WorldWideScience

Sample records for drift wave instabilities

  1. Generation of ULF waves by the Drift-Mirror plasma instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-chavez, A. R.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Xia, Z.; Chen, L.; Kim, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present conclusive evidence of a ULF (Pc5 range) wave generated by the Drift-Mirror plasma instability in Earth's inner magnetosphere. Although seldom discussed, we show that the drift-mirror instability can play an important role in the generation of ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in Earth's inner magnetosphere. The drift-mirror instability is a high-beta plasma instability, and so we present two year measurements of high-beta events taken by the RBSPICE instrument onboard Van Allen Probes. Thus, we discuss the implications of these new measurements and their role on wave-particle interactions in Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  2. Secondary instability in drift wave turbulence as a mechanism for avalanche and zonal flow formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Champeaux, S.; Malkov, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report on recent developments in the theory of secondary instability in drift-ITG turbulence. Specifically, we explore secondary instability as a mechanism for avalanche formation. A theory of radially extended streamer cell formation and self-regulation is presented. Aspects of streamer structure and dynamics are used to estimate the variance of the drift-wave induced flux. The relation between streamer cell structures and the avalanche concept is discussed, as are the implications of our results for transport modeling. (author)

  3. Drift wave instability and turbulence in advanced stellarator configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendl, A.

    2001-08-01

    In the following chapter, an overview and references on the physics and geometry of helical advanced stellarators is given. On the basis of this configuration, the influence of magnetic field geometry is then discussed in a basic model of drift-Alfven wave turbulence which contains the necessary physics that applies to the plasma edge. By means of linear models, core physics in the form of ITG and dissipative trapped electron modes is further included in our survey. These models are, of course, by far not comprehensive in order to cover the complex physics of plasma turbulence in three-dimensional fusion devices, where a large range of parameter and mode regimes is present. Optimization criteria for a possible systematic minimization of turbulent transport in Helias configurations therefore still have to be regarded as tentative. The results presented here should, however, encourage for more detailed future computations. (orig.)

  4. Nonlinear theory of drift instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, T.

    1981-01-01

    In this chapter, we review recent works on the analytical and numerical analysis for the nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities. Only the case of a coherent wave is considered. Contributions to the turbulence theory for drift instabilities are already presented in Chapter 4. (author)

  5. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation

  6. Numerical analysis of nonlinear collisional drift instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1978-04-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisional drift wave instability is studied numerically. Model equations of quasilinear type are used which describe the modification of background density and the amplitude of unstable drift wave. Their solutions are classified according to the value of a parameter (n) which is proportional to the ratio of ion viscous damping to linear growth rate. In the vicinity of marginal stability, the unstable drift waves are shown to be saturated by flattening of the background density. An N decreases further, periodic and later aperiodic solutions are obtained. The wave associated diffusion coefficient is obtained numerically as a function of N and found to be much less than the usual estimate.

  7. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  8. High beta plasma observations in Earth's Ring Current: Waves and particle oscillations, and drift-mirror instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-chavez, A. R.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Kim, H.

    2016-12-01

    We report on high beta ( > 1) plasma observations made by the RBSPICE instruments onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The data presented covers almost two years of continuous measurements (March 9, 2013 to December 31, 2014). This coverage provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify and characterize high-beta plasma occurrences in the inner magnetosphere and their characteristics. It is known that high-beta events involve complex plasma physics dynamics. These events can also have global effects on Earth's magnetosphere. Here we show that on July 6, 2013 (one of many high-beta events) a Pc5 (˜ 2.5 min period) wave was locally generated in the magnetosphere through the drift-mirror instability. We describe the wave characteristics and its effects on particle modulations, specifically ring current ions (˜ 50-500 keV).

  9. On the Radial Eigenmode Structure of Drift Wave Instability with Inhomogeneous Damping in Cylindrical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Naohiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Abe, Satoshi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2018-02-01

    Plasma flows can be driven by turbulent stresses from excited modes in magnetized plasmas. Our recent numerical simulation of resistive drift wave turbulence in a linear device has shown that the radial inhomogeneity of the neutral density affects azimuthal flow generation by changing the phase structure of the most unstable eigenmodes. Eigenmode analyses show that the mode structure has a complex Bessel-type function shape in the central region of the plasma, and the imaginary part arises from the radial inhomogeneity of the damping term caused by ion-neutral collisions. The amplitude of turbulent stress is proportional to the inhomogeneity under a marginally stable condition. Global structural formation is an important factor for determining the plasma turbulent state, and this result clearly shows that several kinds of radial background distributions, the plasma and neutral densities in this case, can influence the global structures.

  10. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations

  11. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  12. Drift wave studies in a linear multiple mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1983-06-01

    The drift wave is modeled by a linear kinetic theory which treats finite ion gyroradius, collisions, an electron temperature gradient, and trapped electrons. The theory predicts three unstable modes, only one of which is consistent with all of the above measurements. This instability is a Doppler shifted drift cyclotron instability modified by trapped particle effects

  13. The effect of plasma drift on the electromagnetic cyclotron instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, V.H.; Rycroft, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the drift of plasma across a homogeneous magnetic field causes the generation of a wave electric field which, for waves propagating along the magnetic field in the whistler mode, is in the direction of the magnetic field. This leads to Landau damping of the wave field by the background electron distribution, simultaneously with amplification via the electromagnetic cyclotron instability. The drift velocity of the plasma for zero net growth of a whistler mode signal is calculated. It is suggested that such a process occurs in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere during a geomagnetic storm and accounts for the missing band of emissions at half the equatorial gyrofrequency. (Auth.)

  14. Comment on the drift mirror instability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2008), 054502/1-054502/2 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : drift mirror instability * linear theory Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.427, year: 2008

  15. Effect of sheared flow on drift and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, P.; Tsai, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of non-uniform rotation with a jet profile on the drift and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a tandem mirror is investigated numerically. Certain regimes of the flow parameters are found where the drift instability is nearly suppressed and the transverse Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is not induced. The growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can also be reduced to almost zero by a sufficiently large rotation frequency or by a radial electric field with moderate shear. The wave-flow resonant interaction may account for the stabilizing effect of sheared flow on drift and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. (Author)

  16. Rossby wave, drift wave and zonal flow turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobinsky, Demian G.

    An extensive qualitative and quantitative study of Rossby wave, drift wave and zonal flow turbulence in the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model is presented. This includes details of two generation mechanisms of the zonal flows, evidence of the nonlocal nature of this turbulence and of the energy exchange between the small and large scales. The modulational instability study shows that for strong primary waves the most unstable modes are perpendicular to the primary wave, which corresponds to the generation of a zonal flow if the primary wave is purely meridional. For weak waves, the maximum growth occurs for off-zonal modulations that are close to being in three-wave resonance with the primary wave. Nonlinear jet pinching is observed for all nonlinearity levels but the subsequent dynamics differ between strong and weak primary waves. The jets of the former further roll up into Karman-like vortex streets and saturate, while for the latter, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet and a dominant primary wave. A critical level of nonlinearity is defined which separates the two regimes. Some of these characteristics are captured by truncated models. Numerical proof of the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence is presented. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively-well conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjortoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the wellknown drift wave - zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation

  17. The Development of Drift Wave Turbulence in Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  18. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  19. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  20. Drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1992-01-01

    Drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities of a finite-beta plasma in equilibrium electric and magnetic fields which are perpendicular to each other are studied using two fluid equations. Three types of these instabilities are considered including the magnetosonic instability of a finite beta-homogeneous plasma, the electrostatic drift instability of an inhomogeneous low-beta plasma, and the magneto-acoustic instability of a high-beta inhomogeneous isothermal plasma. It is shown that the electric field has either stabilizing or destabilizing effect depending on conditions under consideration.

  1. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    In a statistical analysis pair correlation of particles is eventually destroyed by small scale fluctuations giving rise to relative particle diffusion. However, in any one given realization of the statistical ensemble particles may remain correlated in certain regions of space. A perfectly frozen......, two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation...... is proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence...

  2. Theory of drift and trapped-electron instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Frieman, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical investigation of low-frequency drift and trapped-particle instabilities in systems with magnetic shear, by analytic and numerical procedures and by computer simulations. In particular, results are presented for calculations which demonstrate: (1) the stability of both collisionless and dissipative drift eigenmodes at long radial wavelengths (k/sub r/rho/sub i/ less than 1) in a sheared slab (one-dimensional) geometry; (2) the presence and structure of drift and trapped-electron eigenmodes in an axisymmetric toroidal (two-dimensional) geometry; and (3) the nonlinear evolution and resultant anomalous transport from trapped-electron instabilities

  3. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  4. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects

  5. Saturation regime of the collisionless drift instability in a hydrogen plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissier, R.

    1982-09-01

    The saturation regime of the collisionless drift instability is observed in a steady state hydrogen column. The steady state parameters are observed to relax around the average values. A quasilinear model is proposed to describe the dynamics of wave growth and density gradient decay

  6. Dynamics of zonal flows and self-regulating drift-wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Fleischer, J.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Hinton, F.L.; Malkov, M.; Smolyakov, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a theory of zonal flow - drift wave dynamics. Zonal flows are generated by modulational instability of a drift wave spectrum, and are damped by collisions. Drift waves undergo random shearing-induced refraction, resulting in increased mean square radial wavenumber. Drift waves and zonal flows together form a simple dynamical system, which has a single stable fixed point. In this state, the fluctuation intensity and turbulent diffusivity are ultimately proportional to the collisional zonal flow damping. The implications of these results for transport models is discussed. (author)

  7. Study of electric and magnetic field fluctuations from lower hybrid drift instability waves in the terrestrial magnetotail with the fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi level multi domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Norgren, C.; Newman, D.; Goldman, M.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The newly developed fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi-level multi-domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large wavenumber range and at a low computational cost. The power spectra of the perpendicular electric field and of the fluctuations of the parallel magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed by Norgren et al. ["Lower hybrid drift waves: Space observations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 055001 (2012)] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. In the MLMD simulations presented, a domain ("coarse grid") is simulated with low resolution. A small fraction of the entire domain is then simulated with higher resolution also ("refined grid") to capture smaller scale, higher frequency processes. Initially, the MLMD method is validated for LHDI simulations. MLMD simulations with different levels of grid refinement are validated against the standard semi-implicit particle in cell simulations of domains corresponding to both the coarse and the refined grid. Precious information regarding the applicability of the MLMD method to turbulence simulations is derived. The power spectra of MLMD simulations done with different levels of refinements are then compared. They consistently show a break in the magnetic field spectra at k⊥di˜30 , with di the ion skin depth and k⊥ the perpendicular wavenumber. The break is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit <6 , with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is due to the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers, before the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. Evidence of coupling between electric and magnetic

  8. Nonlinear evolution of the lower-hybrid drift instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackbill, J.U.; Forslund, D.W.; Quest, K.B.; Winske, D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of simulations of the lower-hybrid drift instability in a neutral sheet configuration are described. The simulations use an implicit formulation to relax the usual time step limitations and thus extend previous explicit calculations to weaker gradients, larger mass ratios, and long times compared with the linear growth time. The numerical results give the scaling of the saturation level, heating rates, resistivity, and cross-field diffusion and a demonstration by comparison with a fluid electron model that dissipation in the lower-hybrid drift instability is caused by electron kinetic effects

  9. Modulational instability of coupled waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Bingham, R.

    1989-01-01

    The collinear propagation of an arbitrary number of finite-amplitude waves is modeled by a system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations; one equation for each complex wave amplitude. In general, the waves are modulationally unstable with a maximal growth rate larger than the modulational growth rate of any wave alone. Moreover, waves that are modulationally stable by themselves can be driven unstable by the nonlinear coupling. The general theory is then applied to the relativistic modulational instability of two laser beams in a beat-wave accelerator. For parameters typical of a proposed beat-wave accelerator, this instability can seriously distort the incident laser pulse shapes on the particle-acceleration time scale, with detrimental consequences for particle acceleration

  10. A note on the drift waves in the presence of electrons added by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The role of added electrons on the drift dissipative instability in a nonuniform colli- sional plasma is analysed. We observe the presence of a drift wave that depends entirely on the added electrons through the collision frequency coupling and there is an additional damping. The present study is applied to the ...

  11. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Correa-Restrepo, Dario

    1996-01-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T v (x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... polarity, i.e. a pair of electrostatic convective cells....

  13. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  14. Nonlinear heat and particle transport due to collisional drift waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-Kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1978-07-01

    A nonlinear analysis of collisional drift instability is developed in a slab model based on the two fluid equations, where inhomogeneities in electron and ion temperatures and unperturbed current are included in addition to ion inertia, finite ion gyroradius, and viscosity. A systematic expansion is introduced by taking epsilon=vertical-barkappavertical-barl as a smallness parameter, where kappa is the degree of density gradient and l is the linear scale of the slab along the density gradient. The nonlinear development of the drift wave near marginal stability is studied on the basis of the model equations. A new feature, hard excitation, has been found, which is due to the effects of the nonlinear frequency shift and the electron temperature gradient. The saturation amplitude is calculated, and the expressions for wave-associated particle and heat fluxes are obtained. A comparison of the expressions with the experimental results of a stellerator device is also made.

  15. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  16. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  17. Current driven drift instability in the W VII-A stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, R.; Wobig, H.

    1978-12-01

    The instability region and growth rates of current driven drift modes in the W VII-A stellarator are calculated. Several theoretical results are evaluated for specific temperature and density profiles. It is found that in the outer region of the plasma-column (r > 6 cm) collisional drift waves with wavelengths (k 2 x + K 2 y)sup(-1/2) = 0.13 - 0.3 cm exist. In this region also the electron thermal conductivity determined experimentally appears to be large. (orig./GG) [de

  18. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Liu

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are selective and tend to emphasize more on kinetic-theory approaches to waves and instabilities in both uniform and non-uniform plasmas, students are assumed to have some basic knowledge of plasma dynamics in terms of single-particle and fluid descriptions.

  19. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, η e crit , is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient

  20. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantao Ji; Russell Kulsrud; William Fox; Masaaki Yamada

    2005-01-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) waves in the moving electron frame, and the forward propagating sound (slow) waves in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma

  1. Drift Wave Simulations with Reduced Stellarator Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-01-01

    A three-field model to study drift-resistive, low-frequency waves in low-beta, non-axisymmetric plasmas [J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas, 4 (11) 4023 (1997)] is used to analyze the effect of the inhomogeneities in the stellarator magnetic field on the fastest (linear) growth rate, gamma. Extensive numerical calculations for a toroidal heliac show that not all Fourier components in the representation of the equilibrium configuration are important as far as gamma is concerned

  2. Elliptical instability of a vortex tube and drift current induced by it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Y; Hirota, M

    2008-01-01

    We revisit, with some extension to the nonlinear regime, the Moore-Saffman-Tsai-Widnall instability, which is the three-dimensional instability of a straight vortex tube elliptically strained by a pure shear flow. A circular cylindrical vortex tube supports neutrally stable three-dimensional waves called Kelvin waves. A pure shear breaks the circular symmetry, causing a parametric resonance between two Kelvin waves whose azimuthal wavenumbers are separated by two. The eigenvalues and functions are written out in full in terms of the Bessel and the modified Bessel functions, and so is the growth rate. That this instability has a link with the elliptical instability in the short-wave limit is established in this study. This result is studied in the light of Krein's theory for Hamiltonian spectra. We develop a Lagrangian (particle) formulation that makes feasible an efficient calculation of iso-vortical disturbances up to second order in amplitude and thereby facilitates calculation of the energy of Kelvin waves. It is found that a Kelvin wave induces a drift current along the vortex tube.

  3. Electromagnetic instabilities attributed to a cross-field ion drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. L.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Instabilities due to a cross-field ion flow are reexamined by including the electromagnetic response of the ions, which has been ignored in existing discussions. It is found that this effect can lead to significant enhancement of the growth rate. Among the new results, a purely growing, electromagnetic unstable mode with a wave vector k parallel to the ambient magnetic field is found. The plasma configuration under consideration is similar to that used in the discussion of the well-known modified-two-stream instability. This instability has a growth rate faster than the ion cyclotron frequency, and is not susceptible to high-plasma-beta stabilization.

  4. Rippling and drift instabilities in the straight cylinder tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the electron and ion diamagnetic drifts stabilize the rippling mode in the straigth cylindrical tokamak model. Parallel electron heat conduction is further stabilizing if the parameter etasub(e) = dlnTsub(e)/dlnN is positive. This has a consequence that the mode does not survive at temperatures exceeding, typically, 50 eV for standard values of magnetic field and density. The collisional drift wave is found to be always stable even when the effect of the tokamak current is included in the calculation. (orig.)

  5. Numerical simulations of collisionless drift instabilities for low-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Yau, Y.Y.K.; Okuda, H.

    1977-10-01

    Nonlinear behavior of the collisionless drift instabilities are studied for the universal and current driven modes by means of electrostatic particle simulations in two-and-a-half dimensions. Realistic mass ratios of the electrons to the ions are used in the simulations, where the guiding-center approximation for the electrons and the exact dynamics for the ions are employed. Several nonlinear effects including the quasilinear diffusion of the particle density, the frequency shift due to the ambipolar field, the mode competition among the unstable waves, and the quasilinear diffusion in the velocity space are found to be the dominant mechanisms for the saturation. The stabilization of the collisionless drift instabilities by the magnetic shear has also been studied

  6. Deterministic drift instability and stochastic thermal perturbations of magnetic dissipative droplet solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, P.; Iacocca, E.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic dissipative droplet is a strongly nonlinear wave structure that can be stabilized in a thin film ferromagnet exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by use of spin transfer torque. These structures have been observed experimentally at room temperature, showcasing their robustness against noise. Here, we quantify the effects of thermal noise by deriving stochastic equations of motion for a droplet based on soliton perturbation theory. First, it is found that deterministic droplets are linearly unstable at large bias currents, subject to a drift instability. When the droplet is linearly stable, our framework allows us to analytically compute the droplet's generation linewidth and center variance. Additionally, we study the influence of nonlocal and Oersted fields with micromagnetic simulations, providing insight into their effect on the generation linewidth. These results motivate detailed experiments on the current and temperature-dependent linewidth as well as drift instability statistics of droplets, which are important figures-of-merit in the prospect of droplet-based applications.

  7. Solitary drift waves in the presence of magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.; Horton, W.

    1982-07-01

    The two-component fluid equations describing electron drift and ion acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma are shown to possess nonlinear two-dimensional solitary wave solutions. In the presence of magnetic shear, radiative shear damping is exponentially small in L/sub s//L/sub n/ for solitary drift waves, in contrast to linear waves

  8. Terahertz instability of surface optical-phonon polaritons that interact with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoruk, O.; Solymar, L.; Shamonina, E.; Kalinin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave interaction between optical phonons and electrons drifting in diatomic semiconductors has potential for amplification and generation of terahertz radiation. Existing models of this interaction were developed for infinite materials. As a more practically relevant configuration, we studied theoretically a finite semiconductor slab surrounded by a dielectric. This paper analyzes the optical-phonon instability in the slab including the Lorentz force and compares it to the instability in an infinite material. As the analysis shows, the slab instability occurs because of the interaction of surface optical-phonon polaritons with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift. The properties of the instability depend on the slab thickness when the thickness is comparable to the wavelength. For large slab thicknesses, however, the dispersion relation of the slab is similar to that of an infinite material, although the coupling is weaker. The results could be used for the design of practical terahertz traveling-wave oscillators and amplifiers.

  9. Adiabatic-drift-loss modification of the electromagnetic loss-cone instability for anisotropic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, B.; Treumann, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Observation of the adiabatic behaviour of energetic particle pitch-angle distributions in the magnetosphere (Lyons, 1977, and others) in the past indicated the development of pronounced minima or drift-loss cones on the pitch-angle distributions centred at α approx.= 90 0 in connection with storm-time changes in magnetospheric convection and magnetic field. Using a model of a drift-modified loss-cone distribution (MLCD) of the butterfly type, the linear stability of electromagnetic whistler or ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field has been investigated. The instability is shown to be quenched at high frequencies ω 0 are identified as generating electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the marginally stable frequency ωsub(m). It is concluded that the absence of electromagnetic VLF and ELF noise during times when MLCD develops is the result of the shift of the unstable spectrum to low frequencies. (orig.)

  10. Nonlinear damping of drift waves by strong flow curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidikman, K.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    A single-equation model has been used to study the effect of a fixed poloidal flow (V 0 ) on turbulent drift waves. The electron dynamics come from a laminar kinetic equation in the dissipative trapped-electron regime. In the past, the authors have assumed that the mode frequency is close to the drift-wave frequency. Trapped-electron density fluctuations are then related to potential fluctuations by an open-quotes iδclose quotes term. Flow shear (V 0 ') and curvature (V 0 double-prime) both have a stabilizing effect on linear modes for this open-quotes iδclose quotes model. However, in the nonlinear regime, single-helicity effects inhibit the flow damping. Neither V 0 ' nor V 0 double-prime produces a nonlinear damping effect. The above assumption on the frequency can be relaxed by including the electron time-response in the linear part of the evolution. In this time-dependent model, instability drive due to trapped electrons is reduced when mode frequency is greater than drift-wave frequency. Since V 0 double-prime produces such a frequency shift, its linear effect is enhanced. There is also nonlinear damping, since single-helicity effects do not eliminate the shift. Renormalized theory for this model predicts nonlinear stability for sufficiently large curvature. Single-helicity calculations have already shown nonlinear damping, and this strong V 0 double-prime regime is being explored. In the theory, the Gaussian shape of the nonlinear diffusivity is expanded to obtain a quadratic potential. The implications of this assumption will be tested by solving the full renormalized equation using a shooting method

  11. Gravitational waves from instabilities in relativistic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Nils

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of stellar instabilities as sources of gravitational waves. The aim is to put recent work on secular and dynamical instabilities in compact stars in context, and to summarize the current thinking about the detectability of gravitational waves from various scenarios. As a new generation of kilometre length interferometric detectors is now coming online this is a highly topical theme. The review is motivated by two key questions for future gravitational-wave astronomy: are the gravitational waves from various instabilities detectable? If so, what can these gravitational-wave signals teach us about neutron star physics? Even though we may not have clear answers to these questions, recent studies of the dynamical bar-mode instability and the secular r-mode instability have provided new insights into many of the difficult issues involved in modelling unstable stars as gravitational-wave sources. (topical review)

  12. Nonlinear excitation of geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.; Guzdar, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, two mode-coupling analyses for the nonlinear excitation of the geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in tokamak plasmas by drift waves are presented. The first approach is a coherent parametric process, which leads to a three-wave resonant interaction. This investigation allows for the drift waves and the GAMs to have comparable scales. The second approach uses the wave-kinetic equations for the drift waves, which then couples to the GAMs. This requires that the GAM scale length be large compared to the wave packet associated with the drift waves. The resonance conditions for these two cases lead to specific predictions of the radial wave number of the excited GAMs

  13. Resistive drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    1999-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model describing resistive drift waves is investigated analytically and numerically in a three-dimensional periodic geometry. After an initial growth of the energy the drift waves couple nonlinearly to convective cells, which eventually dominate the system completely...

  14. An Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) and its Importance for Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell Kulsrud; Hantao Ji; Will Fox; Masaaki Yamada

    2005-06-07

    The role which resistivity plays in breaking magnetic field lines, heating the plasma, and plasma field slippage during magnetic reconnection is discussed. Magnetic fluctuations are observed in the MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment) that are believed to provide resistive friction or wave resistivity. A localized linear theory has been proposed for their origin as an obliquely propagating Lower Hybrid Drift Instability. In this paper, the linear theory of the instability is summarized, and the resulting heating and slippage are calculated from quasi-linear theory. Making use of measured amplitudes of the magnetic fluctuations in the MRX the amount of these effects is estimated. Within the experimental uncertainties they are shown to be quite important for the magnetic reconnection process.

  15. Parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1992-01-01

    The threshold for parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry is calculated for a pump wave that is a standing wave along the magnetic field, using the Hasegawa-Mima nonlinearity. The shear damping is counteracted by the parametric coupling and the eigenvalue problem is solved analytically using Taylor's strong coupling approximation. (au)

  16. Modulation of drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A. P., E-mail: apmisra@visva-bharati.ac.in, E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan-731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-04-15

    We study the amplitude modulation of low-frequency, long-wavelength electrostatic drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma consisting of cold ions and degenerate electrons. The effects of tunneling associated with the quantum Bohm potential and the Fermi pressure for nonrelativistic degenerate electrons, as well as the equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities are taken into account. Starting from a set of quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations, we derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that governs the dynamics of the modulated quantum drift-wave packets. The NLSE is used to study the modulational instability (MI) of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. It is shown that the quantum tunneling effect as well as the scale length of inhomogeneity plays crucial roles for the MI of the drift-wave packets. Thus, the latter can propagate in the form of bright and dark envelope solitons or as drift-wave rogons in degenerate dense magnetoplasmas.

  17. Littoral drift computations on mutual wave and current influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, E.W.

    1971-01-01

    11th Conference on Coastal Engineering in London 1968, the author presented a method for computing the littoral drift starting from the longshore current velocity as this is generated by the waves and with the assumption that the material is stirred up by the waves. In this paper measurements in a

  18. Plasma particle drifts due to traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Sato, Naoyuki; Sato, Noriyoshi

    1991-01-01

    A particle orbit theory yields that traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies give rise to charged particle drifts perpendicular both to the wave propagation and external magnetic field lines. The result is applicable to particle-flux control of magnetized plasmas. (author)

  19. Plasma wave instabilities in nonequilibrium graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryal, Chinta M.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study two-stream instabilities in a nonequilibrium system in which a stream of electrons is injected into doped graphene. As with equivalent nonequilibrium parabolic band systems, we find that the graphene systems can support unstable charge-density waves whose amplitudes grow with time. We...... of the injected electrons that maximizes the growth rate increases with increasing | q |. We compare the range and strength of the instability in graphene to that of two- and three-dimensional parabolic band systems....

  20. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  1. Drift-wave turbulence and zonal flow generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.

    2003-01-01

    Drift-wave turbulence in a plasma is analyzed on the basis of the wave Liouville equation, describing the evolution of the distribution function of wave packets (quasiparticles) characterized by position x and wave vector k. A closed kinetic equation is derived for the ensemble-averaged part of this function by the methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. It has the form of a non-Markovian advection-diffusion equation describing coupled diffusion processes in x and k spaces. General forms of the diffusion coefficients are obtained in terms of Lagrangian velocity correlations. The latter are calculated in the decorrelation trajectory approximation, a method recently developed for an accurate measure of the important trapping phenomena of particles in the rugged electrostatic potential. The analysis of individual decorrelation trajectories provides an illustration of the fragmentation of drift-wave structures in the radial direction and the generation of long-wavelength structures in the poloidal direction that are identified as zonal flows

  2. Slow Drift-Oscillations of a Ship in Irregular Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd M. Faltinsen

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available A procedure to calculate horizontal slow drift excitation forces on an infinitely long horizontal cylinder in irregular beam sea waves is presented. The hydrodynamic boundary-value problem is solved correctly to second order in wave amplitude. Results in the form of second order transfer functions are presented for different, two-dimensional shapes. It is concluded that Newman's approximative method is a practical way to calculate slow drift excitation forces on a ship in beam sea and it is suggested that it may be used in a more general case. Applications of the results for moored ships are discussed.

  3. Particle simulation of drift waves in a sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydora, R.D.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Tajima, T.

    1983-11-01

    Electrostatic properties of density gradient drift waves (the universal mode), in a sheared magnetic field, are studied using a two-and-one-half dimensional particle code. For the case of a single rational surface, the drift waves are found to be stable with an eigenmode structure that matches the linear theoretical prediction as long as the ion resonance point is well within the system. This applies to both even and odd parity modes with respect to the rational surface. The dependence on various parameters such as the shear length is examined

  4. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome L.V.

    2003-01-01

    There are growing experimental, numerical and theoretical evidences that the anomalous transport observed in tokamaks and stellarators is caused by slow, drift-type modes (such as trapped electron modes and ion-temperature gradient-driven modes). Although typical collision frequencies in hot, magnetized fusion plasmas can be quite low in absolute values, collisional effects are nevertheless important since they act as dissipative sinks. As it is well known, dissipative systems with many (strictly speaking more than two) degrees of freedom are often chaotic and may evolve towards a so-called attractor

  5. The Rossby wave instability in protoplanetary disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meheut H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rossby wave instability has been proposed as a mechanism to transport angular momentum in the dead zone of protoplanetary disks and to form vortices. These vortices are of particular interest to concentrate solids in their centres and eventually to form planetesimals. Here we summarize some recent results concerning the growth and structure of this instability in radially and vertically stratified disks, its saturation and non-linear evolution. We also discuss the concentration of solids in the Rossby vortices including vertical settling.

  6. Parametric instabilities in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, S; Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Ju, L

    2010-01-01

    As the LIGO interferometric gravitational wave detectors have finished gathering a large observational data set, an intense effort is underway to upgrade these observatories to improve their sensitivity by a factor of ∼10. High circulating power in the arm cavities is required, which leads to the possibility of parametric instability due to three-mode opto-acoustic resonant interactions between the carrier, transverse optical modes and acoustic modes. Here, we present detailed numerical analysis of parametric instability in a configuration that is similar to Advanced LIGO. After examining parametric instability for a single three-mode interaction in detail, we examine instability for the best and worst cases, as determined by the resonance condition of transverse modes in the power and signal recycling cavities. We find that, in the best case, the dual recycling detector is substantially less susceptible to instability than a single cavity, but its susceptibility is dependent on the signal recycling cavity design, and on tuning for narrow band operation. In all cases considered, the interferometer will experience parametric instability at full power operation, but the gain varies from 3 to 1000, and the number of unstable modes varies between 7 and 30 per test mass. The analysis focuses on understanding the detector complexity in relation to opto-acoustic interactions, on providing insights that can enable predictions of the detector response to transient disturbances, and of variations in thermal compensation conditions.

  7. Nonlinear heat and particle transport due to collisional drift waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1977-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable modes which govern transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas were investigated. A nonlinear theory of unstable collisional drift wave, and the consequent nonlinear transport were extended to include electron and ion temperature gradients. Thermal transport properties are discussed and basic equations are given.

  8. Structure and damping of toroidal drift waves (and their implications for anomalous transport)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.B.; Connor, J.; Wilson, H.R.

    1993-05-01

    The conventional theory of high-n toroidal drift waves, based on the ballooning representation, indicates that shear-damping is generally reduced in a torus compared to its plane-slab value. It therefore describes the most unstable class of toroidal drift waves. However, modes of this type occur only i f the diamagnetic frequency ω*(r) has a maximum in r, and they affect only a small fraction, Ο(1/n l/2 ), of the plasma radius around this maximum. Consequently they may produce little anomalous transport. In the present work we show that, within the ballooning description, there is another class of toroidal drift waves with very different properties to the conventional ones. The new modes have greater shear-damping (closer to that in a plane-slab) than the conventional ones and so have a higher instability threshold. However, they occur for any plasma profile and at all radii, and they have larger radial extent. Consequently they may produce much greater anomalous transport than the possibly benign conventional modes. This suggests a picture of anomalous transport in which the plasma profile is determined by marginal stability, but marginal to the new class of modes not to the conventional ones. This might explain why marginally stable profiles calculated for drift waves with plane-slab damping sometimes agree well with the profiles in toroidal experiments. It is also consistent with the fact that experimental profiles may exceed conventional toroidal instability thresholds. The new modes may also be related to the tong radial structures which appear in some plasma simulations and in experiments

  9. Drift induced by repeated hydropeaking waves in controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolini, Bruno; Bruno, M. Cristina; Biffi, Sofia; Cashman, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    Repeated hydropeaking events characterize most alpine rivers downstream of power plants fed by high elevation reservoirs. The effects of hydropeaking on the benthic communities are well known, and usually each hydropeaking wave causes an increase in tractive force and changes in temperature and water quality. Simulations of hydropeaking in artificial system can help to disentangle the direct effects of the modified flow regime from impacts associated with other associated physio-chemical changes, and with the effects of river regulation and land-use changes that often accompany water resource development. In September 2013 we conducted a set of controlled simulations in five steel flumes fed by an Alpine stream (Fersina stream, Adige River catchment, Trentino, Italy), where benthic invertebrates can freely colonize the flumes. One flume was used as control with no change in flow, in the other four flumes we simulated an hydropeaking wave lasting six hours, and repeated for five consecutive days. Flow was increased by twice baseflow in two flumes, and three times in the other two. We collected benthic samples before the beginning (morning of day 1) and after the end (afternoon of day 5) of the set of simulations to evaluate changes in the benthic communities due to induced drift migration. During each simulation, we collected drifting organisms at short time intervals to assess the responses to: 1) the initial discharge increase, 2) the persistence of high flows for several hours; 3) the decrease of discharge to the baseflow; 4) the change in drift with each successive day. Preliminary results indicate typical strong increases of catastrophic drift on the onset of each simulated hydropeaking, drift responses proportional to the absolute discharge increase, a decrease in the drift responses over successive days. Different taxa responded with different patterns: taxa which resist tractive force increased in drift only during the periods of baseflow that follow the

  10. Continental drift and climate change drive instability in insect assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fengqing; Tierno de Figueroa, Jos? Manuel; Lek, Sovan; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-01-01

    Global change has already had observable effects on ecosystems worldwide, and the accelerated rate of global change is predicted in the future. However, the impacts of global change on the stability of biodiversity have not been systematically studied in terms of both large spatial (continental drift) and temporal (from the last inter-glacial period to the next century) scales. Therefore, we analyzed the current geographical distribution pattern of Plecoptera, a thermally sensitive insect gro...

  11. Drift current under the action of wind and waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.; Spaulding, M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate estimates of sea surface drift currents are critical to forecasting oil spill transport and fate. Most existing spill models employ a drift factor and deflection angle, based on local wind speed, to estimate the sea surface drift vector. The effects of wind-induced shear and wave-induced transport are lumped together in this formulation. In the present approach, the conservation of momentum, water mass, and turbulent energy equations are solved using an implicit finite difference method to predict the vertical distribution of current, turbulent energy, and eddy viscosity at one point. The model includes coupling between the wave- and shear-induced currents. Input energy from the atmosphere to the turbulent energy and current fields are represented through free-surface boundary conditions. The numerical model showed excellent agreement compared to an analytic solution of the wind-forced shear flow problem. The model was applied to predict surface drift currents for varying wind speeds and predicted results in general agreement with field observations and other numerical and theoretical studies. The model predicted drift factor F (%) and deflection angle A (degrees) decrease with increasing wind speed W (m/s), and can be approximated by the following curve fits: F=3.91-0.318W, A=23.627-7.97 log W. The model was applied to three intentional oil spills conducted on the Norwegian continental shelf in 1991 and predicted the observed trajectories with reasonable accuracy. 24 refs., 17 figs

  12. Alfvenic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the presence of an equilibrium electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1992-01-01

    The Alfvenic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a high-beta plasma in the presence of equilibrium magnetic and electric fields perpendicular to each other are studied. The plasma components are assumed to have 2D sheared velocity in y and z directions. The dispersion relation is derived, and the instability criterion is determined. It is shown that the equilibrium electric field has either stabilizing or destabilizing effect depending on certain conditions discussed in the paper.

  13. ULF waves with drift resonance and drift-bounce resonance energy sources as observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø has been demonstrated to provide ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by the CUTLASS HF radars. Within a short period of time during a single four hour experiment three distinct wave types are observed with differing periods, and latitudinal and longitudinal phase evolution. Combining information from the three waves allows them to be divided into those with a large-scale nature, driven externally to the magnetosphere, and those with small azimuthal scale lengths, driven by wave-particle interactions. Furthermore, the nature of the wave-particle interactions for two distinct small-scale waves is revealed, with one wave interpreted as being driven by a drift resonance process and the other by a drift-bounce resonance interaction. Both of these mechanisms with m ≈ -35 and proton energies of 35–45 keV appear to be viable wave energy sources in the postnoon sector.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and in-stabilities.

  14. Continental drift and climate change drive instability in insect assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengqing; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Lek, Sovan; Park, Young-Seuk

    2015-06-17

    Global change has already had observable effects on ecosystems worldwide, and the accelerated rate of global change is predicted in the future. However, the impacts of global change on the stability of biodiversity have not been systematically studied in terms of both large spatial (continental drift) and temporal (from the last inter-glacial period to the next century) scales. Therefore, we analyzed the current geographical distribution pattern of Plecoptera, a thermally sensitive insect group, and evaluated its stability when coping with global change across both space and time throughout the Mediterranean region--one of the first 25 global biodiversity hotspots. Regional biodiversity of Plecoptera reflected the geography in both the historical movements of continents and the current environmental conditions in the western Mediterranean region. The similarity of Plecoptera assemblages between areas in this region indicated that the uplift of new land and continental drift were the primary determinants of the stability of regional biodiversity. Our results revealed that climate change caused the biodiversity of Plecoptera to slowly diminish in the past and will cause remarkably accelerated biodiversity loss in the future. These findings support the theory that climate change has had its greatest impact on biodiversity over a long temporal scale.

  15. Renormalized Compton scattering and nonlinear damping of collisionless drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1979-05-01

    A kinetic theory for the nonlinear damping of collisionless drift waves in a shear-free magnetic field is presented. The general formalism is a renormalized version of induced scattering on the ions and reduces correctly to weak turbulence theory. The approximation studied explicitly reduces to Compton scattering, systematizes thee earlier calculations of Dupree and Tetreault (DT) [Phys. Fluids 21, 425 (1978)], and extends that theory to finite ion gyroradius. Certain conclusions differ significantly from those of DT

  16. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gurcan, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and non‐resonant off‐diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... and particles is accounted for. Two related momentum conservation theorems are derived. These relate the resonant particle momentum flux, the wave momentum flux and the refractive force. A perturbative calculation, in the spirit of Chapman‐Enskog theory, is used to obtain the wave momentum flux, which...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean κ∥(〈κ∥〉) is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications of the theory for intrinsic...

  17. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gürcan, O.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... and particles is accounted for. Two related momentum conservation theorems are derived. These relate the resonant particle momentum flux, the wave momentum flux, and the refractive force. A perturbative calculation, in the spirit of Chapman-Enskog theory, is used to obtain the wave momentum flux, which...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean k(parallel to) () is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications...

  18. The Inhomogeneous Energy-Density Driven Instability: New Milestones for Ion-Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, M. E.

    1997-11-01

    The Inhomogeneous Energy-Density Driven (IEDD) instability has been investigated in detail, theoretically and experimentally. From this basic work, important aspects of the instability mechanism have been documented and specific applications in space plasmas have been recognized. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves due to the IEDD instability arise when the y-direction flow of ions and electrons is structured in the x-direction, perpendicular to the magnetic field in the z-direction, thus resulting in an inhomogeneous wave energy density. This instability is distinct from the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Current-Driven Electrostatic Ion-Cyclotron (CDEIC) instabilities. We have observed in the laboratory the following remarkable properties of IEDD waves: mode frequency as low as 30% of the ion gyrofrequency, (2) Doppler upshifts and downshifts in a wide range from 30% to 160% of the ion gyrofrequency, (3) multiple, simultaneous eigenmodes of the plasma-flow inhomogeneity that are unrelated to the radial, azimuthal, or axial extent of the plasma column, (4) broadband, large-amplitude spectra extending above and below the ion gyrofrequency and having widths that exceed 50% of the center frequency, and (5) axial propagation along and against the magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, which means current is absolutely unnecessary to drive this mode. These results are obtained in a cylidrically symmetric, sodium Q-machine plasma, far below the excitation threshold for CDEIC and ion-acoustic waves. The adjustable radial electric field profile responsible for the inhomogeneous E x B flow profile is controlled by a segmented disk electrode at the plasma-column end. The experimental results are reinforced with numerical results from a nonlocal, linear model. This model predicts that this instability mechanism can destabilize ion-acoustic waves and drift waves as well. These results establish an expanded understanding regarding the generation and propagation of

  19. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  20. Nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, V.I.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves coupled to fast magnetosonic waves is investigated in two spatial dimensions by numerical simulations. The long time evolution of the modulational instability shows a quasirecurrent behavior with a slow spreading...... of the energy, originally confined to the lowest wave numbers, to larger and larger wave numbers resulting in an apparently chaotic or random wave field. © 1990 The American Physical Society...

  1. Filamentation instability of lower hybrid waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    It is shown that a strong lower hybrid wave is modulationally unstable to perturbations propagating along its own wave vector. The instability relies critically on the finite thermal corrections to the lower hybrid dispersion relation

  2. Effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of sheared parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on both dissipative toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of mean sheared parallel flow are examined. The first part of this work extends the development of a local model of ionization-driven drift wave turbulence [Phys. Fluids B 4, 877 (1992)] to include the effects of magnetic shear and poloidal source asymmetry, as well as poloidal mode coupling due to both magnetic drifts and the source asymmetry. Numerical and analytic investigation confirm that ionization effects can destabilize collisional toroidal drift waves. However, the mode structure is determined primarily by the magnetic drifts, and is not overly effected by the poloidal source asymmetry. The ionization source drives a purely inward particle flux, which can explain the anomalously rapid uptake of particles which occurs in response to gas puffing. In the second part of this work, the role poloidal asymmetries in both the source and turbulent particle diffusion play in the generation of sheared mean parallel flow is examined. Analysis indicates that predictions of sonic parallel shear flow [v parallel (r)∼c s ] are an unphysical result of the assumption of purely parallel flow (i.e., v perpendicular =0) and the neglect of turbulent parallel momentum transport. Results indicate that the flow produced is subcritical to the parallel shear flow instability when diamagnetic effects are properly considered

  3. Solitary Alfven wave envelopes and the modulational instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, C.F.

    1987-06-01

    The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the modulational instability of circularly polarized dispersive Alfven wave envelopes. It also may be used to determine the properties of finite amplitude localized stationary wave envelopes. Such envelope solitons exist only in conditions of modulational stability. This leaves open the question of whether, and if so, how, the modulational instability produces envelope solitons. 12 refs

  4. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  5. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  6. Almost two-dimensional treatment of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, J.M.; Similon, P.L.; Sudan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The approximation of two-dimensionality is studied and extended for electrostatic drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional, magnetized plasma. It is argued on the basis of the direct interaction approximation that in the absence of parallel viscosity, purely 2-D solutions exist for which only modes with k parallel =0 are excited, but that the 2-D spectrum is unstable to perturbations at nonzero k parallel . A 1-D equation for the parallel profile g k perpendicular (k parallel ) of the saturated spectrum at steady state is derived and solved, allowing for parallel viscosity; the spectrum has finite width in k parallel , and hence finite parallel correlation length, as a result of nonlinear coupling. The enhanced energy dissipation rate, a 3-D effect, may be incorporated in the 2-D approximation by a suitable renormalization of the linear dissipation term. An algorithm is presented that reduces the 3-D problem to coupled 1- and 2-D problems. Numerical results from a 2-D spectral direct simulation, thus modified, are compared with the results from the corresponding 3-D (unmodified) simulation for a specific model of drift wave excitation. Damping at high k parallel is included. It is verified that the 1-D solution for g k perpendicular (k parallel ) accurately describes the shape and width of the 3-D spectrum, and that the modified 2-D simulation gives a good estimate of the 3-D energy saturation level and distribution E(k perpendicular )

  7. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  8. Interplanetary shocks, Plasma waves and turbulence, Kinetic waves and instabilities, STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Z.; Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Davis, L.; Grul, P.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2017-12-01

    Determining the role of plasma waves in providing energy dissipation at shock waves is of long-standing interest. Interplanetary (IP) shocks serve as a large database of low Mach number shocks. We examine electric field waveforms captured by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS) on the STEREO spacecraft during the ramps of IP shocks, with emphasis on captures lasting 2.1 seconds. Previous work has used captures of shorter duration (66 and 131 ms on STEREO, and 17 ms on WIND), which allowed for observation of waves with maximum (minimum) frequencies of 125 kHz (15 Hz), 62.5 kHz (8 Hz), and 60 kHz (59 Hz), respectively. The maximum frequencies are comparable to 2-8 times the plasma frequency in the solar wind, enabling observation of Langmuir waves, ion acoustic, and some whistler-mode waves. The 2 second captures resolve lower frequencies ( few Hz), which allows us to analyze packet structure of the whistler-mode waves and some ion acoustic waves. The longer capture time also improves the resolvability of simultaneous wave modes and of waves with frequencies on the order of 10s of Hz. Langmuir waves, however, cannot be identified at this sampling rate, since the plasma frequency is usually higher than 3.9 kHz. IP shocks are identified from multiple databases (Helsinki heliospheric shock database at http://ipshocks.fi, and the STEREO level 3 shock database at ftp://stereoftp.nascom.nasa.gov/pub/ins_data/impact/level3/). Our analysis focuses on TDS captures in shock ramp regions, with ramp durations determined from magnetic field data taken at 8 Hz. Software is used to identify multiple wave modes in any given capture and classify waves as Langmuir, ion acoustic, whistler, lower hybrid, electron cyclotron drift instability, or electrostatic solitary waves. Relevant frequencies are determined from density and magnetic field data collected in situ. Preliminary results suggest that large amplitude (∼ 5 mV/m) ion acoustic waves are most prevalent in the ramp, in agreement with

  9. Analytic moment method calculations of the drift wave spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.R.; Molvig, K.

    1985-11-01

    A derivation and approximate solution of renormalized mode coupling equations describing the turbulent drift wave spectrum is presented. Arguments are given which indicate that a weak turbulence formulation of the spectrum equations fails for a system with negative dissipation. The inadequacy of the weak turbulence theory is circumvented by utilizing a renormalized formation. An analytic moment method is developed to approximate the solution of the nonlinear spectrum integral equations. The solution method employs trial functions to reduce the integral equations to algebraic equations in basic parameters describing the spectrum. An approximate solution of the spectrum equations is first obtained for a mode dissipation with known solution, and second for an electron dissipation in the NSA

  10. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge......Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important...... for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa- Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa...

  11. Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers of Alfvén waves generated by drift-bounce resonance in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Mager

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers m of poloidal Alfvén waves generated by energetic particles in the magnetosphere are studied in the paper. There are two factors that cause the wave localization across magnetic shells. First, the instability growth rate is proportional to the distribution function of the energetic particles, hence waves must be predominantly generated on magnetic shells where the particles are located. Second, the frequency of the generated poloidal wave must coincide with the poloidal eigenfrequency, which is a function of the radial coordinate. The combined impact of these two factors also determines the azimuthal wave number of the generated oscillations. The beams with energies about 10 keV and 150 keV are considered. As a result, the waves are shown to be strongly localized across magnetic shells; for the most often observed second longitudinal harmonic of poloidal Alfvén wave (N=2, the localization region is about one Earth radius across the magnetic shells. It is shown that the drift-bounce resonance condition does not select the m value for this harmonic. For 10 keV particles (most often involved in the explanation of poloidal pulsations, the azimuthal wave number was shown to be determined with a rather low accuracy, -100wave number is determined with a better accuracy, but both of these numbers are too small (if the waves are generated by 150 keV particles, or the waves are generated on magnetic shells (in 10 keV case which are too far away. The calculated values of γ/ω are not large enough to overcome the damping on the ionosphere. All these have cast some suspicion on the possibility of the drift-bounce instability to generate poloidal pulsations in the magnetosphere.

  12. Numerical and theoretical investigations of resistive drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunn Pedersen, T.

    1995-07-01

    With regard to the development of thermonuclear fusion utilizing a plasma confined in a magnetic field, anomalous transport is a major problem and is considered to be caused by electrostatic drift wave turbulence. A simplified quasi-two-dimensional slab model of resistive drift wave turbulence is investigated numerically and theoretically. The model (Hasegawa and Wakatani), consists of two nonlinear partial differential equations for the density perturbation n and the electrostatic potential perturbation φ. It includes the effect of a background density gradient perpendicular to the magnetic field and a generalized Ohm's law for the electrons in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. It may be used to model the basic features of electrostatic turbulence and the associated transport in an edge plasma. Model equations are derived and some important properties of the system are discussed. It is described how the Fourier spectral method is applied to the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, how the time integration is developed to ensure accurate and fast simulations in a large parameter regime, and how the accuracy of the code is checked. Numerical diagnostics are developed to verify and extend the results in publications concerning quasi-stationary turbulent states and to give an overview of the properties of the quasi-stationary turbulent state. The use of analysis tools, not previously applied to the Hasegawa-Wakatani system, and the results obtained are described. Fluid particles are tracked to obtain Lagrangian statistics for the turbulence. A new theoretical analysis of relative dispersion leads to a decomposition criterion for the particles. The significance of this is investigated numerically and characteristic time scales for particles are determined for a range of parameter values. It is indicated that the turbulent state can be characterized in the context of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory as an attractor with a large basin of attraction. The basic

  13. Current drive drift waves as a possible mechanism for dynamo effect and transport in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguglio, S.; Romanelli, F.; Vlad, G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that a current driven drift wave turbulence may be responsible for the outward ion flux observed in Reversed Field Pinches (RFPs) is investigated; the latter flux was recently proposed as the driving mechanism of the dynamo sustaining the poloidal current in the external region of an RFP discharge. It is shown that this possibility can be supported by the linear theory of current driven drift waves. Finally, on the assumption that the transport is dominated by these instabilities, a scaling law for the temperature in RFPs is derived, which shows an approximately linear dependence on the current and a weak dependence on the size of the machine, in agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  14. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  15. Filamentation instability of large-amplitude Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Whang, M.H.; Lee, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    An instability that leads to the filamentation of large-amplitude Alfven waves and gives rise to purely growing density and magnetic field fluctuations is studied. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived, from which the threshold conditions and the growth rates of the instability are analyzed quantitatively for applications to the solar wind plasma. We have examined their dependence on the filamentation spectrum, the plasma β, and the pump frequency and intensity for both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized Alfven waves. The excitation of filamentation instability for certain cases of interest is discussed and compared with that of the parametric decay and modulation instability. The relevance of the proposed instability with some observations is discussed. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  16. Faraday instability of crystallization waves in 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, H; Ueda, T; Morikawa, M; Saitoh, Y; Nomura, R; Okuda, Y

    2007-01-01

    Periodic modulation of the gravity acceleration makes a flat surface of a fluid unstable and standing waves are parametrically excited on the surface. This phenomenon is called Faraday instability. Since a crystal-superfluid interface of 4 He at low temperatures is very mobile and behaves like a fluid surface, Saarloos and Weeks predicted that Faraday instability of the crystallization waves exists in 4 He and that the threshold excitation for the instability depends on the crystal growth coefficient. We successfully observed the Faraday instability of the crystal-liquid interface at 160 mK. Faraday waves were parametrically generated at one half of the driving frequency 90 Hz. Amplitude of the Faraday wave becomes smaller at higher temperature due to decrease of the crystal growth coefficient and disappears above 200 mK

  17. Surface Stokes drift in the Baltic Sea based on modelled wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Laura; Vähä-Piikkiö, Olga; Alenius, Pekka; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Kahma, Kimmo K.

    2018-01-01

    The Stokes drift is an important component in the surface drift. We used the wave model WAM to evaluate the mean values and exceedance probabilities of the surface Stokes drift in the Baltic Sea. As there is no direct way to verify the accuracy of the modelled Stokes drift, we compared the bulk parameters calculated by the wave model against buoy measurements to ensure the quality of the wave hindcast. Furthermore, we evaluated the surface Stokes drift from measured wave spectra to assess the accuracy of the modelled surface Stokes drift. The importance of the Stokes drift as a component of the total surface drift was evaluated by calculating the hindcast mean values and percentiles of the surface Stokes drift. The mean values were between 0.08 and 0.10 ms-1 in the open sea areas, thus being of the same order of magnitude as the mean wind shear currents. The highest values of the surface Stokes drift were slightly larger than 0.6 ms-1. The comparison of modelled Stokes drift values to estimates obtained from measured spectra suggests that the mean values are well represented by the model. However, the higher modelled values are most likely slightly too large because the wave energy was overestimated during high wind situations in some of the sub-basins, such as the Gulf of Finland. A comparison to a drifter experiment showed that use of the Stokes drift improves the estimate of both the drift speed and the direction in the Gulf of Finland. Parameterised methods to evaluate the Stokes drift that are used, e.g. in currently available Baltic Sea drift models, overestimate the smaller values (under 0.3 ms-1) and underestimate the larger values of the Stokes drift compared to the values calculated by the wave model. The modelled surface Stokes drift direction mostly followed the forcing wind direction. This was the case even in the Gulf of Finland, where the direction of the wind and the waves can differ considerably.

  18. Effects of shock waves on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongtao; Shu Chiwang; Zhou Ye

    2006-01-01

    A numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference shock capturing scheme is carried out in this paper, to study the effect of shock waves on the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Shocks with different Mach numbers are introduced ahead or behind the Rayleigh-Taylor interface, and their effect on the transition to instability is demonstrated and compared. It is observed that shock waves can speed up the transition to instability for the Rayleigh-Taylor interface significantly. Stronger shocks are more effective in this speed-up process

  19. Analysis of the Onset of Flow Instability in rectangular heated channel using drift flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hadjen, H.; Balistrou, M.; Hamidouche, T.; Bousbia-Salah, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow excursion (Ledinegg) instability in boiling channels is of great concern in the design and operation of numerous practical systems especially in Research Reactors. Such instability can lead to significant reduction in channel flow, thereby causing premature burnout of the heated channel before the CHF point. The present work focuses on a simulation of pressure drop in forced convection boiling in vertical narrow and parallel uniformly heated channels. The objective is to determine the point of Onset of Flow Instability (OFI) by varying input flow rate. The axial void distribution is also provided. The numerical model is based on the finite difference method which transforms the partial differential conservation equation of mass, momentum and energy, in algebraic equations. Closure relationships based upon the drift flux model and other constitutive equations are considered to determine the channel pressure drop under steady state boiling conditions. The model validation is performed by confronting the calculations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) experimental data set. Further verification of this model is performed by code- to code verification using the results of RELAP5/Mod 3.2 code. (author)

  20. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  1. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa endash Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    For the problem of calculating the coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields, the authors have found it useful to derive the governing nonlinear pde from a variational principle. The variational principle is based on the free energy functional F[var-phi] = ∫ V F(var-phi, ∇ var-phi, x)dx dy. The method is applied to the vortex with speed u derived in Su et al., given by ∇ 2 var-phi = (1 - v d /u) var-phi - S m 2 /u 2 (x - var-phi/u) (x - var-phi/2u) var-phi where space is measured in units of ρ s , var-phi = (eΦ/T e )(L n /ρ s ) and the magnetic shear parameter is S m . While the linearized problem (var-phi much-lt ux) describes the usual shear induced damping, nonlinear solutions with trapped flow (var-phi > ur 0 ) form nonlinear self-bound states, which are maxima of the free energy F. The authors discuss the analytic properties and the numerical procedures for solving these types of nonlinear pde's

  3. Langmuir Wave Instability And Photoelectron Emission In Irradiated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have investigated dust charged fluctuation due to the combined effect of Langmuir Wave and Photoelectron Emission in Irradiated Dusty Plasma. The dispersion relation and growth of the Langmuir wave instability is also presented. The applicability of the developed dispersion relation and growth rate of the Langmuir ...

  4. Thermal-wave balancing flow sensor with low-drift power feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Pjetri, O.; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2014-01-01

    A control system using a low-drift power-feedback signal was implemented applying thermal waves, giving a sensor output independent of resistance drift and thermo-electric offset voltages on interface wires. Kelvin-contact sensing and power control is used on heater resistors, thereby inhibiting the

  5. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...

  6. Gravitational instability in isotropic MHD plasma waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alemayehu Mengesha Cherkos

    2018-03-06

    Mar 6, 2018 ... Abstract. The effect of compressive viscosity, thermal conductivity and radiative heat-loss functions on the gravitational instability of infinitely extended homogeneous MHD plasma has been investigated. By taking in account these parameters we developed the six-order dispersion relation for ...

  7. Energy of linear quasi-neutral electrostatic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1992-01-01

    An exact energy expression for linear quasi-neutral electrostatic perturbations is derived within the framework of dissipationless multi-fluid theory, valid for any geometry. Taking the mass as a tensor with, in general, different masses parallel and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field allows one to treat the full dynamics and also to restrict consideration to parallel dynamics or to the completely adiabatic case. Application to slab configurations yields the result that in plane geometry the adiabatic approximation does not allow negative-energy perturbations, whereas inclusion of the parallel dynamics does. This is in agreement with a numerical study of drift-wave turbulence within the framework of collisional two-fluid theory by B. Scott. Unlike Scott, we consider a dissipationless theory. Whereas the nonlinear energy is just kinetic plus potential plus thermal energy, the energy of perturbations depends on constraints. In a multi-fluid quasi-neutral electrostatic theory, from which we start, such constraints are mass conservation and entropy conservation. The latter is violated if heat conduction, heat sources (e.g. Joule heating) and heat sinks play a role. Hence, the energy expressions obtained are, valid only when situations where this is not the case or where these phenomena do not influence the entropy constraint. The latter is the case if the heat conduction is infinitely large such that the equilibrium temperature profiles T ν (x) of the various particle species ν are independent of x and δT ν =0. A vanishing temperature perturbation results in an entropy-conserving theory if one takes the adiabatic coefficients γ ν =1. This is possible, however, only for the perturbations; the equilibrium energy would diverge. When we consider this case, we do it in the way that the γs are put equal to 1 only after having obtained the perturbed energy for general γs. (author) 7 refs

  8. External excitation of ion cyclotron drift waves in a two-ion species plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kando, M.; Ikezawa, S.; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Ion cyclotron drift waves propagating across a density gradient and a magnetic field have been excited externally in a two-ion species plasma, with its concentration ratio controlled. The measured dispersion relations agree with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  9. Volumetric analysis of rock mass instability around haulage drifts in underground mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahé Shnorhokian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Haulage networks are vital to underground mining operations as they constitute the arteries through which blasted ore is transported to surface. In the sublevel stoping method and its variations, haulage drifts are excavated in advance near the ore block that will be mined out. Numerical modeling is a technique that is frequently employed to assess the redistribution of mining-induced stresses, and to compare the impact of different stope sequence scenarios on haulage network stability. In this study, typical geological settings in the Canadian Shield were replicated in a numerical model with a steeply-dipping tabular orebody striking EW. All other formations trended in the same direction except for two dykes on either side of the orebody with a WNW–ESE strike. Rock mass properties and in situ stress measurements from a case study mine were used to calibrate the model. Drifts and crosscuts were excavated in the footwall and two stope sequence scenarios – a diminishing pillar and a center-out one – were implemented in 24 mining stages. A combined volumetric-numerical analysis was conducted for two active levels by comparing the extent of unstable rock mass at each stage using shear, compressive, and tensile instability criteria. Comparisons were made between the orebody and the host rock, between the footwall and hanging wall, and between the two stope sequence scenarios. It was determined that in general, the center-out option provided a larger volume of instability with the shear criterion when compared to the diminishing pillar one (625,477 m3 compared to 586,774 m3 in the orebody; 588 m3 compared to 403 m3 in the host rock. However, the reverse was true for tensile (134,298 m3 compared to 128,834 m3 in the orebody; 91,347 m3 compared to 67,655 m3 in the host rock instability where the diminishing pillar option had the more voluminous share.

  10. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  11. Electrostatic instabilities and nonlinear structures of low-frequency waves in nonuniform electron-positron-ion plasmas with shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Hasan, Asma; Azeem, M.; Saleem, H.

    2003-01-01

    It is found that the low-frequency ion acoustic and electrostatic drift waves can become unstable in uniform electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas due to the ion shear flow. In a collisional plasma a drift-dissipative instability can also take place. In the presence of collisions the temporal behavior of nonlinear drift-dissipative mode can be represented in the form of well-known Lorenz and Stenflo type equations that admit chaotic trajectories. On the other hand, a quasi-stationary solution of the mode coupling equations can be represented in the form of monopolar vortex. The results of the present investigation can be helpful in understanding electrostatic turbulence and wave phenomena in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

  12. Analysis of zonal flow bifurcations in 3D drift wave turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The main issue of experimental magnetic fusion devices lies with their inherently high turbulent transport, preventing long-term plasma confinement. A deeper understanding of the underlying transport processes is therefore desirable, especially in the high-gradient tokamak edge which marks the location of the drift wave regime as well as the outer boundary of the still badly understood high confinement mode. One of the most promising plasma features possibly connected to a complete bifurcation theory for the transition to this H-mode is found in large-scale phenomena capable of regulating radial transport through vortex shearing - i.e. zonal flows, linearly stable large-scale poloidal vector E x vector B-modes based on radial flux surface averages of the potential gradient generated through turbulent self-organization. Despite their relevance, few detailed turbulence studies of drift wave-based zonal flows have been undertaken, and none of them have explicitly targeted bifurcations - or, within a resistive sheared-slab environment, observed zonal flows at all. In this work, both analytical means and the two-fluid code NLET are used to analyze a reduced set of Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, describing a sheared collisional drift wave system without curvature. The characteristics of the drift waves themselves, as well as those of the drift wave-based zonal flows and their retroaction on the drift wave turbulence are examined. The single dimensionless parameter ρ s proposed in previous analytical models is examined numerically and shown to divide the drift wave scale into two transport regimes, the behavioral characteristics of which agree perfectly with theoretical expectations. This transport transition correlates with a transition from pure drift wave turbulence at low ρ s into the high-ρ s zonal flow regime. The associated threshold has been more clearly identified by tracing it back to a tipping of the ratio between a newly proposed frequency gradient length at

  13. Effect of transverse electron drift on absorption of surface acoustic waves in CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmita, A.M.; Medved', A.V.; Fedorets, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the transverse electron drift on acousto-electron interaction in CdS has been studied. It has been revealed that the free electron drift only in the direction normal to the plane of propagation of surface acoustic waves may change the sound electron absorption coefficient in a wide range. In the case of metallization of the active part of a crystal surface a decrease in sound absorption has been observed both on the electron drift to a working crystal surface and on the opposite direction. Whereas in the case of a free crystal surface the transverse electron drift directed to the working plate surface causes an increase in sound absorption, and with the opposite drift electron absorption of the Rayleigh ultrasound waves is almost not observed. An explanation of the effects observed is proposed

  14. Stochastic electron dynamics due to drift waves in a sheared magnetic field and other drift motion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1986-12-01

    Electron motion in a single electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field is shown to become stochastic in the presence of a second wave at an amplitude well below that obtained from the overlapping pendulum resonance approximation. The enhanced stochasticity occurs for low parallel velocity electrons for which the parallel trapping motion from eE/sub parallel//m interacts strongly with the E x B trapping motion due to the presence of magnetic shear. The guiding-center equations for single particle electron orbits in given fields are investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. The model assumes a slab magnetic field geometry with shear and two electrostatic plane waves propagating at an angle with respect to each other. Collisions and the self-consistent effect of the electron motion upon the fields are ignored. The guiding-center motion in an inertial reference frame moving in phase with the two waves is given by a two degree-of-freedom, autonomous Hamiltonian system. The single wave particle motion may be reduced to a two parameter family of one degree-of-freedom Hamiltonians which bifurcate from a pendulum phase space to a topology with three chains of elliptic and hyperbolic fixed points separated in radius about the mode-rational surface. In the presence of a perturbing wave with a different helicity, electrons in the small parallel velocity regime become stochastic at an amplitude scaling as the fourth root of the wave potential. The results obtained for stochastic motion apply directly to the problem of electron diffusion in drift waves occurring in toroidal fusion confinement devices. The effect of an adiabatically changing radial electric field upon guiding-center orbits in tokamaks is also investigated. This perturbation causes a radial polarization drift of trapped particle tokamak orbits

  15. Oscillatory instability of interstellar medium radiative shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the radiative shock waves produced during the late stages of supernova remnant evolution cannot be understood in the context of steady state shock models. As a result, several more complicated scenarios have been suggested. For example, it has been proposed that several shocks are producing the emission or that one shock, which is in the process of making the transition between the adiabatic and the radiative phases of its evolution, produces the emission. In this paper, we suggest another explanation. We propose that supernova remnant shock waves are subject to an oscillatory instability. By an oscillatory instability, we mean one where the postshock cooling region periodically varies in size on a time scale determined by the postshock plasma cooling time. An oscillatory instability may be able to produce the types of behavior exhibited by supernova remnant radiative shocks in a natural way. 16 refs., 1 fig

  16. The Parametric Instability of Alfven Waves: Effects of Temperature Anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tenerani, A.; Velli, M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 851, č. 2 (2017), 99/1-99/9 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * plasmas * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  17. Internal Gravity Wave Interactions with Double-Diffusive Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Radko, Timour

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we focus on the phenomenon of oscillatory double-diffusive convection, which occurs when cool fresh water is stratified above warm salty water, as commonly observed in the Arctic Ocean. In the Arctic, these regions are generally stable to the development of oscillatory double-diffusive instabilities; despite this, observations show the presence of staircases, i.e., the well-defined structures consisting of a series of homogeneous layers separated by thin high-gradient interfaces. Recent studies have shown that an instability can develop in such circumstances if weak static shear is present even when the shear and double-diffusion are themselves individually stable. However, the impact of oscillating shear, associated with the ubiquitous presence of internal gravity waves, has not yet been addressed for the diffusive case. Through two-dimensional simulations of diffusive convection, we have investigated the impact of magnitude and frequency of externally forced internal waves on the double-diffusive shear instability. The analysis is focused on the parameter regime in which the flow is individually stable with respect to double-diffusion and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but could be susceptible to the combined thermohaline-shear instability. We have illustrated that rapid oscillation inhibits the development of this instability if the dominant period is shorter than four hours for the oceanographically relevant parameters; otherwise, models with static shear adequately reproduce our results. If the dominant period is shorter than four hours but still significantly exceeds the buoyancy period, the instability range is much reduced to the low Richardson number regime. Some of these simulations show the saturated system developing into structures reminiscent of double-diffusive staircases whose thickness is given by the wavelength of the forced shear. Finally, preliminary three-dimensional simulations show no major differences in the growth rate of

  18. Experiment and theory of a drift wave in the levitated octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, E.A.

    1982-08-01

    A very coherent 30 kHz drift wave is observed in the Levitated Toroidal Octupole at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The density and floating potential fluctuations have a well-defined spatial structure in the poloidal magnetic field. Radially the wave has a standing wave structure with amplitude peaked in regions of locally bad magnetic curvature. Poloidally the wave has a standing wave structure with odd symmetry; nodes are located in the regions of locally good magnetic curvature. The wave propagates toroidally in the electron diamagnetic drift direction with a wavelength of 20 centimeters. No changes occur in the wave structure as the plasma is varied over three orders of magnitude in density and beta

  19. Nonlocal analysis of the excitation of the geodesic acoustic mode by drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Kleva, R.G.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2009-01-01

    The geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are typically observed in the edge region of toroidal plasmas. Drift waves have been identified as a possible cause of excitation of GAMs by a resonant three wave parametric process. A nonlocal theory of excitation of these modes in inhomogeneous plasmas typical...

  20. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, A.

    1987-01-01

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs

  1. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  2. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  3. Parametric pitch instability investigation of Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves

    OpenAIRE

    Huan Mao; Hezhen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Parametric pitch instability of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform (DDS) is investigated in irregular waves. Parametric pitch is a form of parametric instability, which occurs when parameters of a system vary with time and the variation satisfies a certain condition. In previous studies, analyzing of parametric instability is mainly limited to regular waves, whereas the realistic sea conditions are irregular waves. Besides, parametric instability also occurs in irregular waves in some exp...

  4. The Hydrodynamics of Blast-Wave-Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron R.

    2010-05-01

    Supernova explosions are among the most dramatic in the universe. Type II supernovae follow core collapse of a massive star, while Type Ia supernovae are typically believed to be thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs that have accreted enough material to initiate carbon burning. In both cases, the explosion dynamics are complicated by hydrodynamic instabilities that make spherical symmetry impossible. Non-planar interactions of shocks with steep density gradients result in vorticity deposition that drives Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth. Deceleration of those same shock-accelerated interfaces drives the ubiquitous Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. These processes yield highly nonlinear structures that are further modified by shear-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities, and provide elemental mixing on a wide range of scales. A broad spectrum of approaches can be applied to study the role of hydrodynamic mixing in SNe. These range from analytic treatments of the fundamental instability problems of classical RT and steady-shock RM, to complex (often multiphysics) computational and experimental systems, including numerical simulations of supernovae and laser-driven laboratory. Between these two extremes lies a third fundamental instability problem that is more relevant than either RT or RM in isolation and somewhat less complex than the full system. Namely, an idealized blast-wave-driven problem in which a localized source drives a divergent Taylor-Sedov blast wave that in turn drives a perturbed interface between heavier and lighter gamma-law fluids. Within this context, we use numerical simulations and simplified analytic models to consider the effect of the initial perturbation spectrum in determining the late-time asymptotic state of the mixing zone, the interaction of multiple unstable interfaces relevant to core-collapse supernovae, and the proximity of the forward shock to the developing instability. This work performed under the

  5. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong Yun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall's instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  6. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  7. Numerical analysis of current-driven collisional drift and Alfven instabilities in a sheared magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-Kawa, K.I.

    1978-12-01

    Collisional drift eigenmode, coupled to shear Alfven mode, is studied numerically in a current-carrying slab with finite magnetic shear. It is shown that, due to finite-beta effects, in the presence of current, a drift mode becomes unstable.

  8. Drift wave shear damping annulment due to parametric coupling and magnetic field variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, T.A.; Jovanovic, D.; Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear suppression of the drift wave shear damping by the simultaneous action of a strong standing pump wave and of the magnetic field variation along the magnetic field line is studied using a version of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. The threshold for the parametric destabilization is calculated as a function of the plasma parameters. Destabilization occurs due to the elimination of the energy convection towards the dissipative layer, by both the linear toroidal coupling and nonlinear parametric coupling

  9. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  10. Shock drift electron acceleration and generation of waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Marian; Vandas, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 15 (2007), s. 2336-2339 ISSN 0032-0633 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA AV ČR IAA300030701; GA ČR GA205/04/0358; GA ČR GA205/06/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : electrons beam * electromagnetic waves * solar radio bursts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2007

  11. Seeded Supercontinuum Generation - Modulation Instability Gain, Coherent and Incoherent Rogue Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic supercontinuum can be generated by seeding the modulation instability-induced pulse break-up. We investigate the influence of the modulation instability gain on seeding and demonstrate the generation of coherent and incoherent rogue waves....

  12. Multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves by a collection of plasma drift turbulent vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resendes, D.

    1995-01-01

    An application of the self-consistent multiple-scattering theory of electro-magnetic waves to drift turbulent vortices is presented. Using the known single-vortex solution, the integral equation describing the scattering from a finite density of drift turbulent vortices is obtained. Rather than solving this equation and then averaging, the averaging operation is taken first to obtain statistical moment equations, from which the coherent and incoherent scattering follow. These results are expressed in a Fourier basis, and the cross-section is evaluated. Limiting forms of the theory and straightforward generalizations are discussed. (Author)

  13. Linear and nonlinear analysis of density wave instability phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Walter

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the mechanism of density-wave oscillations in a boiling channel with uniform and constant heat flux is analysed by linear and nonlinear analytical tools. A model developed on the basis of a semi-implicit numerical discretization of governing partial differential equations is used to provide information on the transient distribution of relevant variables along the channel during instabilities. Furthermore, a lumped parameter model and a distributed parameter model developed in previous activities are also adopted for independent confirmation of the observed trends. The obtained results are finally put in relation with the picture of the phenomenon proposed in classical descriptions. (author)

  14. Improved model of quasi-particle turbulence (with applications to Alfven and drift wave turbulence)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Hizanidis, K.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the classical problem of wave stability and dispersion in a turbulent plasma background. We adopt a kinetic description for the quasi-particle turbulence. We describe an improved theoretical approach, which goes beyond the geometric optics approximation and retains the recoil effects associated with the emission and absorption of low frequency waves by nearly resonant quasi-particles. We illustrate the present approach by considering two particular examples. One is the excitation of zonal flows by drift wave turbulence or driftons. The other is the coupling between ion acoustic waves and Alfven wave turbulence, eventually leading to saturation of Alfven wave growth. Both examples are relevant to anomalous transport in magnetic fusion devices. Connection with previous results is established. We show that these results are recovered in the geometric optics approximation.

  15. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  16. Transition from avalanche dominated transport to drift-wave dominated transport in a basic laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George; Maggs, James; Sydora, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated plasma pressure embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. The off-axis source is active for a period long compared to the density decay time, i.e. as time progresses the power per particle increases. Two distinct regimes are observed to take place, an initial regime dominated by avalanches, identified as sudden intermittent rearrangements of the pressure profile, and a second regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The transition between the two regimes is sudden, affects the full radial profile and is preceded by the growth of drift Alfvén waves. Langmuir probe data will be shown on the evolution of the density, temperature and flow profiles during the transition. The character of the sustained drift wave activity will also be presented. Work supported by NSF/DOE Grant 1619505, and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  17. Nonlinear modeling of stratified shear instabilities, wave breaking, and wave-topography interactions using vortex method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Divyanshu; Guha, Anirban

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical studies on linear shear instabilities often use simple velocity and density profiles (e.g., constant, piecewise) for obtaining good qualitative and quantitative predictions of the initial disturbances. Furthermore, such simple profiles provide a minimal model for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of otherwise elusive shear instabilities. However, except a few specific cases, the efficacy of simple profiles has remained limited to the linear stability paradigm. In this work, we have proposed a general framework that can simulate the fully nonlinear evolution of a variety of stratified shear instabilities as well as wave-wave and wave-topography interaction problems having simple piecewise constant and/or linear profiles. To this effect, we have modified the classical vortex method by extending the Birkhoff-Rott equation to multiple interfaces and, furthermore, have incorporated background shear across a density interface. The latter is more subtle and originates from the understanding that Bernoulli's equation is not just limited to irrotational flows but can be modified to make it applicable for piecewise linear velocity profiles. We have solved diverse problems that can be essentially reduced to the multiple interacting interfaces paradigm, e.g., spilling and plunging breakers, stratified shear instabilities like Holmboe and Taylor-Caulfield, jet flows, and even wave-topography interaction problems like Bragg resonance. Free-slip boundary being a vortex sheet, its effect can also be effectively captured using vortex method. We found that the minimal models capture key nonlinear features, e.g., wave breaking features like cusp formation and roll-ups, which are observed in experiments and/or extensive simulations with smooth, realistic profiles.

  18. Spike morphology in blast-wave-driven instability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Fryxell, B.; Budde, A.; Hansen, J. F.; Miles, A. R.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Knauer, J.

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory experiments described in the present paper observe the blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability with three-dimensional (3D) initial conditions. About 5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser creates conditions similar to those of the He-H interface during the explosion phase of a supernova. The experimental target is a 150 μm thick plastic disk followed by a low-density foam. The plastic piece has an embedded, 3D perturbation. The basic structure of the pattern is two orthogonal sine waves where each sine wave has an amplitude of 2.5 μm and a wavelength of 71 μm. In some experiments, an additional wavelength is added to explore the interaction of modes. In experiments with 3D initial conditions the spike morphology differs from what has been observed in other Rayleigh-Taylor experiments and simulations. Under certain conditions, experimental radiographs show some mass extending from the interface to the shock front. Current simulations show neither the spike morphology nor the spike penetration observed in the experiments. The amount of mass reaching the shock front is analyzed and potential causes for the spike morphology and the spikes reaching the shock are discussed. One such hypothesis is that these phenomena may be caused by magnetic pressure, generated by an azimuthal magnetic field produced by the plasma dynamics.

  19. Fan-structure wave as a source of earthquake instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Today frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength at confined compression corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This determines the lithospheric strength and the primary earthquake mechanism associated with frictional stick-slip instability on pre-existing faults. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism the rock failure, associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as 'domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip, is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new domino-blocks), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the lower limit of the lithospheric strength and favours the generation of new faults in pristine rocks in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along pre-existing faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created

  20. Experimental investigation of detonation waves instabilities in liquid high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosikov, V. A.; Torunov, S. I.; Utkin, A. V.; Mochalova, V. M.; Rapota, D. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigation of unstable detonation front structure in mixtures of liquid high explosives (nitromethane and FEFO—bis-(2-fluor-2.2-dinitroethyl)-formal) with inert diluents (acetone, methanol, DETA—diethylene triamine) has been carried out. Inhomogeneities have been registered by electro-optical camera NANOGATE 4BP allowing to make 4 frames with the exposure time 10 ns. According to experimental results the detonation front in nitromethane–acetone mixture is unstable. It is evident that pulsations on detonation front do not form spatial periodic structure and their dimensions differ several times. But mean longitudinal size of pulsation is about 500 μm at 20 wt% of acetone concentration. This means that the typical size of cell equals to reaction zone width. The same structure of cellular front have been registered in 70/30 FEFO–methanol mixture. Second kind of instability, failure waves, was observed in neat nitromethane at the free surface. In this case the stability loss result in turbulent flow which is clearly detected in the shots obtained. Adding small amount of DETA (0.5 wt%) results in disappearance of the failure waves and flow stabilization. The effect is caused by the fact that DETA sharply accelerates initial rate of chemical reaction because it is sensitizer for nitromethane.

  1. Universal instability of dust ion-sound waves and dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.; Watanabe, K.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the dust ion-sound waves (DISW) and the dust-acoustic waves (DAW) are universally unstable for wave numbers less than some critical wave number. The basic dusty plasma state is assumed to be quasi-neutral with balance of the plasma particle absorption on the dust particles and the ionization with the rate proportional to the electron density. An analytical expression for the critical wave numbers, for the frequencies and for the growth rates of DISW and DAW are found using the hydrodynamic description of dusty plasma components with self-consistent treatment of the dust charge variations and by taking into account the change of the ion and electron distributions in the dust charging process. Most of the previous treatment do not take into account the latter process and do not treat the basic state self-consistently. The critical lengths corresponding to these critical wave numbers can be easily achieved in the existing experiments. It is shown that at the wave numbers larger than the critical ones DISW and DAW have a large damping which was not treated previously and which can be also measured. The instabilities found in the present work on their non linear stage can lead to formation of different types of dust self-organized structures. (author)

  2. Parametric instability and wave turbulence driven by tidal excitation of internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the stability of stratified fluid layers undergoing homogeneous and periodic tidal deformation. We first introduce a local model which allows to study velocity and buoyancy fluctuations in a Lagrangian domain periodically stretched and sheared by the tidal base flow. While keeping the key physical ingredients only, such a model is efficient to simulate planetary regimes where tidal amplitudes and dissipation are small. With this model, we prove that tidal flows are able to drive parametric subharmonic resonances of internal waves, in a way reminiscent of the elliptical instability in rotating fluids. The growth rates computed via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are in very good agreement with WKB analysis and Floquet theory. We also investigate the turbulence driven by this instability mechanism. With spatio-temporal analysis, we show that it is a weak internal wave turbulence occurring at small Froude and buoyancy Reynolds numbers. When the gap between the excitation and the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequencies is increased, the frequency spectrum of this wave turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the high-frequency branch of the Garett and Munk spectrum (Garrett & Munk 1979) which has been measured in the oceans. In addition, we find that the mixing efficiency is altered compared to what is computed in the context of DNS of stratified turbulence excited at small Froude and large buoyancy Reynolds numbers and is consistent with a superposition of waves.

  3. The grain charging and the dust acoustic wave instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Ram K.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of the steady charging state of the assembly of dust grains in a plasma is analyzed using, besides the equations of continuity and momentum balance, also the equations of thermal energy balance with the grain charging terms for both the electron and ion species. The grain charging terms account for the energy exchange between the dust grains and the electron and ion fluids. The grains are taken to be immobile for the purpose of this analysis. Two limiting cases are analyzed: (i) f(≡4πn d λ D 2 a) >1 (n d is the dust number density, λ D plasma Debye length, and a, the grain radius). The steady grain charge state is found to be stable in the case f o is unaffected. On the other hand, in the limit f>>1, the state is found to be unstable provided γ q (≡q o e/aT e ) e -T i )/T e (T e , T i are electron and ion temperatures). A coherent charging of the dust grains results as a consequence of this instability until γ q ≅(1/2) (T e -T i )/T i . Next, by letting the grain charges be mobile, so that the perturbation of dust number density is nonzero, we examine the stability of the dust-acoustic wave (DAW). The DAW is found to be unstable, also in the f>>1 case, while stable in the f<<1. The instability of the DAW also implies a concomitant grain charge growth, which would again be of a coherent nature

  4. Study of turbulence of Lower Hybrid Drift Instability origin with the Multi Level Multi Domain semi-implicit adaptive PIC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Beck, Arnaud; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We study turbulence generated by the Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI [1]) in the terrestrial magnetosphere. The problem is not only of interest per se, but also for the implications it can have for the so-called turbulent reconnection. The LHDI evolution is simulated with the PIC Multi Level Multi Domain code Parsek2D-MLMD [2,3], which simulates different parts of the domain with different spatial and temporal resolutions. This allows to satisfy, at a low computing cost, the two necessary requirements for LHDI turbulence simulations: 1) a large domain, to capture the high wavelength branch of the LHDI and of the secondary kink instability and 2) high resolution, to cover the high wavenumber part of the power spectrum and to capture the wavenumber at which the turbulent cascade ends. The turbulent cascade proceeds seamlessly from the coarse (low resolution) to the refined (high resolution) grid, the only one resolved enough to capture its end, which is studied here and related to wave-particle interaction processes. We also comment upon the role of smoothing (a common technique used in PIC simulations to reduce particle noise, [4]) in simulations of turbulence and on how its effects on power spectra may be easily mistaken, in absence of accurate convergence studies, for the end of the inertial range. [1] P. Gary, Theory of space plasma microinstabilities, Cambridge Atmospheric and Space Science Series, 2005. [2] M. E. Innocenti, G. Lapenta, S. Markidis, A. Beck, A. Vapirev, Journal of Computational Physics 238 (2013) 115 - 140. [3] M. E. Innocenti, A. Beck, T. Ponweiser, S. Markidis, G. Lapenta, Computer Physics Communications (accepted) (2014). [4] C. K. Birdsall, A. B. Langdon, Plasma physics via computer simulation, Taylor and Francis, 2004.

  5. Drifting black aurorae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoute-Vanneck, H.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of eastward drifting forms, previously described in the literature as black aurorae, have been identified in low-light level TV camera data. The TV field of view was within the field of view of STARE and that of an all-sky camera. On the basis of these observations the authors propose that these auroral forms are a manifestation of folds or waves on the borders of auroral bands propagating along the dark regions between neighboring auroral bands. Conditions under which the folds or waves occur are compatible with their formation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz electrostatic instability

  6. Chaotic diffusion across a magnetic island due to a single electrostatic drift wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.

    1990-05-01

    It is shown that the guiding center motion around a single chain of magnetic islands in a Tokamak can become chaotic in the presence of a single electrostatic drift wave. This process leads to radial diffusion across the islands without magnetic braiding. The chaotic diffusion appears to be selective in velocity space. Realistic values of the physical parameters are considered to deduce that this process can be effective in usual conditions: with the observed islands, and electrostatic field values corresponding to measured density fluctuations, this diffusion concerns ions with velocities higher than thermal, and almost all of the electron population. The consequences for radial diffusion are discussed

  7. Numerical study of the system of differential equations for the drift wave in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Whitson, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    The following report discusses the authors' numerical study of a form of the drift wave equations which makes use of the usual quadratic approximation for the ion Z-function term and the usual exponential approximation for the electron Z-function term. Our recent work has shown that the electron Z-function term is not well represented by the exponential. Nevertheless, the numerical methods discussed in this report are similar to those which are applicable in the general case using the Z-function for both electrons and ions, although the use of the ion Z-function term changes the asymptotic behavior of the solutions

  8. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M. F.; Vranjes, J.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vp h-vf 0) exp[-(vph-vf 0) 2] , where vf 0 is the flow speed and vp h is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf 0

  9. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0vph.

  10. Two dimensional aspects of toroidal drift waves in the ballooning representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.; Zhang, X.D.

    1992-05-01

    By systematically doing the higher order theory, the predictions of the conventional ballooning theory (CBT) are examined for non-ideal systems. For the complex solvability condition to be satisfied, radial variation of the lowest order mode amplitude needs to be invoked. It turns out, however, that even this procedure with its concomitant modifications of eigenvalues and eigenstructures, is not sufficient to justify the predictions of many CBT solutions; only a small set of CBT solutions could be put on a firm footing. To demonstrate our general conclusions, theoretical and numerical results are presented for system of fluid drift waves non-adiabatic electron response

  11. Two-dimensional aspects of toroidal drift waves in the ballooning representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.; Zhang, X.D.

    1992-01-01

    By systematically doing the higher-order theory, the predictions of the conventional ballooning theory (CBT) are examined for nonideal systems. For the complex solvability condition to be satisfied, radial variation of the lowest-order mode amplitude needs to be invoked. It turns out, however, that even this procedure with its concomitant modifications of eigenvalues and eigenstructures, is not sufficient to justify the predictions of many CBT solutions; only a small set of the CBT solutions could be put on firm footing. To demonstrate this work's general conclusions, theoretical and numerical results are presented for a system of fluid drift waves with nonadiabatic electron response

  12. Parametric instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, H.; Schmidt, G.

    1976-02-01

    A theory is developed for parametric instabilities driven by a finite wavenumber general pump wave. This formalism is applied to describe lower hybrid decay into electromagnetic modes. A separate treatment is given for the all electrostatic wave case using the physically more transparent particle drift equations. In particular, the purely growing mode is studied

  13. Parametric pitch instability investigation of Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parametric pitch instability of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform (DDS is investigated in irregular waves. Parametric pitch is a form of parametric instability, which occurs when parameters of a system vary with time and the variation satisfies a certain condition. In previous studies, analyzing of parametric instability is mainly limited to regular waves, whereas the realistic sea conditions are irregular waves. Besides, parametric instability also occurs in irregular waves in some experiments. This study predicts parametric pitch of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves. Heave motion of DDS is simulated by wave spectrum and response amplitude operator (RAO. Then Hill equation for DDS pitch motion in irregular waves is derived based on linear-wave theory. By using Bubnov-Galerkin approach to solve Hill equation, the corresponding stability chart is obtained. The differences between regular-waves stability chart and irregular-waves stability chart are compared. Then the sensitivity of wave parameters on DDS parametric pitch in irregular waves is discussed. Based on the discussion, some suggestions for the DDS design are proposed to avoid parametric pitch by choosing appropriate parameters. The results indicate that it's important and necessary to predict DDS parametric pitch in irregular waves during design process.

  14. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  15. Numerical simulation of lowest-order short-crested wave instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.; Bingham, Harry

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of doubly periodic deep-water short-crested wave instabilities, arising from various quartet resonant interactions, is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. The model is first verified through a series of simulations involving classical class I plane wave instabili......A numerical study of doubly periodic deep-water short-crested wave instabilities, arising from various quartet resonant interactions, is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. The model is first verified through a series of simulations involving classical class I plane wave...... filter promoting this behaviour in these cases. A series of class Ia short-crested wave instabilities, near the plane wave limit, are then considered, covering a wide range of incident wave steepness. A close match with theoretical growth rates is demonstrated near the inception. It is shown...

  16. Three-dimensional Langmuir wave instabilities in type III solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardwell, S.; Goldman, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    Assuming that type III solar radio bursts are associated with electron streams moving at about c/3, Langmuir waves should be strongly excited. We have studied all of the Langmuir-wave linear parametric instabilities excited in cylindrical symmetry by an electron-stream--driven Langmuir wave-pump propagating along the stream axis. Included in this unified homogeneous treatment are induced backscattering off ions, the oscillating two-stream instability, and a new ''stimulated modulational instability,'' previously unconsidered in this context. Near a few solar radii, the latter two deposit Langmuir wave energy into a forward-scattering cone about the stream axis. It is concluded that the linear stage of the forward-scattering instabilities involves transfer of energy to Langmuir waves which remain in resonance with the stream, and therefore probably do not prevent rapid depletion of the electron stream due to quasilinear plateau formation at these distances from the Sun

  17. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  18. Solitary wave solutions as a signature of the instability in the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo, Edward, E-mail: arevalo@temf.tu-darmstadt.d [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie elektromagnetischer Felder, TEMF, Schlossgartenstr. 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-09-21

    The effect of instability on the propagation of solitary waves along one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation with cubic nonlinearity is revisited. A self-contained quasicontinuum approximation is developed to derive closed-form expressions for small-amplitude solitary waves. The notion that the existence of nonlinear solitary waves in discrete systems is a signature of the modulation instability is used. With the help of this notion we conjecture that instability effects on moving solitons can be qualitative estimated from the analytical solutions. Results from numerical simulations are presented to support this conjecture.

  19. The modified drift-Poisson model: Analogies with geophysical flows and Rossby waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Finn, J. M.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss an analogy between magnetically confined nonneutral plasmas and geophysical fluid dynamics. The analogy has its roots in the modified drift Poisson model, a recently proposed model that takes into account the plasma compression due to the variations of the plasma length [1]. The conservation of the line integrated density in the new model is analogous to the conservation of potential vorticity in the shallow water equations, and the variation of the plasma length is isomorphic to variations in the Coriolis parameter with latitude or to topography variations in the quasigeostrophic dynamics. We discuss a new class of linear and nonlinear waves that owe their existence to the variations of the plasma length. These modes are the analog of Rossby waves in geophysical flows

  20. Drift wave spectra and enhanced transport in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Hasselberg, G.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate the potentialities of nonlinear scattering of waves off ions as a stabilizing mechanism of drift turbulence in plasmas with magnetic shear. The failure of the random phase averaging procedure and the local character of the interaction in frequency space are the starting point of a reformulation of weak turbulence theory. In particular, the usual integral equation is transformed into a system of two first order differential equations coupling the spectra I(ksub(theta)) and I(ksub(theta) -1 ). The density fluctuation spectrum, which is obtained analytically, has some desirable features in reference to experiment. Firstly, |eta tilde|ksub(theta) 2 behaves asymptotically (ksub(theta) → infinity) as ksub(theta) -4 ; secondly, the high mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) >1) contribute about 80% to the cross field diffusion while the low mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) <1) provide about 80% of the squared density fluctuation. In discussing the transport properties we emphasize the possible role of anomalous heat transfer from electrons to ions. The spectrum of convective cells formed in the interaction of drift waves is obtained; their contribution to the diffusion is found to be negligible, at least in the plasma core. (author)

  1. Global characteristics of zonal flows due to the effect of finite bandwidth in drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, K.; Li Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral effect of the zonal flow (ZF) on its generation is investigated based on the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima turbulence model. It is found that the effect of finite ZF bandwidth qualitatively changes the characteristics of ZF instability. A spatially localized (namely, global) nonlinear ZF state with an enhanced, unique growth rate for all spectral components is created under a given turbulent fluctuation. It is identified that such state originates from the successive cross couplings among Fourier components of the ZF and turbulence spectra through the sideband modulation. Furthermore, it is observed that the growth rate of the global ZF is determined not only by the spectral distribution and amplitudes of turbulent pumps as usual, but also statistically by the turbulence structure, namely, their probabilistic initial phase factors. A ten-wave coupling model of the ZF modulation instability involving the essential effect of the ZF spectrum is developed to clarify the basic features of the global nonlinear ZF state.

  2. New numerical tools to study waves and instabilities of flowing plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beliën, A.J.C.; Bochev, Mikhail A.; Goedbloed, J.P.; van der Holst, B.; Keppens, R.

    2002-01-01

    Studying plasma waves and instabilities is an indispensable part of present thermonuclear fusion and astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Up till recently, spectral analysis was mostly restricted to static plasmas. However, the assumption of a static plasma is unrealistic not only for

  3. A numerical study of lowest-order short-crested water wave instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the first numerical simulations of the long-term evolution of doubly-periodic short-crested wave instabilities, which are the simplest cases involving the three-dimensional instability of genuinely three-dimensional progressive water waves. The simulated evolutions reveal quali...... qualitative differences from well-known two-dimensional descriptions, resulting in a permanent transfer of energy to the lower unstable side-band, even with relatively low initial steepness....

  4. Dynamical evolution of short-wave instability in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Dynamical growth of ballooning modes with high poloidal(m) /toroidal(n) Fourier coefficients (higher m/n modes) in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is studied by means of full 3D nonlinear simulations. Influences of higher modes on low modes are studied numerically. In the LHD experiments, some MHD activities are observed but the activities do not bring about serious deteriorations of plasma profiles and high beta-values have been achieved. For the sake of understanding the mild saturation of the instability, some numerical simulations have been carried out. However, the earlier works focus on low modes and dynamical behaviors of high modes are not understood well. In order to understand the dynamical evolution of the pressure-driven high-modes and clarify their influences on growth of low-modes, full-3D simulations of high Reynolds number LHD plasma are carried out for the magnetic field with the vacuum magnetic axis position 3.6m, the peak beta value 3.7%, and the reference Reynolds number Re=10 6 . In the simulations, the growth of ballooning modes up to n=15 toroidal wave-number is identified. The simultaneous growth of multiple ballooning modes brings about total modification of the pressure profile, showing that the pressure-flattening mechanism can not suppress the growth of the modes. On the other hand, a mild saturation of the unstable mode is obtained in another simulation with the relatively large parallel heat conduction, suggesting that the mild saturations might be rather contributed by the dissipative effects (typically by the parallel heat conduction) than the nonlinear mechanism such as the modifications of the pressure profiles. We also find that the wave-length of the n=15 ballooning mode is comparable to the ion skin-depth, suggesting the necessity of studying the high modes in the framework of the Hall-MHD dynamics. Studying the dynamics of the LHD plasmas by the use of the Hall-MHD or some sort of the two-fluid system is considered

  5. The double-gradient model of flapping instability with oblique wave vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovinskiy, Daniil; Kiehas, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The double-gradient model of magnetotail flapping oscillations/instability is generalized for the case of oblique propagation in the equatorial plane. The transversal direction Y (in GSM reference system) of the wave vector is found to be preferable, showing the highest growth rates of kink and sausage double-gradient unstable modes. Growth rates decrease with the wave vector rotating toward the X direction. It is found that neither waves nor instability with a wave vector pointing toward the Earth/magnetotail can develop.

  6. Possible parametric instabilities of beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M.

    1988-05-01

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the various possible parametric instabilities of the longitudinal beat wave at the difference frequency of two incident laser beams in a hot plasma has been thoeretically investigated. The kinetic equation is employed to obtain the nonlinear response of the magnetized electrons due to the nonlinear coupling of the beat wave with the low-frequency electrostatic plasma modes. It is noted that the growth rates of the three-wave and the four-wave parametric instabilities can be influenced by the external transverse magnetic field. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs

  7. Fast and Ultra-fast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett Marques Brum, C.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, P. P.; Gurubaran, S.; Pancheva, D.; Bageston, J. V.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating Fast (FK) and Ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubbles irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium Frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with TIMED/SABER temperature in the 40 km - 100 km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisondes operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of the both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (~10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electro dynamic coupling process as responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/ plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day-to-day variability of the ESF in its occurrence season.

  8. Fast and ultrafast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Brum, Christiano GM; Batista, Paulo P.; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Pancheva, Dora; Bageston, Jose V.; Batista, Inez S.; Takahashi, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating fast (FK) and ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) temperature in the 40- to 100-km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisonde (Lowell Digisonde International, LLC, Lowell, MA, USA) operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (approximately 10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electrodynamic coupling process as being responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK-induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day

  9. The slow collisional E×B ion drift characterized as the major instability mechanism of a poorly magnetized plasma column with an inward-directed radial electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, Thiéry [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7345 Laboratoire PIIM, Aix*Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2016-04-15

    The low-frequency instability of a cylindrical poorly magnetized plasma with an inward-directed radial electric field is studied changing the gas pressure and the ion cyclotron frequency. The unstable frequency always decreases when the gas pressure is increased indicating collisional effects. At a fixed pressure, the unstable frequency increases with the magnetic field when the B-field is low and decreases at larger magnetic field strength. We find that the transition between these two regimes is obtained when the ion cyclotron frequency equals the ion-neutrals collision frequency. This is in agreement with the theory of the slow-ion drift instability induced by the collisional slowing of the electric ion drift [A. Simon, Phys. Fluids 6, 382 (1963)].

  10. Real-time measurements of spontaneous breathers and rogue wave events in optical fibre modulation instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, Mikko; Wetzel, Benjamin; Billet, Cyril; Toenger, Shanti; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Morandotti, Roberto; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M

    2016-12-19

    Modulation instability is a fundamental process of nonlinear science, leading to the unstable breakup of a constant amplitude solution of a physical system. There has been particular interest in studying modulation instability in the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, a generic model for a host of nonlinear systems including superfluids, fibre optics, plasmas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Modulation instability is also a significant area of study in the context of understanding the emergence of high amplitude events that satisfy rogue wave statistical criteria. Here, exploiting advances in ultrafast optical metrology, we perform real-time measurements in an optical fibre system of the unstable breakup of a continuous wave field, simultaneously characterizing emergent modulation instability breather pulses and their associated statistics. Our results allow quantitative comparison between experiment, modelling and theory, and are expected to open new perspectives on studies of instability dynamics in physics.

  11. Modeling studies of transport bifurcation phenomena in a collisional drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Rima; Diamond, Patrick; Tynan, Georges; Ashourvan, Arash

    2016-10-01

    Self-organization of drift wave turbulence via particle transport and Reynolds stresses is a mechanism for turbulence suppression and reduction of cross field transport. This energy transfer mechanism between microscale drift waves and mesoscale zonal flows can create a transport bifurcation and trigger the formation of an internal transport barrier. We report here on studies investigating transport bifurcation dynamics in the CSDX linear device using a 1D reduced turbulence and mean field evolution model. This two-mixing scale Hasegawa-Wakatani based model evolves spatio-temporal variations of three plasma fields: the mean density n, the mean vorticity u and the turbulent potential enstrophy e. The model adopts inhomogeneous potential vorticity mixing on a mixing length the expression of which is related to the Rhines' scale and to the mode scale (i.e. is ∇n and ∇u dependent). The model is based on expressions for turbulent fluxes of n, u and e derived from mixing length concepts. Turbulent particle and enstrophy transport are written as diffusive, but a residual stress part is included in the expression for the vorticity flux. Mixed boundary conditions are used at both ends of the domain and an external boundary fueling source is added. Simulation results show a steepening in the particle density profiles with B along with the formation of a net flow shear layer resulting from the vorticity mixing. These results suggest that the system dynamic is capable of sustaining the plasma core by means of a purely diffusive particle flux, without any explicit inward particle pinch.

  12. Parametric Instability in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Grass, S; Zhao, C; Degallaix, J; Blair, D G

    2006-01-01

    High frequency parametric instabilities in optical cavities are radiation pressure induced interactions between test mass mechanical modes and cavity optical modes. The parametric gain depends on the cavity power and the quality factor of the test mass internal modes (usually in ultrasonic frequency range), as well as the overlap integral for the mechanical and optical modes. In advanced laser interferometers which require high optical power and very low acoustic loss test masses, parametric instabilities could prevent interferometer operation if not suppressed. Here we review the problem of parametric instabilities in advanced detector configurations for different combinations of sapphire and fused silica test masses, and compare three methods for control or suppression of parametric instabilities-thermal tuning, surface damping and active feedback

  13. Lower hybrid waves instability in a velocity–sheared inhomogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electrostatic linear kinetic analysis of velocity-sheared inhomogeneous charged dust streaming parallel to a magnetic field in plasma is presented. Excited mode and the growth rates are derived in the lower hybrid-like mode regime, with collisional effects included. In the case where the drift velocity u is very small the ...

  14. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  15. Plasma–maser instability of the ion acoustics wave in the presence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. March 2006 physics pp. 547–561. Plasma–maser instability of the ion acoustics wave in the presence of lower hybrid wave turbulence in inhomogeneous plasma. M SINGH∗ and P N DEKA. Department of Mathematics, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh, Assam 786 004, India. *Permanent address: Department of ...

  16. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  17. The Influence of Trapped Particles on the Parametric Decay Instability of Near-Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2017-10-01

    We present quantitative measurements of a decay instability to lower frequencies of near-acoustic waves. These experiments are conducted on pure ion plasmas confined in a cylindrical Penning-Malmberg trap. The axisymmetric, standing plasma waves have near-acoustic dispersion, discretized by the axial wave number kz =mz(π /Lp) . The nonlinear coupling rates are measured between large amplitude mz = 2 (pump) waves and small amplitude mz = 1 (daughter) waves, which have a small frequency detuning Δω = 2ω1 -ω2 . Classical 3-wave parametric coupling rates are proportional to pump wave amplitude as Γ (δn2 /n0) , with oscillatory energy exchange for Γ Δω / 2 . Experiments on cold plasmas agree quantitatively for oscillatory energy exchange, and agree within a factor-of-two for decay instability rates. However, nascent theory suggest that this latter agreement is merely fortuitous, and that the instability mechanism is trapped particles. Experiments at higher temperatures show that trapped particles reduce the instability threshold below classical 3-wave theory predictions. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0008693. M. Affolter is supported by the DOE FES Postdoctoral Research Program administered by ORISE for the DOE. ORISE is managed by ORAU under DOE Contract Number DE-SC0014664.

  18. Instability of traveling waves of the convective-diffusive Cahn-Hilliard equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongjun; Liu Changchun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study the instability of the traveling waves of the convective-diffusive Cahn-Hilliard equation. We prove that it is nonlinearly unstable under H 2 perturbations, for some traveling wave solution that is asymptotic to a constant as x→∞

  19. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  20. Instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in atmospheres and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane are investigated. The wave-energy exchange equation shows that there is an exchange of energy with the background stratified medium. The energy source driving the instability lies in the background enthalpy released by the gravitational buoyancy force. It is shown that if the phase speed of the westward propagating low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave exceeds the Poincaré-Kelvin (or "equivalent" shallow water wave speed, instability arises from the merging of Rossby and Poincaré modes. There are two key parameters in this instability condition; namely, the equatorial/rotational Mach (or Froude number M and the latitude θ0 of the β-plane. In general waves equatorward of a critical latitude for given M can be driven unstable, with corresponding growth rates of the order of a day or so. Although these conclusions may only be safely drawn for short wavelengths corresponding to a JWKB wave packet propagating internally and located far from boundaries, nevertheless such a local instability may play a significant role in atmosphere-ocean dynamics.

  1. On MHD waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities in anisotropic plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-N. Hau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature or pressure anisotropies are characteristic of space plasmas, standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD model for describing large-scale plasma phenomena however usually assumes isotropic pressure. In this paper we examine the characteristics of MHD waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities in anisotropic homogeneous magnetized plasmas. The model equations are a set of gyrotropic MHD equations closed by the generalized Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL laws with two polytropic exponents representing various thermodynamic conditions. Both ions and electrons are allowed to have separate plasma beta, pressure anisotropy and energy equations. The properties of linear MHD waves and instability criteria are examined and numerical examples for the nonlinear evolutions of slow waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities are shown. One significant result is that slow waves may develop not only mirror instability but also a new type of compressible fire-hose instability. Their corresponding nonlinear structures thus may exhibit anticorrelated density and magnetic field perturbations, a property used for identifying slow and mirror mode structures in the space plasma environment. The conditions for nonlinear saturation of both fire-hose and mirror instabilities are examined.

  2. Mechanistic Drifting Forecast Model for A Small Semi-Submersible Drifter Under Tide-Wind-Wave Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Na; Huang, Hui-ming; Wang, Yi-gang; Chen, Da-ke; Zhang, lin

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the drifting motion of a small semi-submersible drifter is of vital importance regarding monitoring surface currents and the floating pollutants in coastal regions. This work addresses this issue by establishing a mechanistic drifting forecast model based on kinetic analysis. Taking tide-wind-wave into consideration, the forecast model is validated against in situ drifting experiment in the Radial Sand Ridges. Model results show good performance with respect to the measured drifting features, characterized by migrating back and forth twice a day with daily downwind displacements. Trajectory models are used to evaluate the influence of the individual hydrodynamic forcing. The tidal current is the fundamental dynamic condition in the Radial Sand Ridges and has the greatest impact on the drifting distance. However, it loses its leading position in the field of the daily displacement of the used drifter. The simulations reveal that different hydrodynamic forces dominate the daily displacement of the used drifter at different wind scales. The wave-induced mass transport has the greatest influence on the daily displacement at Beaufort wind scale 5-6; while wind drag contributes mostly at wind scale 2-4.

  3. Spin waves and spin instabilities in quantum plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, P. A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe main ideas of method of many-particle quantum hydrodynamics allows to derive equations for description of quantum plasma evolution. We also present definitions of collective quantum variables suitable for quantum plasmas. We show that evolution of magnetic moments (spins) in quantum plasmas leads to several new branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered. Inst...

  4. Planetary/Kelvin wave modulation of the equatorial ionospheric evening vertical plasma drift and the post sunset spread F developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Sobral, José; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Brum, Christiano Marques Garnett; Batista, Inez S.; Valentin Bageston, José; Batista, Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that the evening prereversal enhancement in the equatorial ionospheric zonal electric field /vertical plasma drift (PRE) and hence post sunset spread F irregularity (ESF) generation are significantly modified by Planetary waves of a few-day (2-, 5-, 7-day) periodicity, although many specific details of which remain to be investigated. Thus the widely observed day to day/short terms variability in the PRE and ESF developments originate not only from the variable forcing (in the form of disturbance electric fields) from magnetosphere, as is well known, but a large part of it arises also from forcing by upward propagating wave from lower atmosphere. In this paper we have analyzed the PRE vertical drifts measured by an equatorial Digisonde (Fortaleza), and the mesospheric zonal and meridional winds as measured by two meteor radars operated at an equatorial site (Sao Joao de Cariri) and a low latitude sites (Cachoeira Paulista), in Brazil, together with mesospheric winds as measured by MF radar at an equatorial site (Tirunelveli) in India. The comparison of these results show the presence of oscillations of around 3 and 5-7 days of periodicities in the evening vertical drift as well as in the mesospheric wind field simultaneously in the Brazilian and Indian longitudes, which are shown to be produced by eastward propagating Equatorial Kelvin wave as well as by westward propagating planetary waves. The effects of these waves on the development of the ESF/plasma bubble irregularities are also studied.

  5. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  6. Observations of Two-Stream Ion Wave Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, G.B.; Prahm, L.P.

    1973-01-01

    A double‐humped ion velocity distribution function is produced in a Q‐machine cesium plasma. When the plasma becomes unstable, a growing wave amplitude and a characteristic change in the phase velocity of a grid‐excited ion‐acoustic wave are observed.......A double‐humped ion velocity distribution function is produced in a Q‐machine cesium plasma. When the plasma becomes unstable, a growing wave amplitude and a characteristic change in the phase velocity of a grid‐excited ion‐acoustic wave are observed....

  7. Localized instability on the route to disorder in Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Itamar; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2010-05-07

    We experimentally investigate how disorder comes about in parametrically excited waves on a fluid surface (Faraday waves). We find that the transition from an ordered pattern to disorder corresponding to "defect-mediated turbulence" is mediated by a spatially incoherent oscillatory phase. This phase consists of highly damped waves that propagate through the effectively elastic lattice defined by the pattern. They have a well-defined frequency, velocity, and transverse polarization. As these waves decay within a few lattice spaces, they are spatially and temporally uncorrelated at larger scales.

  8. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  9. The ecology of flows and drift wave turbulence in CSDX: A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, R. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the ecology of drift wave turbulence and mean flows in the coupled drift-ion acoustic wave plasma of a CSDX linear device. A 1D reduced model that studies the spatiotemporal evolution of plasma mean density n ¯ , and mean flows v¯ y and v¯ z , in addition to fluctuation intensity ε, is presented. Here, ε=n˜ 2+ (∇⊥ϕ˜ 2+ v˜z2> is the conserved energy field. The model uses a mixing length lmix inversely proportional to both axial and azimuthal flow shear. This form of lmix closes the loop on total energy. The model self-consistently describes variations in plasma profiles, including mean flows and turbulent stresses. It investigates the energy exchange between the fluctuation intensity and mean profiles via particle flux n ˜ v ˜x> and Reynolds stresses y> and . Acoustic coupling breaks parallel symmetry and generates a parallel residual stress Πxzr e s . The model uses a set of equations to explain the acceleration of v¯ y and v¯ z via Πxyr e s∝∇n ¯ and Πxyr e s∝∇n ¯ . Flow dynamics in the parallel direction are related to those in the perpendicular direction through an empirical coupling constant σVT. This constant measures the degree of symmetry breaking in the correlator and determines the efficiency of ∇n ¯ in driving v¯ z . The model also establishes a relation between ∇v¯ y and ∇v¯ z , via the ratio of the stresses Πxyr e s and Πxzr e s . When parallel to perpendicular flow coupling is weak, axial Reynolds power Pxz R e=-∇v¯ z is less than the azimuthal Reynolds power Pxy R e=-y>∇v¯ y . The model is then reduced to a 2-field predator/prey model where v¯ z is parasitic to the system and fluctuations evolve self-consistently. Finally, turbulent diffusion in CSDX follows the scaling: DCSDX=DBρ⋆0.6 , where DB is the Bohm diffusion coefficient and ρ⋆ is the ion gyroradius normalized to the density gradient |∇n ¯ /n ¯ |-1 .

  10. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on secondary structures in Drift-Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we study the effects of RMPs on turbulence, flows and confinement, in the framework of two paradigmatic models, resistive ballooning and resistive drift waves. For resistive ballooning turbulence, we use 3D global numerical simulations, including RMP fields and (externally-imposed) sheared rotation profile. Without RMPs, relaxation oscillations of the pressure profile occur. With RMPs, results show that long-lived convection cells are generated by the combined effects of pressure modulation and toroidal curvature coupling. These modify the global structure of the turbulence and eliminate relaxation oscillations. This effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of residual magnetic island chains. Hence convection-cell generation increases for increasing δBr/B0. For RMP effect on zonal flows in drift wave turbulence, we extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large δBr/B0. Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress), and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters, and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find a novel set of system states that are similar to the Hmode-like state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude and low collisionality, both the ambient turbulence and zonal flow energy increase with δBr/B0. For larger RMP strength, the turbulence energy increases, but the energy of zonal flows decreases with δBr/B0, corresponding to a damping of zonal flows. At high

  11. Experimental investigations of structure and dynamics of drift-wave turbulence in stellarator geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkenmeier, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    For more than 60 years, fusion scientists try to confine a plasma by means of external magnetic fields in order to achieve appropriately high densities and temperatures for the ignition of nuclear fusion. Despite of great progress in the design of confinement concepts, which are considered for the confinement of burning plasmas in the near future, theoretical plasma physics promises further confinement improvements using novel magnetic field geometries. Therefor, the key is the minimization of turbulent transport by choosing appropiate magnetic field geometries, which necessitates a fundamental understanding of the influence of magnetic field geometry on plasma turbulence. There are several theoretical works on turbulent plasma dynamics in three-dimensional geometries, but only a few experimental studies for validation of the theoretical results exist. Hence, the present work aims at providing experimental data for comparison with theory and to gain insights into the interplay between drift-wave turbulence and magnetic field geometry. By means of two multi-probe arrays, local density and potential fluctuations are measured in low-temperature plasmas at 128 positions on a single flux surface of the stellarator TJ-K with high temporal resolution. Using methods of statistical timeseries analysis structure sizes and dynamic properties of the drift-wave turbulence in TJ-K are determined. Thereby, it is shown that the size of turbulent structures perpendicular to the magnetic field is reduced in regions of high absolute local magnetic shear. In addition, a poloidal displacement with respect to the magnetic field lines and a complex propagation pattern of parallelly extended turbulent structures is found. Also, poloidal profiles of turbulent transport are calculated from the probe data. The maximum transport is found to be poloidally localized in a region of negative normal curvature (unfavourable curvature). In addition, the results point to an influence of geodesic

  12. Quantitative study of the trapped particle bunching instability in Langmuir waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.; Chapman, Thomas; Joseph, Ilon; Berger, Richard L.; Banks, Jeffrey W.; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The bunching instability of particles trapped in Langmuir waves is studied using Vlasov simulations. A measure of particle bunching is defined and used to extract the growth rate from numerical simulations, which are compared with theory [Dodin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)]. In addition, the general theory of trapped particle instability in 1D is revisited and a more accurate description of the dispersion relation is obtained. Excellent agreement between numerical and theoretical predictions of growth rates of the bunching instability is shown over a range of parameters

  13. Quantitative study of the trapped particle bunching instability in Langmuir waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Kentaro, E-mail: kenhara@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chapman, Thomas; Joseph, Ilon; Berger, Richard L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Banks, Jeffrey W. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Brunner, Stephan [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CRPP-PPB, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    The bunching instability of particles trapped in Langmuir waves is studied using Vlasov simulations. A measure of particle bunching is defined and used to extract the growth rate from numerical simulations, which are compared with theory [Dodin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)]. In addition, the general theory of trapped particle instability in 1D is revisited and a more accurate description of the dispersion relation is obtained. Excellent agreement between numerical and theoretical predictions of growth rates of the bunching instability is shown over a range of parameters.

  14. Compact dispersion relations for parametric instabilities of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-01-01

    The existence of compact dispersion relations for parametric instabilities of coherent electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas is addressed here. In general, comprehensive dispersion relations for parametric instabilities in unmagnetized plasmas become more complicated in the presence of an applied time-independent magnetic field. This is demonstrated with a fluid perturbation theory. A compact dispersion relation for parametric instabilities in unmagnetized plasma is heuristically extended here to the case of a magnetized plasma. This dispersion relation gives the correct results in a variety of circumstances of interest in considering electron cyclotron heating applications

  15. Generation of Caustics and Rogue Waves from Nonlinear Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Akbar; Fickler, Robert; Padgett, Miles J; Boyd, Robert W

    2017-11-17

    Caustics are phenomena in which nature concentrates the energy of waves and may exhibit rogue-type behavior. Although they are known mostly in optics, caustics are intrinsic to all wave phenomena. As we demonstrate in this Letter, the formation of caustics and consequently rogue events in linear systems requires strong phase fluctuations. We show that nonlinear phase shifts can generate sharp caustics from even small fluctuations. Moreover, in that the wave amplitude increases dramatically in caustics, nonlinearity is usually inevitable. We perform an experiment in an optical system with Kerr nonlinearity, simulate the results based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, and achieve perfect agreement. As the same theoretical framework is used to describe other wave systems such as large-scale water waves, our results may also aid the understanding of ocean phenomena.

  16. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION OF ION-SCALE CURRENT SHEETS: TEARING AND DRIFT-KINK INSTABILITIES IN THE PRESENCE OF PROTON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingell, P. W.; Burgess, D. [Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E4 1NS (United Kingdom); Matteini, L., E-mail: p.w.gingell@qmul.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-20

    We present the first three-dimensional (3D) hybrid simulations of the evolution of ion-scale current sheets, with an investigation of the role of temperature anisotropy and associated kinetic instabilities on the growth of the tearing instability and particle heating. We confirm the ability of the ion cyclotron and firehose instabilities to enhance or suppress reconnection, respectively. The simulations demonstrate the emergence of persistent 3D structures, including patchy reconnection sites and the fast growth of a narrow-band drift-kink instability, which suppresses reconnection for thin current sheets with weak guide fields. Potential observational signatures of the 3D evolution of solar wind current sheets are also discussed. We conclude that kinetic instabilities, arising from non-Maxwellian ion populations, are significant to the evolution of 3D current sheets, and two-dimensional studies of heating rates by reconnection may therefore over-estimate the ability of thin, ion-scale current sheets to heat the solar wind by reconnection.

  17. Hydromagnetic Waves and Instabilities in Kappa Distribution Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    perpendicular effective particle temperatures, respec- tively. Two other parameters related to pM and pnl which naturally occur in the study of...role in determin- ing the excitation conditions of the field swelling and mirror instabilities [see Eqs. (60) and (65)]. Calculating pnl /pni from Eq...more convenient form of the perturbed distribution function /„ that may be used in- stead of Eq. (12) to obtain nn, pM, and pnl given by Eqs. (72

  18. Central recirculation zones and instability waves in internal swirling flows with an annular entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxing; Yang, Vigor

    2018-01-01

    The characteristics of the central recirculation zone and the induced instability waves of a swirling flow in a cylindrical chamber with a slip head end have been numerically investigated using the Galerkin finite element method. The effects of Reynolds number as well as swirl level adjusted by the injection angle were examined systematically. The results indicate that at a high swirl level the flow is characterized by an axisymmetric central recirculation zone (CRZ). The fluid in the CRZ takes on a solid-body rotation driven by the outer main flow through a free shear layer. Both the solid-body rotating central flow and the free shear layer provide the potential for the development of instability waves. When the injection angle increases beyond a critical value, the basic axisymmetric flow loses stability, and instability waves develop. In the range of Reynolds numbers considered in this study, three kinds of instability were identified: inertial waves in the central flow, and azimuthal and longitudinal Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in the free shear layer. These three types of waves interact with each other and mix together. The mode selection of the azimuthal waves depends strongly on the injection angle, through the perimeter of the free shear layer. Compared with the injection angle, the Reynolds number plays a minor role in mode selection. The flow topologies and characteristics of different flow states are analyzed in detail, and the dependence of flow states on the injection angle and Reynolds number is summarized. Finally, a linear analysis of azimuthal instabilities is carried out; it confirms the mode selection mechanisms demonstrated by the numerical simulation.

  19. Decay instability of an upper hybrid wave in a magnetized dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahlot, Ajay; Walia, Ritu; Sharma, Jyotsna; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku

    2013-01-01

    The decay instability of an upper hybrid wave into an upper hybrid sideband wave and low frequency ion-cyclotron wave are studied in a magnetized dusty plasma cylinder. The growth rate and ion-cyclotron mode frequencies were evaluated based on existing dusty plasma parameters. It is found that the unstable mode frequency increases linearly with δ (ion-to-electron density ratio). In addition, the growth rate of the unstable ion-cyclotron mode decreases sharply for lower values of δ in the presence of dust charge fluctuations, i.e., the dust grains increases the damping effect in three wave interaction process.

  20. BURNING PLASMA PROJECTIONS USING DRIFT WAVE TRANSPORT MODELS AND SCALINGS FOR THE H-MODE PEDESTAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KINSEY, J.E.; ONJUN, T.; BATEMAN, G.; KRITZ, A.; PANKIN, A.; STAEBLER, G.M.; WALTZ, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    OAK-B135 The GLF23 and Multi-Mode (MM95) transport models are used along with a model for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the ITER, FIRE, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. The drift-wave predictive transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, yet they differ significantly in their response to temperature gradient (stiffness). Recent gyro-kinetic simulations of ITG/TEM and ETG modes motivate the renormalization of the GLF23 model. The normalizing coefficients for the ITG/TEM modes are reduced by a factor of 3.7 while the ETG mode coefficient is increased by a factor of 4.8 in comparison with the original model. A pedestal temperature model is developed for type I ELMy H-mode plasmas based on ballooning mode stability and a theory-motivated scaling for the pedestal width. In this pedestal model, the pedestal density is proportional to the line-averaged density and the pedestal temperature is inversely related to the pedestal density

  1. Suhl instabilities for spin waves in ferromagnetic nanostripes and ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghshenasfard, Zahra, E-mail: zhaghshe@uwo.ca; Nguyen, Hoa T.; Cottam, Michael G., E-mail: cottam@uwo.ca

    2017-03-15

    A microscopic (or Hamiltonian-based) theory is employed for the spin-wave instability thresholds of nonlinear processes in ultrathin ferromagnetic stripes and films under perpendicular pumping with an intense microwave field. The spatially-quantized linear spin waves in these nanostructures may participate in parametric processes through the three-magnon interactions (the first-order Suhl process) and the four-magnon interactions (the second-order Suhl process) when pumped. By contrast with most previous studies of spin-wave instabilities made for larger samples, where macroscopic (or continuum) theories involving Maxwell's equations for magnetic dipolar effects are used, a discrete lattice of effective spins is employed. Then a dipole-exchange spin Hamiltonian is employed to investigate the behavior of the quantized spin waves under perpendicular pumping, when modifications due to the more extensive spatial confinement and edges effects in these nanostructures become pronounced. The instability thresholds versus applied magnetic field are calculated, with emphasis on the size effects and geometries of the nanostructures and on the different relative strengths of the magnetic dipole-dipole and exchange interactions in materials. Numerical results are presented using parameters for Permalloy, YIG, and EuS. - Highlights: • Suhl instabilities for spin waves in magnetic stripes and films are investigated. • Three- and four-magnon processes in perpendicular pumping are taken into account. • Numerical applications are made to Permalloy, YIG, and EuS.

  2. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  3. Dependence of oscillational instabilities on the amplitude of the acoustic wave in single-axis levitators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco-Santillán, Arturo; Ruiz-Boullosa, Ricardo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that acoustic waves exert forces on a boundary with which they interact; these forces can be so intense that they can compensate for the weight of small objects up to a few grams. In this way, it is possible to maintain solid or liquid samples levitating in a fluid, avoiding the ...... are highly damped. This dependence of the instabilities on the amplitude of the driving acoustic wave, however, cannot be described with the existing theory....

  4. Wave instability induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in a model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Ernesto M.; Bär, Markus; Engel, Harald

    2006-06-01

    We study spatiotemporal patterns resulting from instabilities induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In this system, nonlocal coupling can be externally imposed by means of an optical feedback loop which links the intensity of locally applied illumination with the activity in a certain vicinity of a particular point weighted by a given coupling function. This effect is included in the three-variable Oregonator model by an additional integral term in the photochemically induced bromide flow. A linear stability analysis of this modified Oregonator model predicts that wave and Turing instabilities of the homogeneous steady state can be induced for experimentally realistic parameter values. In particular, we find that a long-range inhibition in the optical feedback leads to a Turing instability, while a long-range activation induces wave patterns. Using a weakly nonlinear analysis, we derive amplitude equations for the wave instability which are valid close to the instability threshold. Therein, we find that the wave instability occurs supercritically or subcritically and that traveling waves are preferred over standing waves. The results of the theoretical analysis are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the model near the wave instability threshold. For larger distances from threshold, a secondary breathing instability is found for traveling waves.

  5. Study of parametric instability in gravitational wave detectors with silicon test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhao, Chunnong; Ju, Li; Blair, David

    2017-01-01

    Parametric instability is an intrinsic risk in high power laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors, in which the optical cavity modes interact with the acoustic modes of the mirrors, leading to exponential growth of the acoustic vibration. In this paper, we investigate the potential parametric instability for a proposed next generation gravitational wave detector, the LIGO Voyager blue design, with cooled silicon test masses of size 45 cm in diameter and 55 cm in thickness. It is shown that there would be about two unstable modes per test mass at an arm cavity power of 3 MW, with the highest parametric gain of  ∼76. While this is less than the predicted number of unstable modes for Advanced LIGO (∼40 modes with max gain of  ∼32 at the designed operating power of 830 kW), the importance of developing suitable instability suppression schemes is emphasized. (paper)

  6. Thermal modulation for suppression of parametric instability in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. B.; Liu, J.; Ma, Y. Q.; Zhao, C.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.; Zhu, Z. H.

    2017-07-01

    Three-mode parametric instability is a threat to attaining design power levels in advanced gravitational wave detectors. The first observation of three-mode parametric instability in a long optical cavity revealed that instabilities could be suppressed by time variation of the mirror radius of curvature. In this paper, we present three dimensional finite element analysis of this thermo-acousto-optics system to determine whether thermal modulation could provide sufficient instability suppression without degrading time averaged optical performance. It is shown that deformations due to the time averaged heating profile on the mirror surface can be compensated by rear surface heating of the test mass. Results show that a heating source with a modulation amplitude of 1 W at 0.01 Hz is sufficient to stabilize an acoustic mode with parametric gain up to 3. The parametric gain suppression factor is linearly proportional to the peak modulation power.

  7. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, J. D.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, K0, becomes K0J0(ρ ̂ ) , where J0 is the zeroth-order Bessel function and ρ ̂ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for ρ ̂ , we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude K0J0(ρ ̂ ) . Using these results, we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), Pc, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, Pt. It is shown that Pc provides an upper bound for the escape rate, and that Pt provides a good estimate of the particle trapping rate. The analytical results are compared with direct numerical Monte-Carlo simulations of particle transport.

  8. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  9. Density wave instabilities of tilted fermionic dipoles in a multilayer geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Block, Jens; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Bruun, Georg

    2012-01-01

    We consider the density wave instability of fermionic dipoles aligned by an external field and moving in equidistant layers at zero temperature. Using a conserving Hartree–Fock approximation, we show that correlations between dipoles in different layers significantly decrease the critical coupling...

  10. Absolute parametric instability of low-frequency waves in a 2D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the separation method, absolute parametric instability (API) of electrostatic waves in a magnetized pumped warm plasma is investigated. In this case the effect of static strong magnetic field is considered. The problem of strong magnetic field is solved in two-dimensional (2D) nonuniform plane plasma. Equations ...

  11. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 2. Instabilities, Turbulence, Fluxes, and Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ling; Laughman, Brian; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    A companion paper by Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) employed an anelastic numerical model to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. That study revealed that MIL responses, including GW transmission, reflection, and instabilities, are sensitive functions of GW parameters. This paper expands on two of the Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) simulations to examine GW instability dynamics and turbulence in the MIL; forcing of the mean wind and stability environments by GW, instability, and turbulence fluxes; and associated heat and momentum transports. These direct numerical simulations resolve turbulence inertial-range scales and yield the following results: GW breaking and turbulence in the MIL occur below where they would otherwise, due to enhancements of GW amplitudes and shears in the MIL. 2-D GW and instability heat and momentum fluxes are 20-30 times larger than 3-D instability and turbulence fluxes. Mean fields are driven largely by 2-D GW and instability dynamics rather than 3-D instabilities and turbulence. 2-D and 3-D heat fluxes in regions of strong turbulence yield small departures from initial T(z) and N2(z) profiles, hence do not yield nearly adiabatic "mixed" layers. Our MIL results are consistent with the relation between the turbulent vertical velocity variance and energy dissipation rate proposed by Weinstock (1981) for the limited intervals evaluated.

  12. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  13. Longitudinal waves and a beam instability in a relativistic anisotropic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishchenko, O.G.

    1981-01-01

    Dispersion relations are derived for longitudinal waves in a relativistic plasma with an arbitrary anisotropic particle distribution function. Longitudinal waves with phase velocity lower than the speed of light are shown to exist in such a plasma. The damping rate of longitudinal waves due to the Cerenkov interaction with plasma particles is derived for such a plasma. The instability of a beam of high-energy particles in such a plasma is studied. As the anisotropy of an ultrarelativistic plasma becomes less pronounced, the maximum hydrodynamic growth rate decreases

  14. Wave instabilities in the presence of non vanishing background in nonlinear Schrödinger systems

    KAUST Repository

    Trillo, S.

    2014-12-03

    We investigate wave collapse ruled by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in 1+1 dimensions, for localized excitations with non-zero background, establishing through virial identities a new criterion for blow-up. When collapse is arrested, a semiclassical approach allows us to show that the system can favor the formation of dispersive shock waves. The general findings are illustrated with a model of interest to both classical and quantum physics (cubic-quintic NLS equation), demonstrating a radically novel scenario of instability, where solitons identify a marginal condition between blow-up and occurrence of shock waves, triggered by arbitrarily small mass perturbations of different sign.

  15. Excitation of upper-hybrid waves by a thermal parametric instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.C.; Kuo, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    A purely growing instability characterized by a four-wave interaction is analysed in a uniform, magnetized plasma. Up-shifted and down-shifted upper-hybrid waves and a non-oscillatory mode can be excited by a pump wave of ordinary rather than extraordinary polarization in the case of ionospheric heating. The differential Ohmic heating force dominates over the ponderomotive force as the wave-wave coupling mechanism. The beating current at zero frequency produces a significant stabilizing effect on the excitation of short-scale modes by counterbalancing the destabilizing effect of the differential Ohmic heating. The effect of ionospheric inhomogeneity is estimated, showing a tendency to raise the thresholds of the instability. When applied to ionospheric heating experiments, the present theory can explain the excitation of field-aligned plasma lines and ionospheric irregularities with a continuous spectrum ranging from metre-scale to hundreds of metre-scale. Further, the proposed mechanism may become a competitive process to the parametric decay instability and be responsible for the overshoot phenomena of the plasma line enhancement at Arecibo. (author)

  16. Spin-wave instabilities, auto-oscillations, and chaos in yttrium-iron-garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, S.M.; de Aguiar, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    Spin-wave instabilities driven by microwave fields display auto-oscillations, intermittency, quasiperiodicity, period-doubling and chaos like other nonlinear dynamic systems. Several of these phenomena, first observed nearly 30 years ago, only recently have been investigated systematically and understood in the light of modern nonlinear dynamics. The authors review recent experimental results in yttrium-iron-garnet subject to three different spin-wave pumping mechanisms: parallel pumping, subsidiary resonance (first-order Suhl process) and premature saturation of the main resonance (second-order Suhl process). A theoretical model derived from first principles leading to coupled nonlinear spin-ave equations is used to interpret the observed spin-wave instabilities, auto-oscillations, and chaotic dynamics. Improvements needed in the model are also indicated

  17. Analysis of the Nonlinear Density Wave Two-Phase Instability in a Steam Generator of 600MWe Liquid Metal Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2011-01-01

    A 600 MWe demonstration reactor being developed at KAERI employs a once-through helically coiled steam generator. The helically coiled steam generator is compact and is efficient for heat transfer, however, it may suffer from the two-phase instability. It is well known that the density wave instability is the main source of instability among various types of instabilities in a helically coiled S/G in a LMR. In the present study a simple method for analysis of the density wave two phase instability in a liquid metal reactor S/G is proposed and the method is applied to the analysis of density wave instability in a S/G of 600MWe liquid metal reactor

  18. Comparison of Different Ion Mobility Setups Using Poly (Ethylene Oxide) PEO Polymers: Drift Tube, TIMS, and T-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haler, Jean R. N.; Massonnet, Philippe; Chirot, Fabien; Kune, Christopher; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Jordens, Jan; Honing, Maarten; Mengerink, Ynze; Far, Johann; Dugourd, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin

    2018-01-01

    Over the years, polymer analyses using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) measurements have been performed on different ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) setups. In order to be able to compare literature data taken on different IM(-MS) instruments, ion heating and ion temperature evaluations have already been explored. Nevertheless, extrapolations to other analytes are difficult and thus straightforward same-sample instrument comparisons seem to be the only reliable way to make sure that the different IM(-MS) setups do not greatly change the gas-phase behavior. We used a large range of degrees of polymerization (DP) of poly(ethylene oxide) PEO homopolymers to measure IMS drift times on three different IM-MS setups: a homemade drift tube (DT), a trapped (TIMS), and a traveling wave (T-Wave) IMS setup. The drift time evolutions were followed for increasing polymer DPs (masses) and charge states, and they are found to be comparable and reproducible on the three instruments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  20. Trapped Electron Instability of Electron Plasma Waves: Vlasov simulations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Brunner, Stephan

    2013-10-01

    The growth of sidebands of a large-amplitude electron plasma wave is studied with Vlasov simulations for a range of amplitudes (. 001 vph = +/-ωbe , where vph =ω0 /k0 and ωbe is the bounce frequency of a deeply trapped electron. In 2D simulations, we find that the instability persists and co-exists with the filamentation instability. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD.

  1. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  2. Nonlinear evolution of drift cyclotron modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.; Lee, Y.C.; Liu, C.S.; Nicholson, D.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    The space-time evolution of the drift-cyclotron instability as influenced by the nonlinear shift in the ion-cyclotron frequency is studied analytically, numerically, and by computer simulation. The analysis is specialized to the case of a single coherent wave with frequency near both a cyclotron harmonic and the ion diamagnetic frequency. Such an analysis is motivated by observations of large-amplitude ion-cyclotron waves in the 2XIIB mirror experiment, which were highly monochromatic and often exhibited these frequency characteristics. A nonlinear dispersion relation describing saturation of the instability is derived by means of a self-consistent analytical solution of the Vlasov--Poisson equations to third order in the wave amplitude. Solitary wave and self-similar solutions are obtained that describe nonlinear wave propagation. Numerical solution of a nonlinear evolution equation and particle simulation confirm the analysis

  3. Flashing coupled density wave oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Zhang Youjie

    1997-07-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The phenomenon and mechanism of different kinds of two-phase flow instabilities, namely geyser instability, flashing instability and flashing coupled density wave instability are described. The especially interpreted flashing coupled density wave instability has never been studied well, it is analyzed by using a one-dimensional non-thermo equilibrium two-phase flow drift model computer code. Calculations are in good agreement with the experiment results. (5 refs.,5 figs., 1 tab.)

  4. Unified formulation for inhomogeneity-driven instabilities in the lower-hybrid range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, O.J.G.; Ziebell, L.F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2002-01-01

    A local dispersion relation that describes inhomogeneity-driven instabilities in the lower-hybrid range is derived following a procedure that correctly describes energy exchange between waves and particles in inhomogeneous media, correcting some inherent ambiguities associated with the standard formalism found in the literature. Numerical solutions of this improved dispersion relation show that it constitutes a unified formulation for the instabilities in the lower-hybrid range, describing the so-called modified two-stream instability, excited by the ion cross-field drift, including the ion Weibel instability, and also describing the lower-hybrid drift instability, which is due to inhomogeneity effects on the electron population

  5. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Kinetic simulations and reduced modeling of longitudinal sideband instabilities in non-linear electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S., E-mail: stephan.brunner@epfl.ch; Hausammann, L. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CRPP-PPB, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Berger, R. L., E-mail: berger5@llnl.gov; Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Kinetic Vlasov simulations of one-dimensional finite amplitude Electron Plasma Waves are performed in a multi-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and quasi- wavenumber δk, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are successfully compared against numerical and analytical solutions to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] for the Trapped Particle Instability (TPI). A model recently suggested by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)], which in addition to the TPI accounts for the so-called Negative Mass Instability because of a more detailed representation of the trapped particle dynamics, is also studied and compared with simulations.

  7. Suppression of transverse instabilities of dark solitons and their dispersive shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Armaroli, Andrea

    2009-11-03

    We investigate the impact of nonlocality, owing to diffusive behavior, on transverse instabilities of a dark stripe propagating in a defocusing cubic medium. The nonlocal response turns out to have a strongly stabilizing effect both in the case of a single soliton input and in the regime where dispersive shock waves develop (multisoliton regime). Such conclusions are supported by the linear stability analysis and numerical simulation of the propagation. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  8. Self-induced dipole force and filamentation instability of a matter wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of copropagating electromagnetic and matter waves is described with a set of coupled higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Optical self-focusing modulates an initially planar wave leading to the generation of dipole forces on the atoms. Atomic channeling due to the dipole...... forces leads, in the nonlinear regime, to filamentation of the atomic beam. Instability growth rates are calculated for atomic beams with both low and high phase space densities. In one transverse dimension an exact solution is found that describes a coupled optical and atomic soliton....

  9. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

  10. Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by timing of the electromagnetic wave propagating along the anode wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boie, R.A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    The feasibility of using an anode wire and surrounding electrodes in drift chambers as a transmission line for second coordinate readout has been studied. The method is based on propagation of the electromagnetic wave along the anode wire is determined by measurement, in an optimized electronic readout system, of the time difference between the arrivals of the signal to the ends of the wire. The resolution obtained on long wires (approx. 2 meters) is about 2 cm FWHM for minimum ionizing particles at a gas gain of approx. = 10 5

  11. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  12. Driving Perpendicular Decay by the Parametric Instabilities of Parallel Propagating Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisel, H.; Nariyuki, Y.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U. M.

    2017-12-01

    The decay of monochromatic Alfven waves is studied by means of 2-D and 3-D hybrid simulations. The goal of the work is to follow up the long-time nonlinear development of theparametric decays after the saturation process in a multi-spatial dimension for coherent Alfven waves with three different polarizations: left-handed circularly polarized -, right-handed circularly polarized - and linearly polarized - Alfven pump waves. The analyzing is restricted for the parallel propagation with respect to the direction of the mean magnetic field in low beta plasmas. Numerical results suggest that the parametric instabilities can lead to broadband decays along the perpendicular direction, in which the magnetic field spectrum is extended towards the perpendicular direction.Perpendicular propagating daughter waves are observed atfinite perpendicular wave numbers as well as direct incompressible energy cascades driven by plasma turbulence.The density power spectrum shows inverse compressible cascades at smallerperpendicular wave numbers and direct cascades at larger wave numbers. The one-dimensional reduced spectra of the magnetic field and densities show correlations for a significant large range of perpendicular wave numbers beforedissipation. The time evolution of the anisotropy index is also determined for all the three analyzed setups.

  13. Parallel and oblique proton fire hose instabilities in the presence of alpha/proton drift: Hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. A1 (2006), A01107/1-A01107/7 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS 98024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * fire hose instability * hybrid simulations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.800, year: 2006

  14. Self-consistent kinetic simulations of lower hybrid drift instability resulting in electron current driven by fusion products in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J W S; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Brady, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of minority energetic protons in deuterium plasmas, which demonstrate a collective instability responsible for emission near the lower hybrid frequency and its harmonics. The simulations capture the lower hybrid drift instability in a parameter regime motivated by tokamak fusion plasma conditions, and show further that the excited electromagnetic fields collectively and collisionlessly couple free energy from the protons to directed electron motion. This results in an asymmetric tail antiparallel to the magnetic field. We focus on obliquely propagating modes excited by energetic ions, whose ring-beam distribution is motivated by population inversions related to ion cyclotron emission, in a background plasma with a temperature similar to that of the core of a large tokamak plasma. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic relativistic PIC code representing all vector field quantities and particle velocities in three dimensions as functions of a single spatial dimension is used to model this situation, by evolving the initial antiparallel travelling ring-beam distribution of 3 MeV protons in a background 10 keV Maxwellian deuterium plasma with realistic ion-electron mass ratio. These simulations provide a proof-of-principle for a key plasma physics process that may be exploited in future alpha channelling scenarios for magnetically confined burning plasmas.

  15. Modulational instability and dynamics of implicit higher-order rogue wave solutions for the Kundu equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2018-01-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Kundu equation, which may be used to describe the propagation process of ultrashort optical pulses in nonlinear optics. The modulational instability of the plane-wave for the possible reason of the formation of the rogue wave (RW) is studied for the system. Based on our proposed generalized perturbation (n,N ‑ n)-fold Darboux transformation (DT), some new higher-order implicit RW solutions in terms of determinants are obtained by means of the generalized perturbation (1,N ‑ 1)-fold DT, when choosing different special parameters, these results will reduce to the RW solutions of the Kaup-Newell (KN) equation, Chen-Lee-Liu (CLL) equation and Gerjikov-Ivanov (GI) equation, respectively. The relevant wave structures are shown graphically, which display abundant interesting wave structures. The dynamical behaviors and propagation stability of the first-order and second-order RW solutions are discussed by using numerical simulations, the higher-order nonlinear terms for the Kundu equation have an impact on the propagation instability of the RW. The method can also be extended to find the higher-order RW or rational solutions of other integrable nonlinear equations.

  16. Thomson-scattering study of the subharmonic decay of ion-acoustic waves driven by the Brillouin instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandulet, H.C.; Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Depierreux, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) has been used to investigate the two-ion decay instability of ion acoustic waves generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an underdense CH plasma. Two complementary TS diagnostics, spectrally and spatially resolved, demonstrate the occurrence of the subharmonic decay of the primary ion acoustic wave into two secondary waves. The study of the laser intensity dependence shows that the secondary ion acoustic waves are correlated with the SBS reflectivity saturation, at a level of a few percent

  17. ELF wave production by an electron beam emitting rocket system and its suppression on auroral field lines - Evidence for Alfven and drift waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.; Abe, Y.; Steffen, J. E.; Malcolm, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Orthogonal probes on a free-flying plasma diagnostics payload are used to study ELF electric disturbances in the auroral ionosphere that are due to the injection of powerful electron beams. Frequency spectrograms are presented for various pitch angles, pulsing characteristics, and other properties of the injected beams; the large scale DC ionospheric convection electric field is measured, together with auroral particle precipitation, visual auroral forms, and ionospheric parameters. In view of the experimental results obtained, it is postulated that the observed ELF waves are in the Alfven and drift modes, and are generated by the positive vehicle potential during beam injection.

  18. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems.

  19. Revisiting tropical instability wave variability in the Atlantic ocean using SODA reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Decco, Hatsue Takanaca; Torres Junior, Audalio Rebelo; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi; Landau, Luiz

    2018-03-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of energy exchange in Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs) in the Atlantic Ocean were investigated. A spectral analysis was used to filter the 5-day mean results from Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis spanning from 1958 to 2008. TIWs were filtered over periods of 15 to 60 days and between wavelengths of 4 and 20 longitude degrees. The main approach of this study was the use of bidirectionally filtered TIW time series as the perturbation fields, and the difference in these time series from the SODA total results was considered to be the basic state for energetics analysis. The main result was that the annual cycle (period of 360 days) was the main source of variability of the waves, and the semi-annual cycle (period of 180 days) was a secondary variation, which indicated that TIWs occurred throughout the year but with intensity that varies seasonally. In SODA, barotropic instability acts as the mechanism that feeds and extracts energy to/from TIWs at equatorial Atlantic. Baroclinic instability is the main mechanism that extracts energy from TIWs to the equatorial circulation north of the Equator. All TIW patterns of variability were observed western of 10° W. The present study reveals new evidences regarding TIW variability and suggests that future investigations should include a detailed description of TIW dynamics as part of Atlantic Ocean equatorial circulation.

  20. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar, E-mail: omar.bouzit@yahoo.fr; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5E2 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  1. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction–diffusion–mechanics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Panfilov, A. V.; Keldermann, R. H.; Nash, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction–diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by...

  2. The gravitational wave background from neutron star formation and bar-mode instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, E; Coward, D; Burman, R; Blair, D; Gilmore, J [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2004-03-07

    We present calculations of the stochastic gravitational wave background resulting from neutron star birth throughout the Universe, including order-of-magnitude estimates for post-collapse bar-mode instabilities based on simulations by Brown (2000 Phys. Rev. D 62 084024) and Shibata et al (2002 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 334 L27). We employ three waveforms from Dimmelmeier et al (2002 Astron. Astrophys. 393 523) based on models, incorporating general relativistic effects, for the axisymmetric core collapse of rotating massive stars. Source-rate evolution is accounted for by using a star formation rate simulation based on a 'flat-{lambda}' cosmology by Hernquist and Springel (2003 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 341 1253). We find that the core-collapse background signal is not detectable by cross correlating two advanced LIGO detectors, but a background generated by bar-mode instabilities is potentially detectable in one year of integration time.

  3. Absolute parametric instability of low frequency waves in a 2-D nonuniform anisotropic warm plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    Using the separation method, the problem of absolute parametric instability (API) of electrostatic waves in magnetized pumped warm plasma is investigated. In this case the effect of static strong magnetic field is considered. The problem of strong magnetic field is solved in 2-D nonuniform plane plasma. The equations which describe the spatial part of the electric potential are obtained. Also the growth rates and conditions of the parametric instability for periodic cases are obtained. It is found that the spatial nonuniformity of the plasma exerts a stabilizing effect on the API. It is shown that the growth rates of periodic and aperiodic API in warm plasma are reduced in comparison with a cold plasma case

  4. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  5. THE Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron R.

    2009-05-01

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role in supernovae (SNe) evolution from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of stellar systems. We consider the simpler idealized problem of an interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a central blast wave. Where valid, the existence of unified solutions suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end, we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models that include effects of divergence and compressibility. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth model. Loss of memory of initial conditions (ICs) can occur in the model, but requires pre-explosion mode numbers higher than predicted for Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low modes dominate, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, the structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes exist in the ICs, the contribution from the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is significant compared to RT. Such RM growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in Tycho. Laser-driven laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

  6. Density-waves instability and a skyrmion lattice on the surface of strong topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Yuval; Stern, Ady

    2012-11-01

    In this work we analyze the instability conditions for spin-density-wave (SDW) formation on the surface of strong topological insulators. We find that for a certain range of Fermi energies and strength of interactions the SDW state is favored compared to the unmagnetized and the uniform-magnetization states. We also find that the SDWs are of spiral nature and, for a certain range of parameters, a Skyrmion lattice may form on the surface. We show that this phase may have a nontrivial Chern number even in the absence of an external magnetic field.

  7. Composite rogue waves and modulation instability for the three-coupled Hirota system in an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Han-Peng; Tian, Bo; Chai, Jun; Du, Zhong

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the three-coupled Hirota system, which is applied to model the long distance communication and ultrafast signal routing systems governing the propagation of light pulses. With the aid of the Darboux dressing transformation, composite rogue wave solutions are derived. Spatial-temporal structures, including the four-petaled structure for the three-coupled Hirota system, are exhibited. We find that the four-petaled rogue waves occur in two of the three components, whereas the eye-shaped rogue wave occurs in the other one. The composite rogue waves can split up into two or three single rogue waves. The corresponding conditions for the occurrence of such phenomena are discussed and presented. We find that the relative position of every single rogue wave is influenced by the ratios of certain parameters. Besides, the linear instability analysis is performed, and our results agree with those from the baseband modulation instability theory.

  8. Gravitational waves from the Papaloizou-Pringle instability in black-hole-torus systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru; Montero, Pedro J; Font, José A

    2011-06-24

    Black hole (BH)-torus systems are promising candidates for the central engine of γ-ray bursts (GRBs), and also possible outcomes of the collapse of supermassive stars to supermassive black holes (SMBHs). By three-dimensional general relativistic numerical simulations, we show that an m = 1 nonaxisymmetric instability grows for a wide range of self-gravitating tori orbiting BHs. The resulting nonaxisymmetric structure persists for a time scale much longer than the dynamical one, becoming a strong emitter of large amplitude, quasiperiodic gravitational waves. Our results indicate that both, the central engine of GRBs and newly formed SMBHs, can be strong gravitational wave sources observable by forthcoming ground-based and spacecraft detectors.

  9. Observational Signatures of Transverse Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Associated Dynamic Instabilities in Coronal Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, P.; Moortel, I. De [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: patrick.antolin@st-andrews.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-02-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves permeate the solar atmosphere and constitute potential coronal heating agents. Yet, the waves detected so far may be but a small subset of the true existing wave power. Detection is limited by instrumental constraints but also by wave processes that localize the wave power in undetectable spatial scales. In this study, we conduct 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling of standing transverse MHD waves in coronal loops with uniform and non-uniform temperature variation in the perpendicular cross-section. The observed signatures are largely dominated by the combination of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI), resonant absorption, and phase mixing. In the presence of a cross-loop temperature gradient, we find that emission lines sensitive to the loop core catch different signatures compared to those that are more sensitive to the loop boundary and the surrounding corona, leading to an out-of-phase intensity and Doppler velocity modulation produced by KHI mixing. In all of the considered models, common signatures include an intensity and loop width modulation at half the kink period, a fine strand-like structure, a characteristic arrow-shaped structure in the Doppler maps, and overall line broadening in time but particularly at the loop edges. For our model, most of these features can be captured with a spatial resolution of 0.″33 and a spectral resolution of 25 km s{sup −1}, although we do obtain severe over-estimation of the line width. Resonant absorption leads to a significant decrease of the observed kinetic energy from Doppler motions over time, which is not recovered by a corresponding increase in the line width from phase mixing and KHI motions. We estimate this hidden wave energy to be a factor of 5–10 of the observed value.

  10. Instability of the ion hybrid wave in the presence of superthermal alpha-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashmore-Davies, C. N.; Russell, D. A.

    1997-02-01

    The stability of the ion hybrid wave in a plasma containing two thermal ion species present in comparable proportions and a low density population of superthermal alpha-particles is analyzed. A simple, model distribution function consisting of a ring distribution in the perpendicular velocity and a Maxwellian in the parallel velocity is used for the superthermal alpha-particles. This distribution function is relevant to the core plasma of a tokamak in the immediate post-birth phase before the alpha-particles have had time to relax collisionally and is therefore of interest to the alpha-channelling question. It has also been used to interpret ion cyclotron emission from fusion products in the edge plasma of large tokamaks. An approximate dispersion relation is derived which allows the conditions for instability to be explored and an analytic expression for the growth rate to be obtained. It is found that the ion hybrid wave can be unstable for v⊥0/cA≪1 where v⊥0 is the alpha-particle ring speed and cA is Alfvén speed for a plasma with two ion species. The instability conditions obtained from the analytic approximation are used to guide the solution of the exact dispersion relation. Numerical solutions for the specific cases of deuterium-tritium core and edge plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. Young et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)] are given.

  11. Van Allen Probes observations of drift-bounce resonance and energy transfer between energetic ring current protons and poloidal Pc4 wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oimatsu, S.; Masahito, N.; Takahashi, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Smith, C.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Poloidal Pc4 wave and proton flux oscillation due to the drift-bounce resonance are observed in the inner magnetosphere on the dayside near the magnetic equator by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft on 2 March 2014. The flux modulation is observed in the energy range of 67.0 keV to 268.8 keV with the same frequency of poloidal Pc4 wave. We estimate the resonant energy to be 120 keV for pitch angle (α) of 20º-40º or 140º-160º, and 170-180 keV for α=40º-60º or 120º-140º. The drift-bounce resonance theory gives the resonant energy of 110-120 keV, which is consistent with the observation for small α (or large α when α≥90º), but slightly higher than the observation for large α (or small α when α≥90º). We consider that this discrepancy of the resonant energy is due to the drift shell splitting. In order to examine the direction of energy flow between protons and the wave, we calculate the sign of the gradient of proton phase space density (df/dW) in both outbound and inbound paths. Results showed positive gradient in both paths, which means that the energy is transferred from the protons to the wave. During the appearance of poloidal Pc4 wave, the Dst* index shows a sudden increase of 6.7 nT. We estimate the total energy loss of the ring current from the recovery of the Dst* index and the variation of proton flux by the drift-bounce resonance. The estimated energy loss is almost comparable for both cases. Therefore, we suggest that the energy transfer from the ring current protons to the wave via the drift-bounce resonance cause the increase of Dst* index.

  12. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  13. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  14. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  15. Electron acoustic waves and parametric instabilities in a 4-component relativistic quantum plasma with Thomas-Fermi distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikramullah, Ahmad, Rashid; Sharif, Saqib; Khattak, Fida Younus

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of Circularly Polarized Electro-Magnetic (CPEM) waves with a 4-component relativistic quantum plasma is studied. The plasma constituents are: relativistic-degenerate electrons and positrons, dynamic degenerate ions, and Thomas-Fermi distributed electrons in the background. We have employed the Klein-Gordon equations for the electrons as well as for the positrons, while the ions are represented by the Schrödinger equation. The Maxwell and Poisson equations are used for electromagnetic waves. Three modes are observed: one of the modes is associated with the electron acoustic wave, a second mode at frequencies greater than the electron acoustic wave mode could be associated with the positrons, and the third one at the lowest frequencies could be associated with the ions. Furthermore, Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), Modulational, and Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) instabilities are studied. It is observed that the growth rates of both the SRS and SBS instabilities decrease with increase in the quantum parameter of the plasma. It is also observed that the scattering spectra in both the SRS and SBS get restricted to very small wavenumber regions. It is shown that for low amplitude CPEM wave interaction with the quantum plasma, the positron concentration has no effect on the SRS and SBS spectra. In the case of large amplitude CPEM wave interaction, however, one observes spectral changes with varying positron concentrations. An increase in the positron concentration also enhances the scattering instability growth rates. Moreover, the growth rate first increases and then decreases with increasing intensity of the CPEM wave, indicating an optimum value of the CPEM wave intensity for the growth of these scattering instabilities. The modulational instability also shows dependence on the quantum parameter as well as on the positron concentration.

  16. The SPS acceleration system: travelling wave drift-tube structure for the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dome, G.

    1976-01-01

    The SPS accelerating structure is essentially a high energy proton linac, except for a small frequency swing during the acceleration cycle. It is operated almost CW with a travelling wave giving an energy gain around 0.1 MeV/m. The guide-lines for the design of such a structure are explained, and practical solutions are described. (author)

  17. Striated drifting auroral kilometric radiation bursts: Possible stimulation by upward traveling EMIC waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Mutel, R. L.; Santolík, Ondřej; Scudder, J. D.; Christopher, I. W.; Cook, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. A4 (2006), A04214/1-A04214/9 ISSN 0148-0227 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Space physics * Waves in plasmas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.800, year: 2006

  18. Electromagnetic dust-lower-hybrid and dust-magnetosonic waves and their instabilities in a dusty magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M.; Rahman, M. M.; Zeba, I.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.; Shukla, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic waves below the ion-cyclotron frequency have been examined in a collisionless and homogeneous dusty plasma in the presence of a dust beam parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. The low-frequency mixed electromagnetic dust-lower-hybrid and purely transverse magnetosonic waves become unstable for the sheared flow of dust grains and grow in amplitude when the drift velocity of the dust grains exceeds the parallel phase velocity of the waves. The growth rate depends dominantly upon the thermal velocity and density of the electrons

  19. Collision of two shock waves as a hypothetical mechanism of producing drifting radio bursts in the 400-500 MHz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicky, M.

    1978-01-01

    After the proton flare of July 3, 1974 a hitherto unclassified phenomenon with a diffusion ''banner'' and with a considerably decelerating drift within the type II and III burst drifts range was observed in the radio dynamic spectrum between 410 and 470 MHz. The hypothesis is presented that the phenomenon is due to the collision of two shock waves, propagating against one another, during which the flux of electromagnetic radiation is considerably enhanced relative to the sum of the fluxes of the electromagnetic radiation of the individual shock waves. The Newkirk 4-density model of the corona is used to describe the phenomenon, the mechanism of plasmon-plasmon conversion in electromagnetic radiation with a double plasma frequency is considered and, according to the parameters derived from the dynamic spectrum, the velocities, radii of curvature and direction of propagation of the anticipated shock waves are analysed in a simplifed symmetric case. (author)

  20. Particle acceleration in tangential discontinuities by lower hybrid waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Spicer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the role that the lower-hybrid wave turbulence plays in providing the necessary resistivity at collisionless reconnection sights. The mechanism for generating the waves is considered to be the lower-hybrid drift instability. We find that the level of the wave amplitude is sufficient enough to heat and accelerate both electrons and ions.

  1. Drift motion of a charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, Yu.N.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    In the drift motion approximation solution of the problem is obtained on the motion of a nonrelativistic charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave under cherenkov and modified cyclotron resonances. The static radial electric field potential is supposed to be close to the parabolic one. The drift motion equations and their integrals are preseOted. The experimentally obtained effect of plasma ionic component division in the crossed fields under the excitation of ion cyclotron oscillations is explained with the help of the theory developed in the paper

  2. Continuous-wave solutions and modulational instability in spinor condensates of positronium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ishfaq Ahmad; Mithun, T.; Malomed, B. A.; Porsezian, K.

    2018-02-01

    We obtain general continuous-wave (CW) solutions in the model of a spinor positronium condensate in the absence of magnetic field. The CW solutions with both in-phase (n = 0) and out-of-phase (n = 1) spin components exist, with their ranges limited by the total particle density, ρ. In the limit of negligible population exchange between the spin components, the CW solutions are found to be stable or unstable, depending on the particle density of the para-positronium. Ortho-positronium, in the F = 1 spinor state, forms a ferromagnetic condensate with stable in-phase CW solutions only. Subsequent examination of the modulational instability is carried out both in the limit case of identical wavenumbers in the spin components, {{Δ }}k\\equiv {k}1-{k}-1=0, and in the more general case of {{Δ }}k\

  3. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Laboratory and numerical simulation of internal wave attractors and their instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzet, Christophe; Dauxois, Thierry; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Joubaud, Sylvain; Sibgatullin, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    Internal wave attractors are formed as result of focusing of internal gravity waves in a confined domain of stably stratified fluid due to peculiarities of reflections properties [1]. The energy injected into domain due to external perturbation, is concentrated along the path formed by the attractor. The existence of attractors was predicted theoretically and proved both experimentally and numerically [1-4]. Dynamics of attractors is greatly influenced by geometrical focusing, viscous dissipation and nonlinearity. The experimental setup features Schmidt number equal to 700 which impose constraints on resolution in numerical schemes. Also for investigation of stability on large time intervals (about 1000 periods of external forcing) numerical viscosity may have significant impact. For these reasons, we have chosen spectral element method for investigation of this problem, what allows to carefully follow the nonlinear dynamics. We present cross-comparison of experimental observations and numerical simulations of long-term behavior of wave attractors. Fourier analysis and subsequent application of Hilbert transform are used for filtering of spatial components of internal-wave field [5]. The observed dynamics shows a complicated coupling between the effects of local instability and global confinement of the fluid domain. The unstable attractor is shown to act as highly efficient mixing box providing the efficient energy pathway from global-scale excitation to small-scale wave motions and mixing. Acknowledgement, IS has been partially supported by Russian Ministry of Education and Science (agreement id RFMEFI60714X0090) and Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant N 15-01-06363. EVE gratefully acknowledges his appointment as a Marie Curie incoming fellow at Laboratoire de physique ENS de Lyon. This work has been partially supported by the ONLITUR grant (ANR-2011-BS04-006-01) and achieved thanks to the resources of PSMN from ENS de Lyon 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F

  5. Lagrangians for plasmas in drift-fluid approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1996-10-01

    For drift waves and related instabilities conservation laws can play a crucial role. In an ideal theory these conservation laws are guaranteed when a Lagrangian can be found from which the equations for the various quantities result by Hamilton's principle. Such a Lagrangian for plasmas in drift-fluid approximation was obtained by a heuristic method in a recent paper by Pfirsch and Correa-Restrepo. In the present paper the same Lagrangian is derived from the exact multi-fluid Lagrangian via an iterative approximation procedure which resembles the standard method usually applied to the equations of motion. That method, however, does not guarantee all the conservation laws to hold. (orig.)

  6. Lagrangians for plasmas in the drift-fluid approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Corres-Restrepo, Dario [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    For drift waves and related instabilities, conservation laws can play a crucial role. In an ideal theory these conservation laws are guaranteed when a Lagrangian can be found from which the equations for the various quantities result by Hamilton`s principle. Such a Lagrangian for plasmas in the drift-fluid approximation was obtained by a heuristic method in a recent paper by Pfirsch and Correa-Restrepo. In the present paper the same Lagrangian is derived from the exact multifluid Lagrangian via an iterative approximation procedure which resembles the standard method usually applied to the equations of motion. That method, however, does not guarantee that all the conservation laws hold. (author).

  7. QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE CAUSED BY MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are frequently observed in solar activity indices. However, no clear physical mechanism for the observed variations has been suggested so far. Here, we study the stability of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline using the shallow water magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our analysis shows that the combination of typical differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field with a strength of ≥10 5 G triggers the instability of the m = 1 magnetic Rossby wave harmonic with a period of ∼2 years. This harmonic is antisymmetric with respect to the equator and its period (and growth rate) depends on the differential rotation parameters and magnetic field strength. The oscillations may cause a periodic magnetic flux emergence at the solar surface and consequently may lead to the observed QBO in solar activity features. The period of QBOs may change throughout a cycle, and from cycle to cycle, due to variations of the mean magnetic field and differential rotation in the tachocline.

  8. Ion Bernstein instability as a possible source for oxygen ion cyclotron harmonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyungguk; Denton, Richard E.; Liu, Kaijun; Gary, S. Peter; Spence, Harlan E.

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates that an ion Bernstein instability can be a possible source for recently reported electromagnetic waves with frequencies at or near the singly ionized oxygen ion cyclotron frequency, ΩO+, and its harmonics. The particle measurements during strong wave activity revealed a relatively high concentration of oxygen ions (˜15%) whose phase space density exhibits a local peak at energy ˜20 keV. Given that the electron plasma-to-cyclotron frequency ratio is ωpe/Ωe≳1, this energy corresponds to the particle speed v/vA≳0.3, where vA is the oxygen Alfvén speed. Using the observational key plasma parameters, a simplified ion velocity distribution is constructed, where the local peak in the oxygen ion velocity distribution is represented by an isotropic shell distribution. Kinetic linear dispersion theory then predicts unstable Bernstein modes at or near the harmonics of ΩO+ and at propagation quasi-perpendicular to the background magnetic field, B0. If the cold ions are mostly protons, these unstable modes are characterized by a low compressibility (|δB∥|2/|δB|2≲0.01), a small phase speed (vph˜0.2vA), a relatively small ratio of the electric field energy to the magnetic field energy (between 10-4 and 10-3), and the Poynting vector directed almost parallel to B0. These linear properties are overall in good agreement with the properties of the observed waves. We demonstrate that superposition of the predicted unstable Bernstein modes at quasi-perpendicular propagation can produce the observed polarization properties, including the minimum variance direction on average almost parallel to B0.

  9. Symbol synchronizer assembly instability study, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Data processing to develop a third-order phase model and to translate all such processed data to the frequency realm for further analysis was described. The frequency study yields a long frequency modulation (FM) drift sinusoid (1600-sec period), an impressed secondary drift wave with a period of about 116 sec, and a set of even harmonics of twice the ramp period-the latter arising from, and used to modify, the phase detector model. The result is applied secondarily to estimate the strong-signal SSA phase detector response "out-of-lock." Finally, the main drift components are verified against all available data, and the result is used to estimate minimum lock conditions and the SSA drift effect under normal operating modes. The instability problem appears marginally resolvable if the acquisition technique is modified.

  10. Hysteresis-controlled instability waves in a scale-free driven current sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Uritsky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetospheric dynamics is a complex multiscale process whose statistical features can be successfully reproduced using high-dimensional numerical transport models exhibiting the phenomenon of self-organized criticality (SOC. Along this line of research, a 2-dimensional driven current sheet (DCS model has recently been developed that incorporates an idealized current-driven instability with a resistive MHD plasma system (Klimas et al., 2004a, b. The dynamics of the DCS model is dominated by the scale-free diffusive energy transport characterized by a set of broadband power-law distribution functions similar to those governing the evolution of multiscale precipitation regions of energetic particles in the nighttime sector of aurora (Uritsky et al., 2002b. The scale-free DCS behavior is supported by localized current-driven instabilities that can communicate in an avalanche fashion over arbitrarily long distances thus producing current sheet waves (CSW. In this paper, we derive the analytical expression for CSW speed as a function of plasma parameters controlling local anomalous resistivity dynamics. The obtained relation indicates that the CSW propagation requires sufficiently high initial current densities, and predicts a deceleration of CSWs moving from inner plasma sheet regions toward its northern and southern boundaries. We also show that the shape of time-averaged current density profile in the DCS model is in agreement with steady-state spatial configuration of critical avalanching models as described by the singular diffusion theory of the SOC. Over shorter time scales, SOC dynamics is associated with rather complex spatial patterns and, in particular, can produce bifurcated current sheets often seen in multi-satellite observations.

  11. Shear flow generation due to electromagnetic instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.; Sato, M.; Hamaguchi, S.; Miyato, N.

    2003-01-01

    Shear flow is the most important ingredient governing nonlinear behavior of many types of plasma instability. Electromagnetic effects on shear flow generation have been studied for an electro- magnetic drift wave called resistive drift-Alfven mode (RDAM) and a global MHD mode called resistive wall mode (RWM). For RDAM it is found that the generated shear flow stabilizes the dominant modes; however, other modes are destabilized. For RWM Maxwell stress due to magnetic fluctuations has a tendency to suppress the poloidal flow near the plasma surface, which gives almost same saturation level, since the shear flow stabilization disappears. (author)

  12. Lower Hybrid Drift Waves and Electromagnetic Electron Space-Phase Holes Associated With Dipolarization Fronts and Field-Aligned Currents Observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission During a Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Nakamura, R.; Breuillard, H.; Argall, M. R.; Graham, D. B.; Fischer, D.; Retinò, A.; Berthomier, M.; Pottelette, R.; Mirioni, L.; Chust, T.; Wilder, F. D.; Gershman, D. J.; Varsani, A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Norgren, C.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bromund, K. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Plaschke, F.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Moore, T. E.; Giles, B. L.; Paterson, W. R.; Pollock, C. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Avanov, L. A.; Saito, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Leonard, T.; Jaynes, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze two ion scale dipolarization fronts associated with field-aligned currents detected by the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission during a large substorm on 10 August 2016. The first event corresponds to a fast dawnward flow with an antiparallel current and could be generated by the wake of a previous fast earthward flow. It is associated with intense lower hybrid drift waves detected at the front and propagating dawnward with a perpendicular phase speed close to the electric drift and the ion thermal velocity. The second event corresponds to a flow reversal: from southwward/dawnward to northward/duskward associated with a parallel current consistent with a brief expansion of the plasma sheet before the front crossing and with a smaller lower hybrid drift wave activity. Electromagnetic electron phase-space holes are detected near these low-frequency drift waves during both events. The drift waves could accelerate electrons parallel to the magnetic field and produce the parallel electron drift needed to generate the electron holes. Yet we cannot rule out the possibility that the drift waves are produced by the antiparallel current associated with the fast flows, leaving the source for the electron holes unexplained.

  13. Nonlinear instability of thin current sheets in antiparallel and guided magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, I.; Büchner, J.

    2003-09-01

    The influence of a current-aligned guide magnetic field on the nonlinear resonant instability of thin current sheets is investigated by means of three-dimensional Vlasov-code simulations. Similarly to the zero-guide field case, the pressure gradient excites lower-hybrid-drift (LHD) waves at the current sheet edges. However, since the LHD waves are excited perpendicular to the local magnetic field they propagate obliquely to the current direction. As a result, the number of resonant particles, i.e., the drift-resonance efficiency, decreases with increasing guide field strength. Hence, the driving of global current sheet kink/sausage instabilities becomes less efficient.

  14. Nonlinear instability of thin current sheets in antiparallel and guided magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, I.; Buechner, J.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a current-aligned guide magnetic field on the nonlinear resonant instability of thin current sheets is investigated by means of three-dimensional Vlasov-code simulations. Similarly to the zero-guide field case, the pressure gradient excites lower-hybrid-drift (LHD) waves at the current sheet edges. However, since the LHD waves are excited perpendicular to the local magnetic field they propagate obliquely to the current direction. As a result, the number of resonant particles, i.e., the drift-resonance efficiency, decreases with increasing guide field strength. Hence, the driving of global current sheet kink/sausage instabilities becomes less efficient

  15. The instability of nonlinear surface waves in an electrified liquid jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatimid, Galal M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the weakly nonlinear stability of surface waves of a liquid jet. In this work, the liquids are uniformly streaming through two porous media and the gravitational effects are neglected. The system is acted upon by a uniform tangential electric field, that is parallel to the jet axis. The equations of motion are linearly treated and solved in the light of nonlinear boundary conditions. Therefore, the boundary-value problem leads to a nonlinear characteristic second-order differential equation. This characterized equation has a complex nature. The nonlinearity is kept up to the third degree. It is used to judge the behavior of the surface evolution. According to the linear stability theory, we derive the dispersion relation that accounts for the growth waves. The stability criterion is discussed analytically and a stability picture is identified for a chosen sample system. Several special cases are recovered upon appropriate data choices. In order to derive the Ginsburg-Landau equation for the general case, in the nonlinear approach, we used the method of multiple timescales with the aid of the Taylor expansion. This equation describes the competition between nonlinearity and the linear dispersion relation. As a special case for non-porous media where there is no streaming, we obtained the well-known nonlinear Schroedinger equation as it has been derived by others. The stability criteria are expressed theoretically in terms of various parameters of the problem. Stability diagrams are obtained for a set of physical parameters. We found new instability regions in the parameter space. These regions are due to the nonlinear effects.

  16. Rogue waves driven by polarization instabilities in a long ring fiber oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpakov, S. A.; Kbashi, Hani; Sergeyev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical results of a study of a complex nonlinear polarization dynamics in a passively self-mode-locked erbium-doped fiber oscillator implemented in a ring configuration and operating near lasing threshold. The theoretical model consists of seven coupled non-linear equations and takes into account both orthogonal states of polarizations in the fiber. The experiment confirmed the existence of seven eigenfrequencies, predicted by the model due to polarization instability near lasing threshold. By adjusting the state of polarization of the pump and in-cavity birefringence we changed some eigenfrequencies from being different (non-degenerate state) to matching (degenerate state). The non-degenerate states of oscillator lead to the L-shaped probability distribution function and true rogue wave regime with a positive dominant Lyapunov exponent value between 1.4 and 2.6. Small detuning from partially degenerate case also leads to L-shaped probability distribution function with the tail trespassing eight standard deviations threshold, giving periodic patterns of pulses along with positive dominant Lyapunov exponent of a filtered signal between 0.6 and 3.2. The partial degeneration, in turn, guides to quasi-symmetric distribution and the value of dominant Lyapunov exponent of 42 which is a typical value for systems with a source of the strongly nonhomogeneous external noise.

  17. Influence of Tropical Instability Waves on Phytoplankton Biomass near the Marquesas Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Martinez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Marquesas form an isolated group of small islands in the Central South Pacific where quasi-permanent biological activity is observed. During La Niña events, this biological activity, shown by a net increase of chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl, a proxy of phytoplankton biomass, is particularly strong. It has been hypothesized that this strong activity is due to iron-rich waters advected from the equatorial region to the Marquesas by tropical instability waves (TIWs. Here we investigate this hypothesis over 18 years by combining satellite observations, re-analyses of ocean data, and Lagrangian diagnostics. Four La Niña events ranging from moderate to strong intensity occurred during this period, and our results show that the Chl plume within the archipelago can be indeed influenced by such equatorial advection, but this was observed during the strong 1998 and 2010 La Niña conditions only. Chl spatio-temporal patterns during the occurrence of other TIWs rather suggest the interaction of large-scale forcing events such as an uplift of the thermocline or the enhancement of coastal upwelling induced by the tropical strengthening of the trades with the islands leading to enhancement of phytoplankton biomass within the surface waters. Overall, whatever the conditions, our analyses suggest that the influence of the TIWs is to disperse, stir, and, therefore, modulate the shape of the existing phytoplankton plume.

  18. Compton harmonic resonances, stochastic instabilities, quasilinear diffusion, and collisionless damping with ultra-high intensity laser waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rax, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The dynamics of electrons in two-dimensional, linearly or circularly polarized, ultra-high intensity (above 10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser waves, is investigated. The Compton harmonic resonances are identified as the source of various stochastic instabilities. Both Arnold diffusion and resonance overlap are considered. The quasilinear kinetic equation, describing the evolution of the electron distribution function, is derived, and the associated collisionless damping coefficient is calculated. The implications of these new processes are considered and discussed

  19. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause (III) transport of energy and momentum by unstable compressional waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Zu-yin; Kivelson, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming the earth's magnetopause to be a one-dimensional tangential discontinuity, the transport of energy and momentum on both sides of the magnetopause caused by unstable compressional Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are investigated. The physical mechanism is also discussed. The calculations show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can indeed play an important role in the coupling processes between the solar wind and the magnetosphere

  20. The Parametric Decay Instability of Alfvén Waves in Turbulent Plasmas and the Applications in the Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Mijie; Xiao, Chijie; Wang, Xiaogang [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Fusion Simulation Center, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Hui, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-06-10

    We perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to study the parametric decay instability (PDI) of Alfvén waves in turbulent plasmas and explore its possible applications in the solar wind. We find that, over a broad range of parameters in background turbulence amplitudes, the PDI of an Alfvén wave with various amplitudes can still occur, though its growth rate in turbulent plasmas tends to be lower than both the theoretical linear theory prediction and that in the non-turbulent situations. Spatial–temporal FFT analyses of density fluctuations produced by the PDI match well with the dispersion relation of the slow MHD waves. This result may provide an explanation of the generation mechanism of slow waves in the solar wind observed at 1 au. It further highlights the need to explore the effects of density variations in modifying the turbulence properties as well as in heating the solar wind plasmas.

  1. Modulation instability and dissipative rogue waves in ion-beam plasma: Roles of ionization, recombination, and electron attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    The amplitude modulation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in an unmagnetized plasma containing positive ions, negative ions, and electrons obeying a kappa-type distribution that is penetrated by a positive ion beam. By considering dissipative mechanisms, including ionization, negative-positive ion recombination, and electron attachment, we introduce a comprehensive model for the plasma with the effects of sources and sinks. Via reductive perturbation theory, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a dissipative term is derived to govern the dynamics of the modulated waves. The effect of the plasma parameters on the modulation instability criterion for the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is numerically investigated in detail. Within the unstable region, first- and second-order dissipative ion-acoustic rogue waves are present. The effect of the plasma parameters on the characteristics of the dissipative rogue waves is also discussed

  2. Turbulence-driven shear flow and self-regulating drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    This dissertation provides an experimental test of the basic theory of the self-regulating drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device. The work is carried out from three approaches: the first explores the statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the ZF generation, the second investigates the dynamical behavior of the DWT/ZF system and the third investigates the variation of the DWT driven ZF verses magnetic field strength and ion-neutral drag. A radially sheared azimuthally symmetric plasma flow is generated by the DWT turbulent Reynolds stress which is directly measured by a multi-tip Langmuir probe. A statistical analysis shows that the cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity components is the key factor determining the detailed Reynolds stress profile. The coincidence of the radial location of the non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent Reynolds stress and the ion saturation current, as well as the properties of the joint probability distribution function (PDF) between the radial particle flux and turbulent Reynolds stress suggest that the bursts of the particle transport appear to be associated with radial transport of azimuthal momentum as well. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale ZF. From both Langmuir probe and fast-faming imaging measurements this shear flow is found to evolve with low frequency (˜250-300Hz). The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulence-driven shear flow

  3. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  4. Catastrophic instabilities of modified DA-DC hybrid surface waves in a semi-bounded plasma system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We find the catastrophic instabilities and derive the growth rates for the dust-cyclotron resonance (DCR) and dust-rotation resonance (DRR) modes of the modified dust-acoustic and dust-cyclotron (DA-DC) hybrid surface waves propagating at the plasma–vacuum interface where the plasma is semi-bounded and composed of electrons and rotating dust grains. The effects of magnetic field and dust rotation frequency on the DCR- and DDR-modes are also investigated. We find that the dust rotation frequency enhances the growth rate of DCR-mode and the effect of dust rotation on this resonance mode decreases with an increase of the wave number. We also find that an increase of magnetic field strength enhances the DCR growth rate, especially, for the short wavelength regime. In the case of DRR-mode, the growth rate is found to be decreased less sensitively with an increase of the wave number compared with the case of DCR, but much significantly enhanced by an increase of dust rotation frequency. The DRR growth rate also decreases with an increase of the magnetic field strength, especially in the long wavelength regime. Interestingly, we find that catastrophic instabilities occur for both DCR- and DRR-modes of the modified DA-DC hybrid surface waves when the rotational frequency is close to the dust-cyclotron frequency. Both modes can also be excited catastrophically due to the cooperative interaction between the DCR-mode and the DRR-mode.

  5. A survey of elementary plasma instabilities and ECH wave noise properties relevant to plasma sounding by means of particle in cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the emission of high amplitude wave packets into a plasma is examined. The plasma is modelled by an 1 1/2D electromagnetic and relativistic particle in cell code. The antenna is modelled by applying forced electrostatic field oscillations to a subset of the simulation grid cells. The emitted wave packets are followed in space and time. It is investigated how the wave packets are affected by instabilities. The detected instabilities affecting ECH waves have been identified as wave decay, nonlinear damping due to trapping and modulational instabilities. These instabilities have been discussed with hindsight to the plasma sounding experiment. A plasma sounder is an experiment emitting short wave packets into the ambient plasma and then it listens to the response. The assumption that the emitted waves are linear waves then allows to determine the plasma magnetic field strength, the electron density and possibly the electron thermal velocity from the response spectrum. The impact of the non-linear instabilities on the plasma wave response spectrum provided by a sounder have been predicted in this work and the predictions have been shown to match a wide range of experimental observations. A dependence of the instabilities on the simulation noise levels, for example the dependence of the wave interaction time in a wave decay on the noise electric field amplitudes, required it to investigate the simulation noise properties (spectral distribution) and to compare it to real plasma thermal noise. It has also been examined how a finite length antenna would filter the simulation noise. (author)

  6. Frozen-wave instability in near-critical hydrogen subjected to horizontal vibration under various gravity fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    The frozen-wave instability which appears at a liquid-vapor interface when a harmonic vibration is applied in a direction tangential to it has been less studied until now. The present paper reports experiments on hydrogen (H2) in order to study this instability when the temperature is varied near its critical point for various gravity levels. Close to the critical point, a liquid-vapor density difference and surface tension can be continuously varied with temperature in a scaled, universal way. The effect of gravity on the height of the frozen waves at the interface is studied by performing the experiments in a magnetic facility where effective gravity that results from the coupling of the Earth's gravity and magnetic forces can be varied. The stability diagram of the instability is obtained. The experiments show a good agreement with an inviscid model [Fluid Dyn. 21 849 (1987)], irrespective of the gravity level. It is observed in the experiments that the height of the frozen waves varies weakly with temperature and increases with a decrease in the gravity level, according to a power law with an exponent of 0.7. It is concluded that the wave height becomes of the order of the cell size as the gravity level is asymptotically decreased to zero. The interface pattern thus appears as a bandlike pattern of alternate liquid and vapor phases, a puzzling phenomenon that was observed with CO2 and H2 near their critical point in weightlessness [Acta Astron. 61 1002 (2007); Europhys. Lett. 86 16003 (2009)].

  7. On Long-Time Instabilities in Staggered Finite Difference Simulations of the Seismic Acoustic Wave Equations on Discontinuous Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2017-10-26

    We consider the long-time instability issue associated with finite difference simulation of seismic acoustic wave equations on discontinuous grids. This issue is exhibited by a prototype algebraic problem abstracted from practical application settings. Analysis of this algebraic problem leads to better understanding of the cause of the instability and provides guidance for its treatment. Specifically, we use the concept of discrete energy to derive the proper solution transfer operators and design an effective way to damp the unstable solution modes. Our investigation shows that the interpolation operators need to be matched with their companion restriction operators in order to properly couple the coarse and fine grids. Moreover, to provide effective damping, specially designed diffusive terms are introduced to the equations at designated locations and discretized with specially designed schemes. These techniques are applied to simulations in practical settings and are shown to lead to superior results in terms of both stability and accuracy.

  8. Dissipation of Alfven Waves at Fluid Scale through Parametric Decay Instabilities in Low-beta Turbulent Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Li, H.; Guo, F.; Li, X.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind is a turbulent magnetized plasma extending from the upper atmosphere of the sun to the edge of the heliosphere. It carries charged particles and magnetic fields originated from the Sun, which have great impact on the geomagnetic environment and human activities in space. In such a magnetized plasma, Alfven waves play a crucial role in carrying energy from the surface of the Sun, injecting into the solar wind and establishing power-law spectra through turbulent energy cascades. On the other hand, in compressible plasmas large amplitude Alfven waves are subject to a parametric decay instability (PDI) which converts an Alfven wave to another counter-propagating Alfven wave and an ion acoustic wave (slow mode). The counter-propagating Alfven wave provides an important ingredient for turbulent cascade, and the slow-mode wave provides a channel for solar wind heating in a spatial scale much larger than ion kinetic scales. Growth and saturation of PDI in quiet plasma have been intensively studied using linear theory and nonlinear simulations in the past. Here using 3D hybrid simulations, we show that PDI is still effective in turbulent low-beta plasmas, generating slow modes and causing ion heating. Selected events in WIND data are analyzed to identify slow modes in the solar wind and the role of PDI, and compared with our simulation results. We also investigate the validity of linear Vlasov theory regarding PDI growth and slow mode damping in turbulent plasmas. Since PDI favors low plasma beta, we expect to see more evidence of PDI in the solar wind close to the Sun, especially from the upcoming NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission which will provide unprecedented wave and plasma data as close as 8.5 solar radii from the Sun.

  9. Slab magnetised non-relativistic low-beta electron-positron plasmas: collisionless heating, linear waves and reconnecting instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, Alessandro

    2017-12-01

    The properties of a non-relativistic magnetised low-beta electron-positron plasma in slab geometry are investigated. The two species are taken to be drift kinetic while we retain Larmor radius effects in quasi-neutrality, and inertia in Ohm's law. A linear analysis shows that, for small magnetic perturbations, Alfvénic perturbations travel at the electron Alfvén speed, which is based on the electron mass. We discuss the role of the displacement current when Larmor-scale and Debye-scale effects are both retained. We predict the existence of a kinetic electron Alfvén wave which connects to the K-modes of Mishchenko et al. (J. Plasma Phys., 2017 (submitted)) in the electrostatic limit. It is found that linear drift waves are not supported by the system if the two species have the same temperature. Tearing modes can be driven unstable by equilibrium current density gradients. Also in this case, the characteristic time is based on the electron Alfvén speed. Nonlinear hybrid fluid-kinetic equations are also derived. It is shown that each species is described, to leading order, by the kinetic reduced electron heating model (KREHM) kinetic equation of Zocco & Schekochihin (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 18, 2011, 102309). The model is extended to retain first-order Larmor radius effects. It supports collisionless dispersive waves, which can greatly impact nonlinear magnetic reconnection. Diamagnetic effects enter the nonlinear equations via the first-order magnetic compressibility. A minimal nonlinear model for two-dimensional low-frequency isothermal pair plasmas is derived.

  10. Wave propagation and instabilities in monolithic and periodically structured elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoldi, Katia; Boyce, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Wave propagation in elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations is relevant in numerous application areas, including nondestructive testing of materials and ultrasound techniques, where finite deformations and corresponding stress states can influence wave propagation and hence

  11. Ion-driven instabilities of surface dust ion-acoustic waves in bounded plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2018-02-01

    The growth rates of the dust ion-acoustic surface wave in the plasma slab device containing ion streaming passing through the stationary electrons and dusty grains at the speed of wave phase velocity are derived and numerically analyzed. We have found that the growth rates for the resonant symmetric and antisymmetric waves are similar to the case of semi-bounded plasma when we have a thick slab. However, in the case of the symmetric wave, the growth rate moves towards the bulk wave as the slab thickness reduces. In the case of the antisymmetric wave, the growth rate increases fast as the slab thickness decreases. The growth rates of surface waves in a plasma slab are compared with those of semi-bounded and bulk waves.

  12. Modulational instability, solitons and periodic waves in a model of quantum degenerate boson-fermion mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations modelling a quantum degenerate mixture of bosons and fermions. We analyze the stability of plane waves, give precise conditions for the existence of solitons and write explicit solutions in the form of periodic waves. We also check that the solitons observed previously in numerical simulations of the model correspond exactly to our explicit solutions and see how plane waves destabilize to form periodic waves

  13. Three wave coupling and explosive instability of magneto-elastic excitations in FeBO3 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevstafyev, O.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Pernod, P.; Berzhansky, V.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric generation of coupled triads of magneto-elastic waves is studied experimentally in FeBO 3 single crystal under transversal electromagnetic pumping at the temperature range 77-293 K. The explosive supercritical dynamics of three wave coupling is observed when the pumping phase is modulated according to the nonlinear frequency shift of an excited magnetoelastic mode. The experimental results are in agreement with strongly nonlinear model of magneto-elastic excitations in antiferromagnets with 'easy plane' magnetic anisotropy. - Research highlights: → Parametric excitation of coupled magneto-elastic triads in FeBO 3 under EM pumping. → Quasi-singular pumping phase modulation to compensate nonlinear frequency shift. → Observation of explosive instability at the temperature range 77-293 K. → Supercritical triads excitation strongly nonlinear model of magneto-elastic dynamics.

  14. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  15. The stability of internal transport barriers to MHD ballooning modes and drift waves: A formalism for low magnetic shear and for velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) provide improved confinement, so it is important to understand their stability properties. The stability to an important class of modes with high wave-numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field, is usually studied with the standard ballooning transformation and eikonal approach. However, ITBs are often characterised by radial q profiles that have regions of negative or low magnetic shear and by radially sheared electric fields. Both these features affect the validity of the standard method. A new approach to calculating stability in these circumstances is developed and applied to ideal MHD ballooning modes and to micro-instabilities responsible for anomalous transport. (author)

  16. Preliminary investigation of trapped particle instabilities in EBT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Hedrick, C.L.

    1978-05-01

    An investigation is presented of the role which trapped particles might play in the drift wave stability of ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT). The model adopted consists of a bounce-averaged drift kinetic equation with a Krook collision operator. Care has been taken to model, at least in an elementary way, the features which distinguish the physics of EBT from that of tokamaks, namely the large magnitude and velocity space dependence of the poloidal drift frequency ..cap omega.., the relatively small collisionality ..nu../..cap omega.., the enhancement of ..nu../sub eff/ for passing particles, and the closed nature of the field lines. Instabilities are found which have a somewhat dissipative character, however the precessional drift is found to be a significant stabilizing influence. In most cases, the modes are completely stabilized when ..omega../sub *//l..cap omega.. approximately equal to 1 for normal gradients. For reversed gradients (..omega../sub *//l..cap omega.. < 0), stability is greatly enhanced.

  17. Absolute parametric instability of low-frequency waves in a 2D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solved in two-dimensional (2D) nonuniform plane plasma. Equations which describe the spatial part of the electric potential are obtained. Also, the growth rates and conditions of the parametric instability for periodic and aperiodic cases are obtained. It is found that the spatial nonuniformity of the plasma exerts a stabilizing ...

  18. Influence of pump power and modulation instability gain spectrum on seeded supercontinuum and rogue wave generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe

    2012-01-01

    The noise properties of a supercontiuum can be significantly improved both in terms of coherence and intensity stability by modulating the input pulse with a seed. In this paper, we numerically investigate the influence of the seed wavelength, the pump power, and the modulation instability gain s...

  19. Plasma–maser instability of the ion acoustics wave in the presence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hybrid wave turbulence. The condition for the plasma–maser is ω = k v and assuming Ω < Kv , we first estimate the linear part of the dielectric function of ion acoustics wave from eq. (26), and considering the fact that for ion acoustics wave, (we have α = (K⊥v⊥/Ωe) ≃ 10−2, i.e. the argument of Bessel's function is small), the ...

  20. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  1. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift. A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE. Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  2. Absolute parametric instability of low-frequency waves in a 2D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    waves in a 2D nonuniform anisotropic warm plasma. N G ZAKI. Plasma and Nuclear ... describing the parametric exci- tation of surface waves at the boundary of isotropic plasma (vacuum) to within ..... Fifteenth National Radio Science Conference, IEEE Catalog Number 98EX109, ISBN. 0-7803-4310-7, Helwan Univ., Cairo, ...

  3. Quantification of the Effect of Pressure Wire Drift on the Diagnostic Performance of Fractional Flow Reserve, Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio, and Whole-Cycle Pd/Pa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Christopher M; Ahmad, Yousif; Shun-Shin, Matthew J; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Petraco, Ricardo; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P; Sen, Sayan; Davies, Justin E

    2016-04-01

    Small drifts in intracoronary pressure measurements (±2 mm Hg) can affect stenosis categorization using pressure indices. This has not previously been assessed for fractional flow reserve (FFR), instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and whole-cycle distal pressure/proximal pressure (Pd/Pa) indices. Four hundred forty-seven stenoses were assessed with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa. Cut point values for significance were predefined as ≤0.8, Pa indices were recalculated and stenosis misclassification quantified. Median (±median absolute deviation) values for FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa were 0.81 (±0.11), 0.90 (±0.07), and 0.93 (±0.06), respectively. For the cut point of FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, 34.6% (155), 50.1% (224), and 62.2% (278) of values, respectively, lay within ±0.05 U. With ±2 mm Hg pressure wire drift, 21% (94), 25% (110), and 33% (148) of the study population were misclassified with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, respectively. Both FFR and iFR had significantly lower misclassification than whole-cycle Pd/Pa (PPa is more vulnerable to such reclassification than FFR and iFR. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. Experimental and theoretical study on density wave instability in low quality natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Hai Jun; Song, Jin Ho

    1997-07-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic experimental research has been performed at INET of Beijing University in two full scale test loops, HRTL-5 and HRTL-200 simulating the HR-5 and HR-200 district heating reactors. The homogeneous equilibrium flow model and the drift flux model are employed to analyze the flow in the HRTL-200 test loop. The frequency domain linear stability analysis program LINTAB has been developed based on the homogeneous equilibrium results from HRTL-200 test facility have been used to validate the LINTAB code. Analysis results using LINTAB showed a good agreement with the test results. (author). 20 refs., 24 figs

  5. Preliminary investigation on a passive method for parametric instability control in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, S; Zhao, C; Ju, L; Blair, D G

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a passive method to suppress parametric instabilities. This method requires the design of a test mass mirror with appropriate loss distribution. We show that localized losses can significantly reduce the parametric gain without degrading the thermal noise for the advanced LIGO configuration. The method can be use individually or in conjunction with other active feed-back methods. We present numerical analysis for both spherical and non-spherical mirrors

  6. Wave instabilities in nonlinear Schrödinger systems with non vanishing background

    KAUST Repository

    Trillo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We investigate wave collapse in the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation and in the presence of a non vanishing background. Through the use of virial identities, we establish a new criterion for blow-up.

  7. Excitation of electrostatic wave instability by dc electric field in earth's magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Misra, K.D.; Pandey, R.P.; Singh, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    The dispersion relation for electrostatic wave propagation in an anisotropic warm collisionless magnetoplasma, in the presence of weak parallel (d c) electric field, has been derived analytically. An expression for the growth rate of the electrostatic wave and the marginal stability condition are also derived. The modifications introduced in the growth rate by the electric field and the temperature anisotropy are discussed using plasma parameters observed in the magnetospheric region (4 < L < 10). The effect of the electric field is to increase the growth rate of electrostatic waves at different electron cyclotron harmonics, whereas the effect of the temperature anisotropy is to decrease the growth rate. The presence of parallel electric field may excite the electrostatic emissions at different electron cyclotron harmonics. The most unstable band of wave frequencies obtained with the aid of computations lies between 5 kHz and 10 kHz. These wave frequencies are well within the experimentally observed frequencies of electrostatic emissions. Therefore such a study would not only explain the observed satellite features of the electrostatic wave emissions but would also account for the diagnostics of the magnetospheric plasma parameters

  8. Modulational instability of ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén waves in a plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of finite amplitude ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén (SDA) waves, and their modulational instability in a magnetized plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids have been theoretically investigated by using the reductive perturbation method. The derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived to examine the stability analysis of such SDA waves. It is found that the SDA waves propagating in such an opposite polarity dust plasma medium are modulationally unstable, and that the instability criterion and the growth rate of these unstable SDA waves in such a novel opposite polarity dust plasma medium are found to be significantly different from those in electron–ion or electron–positron plasma media. The implications of the present investigation in different space environments and laboratory devices are briefly discussed.

  9. Long-wavelength instability of periodic flows and whistler waves in electron magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhin, V.P.; Levchenko, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Stability analysis of periodic flows and whistlers with respect to long-wavelength perturbations within the framework of dissipative electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) based on two-scale asymptotic expansion technique is presented. Several types of flows are considered: two-dimensional Kolmogorov-like flow, helical flow, and anisotropic helical flow. It is shown hat the destabilizing effect on the long-wavelength perturbations is due to either the negative resistivity effect related to flow anisotropy or α-like effect to its micro helicity. The criteria of the corresponding instabilities are obtained. Numerical simulations of EMHD equations with the initial conditions corresponding to two types of periodic flows are presented. (author)

  10. Analysis of density wave instability in counter-flow steam generators using STEAMFREQ-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1986-01-01

    The STEAMFREQ-X computer model was developed to provide a more comprehensive modeling of the different phenomena that are important to stability analysis of counter-flow steam generators. It uses a frequency-domain analysis and considers heat-flux/flow coupling between the primary and secondary fluids in space and time. Predictions by STEAMFREQ-X were compared with data from both a multi-channel liquid-sodium heated steam generator and a set of single pipe test data. Predicted outlet steam qualities at instability thresholds were within 15% of experimental data for all test points. (orig.)

  11. Modulational instability: Conservation laws and bright soliton solution of ion-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Kalaawy, O. H.

    2018-02-01

    We consider the nonlinear propagation of non-planar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic (IA) envelope solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of electron-positron-ion-dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions in the context of the non-extensive statistics. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in cylindrical and spherical geometry by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM). It is found that the nature of the modulational instabilities would be significantly modified due to the effects of the non-extensive and other plasma parameters as well as cylindrical and spherical geometry. Conservation laws of the MNLS equation are obtained by Lie symmetry and multiplier method. A new exact solution (envelope bright soliton) is obtained by the extended homogeneous balance method. Finally, we study the results of this article.

  12. SPECTRA OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AND RELATIVISTIC PARTICLES PRODUCED BY A NONRESONANT WAVE INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, Andrey E.; Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2009-01-01

    We model strong forward shocks in young supernova remnants with efficient particle acceleration where a nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current amplifies magnetic turbulence in the shock precursor. Particle injection, magnetic field amplification (MFA), and the nonlinear feedback of particles and fields on the bulk flow are derived consistently. The shock structure depends critically on the efficiency of turbulence cascading. If cascading is suppressed, MFA is strong, the shock precursor is stratified, and the turbulence spectrum contains several discrete peaks. These peaks, as well as the amount of MFA, should influence synchrotron X-rays, allowing observational tests of cascading and other assumptions intrinsic to the nonlinear model of nonresonant wave growth.

  13. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  14. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  15. Quenching of natural cyclotron instability by large amplitude monochromatic waves propagating in an inhomogeneous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Gendrin, R.

    1979-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that a long duration monochromatic wave generated by a high power VLF transmitter may quench natural magnetospheric hiss emissions over a frequency range Δf of the order of 50-150 Hz below the transmitter frequency. The authors show that this effect can be interpreted by trapping, inside the monochromatic wave, of a certain amount of particles which were contributing to the generation of hiss in the equatorial region before the transmitter was switched on. The competition between the trapping and detrapping forces (the last one being due to the inhomogeneity of the medium) is studied. They show that the frequency range Δf which is concerned by this effect is proportional to b 2 , where b is the field intensity of the monochromatic wave. Δf is also an increasing function of the transmitter frequency. (Auth.)

  16. Low-frequency Waves Driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in a Bounded Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, M. M.; Burinskaya, T. M.

    2011-10-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a plane three-layered plasma is investigated. A general dispersion relation for the case of arbitrarily orientated magnetic fields and flow velocities is derived, and its solutions for a bounded plasma flow in a longitudinal magnetic field are studied numerically. On analyzing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for different ion acoustic velocities, perturbations with wavelengths on the order of or longer than the flow thickness are shown to grow in an arbitrary direction even at a zero temperature. In a low-temperature plasma, solutions resulting in kink-like deformations of the plasma flow turns out to grow at a higher rate than ones resulting in sausage-like deformations. Oscillations excited at small angles with respect to the magnetic field exist in a limited range of the small wavenumbers even if the finite width of the transition region between the flow and the ambient plasma neglegted. The results obtained are applied to explain the excitation of the low-frequency long-wavelength oscillations propagating along the magnetic field in the plasma sheet boundary layer of the Earth's magnetotail.

  17. Angular instability due to radiation pressure in the LIGO gravitational-wave detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Eiichi; Kawabe, Keita; Sigg, Daniel; Adhikari, Rana; Saulson, Peter R

    2010-06-20

    We observed the effect of radiation pressure on the angular sensing and control system of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) interferometer's core optics at LIGO Hanford Observatory. This is the first measurement of this effect in a complete gravitational-wave interferometer. Only one of the two angular modes survives with feedback control, because the other mode is suppressed when the control gain is sufficiently large. We developed a mathematical model to understand the physics of the system. This model matches well with the dynamics that we observe.

  18. Outward radial transport and drift loss due to ULF waves during an energetic electron dropout during the storm on 1 June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. B.; Fok, M. C. H.; Li, W.; Komar, C. M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Glocer, A.; Buzulukova, N.

    2016-12-01

    A flux dropout is a sudden and considerable decrease in the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt occurring over timescales of a few hours. A significant dropout of electrons with energies ranging from 0.1 to 7MeV was observed by Van Allen Probes during the storm on June 1, 2013. To understand the physical mechanisms of this dropout, we simulate flux and phase space density of energetic electrons with event specific plasma waves using the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere and Ionosphere (CIMI) model. We update the magnetic field configuration every 30 seconds using the Tsyganenko 2004 empirical magnetic field model. Likewise, the electric field is updated every 10 seconds using a self-consistent convection potential from ring current pressure to reproduce fluctuations comparable to ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. CIMI reproduces the significant dropout with the last closed drift shell estimated to be L* electrons. We conclude that outward radial transport results from electric and magnetic fluctuations and the Dst effect. These effects combine together and result in electron losses for a wide range of energies to the magnetopause and are the primary driver of the deep dropout over a large range of L values.

  19. Density-space potential phase difference in a Kelvin--Helmholtz instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowienka, J.C.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    The low-frequency instability found in a hollow cathode discharge in helium was studied using an ion beam probe as a primary diagnostic tool. Three aspects of the instability are discussed: the location and amplitude of the oscillation and its correlation with the shape of the space potential; the phase angle between density and space potential oscillations; and the comparison of the data with three known instability models: Kelvin--Helmholtz, Rayleigh--Taylor, and drift waves--for mode identification. (U.S.)

  20. Theoretical and experimental study for possibility of nuclear burn wave initiation in Z-pinch due to M=0 instability development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakshaev, Yu.L.; Blinov, P.I.; Chernenko, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The development of sausage type (m=0) instabilities in initially homogeneous plasma column leads to the appearance of dense plasma. Temperature of this plasma is substantially higher, than the average plasma temperature in the column. Therefore the reasonable idea might be the using of this high temperature areas for nuclear burn wave initiation. The study for possibility of this phenomenon is presented. (author)

  1. Kinetics of parametric instabilities of Alfven waves: Evolution of ion distribution functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Velli, M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, September (2010), A09106/1-A09106/12 ISSN 0148-0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Alfvén waves * evolution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  2. Collisional effect on lower hybrid waves instability in a dusty plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of particle collisions on lower hybrid modes in a dusty plasma is studied. The dispersion relation derived from fluid theory is numerically solved for plasma parameters relevant to determine the modification in wave propagation due to collisions. This study is relevant to the earth's lower atmosphere, in particular, the ...

  3. A new multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface for linear and second-order mean drift wave loads on floating bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Chen, Xiaobo

    2017-10-01

    A novel multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface is proposed by combining the use of free-surface Green function and Rankine source function. A cylindrical control surface is introduced to subdivide the fluid domain into external and internal domains. Unlike the traditional domain decomposition strategy or multi-block method, the control surface here is not panelized, on which the velocity potential and normal velocity components are analytically expressed as a series of base functions composed of Laguerre function in vertical coordinate and Fourier series in the circumference. Free-surface Green function is applied in the external domain, and the boundary integral equation is constructed on the control surface in the sense of Galerkin collocation via integrating test functions orthogonal to base functions over the control surface. The external solution gives rise to the so-called Dirichlet-to-Neumann [DN2] and Neumann-to-Dirichlet [ND2] relations on the control surface. Irregular frequencies, which are only dependent on the radius of the control surface, are present in the external solution, and they are removed by extending the boundary integral equation to the interior free surface (circular disc) on which the null normal derivative of potential is imposed, and the dipole distribution is expressed as Fourier-Bessel expansion on the disc. In the internal domain, where the Rankine source function is adopted, new boundary integral equations are formulated. The point collocation is imposed over the body surface and free surface, while the collocation of the Galerkin type is applied on the control surface. The present method is valid in the computation of both linear and second-order mean drift wave loads. Furthermore, the second-order mean drift force based on the middle-field formulation can be calculated analytically by using the coefficients of the Fourier-Laguerre expansion.

  4. Competing processes of whistler and electrostatic instabilities in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Y.; Matsumoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    Competing processes of whistler mode and electrostatic mode instabilities induced by an electron beam are studied by a linear growth rate analysis and by an electromagnetic particle simulation. In addition to a background cold plasma we assumed an electron beam drifting along a static magnetic field. We studied excitation of whistler and electrostatic mode waves in the direction of the static magnetic field. We first calculated linear growth rates for the whistler mode and electrostatic mode instabilities, assuming various possible parameters in the equatorial magnetosphere. We found that the growth rate for the electrostatic instability is always larger than that of the whistler mode instability. A short simulation run with a monoenergetic electron beam demonstrates that a monoenergetic beam can hardly give energy to whistler mode waves as a result of competition with faster growing electrostatic waves, because the beam electrons are trapped and diffused by the electrostatic waves, and hence the growth rates for whistler mode waves become very small. A long simulation run starting with a warm electron beam demonstrates that whistler mode waves are excited in spite of the small growth rates and the coexisting quasi-linear electrostatic diffusion process

  5. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-02-15

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  6. Modulational instability of the obliquely modulated ion acoustic waves in a warm ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, M.K.; Arora, A.K.; Sharma, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    Using KBM. perturbation technique, it is shown that the modulationally unstable domain in the (kappa - phi) plane for the obliquely modulated ion acoustic waves is appreciably modified due to the finite ion temperature. It is also shown that in a collisionless plasma having small TAUsub(i)/TAUsub(e) ( 0 approximately 0.1) may exceed the Landau damping rate provided the modulation is sufficiently oblique. (author)

  7. A parametric investigation on the cyclotron maser instability driven by ring-beam electrons with intrinsic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zi-Jin; Wang, Chuan-Bing; Zhang, Pei-Jin; Liu, Jin

    2017-05-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser is a process that generates the intense and coherent radio emission in the plasma. In this paper, we present a comprehensive parametric investigation on the electron-cyclotron-maser instability driven by non-thermal ring-beam electrons with intrinsic Alfvén waves, which pervade the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space. It is found that both forward propagating and backward propagating waves can be excited in the fast ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) electromagnetic modes. The growth rates of X1 mode are almost always weakened by Alfvén waves. The average pitch-angle ϕ 0 of electrons is a key parameter for the effect of Alfvén waves on the growth rate of modes O1, O2, and X2. For a beam-dominated electron distribution ( ϕ 0 ≲ 30 ° ), the growth rates of the maser instability for O1, O2, and X2 modes are enhanced with the increase of the Alfvén wave energy density. In other conditions, the growth rates of O1, O2, and X2 modes weakened with the increasing Alfvén wave intensity, except that the growth of the O1 mode may also be enhanced by Alfvén waves for a ring distribution. The results may be important for us in analyzing the mechanism of radio bursts with various fine structures observed in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Direct ion heating in overdense plasmas through the Brillouin instability driven by relativistic whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takayoshi; Hata, Masayasu; Iwata, Natsumi; Mima, Kunioki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Strong magnetic fields over kilo-Tesla have been available in the laboratory by the use of ultra-intense lasers. It would be interesting to apply those strong fields to other laser experiments such as the inertial confinement fusion and laboratory astrophysics. The characteristics of laser-plasma interactions could be modified significantly by the presence of such strong magnetic fields. We investigate electromagnetic wave propagation in overdense plasmas along the magnetic field for a right-hand circularly polarized wave by PIC simulations. Since the whistler mode has no cutoff density, it can penetrate into overdense plasmas and interact directly with charged particles there. When the external field strength is near a critical value defined by that the cyclotron frequency is equal to the laser one, it is reported that electrons are accelerated efficiently by the cyclotron resonance. However, if the field strength is far beyond the critical value, the cyclotron resonance is inefficient, while the ions gain a large amount of energy directly from the laser light owning to the Brillouin scattering. As the result, only ions are heated up selectively. We will discuss about the application of this ion heating in dense plasmas. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15K21767.

  9. NREM sleep instability in children with sleep terrors: the role of slow wave activity interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliviero; Ferri, Raffaele; Novelli, Luana; Finotti, Elena; Miano, Silvia; Guilleminault, Christian

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate NREM sleep instability, as measured by the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP), in children with sleep terrors (ST) vs. normal controls. Ten boys (mean age: 8.5 years, range 5-13) meeting the following inclusion criteria: (a) complaint of ST several times a month, (b) a history of ST confirmed by a third person, and (c) a diagnosis of ST according to the ICSD-2 criteria. Eleven age-matched control children with parental report of at least 8.5h of nightly sleep, absence of known daytime consequences of sleep disorders were recruited by advertisement from the community. Sleep was visually scored for sleep macrostructure and CAP using standard criteria. Sleep macrostructure showed only a significantly increased number of awakenings per hour and reduced sleep efficiency in ST subjects. CAP parameters analysis revealed several significant differences in ST vs. controls: an increase of total CAP rate in SWS, of A1 index in SWS and of the mean duration of A phases while B phases had a decreased duration, exclusively in SWS. The normalized CAP interval-distribution graphs showed significant differences in SWS with interval classes 10< or = i < 35s higher in children with ST and intervals classes above 50s higher in normal controls. Children with ST showed faster alternations of the amplitude of slow EEG bursts during SWS. This abnormally fast alternation of the EEG amplitude in SWS is linked to the frequent intrusion of CAP B phases interrupting the continuity of slow delta activity and could be considered as a neurophysiological marker of ST. This abnormal alternation of the EEG amplitude in SWS is associated with the occurrence of parasomnias and might be considered as a neurophysiological marker of disorders of arousal.

  10. Novel optical solitary waves and modulation instability analysis for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation in monomode step-index optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inc, Mustafa; Aliyu, Aliyu Isa; Yusuf, Abdullahi; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation (CNLSE) in monomode step-index in optical fibers which describes the nonlinear modulations of two monochromatic waves, whose group velocities are almost equal. A class of dark, bright, dark-bright and dark-singular optical solitary wave solutions of the model are constructed using the complex envelope function ansatz. Singular solitary waves are also retrieved as bye products of the in integration scheme. This naturally lead to some constraint conditions placed on the solitary wave parameters which must hold for the solitary waves to exist. The modulation instability (MI) analysis of the model is studied based on the standard linear-stability analysis. Numerical simulation and physical interpretations of the obtained results are demonstrated. It is hoped that the results reported in this paper can enrich the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the CNLSE.

  11. Surface drift prediction in the Adriatic Sea using hyper-ensemble statistics on atmospheric, ocean and wave models: Uncertainties and probability distribution areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, E.; Signell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72??h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches. ?? 2007 NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC).

  12. Impact of Ion Acoustic Wave Instabilities in the Flow Field of a Hypersonic Vehicle on EM Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaliar, Saba; Sotnikov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Flow associated with a high speed air vehicle (HSAV) can get partially ionized. In the absence of external magnetic field the flow field turbulence is due to ion acoustic wave (IAW) instabilities. Our interest is in studying the impact of this turbulence on the radiation characteristics of EM signals from the HSAV. We decompose the radiated signal into coherent and diffuse parts. We find that the coherent part has the same spectrum as that of the source signal, but it is distorted because of dispersive coherent attenuation. The diffuse part is expressed as a convolution (in wavenumber and frequency) of the source signal with the spectrum of electron density fluctuations. This is a constrained convolution in the sense that the spectrum has to satisfy the IAW dispersion relation. A quantity that characterizes the flow is the mean free path (MFP). When the MFP is large compared to the thickness of the flow the coherent part is significant. If the MFP is larger than the thickness of the flow the diffuse part is the dominant part of the received signal. In the special case when the source signal frequency is close the electron plasma frequency, there can exist in the flow region Langmuir modes in addition to the EM modes. The radiation characteristics of EM source signals from the HSAV in this case are quite different.

  13. Exchange correlation effects on plasmons and on charge-density wave instability in narrow-band quasi-one-dimensional metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1979-05-01

    The coexistence of tight-binding and exchange-correlation effects inside each chain of a model quasi-one-dimensional metal, on both plasmon and charge density wave properties have been studied. The results, while in qualitative agreement with other treatments of the problem at long wavelengths, indicate a strong tendency for plasmons to turn into excitons at larger momenta, and to exhibit an ''excitonic'' charge-density wave instability at k approximately 2ksub(F). The nature of the plasmon branches and of the excitonic charge distortion is examined. Relevance to existing quasi-one-dimensional materials is also discussed. (author)

  14. Thresholds of parametric instabilities near the lower hybrid frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, R.L.; Perkins, F.W.

    1975-06-01

    Resonant decay instabilities of a pump wave with frequency ω 0 near the lower-hybrid frequency ω/sub LH/ are analyzed with respect to the wavenumber k of the decay waves and the ratio ω 0 /ω/sub LH/ to determine the decay process with the minimum threshold. It was found that the lowest thresholds are for decay into an electron plasma (lower hybrid) wave plus either a backward ion-cyclotron wave, an ion Bernstein wave, or a low frequency sound wave. For ω 0 less than (2ω/sub LH/)/sup 1 / 2 /, it was found that these decay processes can occur and have faster growth than ion quasimodes provided the drift velocity (cE 0 /B 0 ) is much less than the sound speed. In many cases of interest, electromagnetic corrections to the lower-hybrid wave rule out decay into all but short wavelength (k rho/sub i/ greater than 1) waves. The experimental results are consistent with the linear theory of parametric instabilities in a homogeneous plasma. (U.S.)

  15. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields.

  16. The Influence of Dust on the Farley-Buneman instability. Nonlinear regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara

    In the lower ionosphere in the E-region, a complex process transforms wind energy into currents creating the E-region electrojet. If these currents exceed a certain critical amplitude, a streaming instability called the Farley-Buneman or a collisional two-stream instability develops. This instability grows more rapidly at shorter wavelengths and the waves propagate nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is well known that even system with finite number of interacting waves can realize a turbulent state in active media. In such cases, when the number of cooperating waves remains small due to a competition of processes of their instability and attenuation, the turbulence appears in the result of their stochastic behavior. The perturbed ionospheric plasma is one of important example of such active media. The regimes of nonlinear stabilization of instability of low frequency waves in magnetized, weakly ionized and inhomogeneous ionospheric dusty plasma are considered. We make assumptions that the Earth magnetic field has no influence on the ions and on the dust particles so only the electrons are magnetized. If characteristic time of plasma density oscillations exceeds an electron collision frequency the basic is drift motion of electrons and, accordingly, the vector nonlinearity is the strongest. We study of nonlinear stabilization and influence of the dust component, conditions of stochasticity and the different regimes in the conditions when the number of interacting waves keeps small by the strong competition of processes wave damping and instabilities are considered. *This research is supported by KBN grant 0TOOA 01429 1. Meers Oppenheim and Niels Otani, Hybrid Simulations of the Saturated Farley-Buneman Instability in the Ionosphere, Geophysical Research Letters, 22, pp. 353-356, 1995 2. Meers Oppenheim and Niels Otani and Corrado Ronchi, Saturation of the Farley-Buneman instability via nonlinear electron ExB drifts, Journal of Geophysical Research, 101

  17. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichok, A. V.; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  18. Features of 3–7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations in F-layer vertical drift and equatorial spread F observed over two low-latitude stations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the equatorial atmosphere–ionosphere coupling system have shown that planetary-wave-type oscillations, as an important seeding mechanism for equatorial spread F (ESF, play an important role in ESF irregularity development and its day-to-day variability in the equatorial latitudes. In this study, ionosonde virtual height and ESF measurements over Sanya (18.4° N, 109.6° E; 12.8° N dip latitude and meteor radar neutral-wind measurements over Fuke (19.5° N, 109.1° E; 14° N dip latitude during 2013 are used to investigate the features of planetary-wave-type oscillations in both the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere and their possible influences on ESF occurrence under the weak solar maximum year. The ∼ 3-day and ∼ 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations have been observed in the neutral zonal winds and the time rate of change in F-layer virtual heights. According to the propagation characteristics, the 3-day and 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations are basically recognized as ultrafast and fast Kelvin waves, respectively. With increasing heights, the 3-day wave oscillations are gradually amplified, while the 7-day wave oscillations are generally constant. By performing a cross-wavelet transform on the onsets of ESF and the vertical drifts of the F layer, we found that there are simultaneously occurring 7-day and 3-day common wave oscillations between them. The 7-day waves are mainly in the inversion phase, while the 3-day waves are mostly in an in-phase state, indicating that the 7-day waves may play a main role in ESF initiation. Approximate delays of 6 days for the 7-day waves and 5 days for the 3-day waves in their propagation upward from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere are evaluated with wavelet power spectrum analysis. The estimated upward velocities from these time delays provide consistent evidence that the 7-day and 3-day waves propagate vertically upward with typical Kelvin wave

  19. Two-stream instabilities from the lower-hybrid frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency: application to the front of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschietti, Laurent; Lembège, Bertrand

    2017-09-01

    Quasi-perpendicular supercritical shocks are characterized by the presence of a magnetic foot due to the accumulation of a fraction of the incoming ions that is reflected by the shock front. There, three different plasma populations coexist (incoming ion core, reflected ion beam, electrons) and can excite various two-stream instabilities (TSIs) owing to their relative drifts. These instabilities represent local sources of turbulence with a wide frequency range extending from the lower hybrid to the electron cyclotron. Their linear features are analyzed by means of both a dispersion study and numerical PIC simulations. Three main types of TSI and correspondingly excited waves are identified: i. Oblique whistlers due to the (so-called fast) relative drift between reflected ions/electrons; the waves propagate toward upstream away from the shock front at a strongly oblique angle (θ ˜ 50°) to the ambient magnetic field Bo, have frequencies a few times the lower hybrid, and have wavelengths a fraction of the ion inertia length c/ωpi. ii. Quasi-perpendicular whistlers due to the (so-called slow) relative drift between incoming ions/electrons; the waves propagate toward the shock ramp at an angle θ a few degrees off 90°, have frequencies around the lower hybrid, and have wavelengths several times the electron inertia length c/ωpe. iii. Extended Bernstein waves which also propagate in the quasi-perpendicular domain, yet are due to the (so-called fast) relative drift between reflected ions/electrons; the instability is an extension of the electron cyclotron drift instability (normally strictly perpendicular and electrostatic) and produces waves with a magnetic component which have frequencies close to the electron cyclotron as well as wavelengths close to the electron gyroradius and which propagate toward upstream. Present results are compared with previous works in order to stress some features not previously analyzed and to define a more synthetic view of these TSIs.

  20. Electron-ion attachment induced instability of dust acoustic waves in the presence of ionization in a charge varying collisional dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2006-01-01

    Low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) instability with a significant background pressure of neutrals has been investigated in a collisional dusty plasma incorporating the dust charge relaxation and electron-ion attachment (recombination) onto dust grains using a self consistent theory. A long wavelength mode is found to be unstable due to electron-ion attachment on to the dust grains. Applications to experimental observations of low frequency fluctuation and the relevance of these results to 'void' in a laboratory gas discharge dusty plasma are briefly discussed

  1. Drift correction in a multichannel integrated optical Young interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ymeti, Aurel; Greve, Jan; Lambeck, Paul; Wijn, Robert Raimond; Heideman, Rene; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that in a sensor based on a multichannel Young interferometer, the phase information obtained for different pairs of channels can be used to correct the long-term instability (drift) due to temperature differences between measuring and reference channels, the drift in the alignment of

  2. Nonlinear turbulence theory and simulation of Buneman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, P. H.; Umeda, T.

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, the weak turbulence theory for reactive instabilities, formulated in a companion paper [P. H. Yoon, Phys. Plasmas 17, 112316 (2010)], is applied to the strong electron-ion two-stream (or Buneman) instability. The self-consistent theory involves quasilinear velocity space diffusion equation for the particles and nonlinear wave kinetic equation that includes quasilinear (or induced emission) term as well as nonlinear wave-particle interaction term (or a term that represents an induced scattering off ions). We have also performed one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation in order to benchmark the theoretical analysis. Under the assumption of self-similar drifting Gaussian distribution function for the electrons it is shown that the current reduction and the accompanying electron heating as well as electric field turbulence generation can be discussed in a self-consistent manner. Upon comparison with the Vlasov simulation result it is found that quasilinear wave kinetic equation alone is insufficient to account for the final saturation amplitude. Upon including the nonlinear scattering term in the wave kinetic equation, however, we find that a qualitative agreement with the simulation is recovered. From this, we conclude that the combined quasilinear particle diffusion plus induced emission and scattering (off ions) processes adequately account for the nonlinear development of the Buneman instability.

  3. Saturation of backward stimulated scattering of laser in kinetic regime: Wavefront bowing, trapped particle modulational instability, and trapped particle self-focusing of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Rose, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Backward stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering (SRS and SBS) of laser are examined in the kinetic regime using particle-in-cell simulations. The SRS reflectivity measured as a function of the laser intensity in a single hot spot from two-dimensional (2D) simulations shows a sharp onset at a threshold laser intensity and a saturated level at higher intensities, as obtained previously in Trident experiments [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2311 (2002)]. In these simulations, wavefront bowing of electron plasma waves (ion acoustic waves) due to the trapped particle nonlinear frequency shift, which increases with laser intensity, is observed in the SRS (SBS) regime for the first time. Self-focusing from trapped particle modulational instability (TPMI) [H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas 12, 12318 (2005)] is shown to occur in both two- and three-dimensional SRS simulations. The key physics underlying nonlinear saturation of SRS is identified as a combination of wavefront bowing, TPMI, and self-focusing of electron plasma waves. The wavefront bowing marks the beginning of SRS saturation and self-focusing alone is sufficient to terminate the SRS reflectivity, both effects resulting from cancellation of the source term for SRS and from greatly increased dissipation rate of the electron plasm waves. Ion acoustic wave bowing also contributes to the SBS saturation. Velocity diffusion by transverse modes and rapid loss of hot electrons in regions of small transverse extent formed from self-focusing lead to dissipation of the wave energy and an increase in the Landau damping rate in spite of strong electron trapping that reduces Landau damping initially. The ranges of wavelength and growth rate associated with transverse breakup of the electron-plasma wave are also examined in 2D speckle simulations as well as in 2D periodic systems from Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal equilibrium and are compared with theory predictions

  4. Drift-kinetic simulations of axisymmetric plasma transport at the edge of a divertor tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorf, M.; Dorr, M.; Ghosh, D.; Hittinger, J.; Lee, W.; Cohen, R.

    2017-10-01

    Eulerian kinetic calculations are presented for the axisymmetric cross-separatrix transport of plasma at the edge of a tokamak. The simulations are performed with a high-order finite-volume code COGENT that solves the full-F drift-kinetic equation for the ion species including the effects of fully-nonlinear Fokker-Plank ion-ion collisions. The ion kinetic response is coupled to two-dimensional self-consistent electrostatic potential variations, which are obtained from the vorticity equation with the isothermal fluid electron model. The paper also presents recent progress toward the full-edge turbulence code. The slab-geometry 5D version has recently become available and is successfully verified in simulations of the collisionless drift-wave instability. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. FIRE HOSE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Prague (Czech Republic); Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-10

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  6. Low frequency fluid drift turbulence in magnetised plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    2001-03-01

    We start with the first principles of fluid dynamics and classical electrodynamics and then find the regime in which we can reduce to quasineutral dynamics, which also implicitly underlies MHD. Then, we find the limits under which we can specialise to the MHD model as a subset, first of two fluid dynamics, then of the fluid drift dynamics that results when the motions are not vigorous enough to compress the magnetic field. In Chapters 4 and 5 we find the basic character of small disturbances in this system. Chapters 6 through 9 treat various aspects of fluid drift turbulence, also called drift wave turbulence, moving from a simple consideration of the underlying nonlinear dynamics, to some methods by which one can diagnose computations to find out what is going on, and then to the nonlinear instability which is the hallmark of this physics, and then to the interactions with large scale sheared flows. Chapter 10 introduces interchange turbulence, which is the plasma analog of the buoyant convection well known from fluid dynamics. Chapters 11 through 13 treat electromagnetic drift wave turbulence in closed magnetic field geometry, starting with a simplified model treating only the electron pressure and then introducing the electron and ion temperatures. Chapter 14 treats the basic characteristics of the transport that results from fluid drift turbulence, as this is quite different from the kinetic diffusion, such as heat conduction, that is more familiar. Appendices A and B treat the details of the numerical methods and models of magnetic field geometry necessary to treat all but the simplest cases. For this subject is dominated by nonlinear physics and therefore numerical computation. Computations therefore form an integral part of its study right from the beginning. Citations to the literature are not intended to be comprehensive but to serve as starting points for further reading, a section for which is included in every chapter. Much of this work is very new, and

  7. Effects of Alfvénic Drift on Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-03-01

    Non-detection of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters has challenged diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at weak collisionless shocks that are expected to form in the intracluster medium. As an effort to address this problem, we here explore possible roles of Alfvén waves self-excited via resonant streaming instability during the CR acceleration at parallel shocks. The mean drift of Alfvén waves may either increase or decrease the scattering center compression ratio, depending on the postshock cross-helicity, leading to either flatter or steeper CR spectra. We first examine such effects at planar shocks, based on the transport of Alfvén waves in the small amplitude limit. For the shock parameters relevant to cluster shocks, Alfvénic drift flattens the CR spectrum slightly, resulting in a small increase of the CR acceleration efficiency, η. We then consider two additional, physically motivated cases: (1) postshock waves are isotropized via MHD and plasma processes across the shock transition, and (2) postshock waves contain only forward waves propagating along with the flow due to a possible gradient of CR pressure behind the shock. In these cases, Alfvénic drift could reduce η by as much as a factor of five for weak cluster shocks. For the canonical parameters adopted here, we suggest η ∼ 10‑4–10‑2 for shocks with sonic Mach number M s ≈ 2–3. The possible reduction of η may help ease the tension between non-detection of γ-rays from galaxy clusters and DSA predictions.

  8. Unidirectionally propagating whistler waves in the solar wind: Particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seough, J.

    2017-12-01

    The right-handed circularly polarized whistler fluctuations have often been observed in a free solar wind region. Interestingly, the measured whistlers propagate preferentially anti-sunward and appear to be characterized by nearly unidirectional propagation quasi-parallel to the local mean magnetic field at propagation angles smaller than 20o. Even though the solar wind electrons including the core and halo components possess temperature anisotropies that could drive the whistler instability, the free energy source of locally generated whistler waves is thought to be heat flux instability due to its unidirectional property. The purpose of this study is to present the possibility that not only heat flux instability but also whistler instability could be a local source of unidirectional whistler wave generation in the solar wind. By making use of both linear Vlasov analysis and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation, we show that unidirectionally propagating whistler waves can be naturally generated in situ by electron core temperature anisotropy-driven whistler instability when one takes into account the core-halo relative drift velocity in the proton rest frame. We also carry out particle-in-cell simulations of heat flux instability and compare between the two possible instabilities for understanding nonlinear property such as wave-particle interaction, especially halo electrons and whistler waves.

  9. Rotational instability in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Gribble, R.F.; McKenna, K.F.; Miller, G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The m=1 ''wobble'' instability of the plasma column in a 5-m linear theta pinch has been studied using an axial array of orthogonally viewing position detectors to resolve the wavelength and frequency of the column motion. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical predictions that include finite Larmor orbit effects. The frequency and wavelength characteristics at saturation agree with the predicted dispersion relation for a plasma rotating faster than the diamagnetic drift speed. Measurements of the magnetic fields at the ends of the pinch establish the existence of currents flowing in such a way that they short out the radial electric fields in the plasma column. The magnitude of rotation, the observed delay in the onset of m=1 motion, and the magnitude of end-shorting currents can all be understood in terms of the torsional Alfven waves that communicate to the central plasma column the information that the ends have been shorted. The same waves are responsible for the torque which rotates the plasma and leads to the observed m=1 instability. Observations of the plasma in the presence of solid end plugs indicate a stabilization of high-m number modes and a reduction of the m=1 amplitude

  10. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew; Gras, Slawek; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana X; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Adams, Carl; Aston, Stuart; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; Pele, Arnaud; Romie, Janeen; Thomas, Michael; Thorne, Keith; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Sigg, Daniel; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Heinze, Matthew; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-04-24

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this Letter, we describe the first observation of parametric instability in a gravitational wave detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  11. New insights from a nonlocal generalization of the Farley-Buneman instability problem at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Drexler

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available When their growth rate becomes too small, the E-region Farley-Buneman and gradient-drift instabilities switch from absolute to convective. The neutral density gradient is what gives the instabilities their convective character. At high latitudes, the orientation of the neutral density gradient is close to the geomagnetic field direction. We show that this causes the wave-vector component along the geomagnetic field to increase with time. This in turn leads to wave stabilization, since the increase goes hand-in-hand with an increase in parallel electric fields that ultimately short-circuits the irregularities. We show that from an equivalent point of view, the increase in the parallel wave vector is accompanied by a large upward group velocity that limits the time during which the perturbations are allowed to grow before escaping the unstable region. The goal of the present work is to develop a systematic formalism to account for the propagation and the growth/decay of high-latitude Farley-Buneman and gradient-drift waves through vertical convective effects. We note that our new formalism shies away from a plane wave decomposition along the magnetic field direction. A study of the solution to the resulting nonlinear aspect angle equation shows that, for a host of initial conditions, jump conditions are often triggered in the parallel wave-vector (defined here as the vertical derivative of the phase. When these jump conditions occur, the waves turn into strongly damped ion-acoustic modes, and their evolution is quickly terminated. We have limited this first study to Farley-Buneman modes and to a flow direction parallel to the electron E × B drift. Our initial findings indicate that, irrespective of whether or not a jump in aspect angle is triggered by initial conditions, the largest amplitude modes are usually near the ion-acoustic speed of the medium (although Doppler shifted by the ion motion, unless the growth rates are small, in which case

  12. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  13. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  14. Observations of Large-Amplitude, Parallel, Electrostatic Waves Associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Newman, D. L.; Eriksson, S.; Stawarz, J. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Goodrich, K. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Malaspina, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 8 September 2015, the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered a Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetopause near the dusk flank. The spacecraft observed periodic compressed current sheets, between which the plasma was turbulent. We present observations of large-amplitude (up to 100 mVm) oscillations in the electric field. Because these oscillations are purely parallel to the background magnetic field, electrostatic, and below the ion plasma frequency, they are likely to be ion acoustic-like waves. These waves are observed in a turbulent plasma where multiple particle populations are intermittently mixed, including cold electrons with energies less than 10 eV. Stability analysis suggests a cold electron component is necessary for wave growth.

  15. Propagation of arbitrary initial wave packets in a quantum parametric oscillator: Instability zones for higher order moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subhadip; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the dynamics of a particle in a parametric oscillator with a view to exploring any quantum feature of the initial wave packet that shows divergent (in time) behaviour for parameter values where the classical motion dynamics of the mean position is bounded. We use Ehrenfest's theorem to explore the dynamics of nth order moment which reduces exactly to a linear non autonomous differential equation of order n + 1. It is found that while the width and skewness of the packet is unbounded exactly in the zones where the classical motion is unbounded, the kurtosis of an initially non-gaussian wave packet can become infinitely large in certain additional zones. This implies that the shape of the wave packet can change drastically with time in these zones.

  16. Analysis of plasma instabilities and verification of the BOUT code for the Large Plasma Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, P.; Carter, T. A.; Friedman, B.; Umansky, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    The properties of linear instabilities in the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] are studied both through analytic calculations and solving numerically a system of linearized collisional plasma fluid equations using the three-dimensional fluid code BOUT[M. Umansky et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 180, 887 (2009)], which has been successfully modified to treat cylindrical geometry. Instability drive from plasma pressure gradients and flows is considered, focusing on resistive drift waves and the Kelvin-Helmholtz and rotational interchange instabilities. A general linear dispersion relation for partially ionized collisional plasmas including these modes is derived and analyzed. For Large Plasma Device relevant profiles including strongly driven flows, it is found that all three modes can have comparable growth rates and frequencies. Detailed comparison with solutions of the analytic dispersion relation demonstrates that BOUT accurately reproduces all characteristics of linear modes in this system.

  17. Evidence and effects of a wave-driven nonlinear current in the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oppenheim

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric two-stream waves and gradient-drift waves nonlinearly drive a large-scale (D.C. current in the E-region ionosphere. This current flows parallel to, and with a comparable magnitude to, the fundamental Pedersen current. Evidence for the existence and magnitude of wave-driven currents derives from a theoretical understanding of E-region waves, supported by a series of nonlinear 2D simulations of two-stream waves and by data collected by rocket instruments in the equatorial electrojet. Wave-driven currents will modify the large-scale dynamics of the equatorial electrojet during highly active periods. A simple model shows how a wave-driven current appreciably reduces the horizontally flowing electron current of the electrojet. This reduction may account for the observation that type-I radar echoes almost always have a Doppler velocity close to the acoustic speed, and also for the rocket observation that electrojet regions containing gradient-drift waves do not appear also to contain horizontally propagating two-stream waves. Additionally, a simple model of a gradient-drift instability shows that wave-driven currents can cause nonsinusoidal electric fields similar to those measured in situ.

  18. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  19. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  20. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  1. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  2. Nonlinear analysis of generalized cross-field current instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, P.H.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the generalized cross-field current instability is carried out in which cross-field drift of both the ions and electrons and their temperatures are permitted to vary in time. The unstable mode under consideration is the electromagnetic generalization of the classical modified-two-stream instability. The generalized instability is made of the modified-two-stream and ion-Weibel modes. The relative importance of the features associated with the ion-Weibel mode and those of the modified-two-stream mode is assessed. Specific applications are made to the Earth's neutral sheet prior to substorm onset and to the Earth's bow shock. The numerical solution indicates that the ion-Weibel mode dominates in the Earth's neutral sheet environment. In contrast, the situation for the bow shock is dominated by the modified-two-stream mode. Notable differences are found between the present calculation and previous results on ion-Weibel mode which restrict the analysis to only parallel propagating waves. However, in the case of Earth's bow shock for which the ion-Weibel mode plays no important role, the inclusion of the electromagnetic ion response is found to differ little from the previous results which treats ions responding only to the electrostatic component of the excited waves

  3. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  4. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  5. Interacting spiral waves in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1999-12-01

    We study the interaction of meandering spiral waves within the framework of a modified Oregonator model for the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii medium. In this medium the local excitation threshold can be controlled by varying the intensity of incident light. At low as well as sufficiently high light intensity we find stable axis-symmetric bound states consisting of two counterrotating spirals. At intensity values in between, spiral pairs undergo a symmetry-breaking instability, leading to one spiral suppressing and expelling the other. To avoid the instability, we consider a spiral wave interacting with its mirror image close to a plane boundary impermeable to diffusion. The drift velocity and the drift direction of those pseudobound states parallel to the boundary are strongly influenced by the light intensity.

  6. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  7. Magnetopause Waves Controlling the Dynamics of Earth’s Magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Joo Hwang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Earth’s magnetopause separating the fast and often turbulent magnetosheath and the relatively stagnant magnetosphere provides various forms of free energy that generate low-frequency surface waves. The source mechanism of this energy includes current-driven kinetic physical processes such as magnetic reconnection on the dayside magnetopause and flux transfer events drifting along the magnetopause, and velocity shear-driven (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or density/ pressure gradient-driven (Rayleigh-Taylor instability magnetohydro-dynamics (MHD instabilities. The solar wind external perturbations (impulsive transient pressure pulses or quasi-periodic dynamic pressure variations act as seed fluctuations for the magnetopause waves and trigger ULF pulsations inside the magnetosphere via global modes or mode conversion at the magnetopause. The magnetopause waves thus play an important role in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, which is the key to space weather. This paper presents recent findings regarding the generation of surface waves (e.g., Kelvin- Helmholtz waves at the Earth’s magnetopause and analytic and observational studies accountable for the linking of the magnetopause waves and inner magnetospheric ULF pulsations, and the impacts of magnetopause waves on the dynamics of the magnetopause and on the inner magnetosphere.

  8. Diffusion by Infragravity Stokes Drift Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P.; Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.; Kirshner, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The group-scale variability of ocean waves variability drives infragravity Stokes drift fluctuations, which are important for small-scale diffusion of passive tracers (to the order of a few kilometers), and can thus be important for the break-up and dispersion of e.g. oil spills or sewage outflow, and coastal transport in general. The implications of this were first considered theoretically by Herterich and Hasselmann (1982, JPO), who demonstrated that on small scales, wave diffusion can compete with other upper ocean diffusive processes, but their theory has thus far not been extensively validated with field observations. To investigate drift fluctuations and wave-induced diffusion, we consider the wave-induced dispersion of a cluster of O(10) buoys. The experiment, conducted offshore of San Francisco, uses a cluster of Lagrangian drifters equipped with fast-sampling GPS sensor packages, to accurately resolve both the surface wave motions, and directly measure the Lagrangian dynamics, including surface drift fluctuations. We revisit the Herterich and Hasselmann theory, expand it to include shallow water and variable wave conditions, and compare the theoretical predictions with the new observations.

  9. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic...

  10. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  11. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  12. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Filippov, B. P.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Prestage, N. P.; Temmer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al., 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate for a source of the superstorm being able to produce, at most, a glancing blow on the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis confirms free propagation of shock waves revealed in the event and reconciles their kinematics with "EUV waves" and dynamic radio spectra up to decameters.

  13. Drift estimation for single marker switching based imaging schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Claudia; Hotz, Thomas; Schönle, Andreas; Hell, Stefan W; Munk, Axel; Egner, Alexander

    2012-03-26

    In recent years, the diffraction barrier in fluorescence imaging has been broken and optical nanoscopes now routinely image with resolutions of down to 20 nm, an improvement of more than 10 fold. Because this allows imaging much smaller features and because all super-resolution approaches trade off speed for spatial resolution, mechanical instabilities of the microscopes become a limiting factor. Here, we propose a fully data-driven statistical registration method for drift detection and drift correction for single marker switching (SMS) imaging schemes, including a guideline for parameter choice and quality checks of the drift analysis. The necessary assumptions about the drift are minimal, allowing a model-free approach, but more specific models can easily be integrated. We determine the resulting performance on standard SMS measurements and show that the drift determination can be routinely brought to the range of precision achievable by fiducial marker-tracking methods.

  14. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  15. Instability growth rates of crossing sea states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine-Pearson, F E

    2010-03-01

    Crossing sea states can occur during adverse weather conditions. The instability of such wave trains has been suggested as a possible mechanism for the formation of rogue (freak or extreme) waves. One model for crossing sea states is weakly nonlinear and finite-amplitude short-crested waves (SCWs) on deep water. SCWs are the resonant interaction of two wave systems each with a different direction of propagation. Recently, it has been shown that the stability of these wave interactions is closely associated with the stability of the oblique nonresonant interaction between two waves. The long-wave instability of such waves is considered here; SCWs are used as a benchmark. By using a mismatch of amplitudes, it is demonstrated that instability growth rates of two crossing waves can be larger than those given by SCWs. This indicates that only considering true resonant interactions can underestimate the contribution from unstable crossing sea states to the possible formation of rogue waves.

  16. Drift in Diffusion Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Marchesoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The longstanding problem of Brownian transport in a heterogeneous quasi one-dimensional medium with space-dependent self-diffusion coefficient is addressed in the overdamped (zero mass limit. A satisfactory mesoscopic description is obtained in the Langevin equation formalism by introducing an appropriate drift term, which depends on the system macroscopic observables, namely the diffuser concentration and current. The drift term is related to the microscopic properties of the medium. The paradoxical existence of a finite drift at zero current suggests the possibility of designing a Maxwell demon operating between two equilibrium reservoirs at the same temperature.

  17. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    . We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  18. Theory of suppression of loss cone instabilities by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.; Sinha, M.

    1981-01-01

    A new mechanism for the suppression of Drift Cyclotron Loss Cone instabilities by electron beams injected along the field lines is given. The mechanism explains some of the recent observations. (author)

  19. Continental drift before 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  20. A general approach to optomechanical parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.; Barsotti, L.; Fritschel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple feedback description of parametric instabilities which can be applied to a variety of optical systems. Parametric instabilities are of particular interest to the field of gravitational-wave interferometry where high mechanical quality factors and a large amount of stored optical power have the potential for instability. In our use of Advanced LIGO as an example application, we find that parametric instabilities, if left unaddressed, present a potential threat to the stability of high-power operation.

  1. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  2. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  3. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind: A short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, Lorenzo, E-mail: l.matteini@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-25

    We know from in situ measurements that solar wind plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. Distribution functions of its main constituents -electrons, protons, and alpha particles-show several departures from Maxwellian, including temperature anisotropy, relative drifts and secondary populations streaming along the local magnetic field. We present a short review of recent solar wind observations of these non-thermal features and associated signatures of wave-particle interactions. Several kinetic instabilities are expected to be at work in the solar wind during its expansion, playing a role in the continuous shaping of particle distributions with distance, and regulating the macroscopic behavior of the plasma. Over the past years, modeling of these processes by means of numerical simulations has been successful in reproducing and explaining the observations; these include the evolution of the plasma due to radial expansion and the response of individual species to different kinetic instabilities. Finally, the impact of local inhomogeneities, like current sheets and turbulence, on the development of kinetic instabilities is also discussed.

  4. Flute instability growth on a magnetized plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of the flute-type instability for a field-aligned plasma column immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied. Particle-in-cell simulations are compared with a semi-analytic dispersion analysis of the drift cyclotron instability in cylindrical geometry with a Gaussian density profile in the radial direction. For the parameters considered here, the dispersion analysis gives a local maximum for the peak growth rates as a function of R/r i , where R is the Gaussian characteristic radius and r i is the ion gyroradius. The electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation results give azimuthal and radial mode numbers that are in reasonable agreement with the dispersion analysis. The electrostatic simulations give linear growth rates that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis results, while the electromagnetic simulations yield growth rate trends that are similar to the dispersion analysis but that are not in quantitative agreement. These differences are ascribed to higher initial field fluctuation levels in the electromagnetic field solver. Overall, the simulations allow the examination of both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability in this physical system up to and beyond the point of wave energy saturation

  5. Integral-equation formulation for drift eigenmodes in cylindrically symmetric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsker, R.

    1980-12-01

    A method for solving the integral eigenmode equation for drift waves in cylindrical (or slab) geometry is presented. A leading-order kinematic effect that has been noted in the past, but incorrectly ignored in recent integral-equation calculations, is incorporated. The present method also allows electrons to be treated with a physical mass ratio (unlike earlier work that is restricted to artificially small m/sub i//m/sub e/ owing to resolution limitations). Results for the universal mode and for the ion-temperature-gradient driven mode are presented. The kinematic effect qualitatively changes the spectrum of the ion mode, and a new second region of instability for k/sub perpendicular to/rho/sub i/greater than or equal to 1 is found

  6. Fluid aspects of electron streaming instability in electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, C.-S.; Hau, L.-N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons streaming in a background electron and ion plasma may lead to the formation of electrostatic solitary wave (ESW) and hole structure which have been observed in various space plasma environments. Past studies on the formation of ESW are mostly based on the particle simulations due to the necessity of incorporating particle's trapping effects. In this study, the fluid aspects and thermodynamics of streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas including bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities are addressed based on the comparison between fluid theory and the results from particle-in-cell simulations. The energy closure adopted in the fluid model is the polytropic law of d(pρ −γ )/dt=0 with γ being a free parameter. Two unstable modes are identified for the bump-on-tail instability and the growth rates as well as the dispersion relation of the streaming instabilities derived from the linear theory are found to be in good agreement with the particle simulations for both bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities. At the nonlinear saturation, 70% of the electrons are trapped inside the potential well for the drift velocity being 20 times of the thermal velocity and the pρ −γ value is significantly increased. Effects of ion to electron mass ratio on the linear fluid theory and nonlinear simulations are also examined

  7. Resonant Drag Instabilities in protoplanetary disks: the streaming instability and new, faster-growing instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2018-04-01

    We identify and study a number of new, rapidly growing instabilities of dust grains in protoplanetary disks, which may be important for planetesimal formation. The study is based on the recognition that dust-gas mixtures are generically unstable to a Resonant Drag Instability (RDI), whenever the gas, absent dust, supports undamped linear modes. We show that the "streaming instability" is an RDI associated with epicyclic oscillations; this provides simple interpretations for its mechanisms and accurate analytic expressions for its growth rates and fastest-growing wavelengths. We extend this analysis to more general dust streaming motions and other waves, including buoyancy and magnetohydrodynamic oscillations, finding various new instabilities. Most importantly, we identify the disk "settling instability," which occurs as dust settles vertically into the midplane of a rotating disk. For small grains, this instability grows many orders of magnitude faster than the standard streaming instability, with a growth rate that is independent of grain size. Growth timescales for realistic dust-to-gas ratios are comparable to the disk orbital period, and the characteristic wavelengths are more than an order of magnitude larger than the streaming instability (allowing the instability to concentrate larger masses). This suggests that in the process of settling, dust will band into rings then filaments or clumps, potentially seeding dust traps, high-metallicity regions that in turn seed the streaming instability, or even overdensities that coagulate or directly collapse to planetesimals.

  8. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  9. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  10. Micro-instability physics as illuminated by the ST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, C. M.; Applegate, D. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W. D.; Joiner, N.

    2005-01-01

    Spherical tokamaks (STs) have attractive features for fusion, and there is considerable interest in understanding their transport properties, which are likely to be determined by the underlying micro-instabilities. Inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and . effects are large in STs, and are known to have important influences on the particle dynamics and the nature of the underlying micro-instabilities respectively. Gyrokinetic micro stability calculations, using the flux-tube geometry code GS2, are presented for a number of ST equilibria, some closely resembling those from the MAST experiment. These calculations are performed both with and without electromagnetic effects (which are fully included in GS2). In a modest . MAST equilibrium, ion temperature gradient driven drift waves (ITG) are close to being stabilised by sheared equilibrium ... flows, but electron temperature gradient driven drift waves (ETG) have stronger growth rates and cannot usually be stabilised in this way. Electromagnetic effects, even in this relatively low . equilibrium, appear to give rise to longer perpendicular wavelength tearing parity modes in the plasma core [1]. Micro stability analyses are also presented for higher . equilibria, including that proposed for a conceptual ST power plant, where tearing parity modes are found over wide ranges of perpendicular length scales. Mixing length estimates from linear calculations may suggest the level of the transport coefficients, but nonlinear calculations are required to derive the heat and particle fluxes self-consistently. The status of these computations, which are particularly challenging in today's STs. will be reviewed, and the issues that must be resolved in the future in order to improve these calculations will be outlined. (Author)

  11. Low-frequency instabilities of a warm plasma in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F.; Hollweg, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The marginal stability of a plasma carrying current along the static magnetic field with isotropic Maxwellian ions and isotropic Maxwellian electrons drifting relative to the ions is investigated. The complete electromagnetic dispersion relation is studied using numerical techniques; the electron sums are restricted to three terms which limits the analysis to frequencies much less than the electron gyro-frequency, but includes frequencies somewhat above the ion gyro-frequency. A 'kink-like' instability and an instability of the Alfven mode are found to have the lowest threshold drift velocities in most cases. In fact the threshold drift for the kink-like instability can be significantly less than the ion thermal speed. Electrostatic and electromagnetic ion-cyclotron instabilities are also found as well as the electro-static ion-acoustic instability. No instability of the fast magnetosonic mode was found. The stability analysis provides only threshold drift velocities and gives no information about growth rates. (author)

  12. Algorithm and exploratory study of the Hall MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, Thomas Anthony

    2010-09-01

    This report is concerned with the influence of the Hall term on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. This begins with a review of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the Hall term and the wave modes which are present in the system on time scales short enough that the plasma can be approximated as being stationary. In this limit one obtains what are known as the electron MHD (EMHD) equations which support two characteristic wave modes known as the whistler and Hall drift modes. Each of these modes is considered in some detail in order to draw attention to their key features. This analysis also serves to provide a background for testing the numerical algorithms used in this work. The numerical methods are briefly described and the EMHD solver is then tested for the evolution of whistler and Hall drift modes. These methods are then applied to study the nonlinear evolution of the MHD RT instability with and without the Hall term for two different configurations. The influence of the Hall term on the mixing and bubble growth rate are analyzed.

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  14. Large planar drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, Gérard; Bréhin, S; Devaux, B; Diamant-Berger, Alain M; Leschevin, C; Maillard, J; Malbequi, Y; Martin, H; Patoux, A; Pelle, J; Plancoulaine, J; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René

    1977-01-01

    The authors describe 14 m/sup 2/ hexagonal planar drift chambers designed for the neutrino experiment of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg- Saclay Collaboration. Details on mechanical construction, electronic read-out, results on efficiency and accuracy are presented. (6 refs).

  15. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  16. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  17. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  18. Carpal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Phase space evolution in linear instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantellini, F. G. E.; Burgess, D.; Schwartz, S. J.

    1994-12-01

    A simple and powerful way to investigate the linear evolution of particle distribution functions in kinetic instabilities in a homogeneous collisionless plasma is presented. The method can be applied to any kind of instability, provided the characteristics (growth rate, frequency, wave vector, and polarization) of the mode are known and can also be used to estimate the amplitude of the waves at the end of the linear phase of growth. Two didactic examples are used to illustrate the versatility of the technique: the Alfvén Ion Cyclotron (AIC) instability, which is electromagnetic, and the Electron Ion Cyclotron (EIC) instability, which is electrostatic.

  20. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. The linear and nonlinear collective modes in electron-positron plasma have been investigated theoretically [3–6]. Recently, Oohara and Hatakeyama [7] have developed a novel method for generating a pair plasma con- sisting of only negative and positive ions with equal mass ...

  1. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-1, Block-AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India. 3Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, .... In writing the above equations, the quasineutrality condition is used. Let us consider the low frequency, ω ≪. ± (=|e| B0/cm±), long wavelength,.

  2. Anomalous momentum transport from drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, R.R.; Staebler, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    A sheared slab magnetic field model B = B 0 [z + (x/L s )y], with inhomogeneous flows in the y and z directions, is used to perform a fully-kinetic stability analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and dissipative trapped electron (DTE) modes. The concomitant quasilinear stress components that couple to the local perpendicular (y-component) and parallel (z-component) momentum transport are also calculated and the anomalous perpendicular and parallel viscous stresses obtained. A breakdown of the ITG-induced perpendicular viscous stress is generally observed at moderate values of the sheared perpendicular flow. The ITG-induced parallel viscous stress is generally larger and strongly dependent on the sheared flows. The DTE-induced perpendicular viscous stress may sometimes be negative, tending to cancel the ITG contributions while the DTE-induced parallel viscous stress is generally small. The effect of the perpendicular stress component in the momentum balance equations is generally small while the parallel stress component can dominate the usual neoclassical viscous stress terms. The dominant contribution to parallel viscous stress by the ITG mode suggests that bulk plasma toroidal momentum confinement, like energy confinement, is governed by an anomalous ion loss mechanism. Furthermore, the large anomalous effect suggests that the neoclassical explanation of poloidal flows in tokamaks may be incorrect. The present results are in general agreement with existing experimental observations on momentum transport in tokamaks

  3. Zonal Flows Driven by Small-Scale Drift-Alfven Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dehui; Zhou Deng

    2011-01-01

    Generation of zonal flows by small-scale drift-Alfven modes is investigated by adopting the approach of parametric instability with the electron polarization drift included. The zonal mode can be excited by primary modes propagating at both electron and ion diamagnetic drift directions in contrast to the assertion in previous studies that only primary modes propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift directions can drive zonal instabilities. Generally, the growth rate of the driven zonal mode is in the same order as that in previous study. However, different from the previous work, the growth rate is no longer proportional to the difference between the diamagnetic drift frequencies of electrons and ions. (magnetically confined plasma)

  4. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  5. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  6. Energy of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.

    1975-01-01

    A new definition of the sign of wave energy is given, which is valid where the old definition based on an expansion procedure breaks down. It is shown that a beam-plasma wave does not produce explosive instabilities

  7. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  8. Analysis of turbulence within the front of a quasi-perpendicular shock: two-stream instabilities analyzed with 2D full PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembege, B.; Muschietti, L.

    2017-12-01

    Supercritical shocks in collisionless plasmas are characterized by the presence of a sizable fraction of ions that are reflected off of the shock front and form a foot upstream of the shock ramp. These ions which carry a significant amount of energy are the source of microturbulence within the shock front itself and play a key role in transforming the directed bulk energy (upstream) into thermal energy (downstream). For quasi-perpendicular shock geometries, the speed of the reflected ions is mostly directed at 90° to the magnetic field. Streaming instabilities can develop within the shock's foot, which are excited by the relative drifts between incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons across Bo. Recent linear dispersion analysis and 1D full particle simulations [Muschietti et Lembege, Ann. Geophys., 2017] have identified three types of emissions: (i) one is the oblique extension of the ECDI (electron cyclotron drift instability) defined initially for 90°, and two types of whistler waves that propagate (ii) in the quasi-perpendicular domain and (iii) at strongly oblique angles. Herein, 2D full particle simulations are performed in order to analyze how these different waves can coexist and possibly couple with each other, and to determine the resulting wave emissions in their linear and nonlinear stages. Main results will be extracted for a possible comparison with high-resolution wave measurements issued from the recent MMS mission.

  9. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucci, G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are usually studied either in bounded regions or free to grow in space. In this article we review the experimental results of an intermediate situation, in which an instability develops in deformable domains. The Faraday instability, which consists in the formation of surface waves on a liquid experiencing a vertical forcing, is triggered in floating liquid lenses playing the role of deformable domains. Faraday waves deform the lenses from the initial circular shape and the mutual adaptation of instability patterns with the lens boundary is observed. Two archetypes of behaviour have been found. In the first archetype a stable elongated shape is reached, the wave vector being parallel to the direction of elongation. In the second archetype the waves exceed the response of the lens border and no equilibrium shape is reached. The lens stretches and eventually breaks into fragments that have a complex dynamics. The difference between the two archetypes is explained by the competition between the radiation pressure the waves exert on the lens border and its response due to surface tension.

  10. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  11. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  12. Eulearian approach to bounce-transit and drift resonance with magnetic drifts in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, Ker Chung; Seol, J.; Chu, M. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Bounce-transit and drift resonance can be important to plasma confinement in tokamaks with broken symmetry, and can have implications on the wave-particle resonance. Usually, the resonance is either treated by integrating along the unperturbed orbits or calculated using an action-angle approach. An Eulerian approach has been developed so that momentum conservation property of the Coulomb collision operator can be taken into account. The parallel flows appear in the thermodynamic forces in the Eulerian approach. However, in the existing theory, only E × B drift is kept; the magnetic drifts are neglected by adopting the large aspect ratio assumption. Here, E is the electric field, and B is the magnetic field. The importance of the magnetic drifts in finite aspect ratio tokamaks is demonstrated in. Here, the Eulerian approach is extended to include the magnetic drifts to calculate neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in finite aspect ratio tokamaks. The relation to the nonlinear plasma viscosity in the plateau regime will also be discussed. This work was supported by Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology under Grant No. 100-2112-M-006-004-MY3, and Republic of Korea MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning) under KSTAR program.

  13. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  14. Ionospheric modification and parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Thresholds and linear growth rates for stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering and for the parametric decay instability are derived by using arguments of energy transfer. For this purpose an expression for the ponderomotive force is derived. Conditions under which the partial pressure force due to differential dissipation exceeds the ponderomotive force are also discussed. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are weakly excited by existing incoherent backscatter radars. The parametric decay instability is strongly excited in ionospheric heating experiments. Saturation theories of the parametric decay instability are therefore described. After a brief discussion of the purely growing instability the effect of using several pumps is discussed as well as the effects of inhomogenicity. Turning to detailed theories of ionospheric heating, artificial spread F is discussed in terms of a purely growing instability where the nonlinearity is due to dissipation. Field-aligned short-scale striations are explained in terms of dissipation of the parametrically excited Langmuir waves (plasma oscillations): they might be further amplified by an explosive instability (except the magnetic equator). Broadband absorption is probably responsible for the 'overshoot' effect: the initially observed level of parametrically excited Langmuir waves is much higher than the steady state level

  15. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So, E-mail: sohirata@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree–Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree–Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund’s rule, a singlet instability in Jahn–Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  16. Study of three-mode parametric instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Fengchao; Zhao Chunnong; Gras, Slawomir; Ju Li; Blair, D G

    2010-01-01

    The effect of parametric instability in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors is a potential problem for their proper operation. Great efforts have been made to study the onset of parametric instabilities and to find ways to control them. Here we present an experimental design for studying parametric instability in a 72 m cavity with suspended high quality fused silica mirrors. With 5 W input power and 20 kW circulation power inside the cavity, it is predicted that parametric instability will occur. The resonant condition of parametric instability can be met by thermally tuning the radius of curvature of a test mass. We will present simulation results of parametric gains for different radii of curvature of a test mass. The simulation results will provide the basis for designing the thermal tuning and observation parametric instability experiments. This will provide a test bed for studying parametric instability and its control for next generation detectors.

  17. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimik, Soling; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re-entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral- or scroll-wave frequency ω, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane potential of the fibroblast and the number of fibroblasts attached to the myocytes on the stability of these waves. Finally, we show that the presence of GFDs can lead to the formation of spiral waves at high-frequency pacing.

  18. Analytical modeling of two-phase flow instability in parallel boiling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, X.; Xuejun, C.; Mingyuan, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Research on two-phase flow instabilities is of great importance for power and nuclear industries. Parallel channel boiling systems are most commonly used, for instance, in steam generators and boilers. Thus, to study the stability of these systems is very useful, especially for safety consideration. This paper is concerned with the analytical modeling of density-wave instability in parallel vertical boiling channels with or without cross-connections. A mathematical model is developed to analyze the system stability in the frequency domain by means of multivariable control system theory. Based on drift-flux model, this analysis accounts for subcooled boiling, arbitrary heat flux distribution, turbulent mixing and arbitrary flow paths for cross-connection, and thermodynamic nonequilibrium in different flow regions, etc.. The drift-flux model conservation equations, together with other constitutive relations including those for cross-connections are integrated in subsections, then perturbed and linearized and Laplace-transformed around the system's steadystate operation parameters. Finally, the multivariable nodal equations are obtained and cast into matrix forms, from which the characteristic equations for evaluation of the system's stability are deduced. And the coupling effects between channels, and between channels and external loop can be considered

  19. ABSTRACTION OF DRIFT SEEPAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Drift seepage refers to flow of liquid water into repository emplacement drifts, where it can potentially contribute to degradation of the engineered systems and release and transport of radionuclides within the drifts. Because of these important effects, seepage into emplacement drifts is listed as a ''principal factor for the postclosure safety case'' in the screening criteria for grading of data in Attachment 1 of AP-3.15Q, Rev. 2, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''. Abstraction refers to distillation of the essential components of a process model into a form suitable for use in total-system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this analysis/model is to put the information generated by the seepage process modeling in a form appropriate for use in the TSPA for the Site Recommendation. This report also supports the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report. The scope of the work is discussed below. This analysis/model is governed by the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000a). Details of this activity are in Addendum A of the technical work plan. The original Work Direction and Planning Document is included as Attachment 7 of Addendum A. Note that the Work Direction and Planning Document contains tasks identified for both Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO). Only the PAO tasks are documented here. The planning for the NEPO activities is now in Addendum D of the same technical work plan and the work is documented in a separate report (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The Project has been reorganized since the document was written. The responsible organizations in the new structure are the Performance Assessment Department and the Unsaturated Zone Department, respectively. The work plan for the seepage abstraction calls for determining an appropriate abstraction methodology, determining uncertainties in seepage, and providing

  20. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  1. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime

  2. Self-field effects on instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with an axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi, E-mail: mohsenpour@umz.ac.ir; Rezaee Rami, Omme Kolsoum [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Free electron lasers (FEL) play major roles in the Raman Regime, due to the charge and current densities of the beam self-field. The method of perturbation has been applied to study the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. A dispersion relation for two-stream free electron lasers with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field has been found. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to investigate the influence of self-fields on the FEL coupling and the two-stream instability. It was found that self-fields can produce very large effects on the FEL coupling, but they have almost negligible effects on two-stream instability.

  3. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  4. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  5. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  6. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  7. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  8. Curvature-induced electrostatic drift modes in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with a number of problems in the theory of linear stability of a hot, fully ionized plasma immersed in a strong magnetic field. The most widely used system to magnetically confine a plasma is the tokamak. This is a toroidal, current carrying device with a strong, externally imposed, magnetic field. The author discusses the linear theory of unstable, low-frequency waves in the gradient region, restricted to electrostatic waves. In that case the resulting radial fluxes of particles and energy are due to electric cross-field drifts. In the presence of magnetic fluctuations and small-scale reconnection phenomena, radial transport could also be predominantly along field lines. At present, it is not clear which of the two mechanisms is the dominant feature of the observed anomalous transport. First, the author introduces the theory of drift waves in toroidal geometry. Next, the electrostratic drift modes in toroidal geometry (weakly collisional regime), the equations for low-frequency waves in the strongly collisional regime and the electrostatic drift modes (strongly collisional regime) are discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Trapped-particle instabilities in quasi-isodynamic stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proll, Josefine Henriette Elise

    2014-01-28

    approximately in quasi-isodynamic stellarators, for example Wendelstein 7-X. In such configurations the precessional drift of the trapped particles is in the opposite direction from the direction of propagation of drift waves. Instabilities that are driven by the trapped particles usually rely on a resonance between these two frequencies. Here it is shown analytically by analysing the electrostatic energy transfer between the particles and the instability that, thanks to the absence of the resonance, a particle species draws energy from the mode if the frequency of the mode is well below the characteristic bounce frequency. Due to the low electron mass and the fast bounce motion, electrons are almost always found to be stabilising. Most of the trapped-particle instabilities are therefore predicted to be absent in maximum- J configurations in large parts of parameter space. Analytical theory thus predicts enhanced linear stability of trapped-particle modes in quasi-isodynamic stellarators compared with tokamaks. Moreover, since the electrons are expected to be stabilising, or at least less destabilising, for all instabilities whose frequency lies below the trapped-electron bounce frequency, other modes might benefit from the enhanced stability as well. In reality, however, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with another, non-quasiisodynamic stellarator, the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and a typical tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, several microinstabilities, driven by the density as well as both ion and electron temperature gradients, are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all

  10. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  11. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented

  12. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  13. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  14. Effects of drift angle on model ship flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, J.; Stern, F.

    The effects of drift angle on model ship flow are investigated through towing tank tests for the Series 60 CB=0.6 cargo/container model ship. Resistance, side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel data are procured for a range of drift angles β and Froude numbers (Fr) and the model free condition. Detailed free-surface and mean velocity and pressure flow maps are procured for high and low Fr=0.316 and 0.16 and β=5° and 10° (free surface) and β=10° (mean velocity and pressure) for the model fixed condition (i.e. fixed with zero sinkage, trim, and heel). Comparison of results at high and low Fr and previous data for β=0° enables identification of important free-surface and drift effects. Geometry, conditions, data, and uncertainty analysis are documented in sufficient detail so as to be useful as a benchmark for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The resistance increases linearly with β with same slope for all Fr, whereas the increases in the side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel with β are quadratic. The wave profile is only affected near the bow, i.e. the bow wave amplitude increases/decreases on the windward/leeward sides, whereas the wave elevations are affected throughout the entire wave field. However, the wave envelope angle on both sides is nearly the same as β=0°, i.e. the near-field wave pattern rotates with the hull and remains within a similar wave envelope as β=0°. The wave amplitudes are significantly increased/decreased on the windward/leeward sides. The wake region is also asymmetric with larger wedge angle on the leeward side. The boundary layer and wake are dominated by the hull vortex system consisting of fore body keel, bilge, and wave-breaking vortices and after body bilge and counter-rotating vortices. The occurrence of a wave-breaking vortex for breaking bow waves has not been previously documented in the literature. The trends for the maximum vorticity, circulation, minimum axial velocity, and

  15. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    atmospheric model for periodic structures with Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) wavelengths is used to show the development of quasi-periodic structures in the E-layer. For the model, a background atmosphere near 100 km altitude with a scale height of 12.2 km is subjected to a wind shear profile varying by 100 m/s over a distance of 1.7 km. This neutral speed shear drives the KH instability with a growth time of about 100 seconds. The neutral KH wave is a source of plasma turbulence. The E-layer responds to the KH-Wave structure in the neutral atmosphere as an electrodynamic tracer. The plasma flow leads to small scale plasma field aligned irregularities from a gradient drift, plasma interchange instability (GDI) or a Farley-Buneman, two-stream instability (FBI). These irregularities are detected by radar scatter as quasi-periodic structures. All of these plasma phenomena would not occur without the initiation by neutral atmospheric waves.

  16. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Oscillating two-stream instability; plasma wave; laser wakefield accelerator. Abstract. The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump ...

  17. Two-phase flow instability and propagation of disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Various mechanisms of static and dynamic macroinstabilities, appearing in two-phase flows, have been considered. Types of instabilities, conditioned by the form of hydraulic characteristics of the channel and density waves are analyzed in detail. Problems of instabilities in nuclear reactor circuits, in particular problems of instabilities, conditioned by water and steam mixing and vapour condensation, and problems of steam generator operation instability are discussed

  18. [Microvolt T-wave alternans as a novel method of analysis of changes of repolarization phase and detection of latent electrical instability of the myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarinova, A A; Treshkur, T V; Parmon, E V

    2011-01-01

    This review considers of modern concepts of microvolt T-wave alternans (TWA): its pathophysiological basis at cellular level, particulars of quantitative analysis of TWA, modulating effects of autonomic nervous system and drugs, prognostic efficacy in predicting susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia in comparison with other modern prognostic factors of sudden cardiac death.

  19. Surface-enhanced charge-density-wave instability in underdoped Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6+delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, J. A.; Comin, R.; Levy, G.; Fournier, D.; Zhu, Z. -H.; Ludbrook, B.; Veenstra, C. N.; Nicolaou, A.; Wong, D.; Dosanjh, P.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Blake, G. R.; White, F.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Sutarto, R.; He, F.; Pereira, A. Frano; Lu, Y.; Keimer, B.; Sawatzky, G.; Petaccia, L.; Damascelli, A.

    Neutron and X-ray scattering experiments have provided mounting evidence for spin and charge ordering phenomena in underdoped cuprates. These range from early work on stripe correlations in Nd-LSCO to the latest discovery of charge-density-waves in YBa2Cu3O6 + x. Both phenomena are characterized by

  20. Toroidal drift magnetic pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1977-01-01

    A set of azimuthal coils which carry properly dephased rf-currents in the KHz frequency range can be used to heat toroidal plasmas by perpendicular Landau damping of subsonic Alfven waves. The heating mechanism and the rf-field structure are discussed in some detail

  1. Kinetic theory of geomagnetic pulsations 2. Ion flux modulations by transverse waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chen (Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)); Hasegawa, Akira (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Ion flux modulations by ultra-low-frequency radially polarized geomagnetic pulsations are examined theoretically based on the gyrokinetic analysis of Chen and Hasegawa. The theoretical results thus contain important effects such as plasma anisotropy and inhomogeneities, finite Larmor radii, realistic magnetic field, magnetic trapping, and wave mode structures. The predicted properties are consistent with the satellite observations [Takahashi et al.] and further support the drift-Alfven ballooning mode as a primary instability candidate. The analysis, furthermore, demonstrates that, in the case of highly energetic ions, it is crucial to include the finite-Larmor-radius effects self-consistently in order to properly analyze and compare with the satellite observations.

  2. Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.

    2004-01-01

    The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K + beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25(micro) C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designed to produce a 2(micro)s rectangular 1 Ampere C s + beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K + , was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1mm radius spot at a

  3. White-light parametric instabilities in plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J E; Silva, L O; Bingham, R

    2007-06-08

    Parametric instabilities driven by partially coherent radiation in plasmas are described by a generalized statistical Wigner-Moyal set of equations, formally equivalent to the full wave equation, coupled to the plasma fluid equations. A generalized dispersion relation for stimulated Raman scattering driven by a partially coherent pump field is derived, revealing a growth rate dependence, with the coherence width sigma of the radiation field, scaling with 1/sigma for backscattering (three-wave process), and with 1/sigma1/2 for direct forward scattering (four-wave process). Our results demonstrate the possibility to control the growth rates of these instabilities by properly using broadband pump radiation fields.

  4. Regularization of instabilities in gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanoǧlu, Fethi M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate instabilities and their regularization in theories of gravitation. Instabilities can be beneficial since their growth often leads to prominent observable signatures, which makes them especially relevant to relatively low signal-to-noise ratio measurements such as gravitational wave detections. An indefinitely growing instability usually renders a theory unphysical; hence, a desirable instability should also come with underlying physical machinery that stops the growth at finite values, i.e., regularization mechanisms. The prototypical gravity theory that presents such an instability is the spontaneous scalarization phenomena of scalar-tensor theories, which feature a tachyonic instability. We identify the regularization mechanisms in this theory and show that they can be utilized to regularize other instabilities as well. Namely, we present theories in which spontaneous growth is triggered by a ghost rather than a tachyon and numerically calculate stationary solutions of scalarized neutron stars in these theories. We speculate on the possibility of regularizing known divergent instabilities in certain gravity theories using our findings and discuss alternative theories of gravitation in which regularized instabilities may be present. Even though we study many specific examples, our main point is the recognition of regularized instabilities as a common theme and unifying mechanism in a vast array of gravity theories.

  5. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  6. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  7. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  8. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the spherical pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.B.; Hilko, B.; Panarella, E.

    1994-01-01

    The spherical pinch (SP) concept is an outgrowth of the inertial confinement model (ICF). Unlike the ICF where instabilities, especially the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, have been studied extensively, the instability study of the spherical pinch has just begun. The Raleigh-Taylor instability is investigated for the first time in the SP in the present work. By using the simple condition for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability ∇p · ∇p < O (density and pressure gradients have opposite direction), we have qualitatively identified the regions for development of instabilities in the SP. It is found that the explosion phase (central discharge) is stable and instabilities take place in the imploding phase. However, the growth rate for the instability is not in exponential form, and the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability does not prevent the main shock wave from converging to the center of the sphere

  9. Multi‐instrument observations from Svalbard of a traveling convection vortex, electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave burst, and proton precipitation associated with a bow shock instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Yeoman, T. K.; Oksavik, K.

    2013-01-01

    of Earth observed a steady solar wind and predominantly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientation before and during this event, data from Geotail (near the morning bow shock) showed large reorientations of the interplanetary magnetic field and substantial decreases in ion density several minutes......An isolated burst of 0.35 Hz electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves was observed at four sites on Svalbard from 0947 to 0954 UT 2 January 2011, roughly 1 h after local noon. This burst was associated with one of a series of ~50 nT magnetic impulses observed at the northernmost stations...... satellite indicated that the EMIC burst was located on closed field lines, but near to the polar cap boundary. We believe these are the first simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and precipitating energetic protons so near to the boundary of the dayside magnetosphere. Although several spacecraft upstream...

  10. Metocean input data for drift models applications: Loustic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michon, P.; Bossart, C.; Cabioc'h, M.

    1995-01-01

    Real-time monitoring and crisis management of oil slicks or floating structures displacement require a good knowledge of local winds, waves and currents used as input data for operational drift models. Fortunately, thanks to world-wide and all-weather coverage, satellite measurements have recently enabled the introduction of new methods for the remote sensing of the marine environment. Within a French joint industry project, a procedure has been developed using basically satellite measurements combined to metocean models in order to provide marine operators' drift models with reliable wind, wave and current analyses and short term forecasts. Particularly, a model now allows the calculation of the drift current, under the joint action of wind and sea-state, thus radically improving the classical laws. This global procedure either directly uses satellite wind and waves measurements (if available on the study area) or indirectly, as calibration of metocean models results which are brought to the oil slick or floating structure location. The operational use of this procedure is reported here with an example of floating structure drift offshore from the Brittany coasts

  11. The controlled-drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, A; Guazzoni, C; Longoni, A; Rehak, P; Strüder, L

    2000-01-01

    A new position-sensing X-ray detector is presented. The novel device is called Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD). The detector is fully depleted and is operated by switching between integration and drift modes. The relevant details of the detector design are discussed. A complete experimental characterization of the fast readout of the integrated signal charges achievable with static drift fields in the range 100-400 V/cm has been carried out. Preliminary measurements to evaluate the charge-handling capacity are also shown. The CDD can provide unambiguous two-dimensional position measurement, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time resolution below 1 ms.

  12. The controlled-drift detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castoldi, A. E-mail: andrea.castoldi@polimi.it; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Longoni, A.; Rehak, P.; Strueder, L

    2000-01-11

    A new position-sensing X-ray detector is presented. The novel device is called Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD). The detector is fully depleted and is operated by switching between integration and drift modes. The relevant details of the detector design are discussed. A complete experimental characterization of the fast readout of the integrated signal charges achievable with static drift fields in the range 100-400 V/cm has been carried out. Preliminary measurements to evaluate the charge-handling capacity are also shown. The CDD can provide unambiguous two-dimensional position measurement, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time resolution below 1 ms.

  13. Drift mode in a bounded plasma having two-ion species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ali; Sajid, M.; Saleem, H.

    2008-01-01

    The drift wave is investigated in a two-ion species plasma in several different cases. The global drift mode is studied in a plasma bounded in a cylinder having Gaussian density profile corresponding to different poloidal wavenumbers. The frequency of the mode becomes a little larger when it is investigated without including the ion cyclotron wave dynamics. The effect of magnetic shear on the wave propagation along the density gradient is studied in a Cartesian geometry assuming absorbing boundary. It is found that the wave amplitude is reduced when two-ion species are present (with the same concentration) compared to pure electron-ion plasma

  14. OpenDrift v1.0: a generic framework for trajectory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2018-04-01

    OpenDrift is an open-source Python-based framework for Lagrangian particle modelling under development at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute with contributions from the wider scientific community. The framework is highly generic and modular, and is designed to be used for any type of drift calculations in the ocean or atmosphere. A specific module within the OpenDrift framework corresponds to a Lagrangian particle model in the traditional sense. A number of modules have already been developed, including an oil drift module, a stochastic search-and-rescue module, a pelagic egg module, and a basic module for atmospheric drift. The framework allows for the ingestion of an unspecified number of forcing fields (scalar and vectorial) from various sources, including Eulerian ocean, atmosphere and wave models, but also measurements or a priori values for the same variables. A basic backtracking mechanism is inherent, using sign reversal of the total displacement vector and negative time stepping. OpenDrift is fast and simple to set up and use on Linux, Mac and Windows environments, and can be used with minimal or no Python experience. It is designed for flexibility, and researchers may easily adapt or write modules for their specific purpose. OpenDrift is also designed for performance, and simulations with millions of particles may be performed on a laptop. Further, OpenDrift is designed for robustness and is in daily operational use for emergency preparedness modelling (oil drift, search and rescue, and drifting ships) at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute.

  15. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  16. Rogue waves in the ocean - review and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Kharif, Christian; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Rogue waves in the ocean and physical mechanisms of their appearance are discussed. Theyse waves are among waves naturally observed by people on the sea surface that represent inseparable feature of the Ocean. Rogue waves appear from nowhere, cause danger and disappear at once. They may occur at the surface of a relatively calm sea, reach not very high amplitudes, but be fatal for ships and crew due to their unexpectedness and abnormal features. The billows appear suddenly exceeding the surrounding waves twice and more, and obtained many names: abnormal, exceptional, extreme, giant, huge, sudden, episodic, freak, monster, rogue, vicious, killer, mad- or rabid-dog waves; cape rollers, holes in the sea, walls of water, three sisters… Freak monsters, though living for seconds, were able to arouse superstitious fear of the crew, cause damage, death of heedless sailors or the whole ship. All these epithets are full of human fear and feebleness. The serious studies of the phenomenon started about 20-30 years ago and have been intensified during the recent decade. The research is being conducted in different fields: in physics (search of physical mechanisms and adequate models of wave enhancement and statistics), in geoscience (determining the regions and weather conditions when rogue waves are most probable), and in ocean and coastal engineering (estimations of the wave loads on fixed and drifting floating structures). Thus, scientists and engineers specializing in different subject areas are involved in the solution of the problem. The state-of-art of the rogue wave study is summarized in our book [Kharif, Ch., Pelinovsky, E., and Slunyaev, A. Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Springer, 2009] and presented in given review. Firstly, we start with a brief introduction to the problem of freak waves aiming at formulating what is understood as rogue or freak waves, what consequences their existence imply in our life, why people are so worried about them. Then we discuss existing

  17. Two-stream Instabilities within the Front of Supercritical Quasi-perpendicular Shocks: a Synthetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschietti, L.; Lembege, B.

    2015-12-01

    In supercritical shocks a substantial fraction of ions is reflected at the steep shock ramp and carries a considerable amount of energy. The presence of reflected ions enables streaming instabilities to develop across the foot's magnetic field. These are excited by relative drifts between the populations of incoming ions, reflected ions, and electrons. The instabilities cover wavelengths from the ion inertia length to the electron gyroradius and frequencies from the lower-hybrid to the electron cyclotron. The particle distributions are modelled as three components: a broad electron and two ion populations, viz. a core and a beam representing the reflected ions. Assuming the ion beam is directed along the shock normal at 90o to Bo, we investigate the possible instabilities under various wave propagation angles. Three types of waves are shown to be unstable: 1) Oblique whistlers with wavelength about the ion inertia length which propagate toward upstream at angles about 50o to Bo. Frequencies are a few times the lower-hybrid. The waves share many similarities to the oblique whistlers measured in detail by Polar [Hull et al., JGR 117, 2012]. 2) Quasi-perpendicular whistlers with wavelength covering a fraction of the electron inertia length which propagate toward downstream at angles larger than 80o to Bo. Frequencies are close to the lower-hybrid. 3) Bernstein waves with wavelength close to the electron gyroradius which propagate toward upstream at angles within 5o of perpendicular to Bo. Frequencies are close to the electron cyclotron. The waves have similarities to those reported by Wind and Stereo [Breneman et al., JGR 118, 2013; Wilson et al., JGR 115, 2010]. Linear dispersion properties are analyzed by computing the full electromagnetic dielectric tensor. Then, dispersion results are compared with waveforms and hodograms obtained from electromagnetic pseudo-oblique 1D PIC simulations. One computes the Poynting flux associated to the whistlers. It is directed

  18. Modulational instability and nonlocality management in coupled NLS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, Evgeny V; Molchan, Maxim A

    2007-01-01

    The modulational instability of two interacting waves in a nonlocal Kerr-type medium is considered analytically and numerically. For a generic choice of wave amplitudes, we give a complete description of stable/unstable regimes for zero group-velocity mismatch. It is shown that nonlocality suppresses considerably the growth rate and bandwidth of instability. For nonzero group-velocity mismatch we perform a geometrical analysis of a nonlocality management which can provide stability of waves otherwise unstable in a local medium

  19. Polygonal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex with a free surface is encountered in a series of experiments, the hydraulic jump, the hydraulic bump, the toroidal Leidenfrost experiment. All these experiments share in common an unstable configuration in which azimuthal perturbations give rise to polygonal patterns. We propose a unified theoretical framework to model the emergence of this instability by investigating the stability of a liquid torus with a poloidal motion. As simple as it is, we show that the model retains the necessary ingredients to account for the experimental observations. In this talk, I will first describe the model and compare it to the existing data. However this model is purely inviscid and reaches its limits when being applied to relatively moderate Reynolds flows. So in a second part, I will present a recent experimental and theoretical investigation in which polygonal patterns are now driven by Marangoni flows. To our great surprise, it extends the range of validity of the initial proposed framework, much more than initially expected.

  20. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in solar spicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ebadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magneto hydrodynamic waves, propagating along spicules, may become unstable and the expected instability is of Kelvin-Helmholtz type. Such instability can trigger the onset of wave turbulence leading to an effective plasma heating and particle acceleration. In present study, two-dimensional magneto hydrodynamic simulations performed on a Cartesian grid is presented in spicules with different densities, moving at various speeds depending on their environment. Simulations being applied in this study show the onset of Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and transition to turbulent flow in spicules. Development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to momentum and energy transport, dissipation, and mixing of fluids. When magnetic fields are involved, field amplification is also possible to take place

  1. Review article "Remarks on factors influencing shear wave velocities and their role in evaluating susceptibilities to earthquake-triggered slope instability: case study for the Campania area (Italy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Paoletti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocities have a fundamental role in connection with the mitigation of seismic hazards, as their low values are the main causes of site amplification phenomena and can significantly influence the susceptibility of a territory to seismic-induced landslides. The shear wave velocity (Vs and modulus (G of each lithological unit are influenced by factors such as the degree of fracturing and faulting, the porosity, the clay amount and the precipitation, with the latter two influencing the unit water content. In this paper we discuss how these factors can affect the Vs values and report the results of different analyses that quantify the reduction in the rock Vs and shear modulus values connected to the presence of clay and water. We also show that significant results in assessing seismic-induced slope failure susceptibility for land planning targets could be achieved through a careful evaluation, based only on literature studies, of the geo-lithological and geo-seismic features of the study area.

  2. MHD instabilities in astrophysical plasmas: very different from MHD instabilities in tokamaks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2018-01-01

    The extensive studies of MHD instabilities in thermonuclear magnetic confinement experiments, in particular of the tokamak as the most promising candidate for a future energy producing machine, have led to an ‘intuitive’ description based on the energy principle that is very misleading for most astrophysical plasmas. The ‘intuitive’ picture almost directly singles out the dominant stabilizing field line bending energy of the Alfvén waves and, consequently, concentrates on expansion schemes that minimize that contribution. This happens when the wave vector {{k}}0 of the perturbations, on average, is perpendicular to the magnetic field {B}. Hence, all macroscopic instabilities of tokamaks (kinks, interchanges, ballooning modes, ELMs, neoclassical tearing modes, etc) are characterized by satisfying the condition {{k}}0 \\perp {B}, or nearly so. In contrast, some of the major macroscopic instabilities of astrophysical plasmas (the Parker instability and the magneto-rotational instability) occur when precisely the opposite condition is satisfied: {{k}}0 \\parallel {B}. How do those instabilities escape from the dominance of the stabilizing Alfvén wave? The answer to that question involves, foremost, the recognition that MHD spectral theory of waves and instabilities of laboratory plasmas could be developed to such great depth since those plasmas are assumed to be in static equilibrium. This assumption is invalid for astrophysical plasmas where rotational and gravitational accelerations produce equilibria that are at best stationary, and the associated spectral theory is widely, and incorrectly, believed to be non-self adjoint. These complications are addressed, and cured, in the theory of the Spectral Web, recently developed by the author. Using this method, an extensive survey of instabilities of astrophysical plasmas demonstrates how the Alfvén wave is pushed into insignificance under these conditions to give rise to a host of instabilities that do not

  3. Centrifugal instability in the regime of fast rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, R.; Rax, J. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-08-01

    Centrifugal instability, which stems from a difference between the azimuthal angular drift velocity of ions and electrons, is studied in the limit of fast rotation for which ions can rotate up to twice as fast as electrons. As the angular velocity approaches the so-called Brillouin limit, the growth rate for the centrifugal instability in a collisionless solid-body rotating plasma increases markedly and is proportional to the azimuthal mode number. For large wavenumbers, electron inertia effects set in and lead to a cut-off. Interestingly, conditions for the onset of this instability appear to overlap with the operating conditions envisioned for plasma mass separation devices.

  4. A quasilinear operator retaining magnetic drift effects in tokamak geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catto, Peter J.; Lee, Jungpyo; Ram, Abhay K.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction of radio frequency waves with charged particles in a magnetized plasma is usually described by the quasilinear operator that was originally formulated by Kennel & Engelmann (Phys. Fluids, vol. 9, 1966, pp. 2377-2388). In their formulation the plasma is assumed to be homogenous and embedded in a uniform magnetic field. In tokamak plasmas the Kennel-Engelmann operator does not capture the magnetic drifts of the particles that are inherent to the non-uniform magnetic field. To overcome this deficiency a combined drift and gyrokinetic derivation is employed to derive the quasilinear operator for radio frequency heating and current drive in a tokamak with magnetic drifts retained. The derivation requires retaining the magnetic moment to higher order in both the unperturbed and perturbed kinetic equations. The formal prescription for determining the perturbed distribution function then follows a novel procedure in which two non-resonant terms must be evaluated explicitly. The systematic analysis leads to a diffusion equation that is compact and completely expressed in terms of the drift kinetic variables. The equation is not transit averaged, and satisfies the entropy principle, while retaining the full poloidal angle variation without resorting to Fourier decomposition. As the diffusion equation is in physical variables, it can be implemented in any computational code. In the Kennel-Engelmann formalism, the wave-particle resonant delta function is either for the Landau resonance or the Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance. In the combined gyro and drift kinetic approach, a term related to the magnetic drift modifies the resonance condition.

  5. Thermal instability during an electrical wire explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    The development of thermal instabilities during an electrical wire explosion is analyzed in the present work based on the methods of small perturbation theory. For two cases, with and without allowance for motion, the dispersion equations are derived that describe a relationship between the instantaneous buildup increment and the axial wave vector component. It is demonstrated that the thermal instabilities are always formed during electrical explosion, irrespective of the explosion mode. There are three destabilizing factors leading to the development of the thermal instabilities: a temperature rise, an increase in the specific resistance with increasing temperature, and an increase in the specific resistance with decreasing density. The critical value of current density below which the sausage instabilities grow faster than the thermal ones and above which, on the contrary, the thermal instabilities are dominant can be found for each metal.

  6. Thermal instability during an electrical wire explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2008-09-01

    The development of thermal instabilities during an electrical wire explosion is analyzed in the present work based on the methods of small perturbation theory. For two cases, with and without allowance for motion, the dispersion equations are derived that describe a relationship between the instantaneous buildup increment and the axial wave vector component. It is demonstrated that the thermal instabilities are always formed during electrical explosion, irrespective of the explosion mode. There are three destabilizing factors leading to the development of the thermal instabilities: a temperature rise, an increase in the specific resistance with increasing temperature, and an increase in the specific resistance with decreasing density. The critical value of current density below which the sausage instabilities grow faster than the thermal ones and above which, on the contrary, the thermal instabilities are dominant can be found for each metal.

  7. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  8. The dynamics of magnetic Rossby waves in spherical dynamo simulations: A signature of strong-field dynamos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, K.; Teed, R. J.; Jones, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate slow magnetic Rossby waves in convection-driven dynamos in rotating spherical shells. Quasi-geostrophic waves riding on a mean zonal flow may account for some of the geomagnetic westward drifts and have the potential to allow the toroidal field strength within the planetary fluid core to be estimated. We extend the work of Hori et al. (2015) to include a wider range of models, and perform a detailed analysis of the results. We find that a predicted dispersion relation matches well with the longitudinal drifts observed in our strong-field dynamos. We discuss the validity of our linear theory, since we also find that the nonlinear Lorentz terms influence the observed waveforms. These wave motions are excited by convective instability, which determines the preferred azimuthal wavenumbers. Studies of linear rotating magnetoconvection have suggested that slow magnetic Rossby modes emerge in the magnetostrophic regime, in which the Lorentz and Coriolis forces are in balance in the vorticity equation. We confirm this to be predominant balance for the slow waves we have detected in nonlinear dynamo systems. We also show that a completely different wave regime emerges if the magnetic field is not present. Finally we report the corresponding radial magnetic field variations observed at the surface of the shell in our simulations and discuss the detectability of these waves in the geomagnetic secular variation.

  9. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  10. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  11. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  12. Effects of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac electrical instability assessed by T-wave alternans during ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring in coronary artery disease patients without and with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenttä, Tuomas; Tulppo, Mikko P; Nearing, Bruce D; Karjalainen, Jaana J; Hautala, Arto J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Huikuri, Heikki V; Verrier, Richard L

    2014-09-15

    Effects of exercise rehabilitation on electrocardiographic markers of risk for sudden cardiac death have not been adequately studied. We examined effects of controlled exercise training on T-wave alternans (TWA) in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) without and with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed CAD were recruited to join the ARTEMIS (Innovation to Reduce Cardiovascular Complications of Diabetes at the Intersection) study. Exercise (n = 65) and control groups (n = 65) were matched on age, sex, DM, and previous myocardial infarction. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded before and after a 2-year training period. TWA was assessed using time domain-modified moving average method by an investigator blinded to patients' clinical status. Average TWA values decreased in the rehabilitation group but not in control patients (rehabilitation [mean ± SEM]: 52.8 ± 1.7 μV vs 48.7 ± 1.5 μV, p exercise versus 10% (n = 2 of 20) of controls (p = 0.020). In CAD patients, 30% (n = 8 of 27) of positive TWA cases were converted with exercise versus 4% (n = 1 of 28) of controls (p = 0.012). In conclusion, this is the first report of the effectiveness of exercise rehabilitation to reduce TWA, a marker of sudden cardiac death risk, in patients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Farley Instability: A Laboratory Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is described that was performed in an alkali plasma (Cs) device in order to test the theory of the Farley instability. With υ E×B > Cs (the speed of sound) and νι ≳ ω cι (ν e ≪ ω ce ) wave excitation occurs, the waves traveling normal to the magnetic field B at the υ E×B speed. The ....... The perturbations are strongly elongated along the B field lines, with λ∥ ≫ λ⊥. A comparison with theoretical predictions is given for the observed excitation conditions of the instability....

  14. Heuristic explanation of journal bearing instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid-filled journal bearing is viewed as a powerful pump circulating fluid around the annular space between the journal and the bearing. A small whirling motion of the journal generates a wave of thickness variation progressing around the channel. The hypothesis that the fluid flow drives the whirl whenever the mean of the pumped fluid velocity is greater than the peripheral speed of the thickness variation wave is discussed and compared with other simple explanations of journal bearing instability. It is shown that for non-cavitation long bearings the hypothesis predicts instability onset correctly for unloaded bearings but gradually overpredicts the onset speed as the load is increased.

  15. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  16. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  17. Raman sidescatter instability in a nonuniform plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostrom, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    In the various laser-fusion concepts, an intense electromagnetic wave (the laser) must propagate through an under-dense plasma region where it could decay, via the stimulated Raman instability, into a Langmuir plasma wave and a scattered electromagnetic wave. This process could, therefore, scatter a significant fraction of the laser energy before it could be deposited in the plasma. A density gradient, in the direction of laser incidence, localizes the instability to a narrow resonance zone where the local plasma wave frequency approximately equals the difference-frequency between the incident and scattered electromagnetic waves. The narrowness of this zone can strongly inhibit the growth of back- or oblique-scattered electromagnetic waves since they quickly propagate out of their resonance region; however, the density gradient has a much weaker effect on side-scattered waves (which propagate perpendicular to the density gradient) since they remain in their resonance zone until refraction bends them out or they exit through the side of the finite diameter laser beam. Thus, we place particular emphasis on evaluating, in a manner valid for the side scattered electromagnetic waves (which are at their turning point), the level of exponentiation at which the growth is linearly saturated due to convection of the waves out of their resonance zone. We also determine the general nature and propagation of the scattered electromagnetic waves and obtain approximate values for the resonance zone size and the time required for the above saturation

  18. A study and classification of non-linear high frequency ionospheric instabilities by coupled mode theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two basic high-frequency ionospheric instabilities are discussed - i.e., the three-wave parametric interaction, and the oscillating two-stream instability. In the parametric instability, the ion-acoustic wave has a complex frequency, whereas in the oscillating two-stream instability the ion-acoustic frequency is purely imaginary. The parametric instability is shown to be the only one whose threshold depends on the ion collision frequency. A coupled-mode theory is proposed which permits study and classification of high-frequency instabilities on a unified basis.

  19. Parametric instabilities in inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The nonlinear coupling of three waves in a plasma is considered. One of the waves is assumed large and constant; its amplitude is the parameter of the parametric instability. The spatial-temporal evolution of the other two waves is treated theoretically, in one dimension, by analytic methods and by direct numerical integration of the basic equations. Various monotonic forms of inhomogeneity are considered; agreement with previous work is found and new results are established. Nonmonotonic inhomogeneities are considered, in the form of turbulence and, as a model problem, in the form of a simple sinusoidal modulation. Relatively small amounts of nonmonotonic inhomogeneity, in the presence of a linear density gradient, are found to destabilize the well-known convective saturation, absolute growth occurring instead. (U.S.)

  20. Nonlinear evolution of astrophysical Alfven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear Alfven waves were studied using the derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation as a model. The evolution of initial conditions, such as envelope solitons, amplitude-modulated waves, and band-limited noise was investigated. The last two furnish models for naturally occurring Alfven waves in an astrophysical plasma. A collapse instability in which a wave packet becomes more intense and of smaller spatial extent was analyzed. It is argued that this instability leads to enhanced plasma heating. In studies in which the waves are amplified by an electron beam, the instability tends to modestly inhibit wave growth.

  1. The role of instability-enhanced friction on ‘anomalous’ electron and ion transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Trevor; Chabert, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Using a self-consistent 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation, we investigate the electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters. The PIC simulation is explicit in time and models the axial and azimuthal directions of a thruster without using any artificial parametric or geometric scaling factors. The applied discharge voltage and external magnetic field causes electrons to drift in the azimuthal direction, and this drives an instability in the plasma that produces large amplitude oscillations in both the plasma density and azimuthal electric field. A Fourier transform in time and space shows that the oscillations follow a dispersion relation similiar to that for an ion acoustic instability (in agreement with a recent kinetic theory). Correlated with the presence of this instability is an enhanced electron cross-field transport; even in the absence of electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission. The amplitude of plasma density oscillations (but not electric field oscillations) is found to decrease significantly in a region just downstream of the thruster exit (before then increasing again), and reaches levels similar to those measured experimentally with collective light scattering techniques. By taking relevant velocity moments of the electron distribution function in the PIC simulations, we reconstruct each term in the electron momentum conservation equation and demonstrate that ‘anomalous’ electron transport can be explained entirely due to an instability-enhanced friction force between electrons and ions. This friction force acts as an additional momentum loss allowing electrons to cross the magnetic field, and as an accelerating force causing ions to rotate azimuthally in the same direction as the electrons. Clear evidence of ion-wave trapping in the instability electric field is observed.

  2. Review of semiconductor drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Emilio; Rehak, Pavel

    2005-04-01

    A short review of semiconductor drift detectors is given. The emphasis is given to detectors intended for tracking of fast charged particles for experiments in particle physics and high energy heavy-ion physics. The use and performance of this kind of detector in past, present and future experiments is described together with the experience learned during the design, production and data taking phases.

  3. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  4. The Continental Drift Convection Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents, and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson Cycle). Highly developed but realistic numerical models cannot resolve if continents respond passively to mantle convection or whether they modulate flow. Our simplified numerical model addresses this problem: A thermally insulating continent floats on a stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties in a chamber 8 times longer than its depth. The continent moves back and forth across the chamber driven by a "continental drift convection cell" of a form not previously described. Subduction exists at the upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent. Fluid moves with the continent in the upper region of this cell with return flow near the bottom. Many continent/subduction regions on Earth have these features. The drifting cell enhances vertical heat transport by approximately 30% compared to a fixed continent, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and significantly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences. However, continent drift or fixity has smaller effects on profiles of horizontally averaged temperature. Although calculations are done at Rayleigh numbers lower than expected for Earth's mantle (2x105 and 106), the drift speed extrapolates to reasonable Wilson Cycle speeds for larger Ra.

  5. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  6. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10 12 Ω cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  7. Ion flux oscillations and ULF waves observed by ARASE satellite and their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Masahito, N.; Kasahara, S.; Yokota, S.; Keika, K.; Matsuoka, A.; Teramoto, M.; Nomura, R.; Fujimoto, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Shinohara, M.; Shinohara, I.; Yoshizumi, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ARASE satellite, which was launched on December 20, 2016, is now observing thenightside inner magnetosphere. The inclination of the orbit is larger than those of otherrecent spacecraft flying in the inner magnetosphere such as THMEIS and Van Allen Probes.This unique orbit provides us new information on ULF waves since ULF waves havelatitudinal structure and the antinode of magnetic fluctuations of fundamental mode is athigh magnetic latitudes.Although Pc pulsations are predominantly observed on the dayside, ARASE satellitesometimes observes Pc4-5 pulsations on the nightside. Some of these waves are accompaniedwith energetic particle flux modulations. We found 6 events of the particle flux modulationsaccompanying Pc pulsations on the dawnside and nightside. Theoretical studies suggest thatULF waves detected at afternoon are generated by plasma instabilities like drift-mirror instability [Hasegawa, 1969] and drift-bounce resonance [Southwood et al, 1969].These instabilities cause plasma pressure disturbances or flux modulation of ions. Nonresonant ion clouds injected on the duskside are also considered to be one of the candidates ofULF wave driver [Zolotukhina, 1974]. We therefore discuss whether the ULF waves observedby ARASE satellite are generated internally or externally, and the flux modulations arecreated by plasma instabilities or the other non-resonant effects.On March 31, 2017, Medium-Energy Particle Experiments - Ion Mass Analyzer (MEPi)onboard ARASE detected ion flux oscillations at 12-70 keV with a period of 120 seconds inthe normal (NML) mode observation. NML mode observation provides details of the directionof particle movements. The pitch angle distribution of proton flux showed isotropic fluxoscillations. At the same time, Pc4 pulsations with the same oscillation period were observed.These flux and field perturbations were seen on the dawnside (4.3-5.9 MLT).ARASE found oscillations of ion count with a period of 130 seconds in the time

  8. Estimating Outer Zone Radial Diffusion Coefficients from Drift Scale Fluctuations in Van Allen Particle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. P., III; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. This transport occurs via phase-dependent radial displacements of particles, either by impulsive events or drift resonant waves. Because transport is phase dependent, it produces drift phase bunching, which can be observed with in situ particle detectors. We provide bounds on the radial diffusion coefficients derived from this drift phase structure as seen by NASA's Van Allen Probes. We compare these bounds to published radial diffusion coefficient models, particularly those derived independently from electromagnetic field observations.

  9. Modulational instability of electric helicons in a magnetized collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ashry, M.Y.; Papuashvili, N.A.

    1987-06-01

    The interaction of a rf electromagnetic wave with a magnetized collisional plasma in the ultra-relativistic case has been investigated to show the effect of the collisions on the modulational instability growth rate. (author). 5 refs

  10. Cross-phase modulational instability in an elliptical birefringent fiber ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fringent optical fiber. PACS Nos 42.81.Gs; 42.65.Sf; 42.65.Tg. 1. Introduction. A continuous wave with a cubic nonlinearity in an anomalous dispersion regime is known to develop instability with respect to small modulations in amplitude or in phase, called modulational instability (MI) [1]. The MI phenomenon was discovered ...

  11. Polarization modulational instability in a birefringent optical fiber ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modulational instability (MI) phenomenon in optical fibers manifests as breakup of con- tinuous wave (cw) or quasi-cw radiation into a train of ultrashort pulses and happens when a cw perturbed radiation experiences an instability that leads to an exponential growth of its amplitude due to an interplay between fiber ...

  12. Vortex-Surface Interactions: Vortex Dynamics and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    Crow instability (see for example Leweke & Williamson, 2012). (b) Short-wave cooperative elliptic instability (Leweke & Williamson 1998). (c...vortex generators. Of interest in such studies would be the formation of secondary vorticity from the surface, the downstream vortex trajectories , and

  13. First results from the DRIFT-1 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, R.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Lawson, T.B.; Martoff, C.J.; Morgan, B.; Paling, S.M.; Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Spooner, N.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    DRIFT-I is the world's first WIMP dark matter detector with sensitivity to the direction of nuclear recoils. This article discusses the DRIFT-I detector, and presents some preliminary data from underground engineering runs

  14. Triaxial instabilities in rapidly rotating Neutron Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Arkadip

    2018-03-01

    Viscosity driven bar mode secular instabilities of rapidly rotating neutron stars are studied using LORENE/Nrotstar code. These instabilities set a more rigorous limit to the rotation frequency of a neutron star than the Kepler frequency/mass-shedding limit. The procedure employed in the code comprises of perturbing an axisymmetric and stationary configuration of a neutron star and studying its evolution by constructing a series of triaxial quasi-equilibrium configurations. Symmetry breaking point was found out for Polytropic as well as 10 realistic Equations of states (EOS) from the CompOSE database. The concept of piecewise polytropic EOSs has been used to comprehend the rotational instability of Realistic EOSs and validated with 19 different Realistic EOSs from CompOSE. The possibility of detecting quasi-periodic gravitational waves from viscosity driven instability with ground-based LIGO/VIRGO interferometers is also discussed very briefly.

  15. Modulational instability in periodic quadratic nonlinear materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corney, Joel Frederick; Bang, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the modulational instability of plane waves in quadratic nonlinear materials with linear and nonlinear quasi-phase-matching gratings. Exact Floquet calculations, confirmed by numerical simulations, show that the periodicity can drastically alter the gain spectrum but never complete...

  16. Modulational instability in nonlocal nonlinear Kerr media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Bang, Ole; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    We study modulational instability (MI) of plane waves in nonlocal nonlinear Kerr media. For a focusing nonlinearity we show that, although the nonlocality tends to suppress MI, it can never remove it completely, irrespective of the particular profile of the nonlocal response function. For a defoc...

  17. Mirror Instability in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Verdini, A.; Franci, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 838, č. 2 (2017), 158/1-158/7 ISSN 0004-637X Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * solar wind * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  18. Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

  19. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  20. Experimental study on low pressure flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Wu Shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Zhang Youjie

    1997-05-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcooling, in which the flow undergoes from single phase to two phase, is described in a natural circulation system at low pressure (p = 0.1, 0.24 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability, e.g. subcooled boiling instability, subcooled boiling induced flashing instability, pure flashing instability as well as flashing coupled density wave instability and high frequency flow oscillation, are investigated. The mechanism of flashing and flashing concerned flow instability, which has never been studied well in this field, is especially interpreted. The experimental results show that, firstly, for a low pressure natural circulation system the two phase flow is unstable in most of inlet subcooling conditions, the two phase stable flow can only be reached at very low inlet subcooling; secondly, at high inlet subcooling the flow instability is dominated by subcooled boiling in the heated section, and at middle inlet subcooling is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser; thirdly, in two phase stable flow region the condition for boiling out of the core, namely, single phase flow in the heated section, two phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are very important for the design and accident analysis of the vessel and swimming pool type natural circulation nuclear heating reactor. (7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)