principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The model was designed to allow gas and liquid flow at desired volumetric flow rates through the drillstring and annulus. Parametric studies are conducted in order to identify the most influential variables in the hydrodynamic modeling of foam flow.

  8. Level best : drilling seasonal load leveling business case : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    Drilling and seismic costs in Western Canada are as much as 35 per cent higher during winter months. Favourable commodity pricing has prompted aggressive expansion of drilling programs in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), and capacity is becoming a significant issue. Many operators are turning to load leveling in order to secure rigs and crew availability. However, many operators still adhere to the traditional view that drilling of oil and gas wells is best accomplished during the winter. The purpose of the project discussed in this paper was to develop and present a business case for greater seasonal load leveling in the WCSB and spreading it more evenly throughout the year. Using calendar year quarters, publicly available data for a 5 year period from 2000-2004 for drilling activity, safety, weather, and environmental restrictions were examined. A list of candidate fields with high levels of activity and a good representation of well depths was selected. Well cost and rig data from 14 different companies was used. A variety of industry participants, drilling contractors, load leveling technology suppliers and provincial agencies were consulted to supplement well cost analyses. The financial impacts of load leveling were examined. Benefits included lower well costs; advanced production; avoided rig construction; reduced incident rates; and reduced turnover. While the focus of the business case for load leveling was based on hard cost data, many indirect benefits were identified, including First Nations sustainability and greater job security and comfort for workers. Various policies and incentives that encouraged load leveling in British Columbia and Alberta were reviewed. 57 figs.

  9. Level best : drilling seasonal load leveling business case : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    Drilling and seismic costs in Western Canada are as much as 35 per cent higher during winter months. Favourable commodity pricing has prompted aggressive expansion of drilling programs in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), and capacity is becoming a significant issue. Many operators are turning to load leveling in order to secure rigs and crew availability. However, many operators still adhere to the traditional view that drilling of oil and gas wells is best accomplished during the winter. The purpose of the project discussed in this paper was to develop and present a business case for greater seasonal load leveling in the WCSB and spreading it more evenly throughout the year. Using calendar year quarters, publicly available data for a 5 year period from 2000-2004 for drilling activity, safety, weather, and environmental restrictions were examined. A list of candidate fields with high levels of activity and a good representation of well depths was selected. Well cost and rig data from 14 different companies was used. A variety of industry participants, drilling contractors, load leveling technology suppliers and provincial agencies were consulted to supplement well cost analyses. The financial impacts of load leveling were examined. Benefits included lower well costs; advanced production; avoided rig construction; reduced incident rates; and reduced turnover. While the focus of the business case for load leveling was based on hard cost data, many indirect benefits were identified, including First Nations sustainability and greater job security and comfort for workers. Various policies and incentives that encouraged load leveling in British Columbia and Alberta were reviewed. 57 figs

  10. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  11. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of approximately minus8 m (minus27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of approximately1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of ∼ -21 m (-70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned

  12. DOE ZERH Case Study: Carl Franklin Homes, L.C./Green Extreme Homes, CDC, McKinley Project, Garland TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the hot-humid climate that got a HERS 56 without PV or HERS 26 with PV, with 4.5” SIP walls and 8.5” SIP roof; uninsulated slab; ductless minisplit heat pump 15.5 SEER, and tankless hot water.

  13. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  14. The archaeology of drill hole U20bc, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, A.R.; Hemphill, M.L.; Livingston, S.J.; Pippin, L.C.; Walsh, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Impacts to four sites near drill hole U20bc on Pahute Mesa in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site were mitigated through data recovery. The work was done during 1988 by the Desert Research Institute for the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV)- The four sites that warranted data recovery were 26NY3171, 26NY3173, 26NY5561 and 26NY5566. These sites had previously been determined eligible to the National Register of Historic Places. They were temporary camps that contained lithic debitage, projectile points, milling stones and pottery, and therefore contributed significant information concerning the prehistory of the area. The study of the archaeological remains shows that the prehistoric people subsisted on plant foods and game animals as determined by the artifacts including manos, metates, pottery, lithic scrapers, and projectile points. The time sensitive arfifacts (pottery and diagnostic points) suggest that the region was used from about 12,000 B.P. to just before the historic period, possibly 150 years ago. DOE/NV has met its obligation to mitigate adverse impacts to the cultural resources at U20bc. Therefore, it is recommended that this project proceed as planned

  15. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and

  16. Georges Bank drilling moratorium gets extended until 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-15

    A moratorium on oil and gas exploration and drilling on the Georges Bank will continue until the end of 2015. Governments require a full public review and research concerning the potential environmental impacts of the project before lifting the moratorium. Canada's federal and provincial governments have agreed to gather information related to the region's fragile ecosystem, and investigate the potential impacts that petroleum-related activities may have in the area. Preliminary reviews are being conducted to study the socio-economic impacts of offshore petroleum activities and to assess new technologies and drilling practices that may be used to reduce the impacts of oil and gas operations. 1 fig.

  17. Parameter definition using vibration prediction software leads to significant drilling performance improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Dalmo; Hanley, Chris Hanley; Fonseca, Isaac; Santos, Juliana [National Oilwell Varco, Houston TX (United States); Leite, Daltro J.; Borella, Augusto; Gozzi, Danilo [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The understanding and mitigation of downhole vibration has been a heavily researched subject in the oil industry as it results in more expensive drilling operations, as vibrations significantly diminish the amount of effective drilling energy available to the bit and generate forces that can push the bit or the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) off its concentric axis of rotation, producing high magnitude impacts with the borehole wall. In order to drill ahead, a sufficient amount of energy must be supplied by the rig to overcome the resistance of the drilling system, including the reactive torque of the system, drag forces, fluid pressure losses and energy dissipated by downhole vibrations, then providing the bit with the energy required to fail the rock. If the drill string enters resonant modes of vibration, not only does it decreases the amount of available energy to drill, but increases the potential for catastrophic downhole equipment and drilling bit failures. In this sense, the mitigation of downhole vibrations will result in faster, smoother, and cheaper drilling operations. A software tool using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been developed to provide better understanding of downhole vibration phenomena in drilling environments. The software tool calculates the response of the drilling system at various input conditions, based on the design of the wellbore along with the geometry of the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) and the drill string. It identifies where undesired levels of resonant vibration will be driven by certain combinations of specific drilling parameters, and also which combinations of drilling parameters will result in lower levels of vibration, so the least shocks, the highest penetration rate and the lowest cost per foot can be achieved. With the growing performance of personal computers, complex software systems modeling the drilling vibrations using FEA has been accessible to a wider audience of field users, further complimenting with real time

  18. Testing the process of drilling - analysis of drilling performance in variegated sandstone and Keuper in Northern Germany; Der Bohrprozess auf dem Pruefstand - Analyse der Bohrleistungen im Buntsandstein und Keuper in Norddeutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pust, G.; Tschaffler, H. [Mobil Erdgas Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Grunwald, R. [BEB Erdgas und Erdoel GmbH, Nienhagen (Germany); Gloth, H. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Marx, C. [ITE, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of the project launched jointly by DGMK and 5 companies from the German oil- and gas industry and two institutes for drilling technologies was to find suitable ways in which the drilling progress in formations with bad drilling conditions in Northern Germany, i.e. lower and middle variegated sandstone and Keuper can be increases in order to bring costs down. The borehole sunk in Northern Germany were surveyed and inventorised. Data were subjected to a thorough statistical analysis in order to obtain optimal drilling parameters and improve the drilling tools. Basic studies on rock damaging were also to be included in order to better understand the processes. Finally, the project aims at realising the optimal drilling parameters, increase drilling progress, use improved drilling machinery and thus cut costs. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel des DGMK-Gemeinschaftsprojektes mit 5 Firmen der deutschen Erdoel- und Erdgasindustrie sowie 2 bohrtechnischen Instituten war es, durch geeignete Massnahmen den Bohrfortschritt in schlechtbohrbaren Formationen in Norddeutschland, naemlich unterer und mittlerer Buntsandstein sowie Keuper, zu erhoehen und damit einen Beitrag zur Kostensenkung zu leisten. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, sollte eine Bestandsaufnahme der in Norddeutschland abgeteuften Bohrungen erfolgen. Die Daten sollten einer eingehenden statistischen Auswertung unterzogen werden. Hieraus sollten optimale Bohrparameter und Verbesserungen der Bohrwerkzeuge abgeleitet werden. Ferner sollten grundlegende Untersuchungen zur Gesteinszerstoerung herangezogen werden, um ein besseres Verstaendnis fuer die ablaufenden Prozesse zu bekommen. Durch die Realisierung optimaler Bohrparameter und den Einsatz verbesserter Bohrwerkszeuge sollte schliesslich die Erhoehung des Bohrfortschritts und damit eine Senkung der Kosten erreicht werden. (orig.)

  19. Neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chih; Lin, Hsin-Cheng; Lee, Wen-Yo; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system that provides assistance throughout the complete bone drilling process. The system comprised neurosurgical robotic arm navigation combining robotic and surgical navigation, 3D medical imaging based surgical planning that could identify lesion location and plan the surgical path on 3D images, and automatic bone drilling control that would stop drilling when the bone was to be drilled-through. Three kinds of experiment were designed. The average positioning error deduced from 3D images of the robotic arm was 0.502 ± 0.069 mm. The correlation between automatically and manually planned paths was 0.975. The average distance error between automatically planned paths and risky zones was 0.279 ± 0.401 mm. The drilling auto-stopping algorithm had 0.00% unstopped cases (26.32% in control group 1) and 70.53% non-drilled-through cases (8.42% and 4.21% in control groups 1 and 2). The system may be useful for neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  1. Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

    1994-09-01

    This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

  2. 75 FR 877 - Drill Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe From China AGENCY: International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of antidumping... States is materially retarded, by reason of imports from China of drill pipe, provided for in subheadings... Government of China. Unless the Department of Commerce extends the time for initiation pursuant to sections...

  3. Considerations for the Estimation of the Risk of Environmental Contamination Due to Blow Out in Offshore Exploratory Drilling Projects; Consideraciones a la Estimación del Riesgo de Contaminación Ambiental por Blow Out en Proyectos de Perforación de Sondeos Exploratorios Offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, A.; Eguilior, S.; Recreo, F.

    2015-07-01

    From the consideration of a contemporary society based on the need of a high-level complex technology with a high intrinsic level of uncertainty and its relationship with risk assessment, this analysis, conducted in late 2014, was developed from that that led the Secretary of State for the Environment to the Resolution of 29 May 2014, by which the Environmental Impact Statement of the Exploratory Drilling Project in the hydrocarbons research permits called ''Canarias 1-9// was set out and published in the Spanish Official State Gazette number 196 on 13rd August 2014. The aim of the present study is to analyze the suitability with which the worst case associated probability is identified and defined and its relation to the total risk estimate from a blow out. Its interest stems from the fact that all risk management methodologically rests on two pillars, i.e., on a sound risk analysis and evaluation. This determines the selection of management tools in relation to its level of complexity, the project phase and its potential impacts on the health, safety and environmental contamination dimensions.

  4. Heat Generation During Bone Drilling: A Comparison Between Industrial and Orthopaedic Drill Bits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christopher; Inceoglu, Serkan; Juma, David; Zuckerman, Lee

    2017-02-01

    Cortical bone drilling for preparation of screw placement is common in multiple surgical fields. The heat generated while drilling may reach thresholds high enough to cause osteonecrosis. This can compromise implant stability. Orthopaedic drill bits are several orders more expensive than their similarly sized, publicly available industrial counterparts. We hypothesize that an industrial bit will generate less heat during drilling, and the bits will not generate more heat after multiple cortical passes. We compared 4 4.0 mm orthopaedic and 1 3.97 mm industrial drill bits. Three types of each bit were drilled into porcine femoral cortices 20 times. The temperature of the bone was measured with thermocouple transducers. The heat generated during the first 5 drill cycles for each bit was compared to the last 5 cycles. These data were analyzed with analysis of covariance. The industrial drill bit generated the smallest mean increase in temperature (2.8 ± 0.29°C) P industrial bit generated less heat during drilling than its orthopaedic counterparts. The bits maintained their performance after 20 drill cycles. Consideration should be given by manufacturers to design differences that may contribute to a more efficient cutting bit. Further investigation into the reuse of these drill bits may be warranted, as our data suggest their efficiency is maintained after multiple uses.

  5. Does Patients’ Attachment Style Affect their Help-Seeking in relation to Cancer-Related Symptoms? – project protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina Maar; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Olesen, Frede

    influence length of patient delay and doctor delay in patients diagnosed with cancer. Interactions between patients’ attachment styles and general practitioners’ attachment styles on patient and doctor delay will also be explored. METHODS: The project is a cross-sectional study based on registry data...... to be able to contribute as an explanatory model. This theory describes the evolutionary and developmental origin of patterns of close interpersonal relationships OBJECTIVE: The aims of the present project are to examine whether attachment styles in general practitioners as well as in their patients......-patient communication. This project focuses on the period until the start of targeted diagnostic investigation. The time interval can be divided into patient delay and doctor delay: • Patient delay is the time from the patients experience the first symptom until they seek medical help. • Doctor delay is the time from...

  6. Audio effects on haptics perception during drilling simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Valbuena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality has provided immersion and interactions through computer generated environments attempting to reproduce real life experiences through sensorial stimuli. Realism can be achieved through multimodal interactions which can enhance the user’s presence within the computer generated world. The most notorious advances in virtual reality can be seen in computer graphics visuals, where photorealism is the norm thriving to overcome the uncanny valley. Other advances have followed related to sound, haptics, and in a lesser manner smell and taste feedback. Currently, virtual reality systems (multimodal immersion and interactions through visual-haptic-sound are being massively used in entertainment (e.g., cinema, video games, art, and in non-entertainment scenarios (e.g., social inclusion, educational, training, therapy, and tourism. Moreover, the cost reduction of virtual reality technologies has resulted in the availability at a consumer-level of various haptic, headsets, and motion tracking devices. Current consumer-level devices offer low-fidelity experiences due to the properties of the sensors, displays, and other electro-mechanical devices, that may not be suitable for high-precision or realistic experiences requiring dexterity. However, research has been conducted on how toovercome or compensate the lack of high fidelity to provide an engaging user experience using storytelling, multimodal interactions and gaming elements. Our work focuses on analyzing the possible effects of auditory perception on haptic feedback within a drilling scenario. Drilling involves multimodal interactions and it is a task with multiple applications in medicine, crafting, and construction. We compare two drilling scenarios were two groups of participants had to drill through wood while listening to contextual and non-contextual audios. We gathered their perception using a survey after the task completion. From the results, we believe that sound does

  7. 75 FR 33245 - Drill Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... specifications, whether finished or unfinished (including green tubes suitable for drill pipe), without regard to... differences between the Soviet- style economies and China's economy in recent years, the Department's previous decision not to apply the CVD law to these Soviet-style economies does not act as a bar to proceeding with...

  8. New approaches to subglacial bedrock drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel; Sun, Youhong; Zhao, Yue; Xue, Jun; Chen, Chen; Markov, Alexey; Xu, Huiwen; Gong, Wenbin; Han, Wei; Zheng, Zhichuan; Cao, Pinlu; Wang, Rusheng; Zhang, Nan; Yu, Dahui; Fan, Xiaopeng; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Cheng; Han, Lili; Sysoev, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    Drilling to bedrock of ice sheets and glaciers offers unique opportunities to research processes acting at the bed for paleo-climatic and paleo-environmental recording, basal sliding studies, subglacial geology and tectonics investigations, prospecting and exploration for minerals covered by ice. Retrieving bedrock samples under ice sheets and glaciers is a very difficult task. Drilling operations are complicated by extremely low temperature at the surface of, and within glaciers, and by glacier flow, the absence of roads and infrastructures, storms, winds, snowfalls, etc. In order to penetrate through the ice sheet or glacier up to the depth of at least 1000 m and to pierce the bedrock to the depth of several meters from ice - bedrock boundary the development activity already has been started in Polar Research Center at Jilin University, China. All drilling equipment (two 50-kW diesel generators, winch, control desk, fluid dumping station, etc.) is installed inside a movable sledge-mounted warm-keeping and wind-protecting drilling shelter that has dimensions of 8.8 ×2.8 × 3.0 m. Mast has two positions: horizontal for transportation and vertical working position (mast height is 12 m). Drilling shelter can be transported to the chosen site with crawler-tractor, aircraft or helicopter. In case of carriage by air the whole drilling shelter was designed to be disassembled into pieces "small" enough to ship by aircraft. Weight and sizes of each component has been minimized to lower the cost of transportation and to meet weight restrictions for transportation. Total weight of drilling equipment (without drilling fluid) is near 15 tons. Expected time of assembling and preparing for drilling is 2 weeks. If drilling shelter is transported with crawler-tractor (for example, in Antarctic traverses) all equipment is ready to start drilling immediately upon arrival to the site. To drill through ice and bedrock a new, modified version of the cable-suspended electromechanical

  9. 77 FR 55829 - Western Area Power Administration; Grapevine Canyon Wind Project Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0427)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration; Grapevine Canyon Wind Project Record of... one or more phases, dependent on one or more power sale contracts. The proposed wind park would... that limit construction vehicle speed limits. Foresight indicated that the wind park contractor will...

  10. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; Poell, Rob F.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  11. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.M.J.H.; Poell, R.F.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  12. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? : An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.; Poell, R.F.; van der Heijden, B.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  13. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ''Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ''Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.''

  14. Closure report for CAU No. 416: Project Shoal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Closure Report provides the documentation for closure of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Project Shoal Area (PSA) Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 416. CAU 416 consists of a mud pit, muckpile, and housekeeping site. The PSA is located approximately 48.3 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The mud pit was the result of drilling activities at the PSA in 1963. Investigation activities completed in 1996 determined drilling mud in the mud pit was impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons in excess of the State of Nevada 100 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg). The muckpile consists of broken granite from emplacement shaft and drift (tunnel) mining activities at the PSA in 1963. The housekeeping site consisted of approximately 20 used, empty, rusted, steel 0.9 liter (1 quart) oil cans.

  15. Closure report for CAU No. 416: Project Shoal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Closure Report provides the documentation for closure of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Project Shoal Area (PSA) Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 416. CAU 416 consists of a mud pit, muckpile, and housekeeping site. The PSA is located approximately 48.3 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The mud pit was the result of drilling activities at the PSA in 1963. Investigation activities completed in 1996 determined drilling mud in the mud pit was impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons in excess of the State of Nevada 100 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg). The muckpile consists of broken granite from emplacement shaft and drift (tunnel) mining activities at the PSA in 1963. The housekeeping site consisted of approximately 20 used, empty, rusted, steel 0.9 liter (1 quart) oil cans

  16. [Review comments on the Draft DOE Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project]: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutch, S.I.; Stiegliltz, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Research performed under the grant primarily involved review and comment on the Draft Area Recommendations Report (DARR). However, because data and ''recommendations'' included in the DARR are unquestionably tied to years of research and dozens of technical reports and documents, i.e., Screening Methodologies, Regional characterization Reports, etc., it is essential that consultants to the Menominee Tribe review all the relevant DOE documents, working papers, etc. Given the short period provided for technical comment and limited funds available to the Tribe, a well designed and thorough technical review was (and is) without question impossible. What review and comment that did occur on a geotechnical level is included in this report

  17. Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  18. The Auto-Gopher Deep Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface penetration by coring, drilling or abrading is of great importance for a large number of space and earth applications. An Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) has been in development at JPL's Nondestructive Evaluation and Advanced Actuators (NDEAA) lab as an adaptable tool for many of these applications. The USDC uses a novel drive mechanism to transform the high frequency ultrasonic or sonic vibrations of the tip of a horn into a lower frequency sonic hammering of a drill bit through an intermediate free-flying mass. The USDC device idea has been implemented at various scales from handheld drills to large diameter coring devices. A series of computer programs that model the function and performance of the USDC device were developed and were later integrated into an automated modeling package. The USDC has also evolved from a purely hammering drill to a rotary hammer drill as the design requirements increased form small diameter shallow drilling to large diameter deep coring. A synthesis of the Auto-Gopher development is presented in this paper.

  19. DOES QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IMPROVE PATIENTS’ HEALTH? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF MEASURES OF EFFECT USED IN PDSA PROJECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Nanna Kastrup; Vestergaard, Anne Sig; Ehlers, Lars Holger

    Abstract Introduction Quality improvement is an inherent part of modern healthcare systems worldwide, used for the continuous advancement in effectiveness and safety. Amongst other approaches, the plan-do-study-act (PDSA) method, a four-step iterative method, is widely used for testing...... and implementation of quality-improving interventions in health care despite a poor evidence of its effectiveness. Accepting the premise that the underlying purpose of improvements in health care is to improve patients’ health as suggested by, amongst others, the American National Academy of Medicine, the data...... measurements used to assess the impact of quality improvement projects, consequently, ought to reflect how they eventually impact patients’ health. Objectives The purpose of the present paper is to review recently published PDSA projects to investigate how the effect of quality improvements are being measured...

  20. Annual Report: Support Research for Development of Improved Geothermal Drill Bits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Winzenried, R.W.; Jones, A.H.; Green, S.J.

    1978-07-01

    The work reported herein is a continuation of the program initiated under DOE contract E(10-1)-1546* entitled "Program to Design and Experimentally Test an Improved Geothermal Bit"; the program is now DOE Contract EG-76-C-1546*. The objective of the program has been to accelerate the commercial availability of a tolling cutter drill bit for geothermal applications. Data and experimental tests needed to develop a bit suited to the harsh thermal, abrasive, and chemical environment of the more problematic geothermal wells, including those drilled with air, have been obtained. Efforts were directed at the improvement of both the sealed (lubricated) and unsealed types of bits. The unsealed bit effort included determination of the rationale for materials selection, the selection of steels for the bit body, cutters, and bearings, the selection of tungsten carbide alloys for the friction bearing, and preliminary investigation of optimized tungsten carbide drilling inserts. Bits build** with the new materials were tested under stimulated wellbore conditions. The sealed bit effort provided for the evaluation of candidate high temperature seals and lubricants, utilizing two specially developed test apparatus which simulate the conditions found in a sealed bit operating in a geothermal wellbore. Phase I of the program was devoted largely to (1) the study of the geothermal environment and the failure mechanisms of existing geothermal drill bits, (2) the design and construction of separate facilities for testing both drill-bit seals and full-scale drill bits under simulated geothermal drilling conditions, and (3) fabrication of the MK-I research drill bits from high-temperature steels, and testing in the geothermal drill-bit test facility. The work accomplished in Phase I is reported in References 1 through 9. In Phase II, the first generation experimental bits were tested in the geothermal drill-bit test facility. Test results indicated that hardness retention at temperature

  1. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  2. Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Talalay, P.G.; Gundestrup, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on the data published in research report of P. G. Talalay and N. S. Gundestrup; Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling : A review. Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, 1999,120p. In the practice of deep ice core drilling only three types of bore-hole fluids have been used : 1) petroleum oil products (fuels or solvents) containing densifier, 2) aqueous ethylene glycol or ethanol solutions, 3) n-butyl acetate. The main parameters of drilling fluids are 1) density and fluid top...

  3. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  4. How does dynamical downscaling affect model biases and future projections of explosive extratropical cyclones along North America's Atlantic coast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Zwiers, F. W.; Hodges, K. I.; Scinocca, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    Explosive extratropical cyclones (EETCs) are rapidly intensifying low pressure systems that generate severe weather along North America's Atlantic coast. Global climate models (GCMs) tend to simulate too few EETCs, perhaps partly due to their coarse horizontal resolution and poorly resolved moist diabatic processes. This study explores whether dynamical downscaling can reduce EETC frequency biases, and whether this affects future projections of storms along North America's Atlantic coast. A regional climate model (CanRCM4) is forced with the CanESM2 GCM for the periods 1981 to 2000 and 2081 to 2100. EETCs are tracked from relative vorticity using an objective feature tracking algorithm. CanESM2 simulates 38% fewer EETC tracks compared to reanalysis data, which is consistent with a negative Eady growth rate bias (-0.1 day^{-1}). Downscaling CanESM2 with CanRCM4 increases EETC frequency by one third, which reduces the frequency bias to -22%, and increases maximum EETC precipitation by 22%. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing is projected to decrease EETC frequency (-15%, -18%) and Eady growth rate (-0.2 day^{-1}, -0.2 day^{-1}), and increase maximum EETC precipitation (46%, 52%) in CanESM2 and CanRCM4, respectively. The limited effect of dynamical downscaling on EETC frequency projections is consistent with the lack of impact on the maximum Eady growth rate. The coarse spatial resolution of GCMs presents an important limitation for simulating extreme ETCs, but Eady growth rate biases are likely just as relevant. Further bias reductions could be achieved by addressing processes that lead to an underestimation of lower tropospheric meridional temperature gradients.

  5. Comprehensive Summary and Analysis of Oral and Written Scoping Comments on the Hawaii Geothermal Project EIS (DOE Review Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-09-18

    This report contains summaries of the oral and written comments received during the scoping process for the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Oral comments were presented during public scoping meetings; written comments were solicited at the public scoping meetings and in the ''Advance Notice of Intent'' and ''Notice of Intent'' (published in the ''Federal Register'') to prepare the HGP EIS. This comprehensive summary of scoping inputs provides an overview of the issues that have been suggested for inclusion in the HGP EIS.

  6. Temperature analysis in CFRP drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takashi; Tamura, Shoichi

    2016-10-01

    The cutting temperature in drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is simulated numerically in finite difference analysis. The cutting force is predicted to estimate heat generation on the shear plane and the rake face by an energy approach. In the force model, three dimensional chip flow is interpreted as a piling up of the orthogonal cuttings in the planes containing the cutting velocities and the chip flow velocities, in which the chip flow direction is determined to minimize the cutting energy. Then, the cutting force is predicted in the determined chip flow model. The cutting temperature distribution is simulated with the thermal conductions, the thermal convections and the heat generations in the discrete elements of the tool, the chip and the workpiece. The heat generations on the shear plane and the rake face are given by stress distributions based on the cutting force predicted. The cutting temperature is analyzed on assumption that all mechanical works contribute the heat generation. The temperature of CFRP is compared with that of carbon steel in the numerical simulation. The maximum temperature of CFRP is much lower than carbon steel. The position at the maximum temperature is near the tool tip due to a low thermal conductivity of CFRP.

  7. Ecologically pure drilling muds for the drilling of variable purpose wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudaikulova, G.A.; Rakishev, B.R.; Aitugulova, B.A. [K.I. Satpaev Kazak National Technical Univ., (Kazakhstan)

    2010-07-01

    The volumes of prospecting and geotechnological rock drilling wells have increased considerably in Kazakhstan. Among the number of ores developed in Kazakhstan, the gold-containing, polymetallic and uranium ores are of particular interest. By working out the deposits, the creviced and cavernous zones often appear. Therefore, a high-quality polymer-clay drilling mud is needed to provide a high yield of core, increase mechanical speed of drilling, and increase the technical and economic indicators of drilling. This paper presented data on the development of ecologically pure polymer-clay drilling muds with application of Kazakhstan clays of various deposits and ecologically pure chemical reagents of companies around the world. The paper discussed the theory and experimental results. It was concluded that the newly created ecologically pure polymer-clay drilling muds had a low indicator of filtration, good removal ability and contained a minimum quantity of reagents. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. Three-dimensional Locomotion and Drilling Microrobot Using Electromagnetic Actuation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Girl; Choi, Hyun Chul; Cha, Kyoung Rae; Jeong, Se Mi; Park, Jong Oh; Park, Suk Ho

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel electromagnetic microrobot system with locomotion and drilling functions in three dimensional space was developed. Because of size limitations, the microrobot does not have actuator, battery, and controller. Therefore, an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system was used to drive the robot. The proposed EMA system consists of three rectangular Helmholtz coil pairs in x-, y- and z-axes and a Maxwell coil pair in the z-axis. The magnetic field generated in the EMA coil system could be controlled by the input current of the EMA coil. Finally, through various experiments, the locomotion and drilling performances of the proposed EMA microrobot system were verified

  9. Three-dimensional Locomotion and Drilling Microrobot Using Electromagnetic Actuation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Girl; Choi, Hyun Chul; Cha, Kyoung Rae; Jeong, Se Mi; Park, Jong Oh; Park, Suk Ho [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    In this study, a novel electromagnetic microrobot system with locomotion and drilling functions in three dimensional space was developed. Because of size limitations, the microrobot does not have actuator, battery, and controller. Therefore, an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system was used to drive the robot. The proposed EMA system consists of three rectangular Helmholtz coil pairs in x-, y- and z-axes and a Maxwell coil pair in the z-axis. The magnetic field generated in the EMA coil system could be controlled by the input current of the EMA coil. Finally, through various experiments, the locomotion and drilling performances of the proposed EMA microrobot system were verified.

  10. I. Final Report for DOE SBIR Phase I Project DE-SC0013795 Final Report for DOE SBIR Phase I Project DE-SC0013795 Microtron-based Compact, Portable Gamma-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, Robert J. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Microtron-based Compact, Portable Gamma-Ray Source. The objective of Phase I of this project was to produce a conceptual design of a prototype compact microtron electron accelerator, which could be designed, built, and demonstrated in Phase II of the project. The conceptual design study included an analysis of the parameters of the microtron and its components, and the expected performance of the prototype microtron as a source of x-rays and/or RF neutrons in the MeV energy range. The major components of the microtron are the magnet, the accelerating system, the power system, the vacuum system, the control system, the beam extraction system and the targets to produce x-rays (and/or neutrons). Our objectives for the design of the prototype were for it to be compact, cost-effective, capable of producing high intensity x-ray (an/or neutron) fluxes. In addition, the prototype was to be easily assembled and disassembled so that components could be easily replaced. The main parameters for the prototype are the following: the range of electron kinetic energies, the output power, the RF frequency band (X-band, C-band, or S-Band), the type of injection (Type I or Type II), the magnet type, i.e. permanent magnet, electromagnet, or a hybrid combination of permanent and electromagnet. The results of the Phase I study and analysis for a prototype microtron are the following: The electron energy range can be varied from below 6 MeV to 9 MeV, the optimal frequency range is S-Band (2-4 GHz) RF frequency, Type II injection (described below), and the magnet type is the hybrid version. The prototype version will be capable of producing gamma ray doses of ~1800 R/min-m and neutron fluxes of up to ~6 x 1010 n/s with appropriate targets. The results of the Phase I study and analysis are provided below. The proposed Phase II plan was to demonstrate the prototype at low beam power. In the subsequent Phase III, high power tests would be performed, and the design of commercial

  11. Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) for shore approach applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Neil [MGI do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) has become a commonly used construction method for pipeline shore approaches. HDD can mitigate environmental impact, provide greater burial depths and minimize construction schedules. The risks that are associated with HDD river crossings, which are generally well recognized, also apply to HDD shore approaches where they are combined with specific risks occurring from working in the marine environment. The shore approach projects of The Bronx and Hunts Point provide good practical examples of the benefits of this technology in spite of the various challenges encountered. (author)

  12. HORIZONTAL WELL DRILL-IN FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of horizontal driling is to place a drain-hole for a long distance within the pay zone to enhance productivity or injectivity. In drilling horizontal wells, more serious problems appear than in drilling vertical wells. These problems are: poor hole cleaning, excessive torque and drag, hole filling, pipe stucking, wellbore instability, loss of circulation, formation damage, poor cement job, and difficulties at logging jobs. From that reason, successful drilling and production of horizontal well depends largely on the fluid used during drilling and completion phases. Several new fluids, that fulfill some or all of required properties (hole cleaning, cutting suspension, good lubrication, and relative low formation damage, are presented in this paper.

  13. Drill Embedded Nanosensors for Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor for water vapor detection under Martian Conditions and the miniaturized electronics can be embedded in the drill bit...

  14. 75 FR 8113 - Drill Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Drill Pipe From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject antidumping and countervailing duty investigations. DATES: Effective Date...

  15. NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

    2004-05-06

    Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas

  16. A reagent for processing drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, G.A.; Khon-Pak, A.T.; Khon, A.V.; Normatov, L.N.; Telegin, B.V.

    1983-01-01

    A reagent is proposed for processing drilling muds. It contains an acrylic polymer and potassium permanganate. The reagent is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the drilling muds by increasing their salt resistance, the reagent contains hydrolized nitron fiber as the acrylic polymer with the following component relationship (in percent by weight): potassium permanganate, 0.015 to 0.065 and hydrolyzed nitron fiber, the remainder.

  17. A self propelled drilling system for hard-rock, horizontal and coiled tube drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglin, D.; Wassell, M.

    1997-12-31

    Several advancements are needed to improve the efficiency and reliability of both hard rock drilling and extended reach drilling. This paper will present a Self Propelled Drilling System (SPDS) which can grip the borehole wall in order to provide a stable platform for the application of weight on bit (WOB) and resisting the reactive torque created by the downhole drilling motor, bit and formation interaction. The system will also dampen the damaging effects of drill string vibration. This tool employs two hydraulically activated anchors (front and rear) to grip the borehole wall, and a two-way thrust mandrel to apply both the drilling force to the bit, and a retraction force to pull the drill string into the hole. Forward drilling motion will commence by sequencing the anchor pistons and thrust mandrel to allow the tool to walk in a stepping motion. The SPDS has a microprocessor to control valve timing, sensing and communication functions. An optional Measurement While Drilling (MWD) interface can provide two-way communication of critical operating parameters such as hydraulic pressure and piston location. This information can then be telemetered to the surface, or used downhole to autonomously control system parameters such as anchor and thrust force or damping characteristics.

  18. Percussive Augmenter of Rotary Drills for Operating as a Rotary-Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Jack Barron (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Scott, James Samson (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A percussive augmenter bit includes a connection shaft for mounting the bit onto a rotary drill. In a first modality, an actuator percussively drives the bit, and an electric slip-ring provides power to the actuator while being rotated by the drill. Hammering action from the actuator and rotation from the drill are applied directly to material being drilled. In a second modality, a percussive augmenter includes an actuator that operates as a hammering mechanism that drives a free mass into the bit creating stress pulses that fracture material that is in contact with the bit.

  19. Aerated drilling cutting transport analysis in geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhyudin, Aris; Setiawan, Deni; Dwi Marjuan, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Aeratad drilling widely used for geothermal drilling especially when drilled into predicted production zone. Aerated drilling give better performance on preventing lost circulation problem, improving rate of penetration, and avoiding drilling fluid invasion to productive zone. While well is drilled, cutting is produced and should be carried to surface by drilling fluid. Hole problem, especially pipe sticking will occur while the cutting is not lifted properly to surface. The problem will effect on drilling schedule; non-productive time finally result more cost to be spent. Geothermal formation has different characteristic comparing oil and gas formation. Geothermal mainly has igneous rock while oil and gas mostly sedimentary rock. In same depth, formation pressure in geothermal well commonly lower than oil and gas well while formation temperature geothermal well is higher. While aerated drilling is applied in geothermal well, Igneous rock density has higher density than sedimentary rock and aerated drilling fluid is lighter than water based mud hence minimum velocity requirement to transport cutting is larger than in oil/gas well drilling. Temperature and pressure also has impact on drilling fluid (aerated) density. High temperature in geothermal well decrease drilling fluid density hence the effect of pressure and temperature also considered. In this paper, Aerated drilling cutting transport performance on geothermal well will be analysed due to different rock and drilling fluid density. Additionally, temperature and pressure effect on drilling fluid density also presented to merge.

  20. Thermal numerical assessment of jawbone drilling factor during implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Pirjamali Neisiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Optimization drilling parameters in order to temperature decrease during creation of hole in the bone is an interested issue. The aim of this study was to achieve optimum values of drilling parameters based on the creation of minimum temperature during jawbone drilling. Materials and Methods: In this study two models of mandible and maxilla was created and teeth 2, 5 and 8 from maxilla and teeth 25, 28 and 31 from mandible were removed. The drilling operation was performed under different conditions on jawbone models using finite element analysis and the maximum temperatures were measured in adjacent of holes. Results: Drill bit head angle of 70 degrees was created the lowest maximum temperature during drilling operation. The lowest maximum temperatures were observed in the drill bit rotational speed, drill bit feed rate and the force exerted on the drill bit equal to 200 rpm, 120 mm/min and 60 N, respectively. The use of irrigation can decrease the maximum bone temperature about 7ºC. The maximum temperature differences in various regions of mandible and maxilla were approximately about 1ºC. Conclusion: Sharpness of drill bit head angle, reduction of drill bit rotational speed, increasing drill bit feed rate and exerted force on drill bit and also the use of irrigation played effective roles in temperature decrease during jawbone drilling. Drilling site did not have important effect on the temperature changes during jawbone drilling.

  1. Does power mobility training impact a child's mastery motivation and spectrum of EEG activity? An exploratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Farris, John P; Aldrich, Naomi J; Rhodes, Samhita

    2017-08-30

    The purposes of this exploratory project were: (1) to evaluate the impact of power mobility training with a child who has multiple, severe impairments and (2) to determine if the child's spectrum of electroencephalography (EEG) activity changed during power mobility training. A single-subject A-B-A-B research design was conducted with a four-week duration for each phase. Two target behaviours were explored: (1) mastery motivation assessed via the dimensions of mastery questionnaire (DMQ) and (2) EEG data collected under various conditions. Power mobility skills were also assessed. The participant was a three-year, two-month-old girl with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, gross motor function classification system level V. Each target behaviour was measured weekly. During intervention phases, power mobility training was provided. Improvements were noted in subscale scores of the DMQ. Short-term and long-term EEG changes were also noted. Improvements were noted in power mobility skills. The participant in this exploratory project demonstrated improvements in power mobility skill and function. EEG data collection procedures and variability in an individual's EEG activity make it difficult to determine if the participant's spectrum of EEG activity actually changed in response to power mobility training. Additional studies are needed to investigate the impact of power mobility training on the spectrum of EEG activity in children who have multiple, severe impairments. Implications for Rehabilitation Power mobility training appeared to be beneficial for a child with multiple, severe impairments though the child may never become an independent, community-based power wheelchair user. Electroencephalography may be a valuable addition to the study of power mobility use in children with multiple, severe impairments. Power mobility training appeared to impact mastery motivation (the internal drive to solve complex problems and master new skills) in a child who has multiple

  2. Requirements for drilling and disposal in deep boreholes; Foerutsaettningar foer borrning av och deponering i djupa borrhaal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oden, Anders [QTOB, Haesselby (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    In this report experience from drilling at great depth in crystalline rock is compiled based on project descriptions, articles and personal contacts. Rock mechanical effects have been analyzed. The report also describes proposals made by SKB and other agencies regarding the disposal of and closure of deep boreholes. The combination of drilling deep with large diameter in crystalline rocks have mainly occurred in various research projects, such as in the German KTB project. Through these projects and the increased interest in recent years for geothermal energy , today's equipment is expected to be used to drill 5000 m deep holes , with a hole diameter of 445 mm , in crystalline rock. Such holes could be used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. With the deposition technique recently described by Sandia National Laboratories in USA, SKB estimates that it might be possible to implement the disposal to 5000 m depth. Considering the actual implementation, drilling and disposal, and the far-reaching requirements on nuclear safety and radiation protection, it is considered an important risk getting stuck with the capsule-string, or part of it, above deposition zone without being able to get it loose. In conclusion, even if the drilling and the deposit would succeed there remains to verify that the drill holes with the deposited canisters meet the initial requirements and is long-term safe.

  3. How does a Collaborative Community Affect Diverse Students' Engagement with an Open Source Software Project: A Pedagogical Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Becka S.

    Open Source Software (OSS) communities are homogenous and their lack of diversity is of concern to many within this field. This problem is becoming more pronounced as it is the practice of many technology companies to use OSS participation as a factor in the hiring process, disadvantaging those who are not a part of this community. We should expect that any field would have a population that reflects the general population given no constraints. The constraints within OSS are documented as being a hostile environment for women and minorities to participate in. Additionally OSS communities rely predominately on volunteers to create and maintain source code, documentation, and user interface as well as the organizational structure of the project. The volunteer nature of OSS projects creates a need for an ongoing pool of participants. This research addresses the lack of diversity along with the continual need for new members by developing a pedagogical paradigm that uses a collaborative environment to promote participation in an OSS project by diverse students. This collaborative environment used a Communities of Practice (CoP) framework to design the course, the indicators of which were used to operationalize the collaboration. The outcomes of this course not only benefit the students by providing them with skills necessary to continue participation and experience for getting a job, but also provide a diverse pool of volunteers for the OSS community. This diverse pool shows promise of creating a more diverse culture within OSS. In the development of this pedagogical paradigm this research looked primarily at student's perception of the importance of their group members and mentors provided to guide their participation in and contribution to an OSS community. These elements were used to facilitate the formation of a CoP. Self-efficacy was also used as a measure; an increase in self-efficacy is associated with the successful formation of a CoP. Finally the intent to

  4. Waste and cost reduction using dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for contaminant plume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smuin, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the drilling and sampling methods used to delineate a groundwater contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the Groundwater Monitoring IV characterization. The project was unique in that it relied upon dual wall reverse circulation drilling instead of the traditional hollow stem auger method. The Groundwater Monitoring program sought to characterize the boundaries, both vertically and horizontally, of the northeast plume which contains both 99 Tc and trichloroethene. This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the drilling method used by investigators

  5. Scientific drilling reveals geochemical heterogeneity within the Ko'olau shield, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States