WorldWideScience

Sample records for drift chamber readout

  1. Drift chamber data readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Lokhonyai, L.

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for processing drift chamber signals is described. The system consists of 4-channel fast amplifier-discriminators of low threshold, 16-channel time-expanders transforming 0.5 μs time intervals to 10 μs and a 9-bit time-to-digital converter (TDC) recording up to 16 expanded time intervals. If the average track multiplicity is small, TDC is capable to process signals from 4 time-expanders (i.e., 64 drift gaps). In order to record multiple tracks per drift gap discriminator outputs can be connected to a number of time-expander channels. The fast clear input enables the system to be cleared within 0.5 μs. Efficient readout from TDC is facilated by reading only those channels which contain non-zero data (9 bits - drift time; 6 bits - wire number)

  2. Drift chamber and pulse height readout systems using analog multiplexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros, E.L; Kang, H.K.; Hall, J.N.; Larsen, R.S.

    1976-11-01

    Drift chamber and pulse-height readout systems are being developed for use in a new large scale detector at the SPEAR colliding beam facility. The systems are based upon 32 channels of sample-and-hold together with an analog multiplexer in a single-width CAMAC module. The modules within each crate are scanned by an autonomous controller containing a single ADC and memory plus arithmetic capability for offset, gain and linearity corrections. The drift chamber module has a facility for extracting hit wire information for use in trigger decision circuitry

  3. Drift chamber readout system of the DIRAC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, L G

    2002-01-01

    A drift chamber readout system of the DIRAC experiment at CERN is presented. The system is intended to read out the signals from planar chambers operating in a high current mode. The sense wire signals are digitized in the 16-channel time-to-digital converter boards which are plugged in the signal plane connectors. This design results in a reduced number of modules, a small number of cables and high noise immunity. The system has been successfully operating in the experiment since 1999.

  4. A TDC integrated circuit for drift chamber readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passaseo, M.; Petrolo, E.; Veneziano, S.

    1995-01-01

    A custom integrated circuit for the measurement of the signal drift-time coming from the KLOE chamber developed by INFN Sezione di Roma is presented. The circuit is a multichannel common start/stop TDC, with 32 channels per chip. The TDC integrated circuit will be developed as a full-custom device in 0.5 μm CMOS technology, with 1 ns LSB realized using a Gray counter working at the frequency of 1 GHz. The circuit is capable of detecting rising/falling edges, with a double edge resolution of 8 ns; the hits are recorded as 16 bit words, hits older than a programmable time window are discarded, if not confirmed by a stop signal. The chip has four event-buffers, which are used only if at least one hit is present in one of the 32 channels. The readout of the data passes through the I/O port at a speed of 33 MHz; empty channels are automatically skipped during the readout phase. (orig.)

  5. A TDC integrated circuit for drift chamber readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passaseo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Petrolo, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Veneziano, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy)

    1995-12-11

    A custom integrated circuit for the measurement of the signal drift-time coming from the KLOE chamber developed by INFN Sezione di Roma is presented. The circuit is a multichannel common start/stop TDC, with 32 channels per chip. The TDC integrated circuit will be developed as a full-custom device in 0.5 {mu}m CMOS technology, with 1 ns LSB realized using a Gray counter working at the frequency of 1 GHz. The circuit is capable of detecting rising/falling edges, with a double edge resolution of 8 ns; the hits are recorded as 16 bit words, hits older than a programmable time window are discarded, if not confirmed by a stop signal. The chip has four event-buffers, which are used only if at least one hit is present in one of the 32 channels. The readout of the data passes through the I/O port at a speed of 33 MHz; empty channels are automatically skipped during the readout phase. (orig.).

  6. A cylindrical drift chamber with azimuthal and axial position readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Yam, Z.; Cummings, J.P.; Dowd, J.P.; Eugenio, P.; Hayek, M.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Shenhav, N.; Chung, S.U.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Olchanski, C.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Gunter, J.; Lindenbusch, R.; Rust, D.R.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.T.; Sulanke, T.; Teige, S.; Denisov, S.; Dushkin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Lipaev, V.; Popov, A.; Shein, I.; Soldatov, A.; Anoshina, E.V.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Demianov, A.I.; Gribushin, A.M.; Kodolova, O.L.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Kostin, M.A.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sinev, N.B.; Vardanyan, I.N.; Yershov, A.A.; Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cason, N.M.; Sanjari, A.H.; LoSecco, J.M.; Manak, J.J.; Shephard, W.D.; Stienike, D.L.; Taegar, S.A.; Thompson, D.R.; Brown, D.S.; Pedlar, T.; Seth, K.K.; Wise, J.; Zhao, D.; Adams, G.S.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical multiwire drift chamber with axial charge-division has been constructed and used in experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It serves as a trigger element and as a tracking device for recoil protons in π - p interactions. We describe the chamber's design considerations, details of its construction, electronics, and performance characteristics. (orig.)

  7. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Parsons, A.; Lin, R.P.; Smith, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present results from their prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber. They discuss its operation with two types of light detection schemes: one based on a Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave shifting light fibers. The results demonstrate some of the instruments's tremendous potential

  9. Characteristics of a delay-line readout in a cylindrical drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.; Ahmed, M.W.; Dzemidzic, M.; Empl, A.; Hungerford, E.V.; Lan, K.J.; Wilson, J.; Cooper, M.D.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Haim, D.; Kim, G.J.; Koetke, D.D.; Tribble, R.E.; Van Ausdeln, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the design, construction, and operational characteristics of a delay-line readout implemented on the cathode foils of a cylindrical drift chamber system. The readout was used to determine the position of an event along the length of the 1.74 m drift wires in the MEGA detectors used at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The performance of the system is interpreted by comparison to a PSPICE simulation, and to simple analytical models

  10. Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by charge division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.

    1977-10-01

    The drift time measurement and the charge division can be performed simultaneously on the same electrode (resistive anode) without affecting the accuracy of either measurement. It is shown that for the shortest measurement time there is an optimum value for the anode wire resistance. The signal requirement for a position uncertainty sigma less than or equal to 0.5% of the anode wire length is only 2.7 x 10 6 electron charges. The drift chamber can be operated in the linear mode and with negligible space charge effects, so that it can also be used for ΔE/ΔX measurements. A simple preamplifier optimized for both the time and charge measurements using a monolithic transistor array is described

  11. High pressure gas scintillation drift chambers with wave-shifter fiber readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Edberg, T.K.; Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Wilkerson, J.; Hurley, K.; Lin, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results from a prototype high pressure xenon gas scintillation drift chamber using a novel wave-shifter fiber readout scheme. They have measured the primary scintillation light yield to be one photon per 76 ± 12 eV deposited energy. They present initial results of our chamber for the two-interaction separation (< 4 mm in the drift direction, ∼ 7 mm orthogonal to the drift); for the position resolution (< 400 μm rms in the plane orthogonal to the drift direction); and for the energy resolution (ΔE/E < 6% FWHM at 122 keV)

  12. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W.; Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J.; Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P.; Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Dukes, E.; Golovatyuk, V.; Hanlet, P.; McManus, A.; Nelson, K.; Recagni, M.; Segal, J.; Sun, J.; Ballagh, C.; Bingham, H.; Kaeding, T.; Lys, J.; Misawa, S.; Blankman, A.; Borodin, S.; Kononenko, W.; Newcomer, M.; Selove, W.; Trojak, T.; VanBerg, R.; Zhang, S.N.; Block, M.; Corti, G.; LeCompte, T.; Rosen, J.; Yao, T.; Boden, A.; Cline, D.; Ramachandran, S.; Rhoades, J.; Tokar, S.; Budagov, J.; Tsyganov, E.; Cao, Z.L.; He, M.; Wang, C.; Wei, C.; Zhang, N.; Chen, T.Y.; Yao, N.; Clark, K.; Jenkins, M.; Cooper, M.; Creti, P.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Fortney, L.; Kowald, W.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D.; Lau, K.; Mo, G.; Trischuk, J.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized (∼1 x 2 m 2 ) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers

  13. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P. (Pavia Univ. (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy)); Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized ({approx}1 {times} 2 m{sup 2}) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers.

  14. A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting/Timing drift chambers on a FPGA board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Creti, P.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: Aurora.Pepino@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università Marconi, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting and Timing purposes has been implemented and tested on a Virtex 6 core FPGA board. The algorithm analyses and stores data coming from a Helium based drift tube instrumented by 1 GSPS fADC and represents the outcome of balancing between cluster identification efficiency and high speed performance. The algorithm can be implemented in electronics boards serving multiple fADC channels as an online preprocessing stage for drift chamber signals.

  15. Beam test of a full-length prototype of the BESIII drift chamber with the readout electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Z.H.; Chen, Y.B.; Sheng, H.Y.; Wu, L.H.; Liu, J.B.; Zhuang, B.A.; Jiang, X.S.; Zhao, Y.B.; Zhu, K.J.; Yan, Z.K.; Chen, C.; Xu, M.H.; Wang, L.; Ma, X.Y.; Tang, X.; Liu, R.G.; Jin, Y.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhang, G.F.; Wu, Z.; Li, R.Y.; Zhao, P.P.; Dai, H.L.; Li, X.P.; Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    A full-length prototype of the BESIII drift chamber together with its readout electronics was built and a beam test was performed. Two different methods, namely 'single-threshold method' and 'double-threshold method' for timing measurement, were studied. Test results show that the BESIII drift chamber and its readout electronics can reach their design specifications. The 'double-threshold method' results in a better timing accuracy and noise suppression capabilities as compared with the 'single-threshold method'

  16. Towards new analog read-out electronics for the HADES drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebusch, Michael [Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Track reconstruction in HADES is realized with 24 planar, low-mass drift chambers (MDC). About 27000 drift cells provide precise spatial information of track hit points together with energy loss information, serving for particle ID. In order to handle high rates and track densities required at the future SIS100 accelerator at FAIR, an upgrade of the MDC system is necessary, i.e. by receiving additional redundant layers of drift cells in front of the magnet. This involves new front-end electronics, as the original analog read-out ASIC (ASD8) is no longer in stock and cannot be produced due to its legacy silicon process. Employing new FEE would allow to further increase the sensitivity, e.g. providing additional valuable information for the analysis. This contribution presents a market analysis of alternative state-of-the-art technologies for the analog read-out of drift chambers. Test procedures to evaluate the suitability for the HADES MDCs are discussed and preliminary results are shown. Emphasis is put on the benefits and possible implementations of using two separate analog channels for reading out a sense wire, i.e. a fast amplifier with a discriminator for recording the arrival time of the signal pulse and a slow integrating amplifier with a time-over-threshold discriminator to measure the total charge of the pulse.

  17. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  18. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  19. A new drift chamber TDC readout for the high intensity program of the NA48 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ramusino, A C; Cartiglia, N; Chiozzi, S; Clemencic, M; Damiani, C; Gianoli, A; Milano, L; Malaguti, R; Petrucci, F; Scarpa, M

    2004-01-01

    A new read-out for the drift chambers (DCH) (8192 channels) of the NA48 experiment at CERN has been developed and realized by the Ferrara and Torino INFN sites and has taken data during the 2002 run. The core of the system is a set of 32 VME-9U Time-to-Digital- Converter boards (NA48-TDC). The NA48-TDCs record the time of arrival of signals from the DCH and store them in 40 MHz pipelined ring memories pending the trigger supervisor's decision. Dual memories and data extraction resources allow independent and simultaneous processing of level-1 and level-2 trigger requests. Time measurements are performed by the TDC-F1 commercial ASICs, having an intrinsic time resolution of 120 ps and multi-hit capabilities. The NA48-TDC board features a maximum sustained rate of 500 kHz per channel.

  20. A new drift chamber TDC readout for the high intensity program of the NA48 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcidiacono, R.; Cartiglia, N.; Chiozzi, S.; Clemencic, M.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Damiani, C.; Gianoli, A.; Milano, L.; Malaguti, R.; Petrucci, F.; Scarpa, M.

    2004-01-01

    A new read-out for the drift chambers (DCH) (8192 channels) of the NA48 experiment at CERN has been developed and realized by the Ferrara and Torino INFN sites and has taken data during the 2002 run. The core of the system is a set of 32 VME-9U Time-to-Digital-Converter boards (NA48-TDC). The NA48-TDCs record the time of arrival of signals from the DCH and store them in 40 MHz pipelined ring memories pending the trigger supervisor's decision. Dual memories and data extraction resources allow independent and simultaneous processing of level-1 and level-2 trigger requests. Time measurements are performed by the TDC-F1 commercial ASICs, having an intrinsic time resolution of 120 ps and multi-hit capabilities. The NA48-TDC board features a maximum sustained rate of 500 kHz per channel

  1. A multi-channel time-to-digital converter chip for drift chamber readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.; Chau, A.; DeBusshere, D.; Dow, S.; Flasck, J.; Levi, M.; Kirsten, F.; Su, E.

    1995-12-01

    A complete, multi-channel, timing and amplitude measurement IC for use in drift chamber applications is described. By targeting specific resolutions, i.e. 6-bits of resolution for both time and amplitude, area and power can be minimized while achieving the proper level of measurement accuracy. Time is digitized using one eight channel TDC comprised of a delay locked loop and eight sets of latches and encoders. Amplitude (for dE/dx) is digitized using a dual-range FADC for each channel. Eight bits of dynamic range with six bits of accuracy are achieved with the dual-range. The timing and amplitude information is multiplexed into one DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) trigger latency buffer. Interesting events are then transferred into an SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) readout buffer before the latency time has expired. The design has been optimized to achieve the requisite resolution using the smallest area and lowest power. The circuit has been implemented in a 0.8μ triple metal CMOS process. The TDC sub-element has been measured to have better than 135 ps time resolution and 35 ps jitter. The DRAM has a measured cycle time of 80 MHz

  2. A multi-channel time-to-digital converter chip for drift chamber readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, A.; DeBusschere, D.; Dow, S.F.; Flasck, J.; Levi, M.E.; Kirsten, F.; Su, E.; Santos, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A complete, multi-channel, timing and amplitude measurement IC for use in drift chamber applications is described. By targeting specific resolutions, i.e., 6-bits of resolution for both time and amplitude, area and power can be minimized while achieving the proper level of measurement accuracy. Time is digitized using an TDC comprised of a delay locked loop, latch and encoder. Amplitude (for dE/dx) is digitized using a dual-range FADC for each channel. Eight bits of dynamic range with six bits of accuracy are achieved with the dual-range. Eight complete channels of timing and amplitude information are multiplexed into one DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) trigger latency buffer. Interesting events are subsequently transferred into an SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) readout buffer before the latency time has expired. The design has been optimized to achieve the requisite resolution using the smallest area and lowest power. The circuit has been implemented in an 0.8 microm triple metal CMOS process. The measured results indicate that the differential non-linearities of the TDC and the FADC are 200 ps and 10 mV, respectively. The integral nonlinearities of the TDC and the FADC are 230 ps and 9 mV, respectively

  3. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  4. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  5. Right-left ambiguity resolution using field corrector readout in a large planar drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Tarte, G.

    1980-02-01

    Induced signals on field corrector wires are used to resolve the right-left ambiguity in a large planar drift chamber. Efficient separation is obtained for +-3 cm drift cells, 4 meters long. Technical problems of the method, in particular the severe geometrical constraints, are discussed. Important features of the avalanche asymmetry can be inferred from the measurements

  6. Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by timing of the electromagnetic wave propagating along the anode wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boie, R.A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    The feasibility of using an anode wire and surrounding electrodes in drift chambers as a transmission line for second coordinate readout has been studied. The method is based on propagation of the electromagnetic wave along the anode wire is determined by measurement, in an optimized electronic readout system, of the time difference between the arrivals of the signal to the ends of the wire. The resolution obtained on long wires (approx. 2 meters) is about 2 cm FWHM for minimum ionizing particles at a gas gain of approx. = 10 5

  7. The upgrade of the multiwire drift chamber readout of the HADES experiment at GSI: the optical end point board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantola, Attilio; Michel, Jan; Muentz, Christian; Stroth, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Froehlich, Ingo; Stroebele, Herbert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Kolb, Burkhard; Traxler, Michael [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Palka, Marek [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Wuestenfeld, Joern [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Forschungszentrum, Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    One of the goal of the HADES upgrade project is the realization of a new data acquisition scheme for the 24 Multiwire Drift Chambers (MDCs), which allows to increase the readout speed of the 40.000 TDC channels. On the existing MDC Front End Electronic (FEE) side an Optical End Point Board (OEPB) has been designed to control configuration and readout of the chamber's TDCs. The OEPB uses Plastic Optical Fibres (POF) for data transmission, which results in total electromagnetic immunity, amazing simplicity in handling and low power consumption. The employment of a Lattice ECP2/M FPGA with SERDES manages serial data transmission and its large resources allow for the storage of several events close-to-front-end. As 400 OEPBs will be located in the detector acceptance, dedicated FPGA hardware is used to detect Single Event Upsets (SEUs).

  8. Electronics for the CMS muon drift tube chambers the read-out minicrate

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Oller, Juan Carlos; Willmott, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    On the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experimentat the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory, the drift tube chambers are responsible for muon detection and precise momentum measurement. In this paper the first level of the read out electronics for these drift tube chambers is described. These drift tube chambers will be located inside the muon barrel detector in the so-called minicrates (MCs), attached to the chambers. The read out boards (ROBs) are the main component of this first level data acquisition system, and they are responsible for the time digitalization related to Level 1 Accept (L1A) trigger of the incoming signals from the front-end electronics, followed by a consequent data merging to the next stages of the data acquisition system. ROBs' architecture and functionality have been exhaustively tested, as well as their capability of operation beyond the expected environmental conditions inside the CMS detector. Due to the satisfactory results obtained, final production of ROBs and their a...

  9. Readout electronics for fine dE/dx sampling with a longitudinal drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, A.; Shiino, K.; Ishii, T.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, H.

    1982-04-01

    A fast, low noise preamplifier, a signal shaping filter and a fast sampling ADC circuit have been developed for fine sampling dE/dx measurement with a longitudinal drift chamber. dE/dx has been sampled with a time interval of 40 ns which corresponds to a gas thickness of 1.4 mm in Ar(90%)/CH 4 (10%). Parameters of each circuit have been adjusted to match with this sampling interval. It is found that the signal tail cancellation is crucial to obtain better dE/dx resolution when the wider drift space is used, and this can be realized with a pole-zero shortening filter and a semi-Gaussian shaping integrator. (author)

  10. Resolution and Efficiency of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers with Final Read-out Electronics at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A; Stiller, W

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a monitored drift-tube chamber for ATLAS with the final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation facility at CERN under varyin photon irradiation rates of up to 990~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$ which corresponds to 10 times the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. The signal pulse-height measurement of the final read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections. The corrections improve the average single-tube resolution from 106~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the nominal discriminator threshold of 44~mV without irradiation, and from 114~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the maximum nominal irradiation rate in ATLAS of 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The reduction of the threshold from 44~mV to 34~mV and the time-slewing corrections lead to an average single-tube resolution of 82~$\\mu$m without photon background and of 89~$\\mu$m at 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The measured muon detection efficiency agrees with the expectation for the final read-out electronics.

  11. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  12. Development of a test system for the analysis of the read-out electronic cabling for the CMS drift tube chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Montero, M.; Willmott, C.

    2004-01-01

    A test system has been developed for the analysis of the read-out electronics cabling for the CMS drift tube chambers. The read-out electronics will be placed inside some aluminium boxes, so-called Minicrates, which are going to be produced soon at CIEMAT. Due to the difficulty of detecting and repairing errors in the cables once they have been installed and recalling also to the large number of Minicrates that are going to be produced, it was decided to design and develop a test system for testing the cabling before its installation. (Author)

  13. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  14. An electrodeless drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Duerdoth, I.; Rowe, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a chamber in which the drift field is controlled by the deposition of electrostatic charge on an insulating surface. The chamber operates with good efficiency and precision for observed drift distances of up to 45 cm, promises to be extremely robust and adaptable and offers a very cheap way of making particle detectors. (orig.)

  15. Optimisation of the Read-out Electronics of Muon Drift-Tube Chambers for Very High Background Rates at HL-LHC and Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; Gadow, Philipp; Ecker, Katharina; Fink, David; Fras, Markus; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Müller, Felix; Richter, Robert; Schmid, Clemens; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Zhao, Yazhou

    2016-01-01

    In the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and sMDT chambers with half of the tube diameter of the MDTs are used for precision muon track reconstruction. The sMDT chambers are designed for operation at high counting rates due to neutron and gamma background irradiation expected for the HL-LHC and future hadron colliders. The existing MDT read-out electronics uses bipolar signal shaping which causes an undershoot of opposite polarity and same charge after a signal pulse. At high counting rates and short electronics dead time used for the sMDTs, signal pulses pile up on the undershoot of preceding background pulses leading to a reduction of the signal amplitude and a jitter in the drift time measurement and, therefore, to a degradation of drift tube efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to further increase the rate capability of sMDT tubes, baseline restoration can be used in the read-out electronics to suppress the pile-up effects. A discrete bipolar shaping circuit with baseline...

  16. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  17. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  18. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  19. Argus drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M; Nagovizin, V; Hasemann, H; Michel, E; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Wurth, R; Kim, P

    1983-11-15

    The ARGUS detector came into operation at the DORIS-II e/sup +/s/sup -/ storage ring at the end of 1982. Its two meter long drift chamber contains 5940 sense and 24588 field wires organized in uniform 18x18.8 mm/sup 2/ drift cells filling the whole volume. These cells form 36 layers, 18 of which provide stereo views. Each sense wire is equipped with a single hit TDC and ADC for coordinate and dE/dx measurements. The chamber is operated with propane to improve momentum and dE/dx resolution. The drift chamber design and initial performance are presented. With a very crude space-time relation approximation and without all the necessary corrections applied a spatial resolution of about 200 ..mu..m was obtained for half of the drift cell volume. Further corrections should improve this result. An intrinsic dE/dx resolution of 4.2% and an actual resolution of 5% were obtained for cosmic muons and also for Bhabha scattered electrons. An actual dE/dx resolution of 5.6% was obtained for pions from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data with almost no track selection. A relativistic rise of 30% was observed in good agreement with theory. The long-term stability is still to be investigated.

  20. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  1. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  2. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  3. A time projection chamber with microstrip read-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bootsma, T.M.V.; Van den Brink, A.; De Haas, A.P.; Kamermans, R.; Kuijer, P.G.; De Laat, C.T.A.M.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Ostendorf, R.; Snellings, R.J.M.; Twenhoefel, C.J.W.; Peghaire, A.

    1994-01-01

    The design and testing of a novel detector for heavy-ion physics in the intermediate-energy regime is described. This detector consists of a large drift chamber with microstrip read-out in combination with thick plastic scintillators. With this system particle identification and energy determination with high spatial resolution and multiple hit capacity is achieved. ((orig.))

  4. Drift chamber system for use in a high rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etkin, A.

    1978-01-01

    A system of short drift distance (0.125'') drift chambers is described. This system is being built for use in the Brookhaven National Laboratory Multiparticle Spectrometer. These chambers will be able to handle beam rates of several million/pulse and give a spatial resolution of the order of 150 μm. Cathode readout will provide unique 3-dimensional points for each crack. The readout will utilize three custom built integrated circuits, a four channel amplifier-shaper, a four channel discriminator and a four channel shift register delay and time digitizer. A summary of test results on a prototype is also given

  5. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  6. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  7. The PHENIX Drift Chamber Front End Electroncs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancake, C.; Velkovska, J.; Pantuev, V.; Fong, D.; Hemmick, T.

    1998-04-01

    The PHENIX Drift Chamber (DC) is designed to operate in the high particle flux environment of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and provide high resolution track measurements. It is segmented into 80 keystones with 160 readout channels each. The Front End Electronics (FEE) developed to meet the demanding operating conditions and the large number of readout channels of the DC will be discussed. It is based on two application specific integrated circuits: the ASD8 and the TMC-PHX1. The ASD8 chip contains 8 channels of bipolar amplifier-shaper-discriminator with 6 ns shaping time and ≈ 20 ns pulse width, which satisfies the two track resolution requirements. The TMC-PHX1 chip is a high-resolution multi-hit Time-to-Digital Converter. The outputs from the ASD8 are digitized in the Time Memory Cell (TMC) every (clock period)/32 or 0.78 ns (at 40 MHz), which gives the intrinsic time resolution of the system. A 256 words deep dual port memory keeps 6.4 μs time history of data at 40 MHz clock. Each DC keystone is supplied with 4 ASD8/TMC boards and one FEM board, which performs the readout of the TMC-PHX1's, buffers and formats the data to be transmitted over the Glink. The slow speed control communication between the FEM and the system is carried out over ARCNET. The full readout chain and the data aquisition system are being tested.

  8. MPS II drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed

  9. A time projection chamber with GEM-based readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attié, David [CEA Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Behnke, Ties [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Hamburg site) (Germany); Bellerive, Alain [Carleton University, Department of Physics, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Bezshyyko, Oleg [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64/13, Volodymyrska Street, City of Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Bhattacharya, Deb Sankar [CEA Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); now at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Sector 1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharya, Purba [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Sector 1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); now at National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER) Bhubaneswar, P.O. Jatni, Khurda 752050, Odisha (India); Bhattacharya, Sudeb [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Sector 1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Caiazza, Stefano [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Hamburg site) (Germany); now at Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Colas, Paul [CEA Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lentdecker, Gilles De [Inter University ULB-VUB, Av. Fr. Roosevelt 50, B1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Dehmelt, Klaus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Hamburg site) (Germany); now at State University of New York at Stony Brook, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Desch, Klaus [Universität Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Nußallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2017-06-01

    For the International Large Detector concept at the planned International Linear Collider, the use of time projection chambers (TPC) with micro-pattern gas detector readout as the main tracking detector is investigated. In this paper, results from a prototype TPC, placed in a 1 T solenoidal field and read out with three independent Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) based readout modules, are reported. The TPC was exposed to a 6 GeV electron beam at the DESY II synchrotron. The efficiency for reconstructing hits, the measurement of the drift velocity, the space point resolution and the control of field inhomogeneities are presented.

  10. System of cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Dimcovski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    A superconducting solenoid at the CERN ISR was equipped with a system of high accuracy cylindrical drift chambers. This detector consists of eight layers of field shaped drift cells with a delay line opposite each sense wire to provide coupled two dimensional readout. The design, construction, and operation of this system are discussed. The resolution and performance of the delay lines and sense wires under ISR running conditions are shown

  11. A Full Front End Chain for Drift Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Primiceri, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois (United States); Università Marconi, Roma (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    We developed a high performance full chain for drift chamber signals processing. The Front End electronics is a multistage amplifier board based on high performance commercial devices. In addition a fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting and Timing purposes has been implemented on a Xilinx-Virtex 4 core FPGA. The algorithm analyzes and stores data coming from a Helium based drift tube and represents the outcome of balancing between efficiency and high speed performance.

  12. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Olmos, P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  15. Single wire drift chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krider, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 μm rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles

  16. Data readout system on the base of CAMAC time-to-digital converters with time resolution 2 ns for a drift chamber; Sistema s{sup e}ma informatsii s drejfovykh kamer na osnove vremyatsmfrovykh preobrazovatelej s 2 ns razresheniem v standarte KAMAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorkin, V V

    1996-12-31

    Data readout system for drift chambers consists of time-to-digital converter (TDS), timer-generator (TG) and sub controller. Maximal time of conversion constitutes 12.5 m ks. Block-circuits of TDC and TG are presented and their functioning under calibration and measuring is studied as well. 4 refs.

  17. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  18. Drift velocity monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented.

  19. Proportional chambers and multiwire drift chambers at high rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walenta, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The high event and particle rates expected for ISABELLE intersecting storage rings raise the question whether PWC's and drift chambers, now widely in use in experiments, still can operate under such conditions. Various effects depend on the number of avalanches produced per length of wire N and the size of the avalanche Q, i.e., on the number of positive ions created in an avalanche. Therefore the important parameter for the following discussion is the product QN. The minimum Q is determined by the type and noise level of preamplifiers used. Examples are given for a typical low noise amplifier as well as for a typical integrated ''cheap'' amplifier. The rate/wire length N depends on the chamber arrangement, wire spacing, etc. In multiwire drift chambers, a single wire shows space-charge effects reducing the pulse height by 1% at a rate of N = 7 x 10 3 mm -1 sec -1 . At a rate of N approximately equal to 10 5 mm -1 sec -1 an efficiency loss of the order of 1% was noticed. The aging effect due to deposits on the anode wire can be reduced using low noise amplifiers and low gas gain to such an extent that a lifetime of about half a year at ISABELLE can be expected. The use of conventional cheap preamplifiers will result in a typical lifetime of about 30 days. Improvements are probable. The time resolution of Δt/sub r/ = 4 nsec fwhm seems adequate for event rates of 10 7 sec -1 . The memory time Δt/sub m/ greater than or equal to 100 nsec may cause serious problems for pattern recognition depending on layout and readout. The use of induced signals on cathode pads, thus reading out shorter parts of the wire, can solve the problem

  20. The large cylindrical drift chamber of TASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.; Fischer, H.M.; Hartmann, H.; Loehr, B.; Wollstadt, M.; Fohrmann, R.; Schmueser, P.; Cassel, D.G.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.

    1980-03-01

    We have built and operated a large cylindrical drift chamber for the TASSO experiment at the DESY storage ring, PETRA. The chamber has a length of 3.5 m, a diameter of 2.5 m, and a total of 2340 drift cells. The cells are arranged in 15 concentric layers such that tracks can be reconstructed in three dimensions. A spatial resolution of 220 μm has been achieved for tracks of normal incidence on the drift cells. (orig.)

  1. Resistive Plate Chambers for hadron calorimetry: Tests with analog readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Gary [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Repond, Jose [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: repond@hep.anl.gov; Underwood, David [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Xia, Lei [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are being developed for use in a hadron calorimeter with very fine segmentation of the readout. The design of the chambers and various tests with cosmic rays are described. This paper reports on the measurements with multi-bit (or analog) readout of either a single larger or multiple smaller readout pads.

  2. Readout and trigger electronics for the TPC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Jared, R.C.; McGathen, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Broeder, W.J.; Godfrey, G.L.

    1987-10-01

    The introduction of the vertex chamber required the addition of new front-end electronics and a new 1024-channel, high-accuracy TDC system. The preamplifier/discriminator should be capable of triggering on the first electrons and the time digitzer should preserve the measurement resolution. For the TDC's, in order to maintain compatibility with the existing TPC readout system, an upgrade of a previous inner drift chamber digitizer system has been chosen. Tests of the accuracy and stability of the original design indicated that the new design specifications would be met. The TPC detector requires a fast pretrigger to turn on its gating grid within 500 ns of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ beam crossing time, to minimize the loss of ionization information. A pretrigger based on the Straw Chamber signals, operating at a rate of about 2 K/sec, will be used for charged particle final states. In addition, in order to reject low mass Two-Photon events at the final trigger level, an accurate transverse momentum cutoff will be made by the Straw Chamber trigger logic. In this paper, we describe the readout and trigger electronics systems which have been built to satisfy the above requirements. 5 refs., 8 figs

  3. Measurement of the spatial resolution and rate capability of an induction drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderburg, E.; Broeders, R.; Dahmen, M.; Decker, G.; Kilian, K.; Kurtenbach, A.; Lippert, C.; Oelert, W.; Sehl, G.; Steinkamp, O.; Stratmann, R.; Walsh, S.; Ziolkowski, M.

    1992-01-01

    The limits of spatial resolution of an induction drift chamber (IDC) lead to the concept of an asymmetric IDC with Flash ADC readout. The construction of a chamber is described. The results of two measurements concerning the spatial resolution and the rate capability are reported. (orig.)

  4. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  5. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  6. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A general purpose program for drift chamber studies is described. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. Results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR

  7. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assiro, R.; Cappelli, L.; Cascella, M.; De Lorenzis, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Ignatov, F.; L'Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A.; Miccoli, A.; Onorato, G.; Perillo, M.; Piacentino, G.; Rella, S.; Rossetti, F.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce

  8. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiro, R.; Cappelli, L.; Cascella, M.; De Lorenzis, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Ignatov, F.; L'Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A.; Miccoli, A.; Onorato, G.; Perillo, M.; Piacentino, G.; Rella, S.; Rossetti, F.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.; Zavarise, G.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100-200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50-100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce .

  9. Properties of low-pressure drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breskin, A.; Trautner, N.

    1976-01-01

    Drift chambers operated with methylal vapour or ethylene at pressures in the range of 10-110 torr are described. A systematic study of position resolution, pulse height and rise time shows that especially for ethylene they are strongly influenced by electron diffusion. Intrinsic position resolution was found to be at least as good as found at atmospheric pressure. A relative pulse height resolution of 10% was obtained with 5.5 MeV alpha-particles. A simple mathematical model which can describe the processes in the drift chamber is presented. (Auth.)

  10. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T J

    1980-01-01

    The author describes a general purpose program for drift chamber studies. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. The results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR. (1 refs).

  11. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Laso, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  12. The drift chamber array at the external target facility in HIRFL-CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, S. T.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, Y.; Yan, D.; Tang, S. W.; Yang, H. R.; Lu, C. G.; Ma, P.; Yu, Y. H.; Zhang, X. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Su, H.

    2018-06-01

    A drift chamber array at the External Target Facility in HIRFL-CSR has been constructed for three-dimensional particle tracking in high-energy radioactive ion beam experiments. The design, readout, track reconstruction program and calibration procedures for the detector are described. The drift chamber array was tested in a 311 AMeV 40Ar beam experiment. The detector performance based on the measurements of the beam test is presented. A spatial resolution of 230 μm is achieved.

  13. Three-dimensional points from PWC's and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two aspects of the high event rates anticipated at ISABELLE are, first, the need for sophisticated triggers to select interesting events and, second, the enormous data reduction capabilities that will be required. It was concluded that both of these problems must be considered in the design of the detectors. A description is given of some of the advantages that a PWC or drift chamber system that provides correlated x-y readouts would provide, and a scheme for implementing such a detector with adequate spatial and rate capabilities is discussed

  14. Cylindrical geometry for proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1975-06-01

    For experiments performed around storage rings such as e + e - rings or the ISR pp rings, cylindrical wire chambers are very attractive. They surround the beam pipe completely without any dead region in the azimuth, and fit well with the geometry of events where particles are more or less spherically produced. Unfortunately, cylindrical proportional or drift chambers are difficult to make. Problems are discussed and two approaches to fabricating the cathodes are discussed. (WHK)

  15. Investigation of long drift chambers for a nucleon-decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, L.E.; Dawson, J.; Ayres, D.; Denis, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The use of long drift chambers for a nucleon-decay detector is discussed as a means of achieving a detector with very fine tracking, but with a modest number of readout channels. Strategies for reducing the attenuation of drifting electrons are considered, particularly the necessity of shaping the electric field to reduce the effects of diffusion and of nearby grounded conductors. Measured results are presented for a chamber with 1 cm drift gap and 50 cm maximum drift distance. The measured attenuation is 12%

  16. Wet drift chambers for precise luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.E.; Kennedy, B.W.; Ahmet, K.; Attree, D.J.; Barraclough, G.A.; Cresswell, M.J.; Hayes, D.A.; Miller, D.J.; Selby, C.; Sherwood, P.

    1994-01-01

    A set of high-precision compact drift chambers has been a vital component of the OPAL luminosity monitor since the start of data-taking at LEP. They were augmented in 1992 by the addition of Small Angle Reference Chambers with a very similar design to the original chamber. The performance of the chambers is reviewed, highlighting both the importance of using polyalkylene glycol (Breox) to maintain a uniform and parallel electric field and the construction techniques used to sustain the required field strength. We describe some of the operating problems, with their solutions, and show how the chambers have been used in achieving a systematic error of 0.41% on the luminosity measurement. ((orig.))

  17. Silicon drift chamber studies for the RHIC STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The two-hit resolution of a silicon drift chamber is measured using a pulsed Nd:Yag laser and a time digitizer readout. The data is analyzed by forming the covariance matrix in time samples, and transforming to a matrix in amplitude and time variation of each of the two hits. The resolution of the two-hit separation is found to be better than 25 microns with a drift field of 530 V/cm and a separation of more than 500 microns, with the resolution increasing to 50 microns as the separation nears 500 microns. Results are also presented for multiply ionizing tracks, showing a great improvement over single minimum ionizing. 8 refs

  18. Flexible geometry hodoscope using proportional chamber cathode read-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubret, C.; Bellefon, A. de; Benoit, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Tristram, G.

    1978-01-01

    The construction of a cathode read-out proportional chamber, used as a low mass hodoscope is described. Results on efficiency, time resolution and space resolution are shown. The associative logic, which permits the use of the chamber as a coplanarity chamber is briefly presented

  19. PWCs and drift chambers at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, H.; Teramoto, Y.; Wheeler, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    Rate effects in proportional chambers and drift chambers are addressed first. The widely used high-gas-gain chambers would have impaired performance at ISABELLE data rates. Improvement can be expected with lower gas gain, and this possibility is investigated with respect to position and time resolution. Results on chamber lifetime are summarized; space-charge effects, gain saturation, and radiation hardness of electronics are considered. The resolution of drift chambers is discussed in some detail; time resolution, double pulse resolution, and momentum resolution and multiple scattering are included. The expected high multiplicity of tracks from a single event, the high event rates, and the requirement for low gas gain necessitate revision of the methods for measuring the second coordinate. Known methods of two-dimensional point localization are summarized according to spatial accuracy, electronics requirements, and multihit capability. Delay lines, charge division, and cathode strips are considered. Particle identification by means of measurement of the relativistic rise of energy loss by conventional and unconventional means was investigated. 32 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  20. Construction of the Cleo III drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csorna, S.; Marka, S.; Dickson, M.; Dombrowski, S. von; Peterson, D.; Thies, P.; Glenn, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Kravchenko, I.

    1998-01-01

    The CLEO III group is constructing a new chamber to be installed as part of the staged luminosity upgrade program at the Cornell electron storage ring and compatible with the interaction region optics. Although having less radial extent than the current CLEO II tracking system, CLEO III will have equivalent momentum resolution because of material reduction in the drift chamber inner skin and gas. The thin inner skin requires special attention to the end-plate motion due to wire creep. During stringing, use of a robot will fully automate the wire handling on the upper end. (author)

  1. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution. (orig.)

  2. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, H J

    1987-09-15

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution.

  3. On-chamber readout system for the ATLAS MDT Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J; Ball, R; Brandenburg, G; Hazen, E; Oliver, J; Posch, C

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS MDT Muon Spectrometer is a system of approximately 380,000 pressurized cylindrical drift tubes of 3 cm diameter and up to 6 meters in length. These Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) are precision- glued to form super-layers, which in turn are assembled into precision chambers of up to 432 tubes each. Each chamber is equipped with a set of mezzanine cards containing analog and digital readout circuitry sufficient to read out 24 MDTs per card. Up to 18 of these cards are connected to an on-chamber DAQ element referred to as a Chamber Service Module, or CSM. The CSM multiplexes data from the mezzanine cards and outputs this data on an optical fiber which is received by the off-chamber DAQ system. Thus, the chamber forms a highly self-contained unit with DC power in and a single optical fiber out. The Monitored Drift Tubes, due to their length, require a terminating resistor at their far end to prevent reflections. The readout system has been designed so that thermal noise from this resistor remains the domi...

  4. Investigation of the readout electronics of DELPHI surround muon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khovanskij, N.; Krumshtejn, Z.; Ol'shevskij, A.; Sadovskij, A.; Sedykh, Yu.; Molnar, J.; Sicho, P.; Tomsa, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of the readout electronics of the DELPHI surround muon chambers with various AMPLEX chips (AMPLEX 16 and AMPLEX-SICAL) are presented. This electronics is studied in a cosmic rays test of the real surround muon chamber model. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. Resolution and Efficiency of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, M.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Mohrdieck-Mock, S.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, Robert; Staude, A.; Stiller, W.

    2016-01-01

    The resolution and efficiency of a precision drift-tube chamber for the ATLAS muon spectrometer with final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in a 100 GeV muon beam and at photon irradiation rates of up to 990 Hz/square cm which corresponds to twice the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. A silicon strip detector telescope was used as external reference in the beam. The pulse-height measurement of the read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections which lead to an improvement of the average drift-tube resolution from 104 microns to 82 microns without irradiation and from 128 microns to 108 microns at the maximum expected rate. The measured drift-tube efficiency agrees with the expectation from the dead time of the read-out electronics up to the maximum expected rate.

  6. Development, construction and test of the planar forward drift chambers of the ZEUS inner detector and analyses of chamber properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramarczyk, S.

    1993-08-01

    The three planar drift chambers FTD1-3 are part of the inner tracking system of the ZEUS detector at the ep facility HERA, DESY. Together with 2x2 transition radiation modules they form the Forward Detector which covers the range of forward (proton) angles. Development, construction and tests of the drift chambers are described, emphasizing design features and details of the manufacture. Two compensation methods were tested to annihilate the cross talk which emerges from the influence of one signal wire on the others in the same drift cell. A prototyp system of the final digital readout electronics was used together with a test cell. The single wire resolution was studied with optimized drift time algorithms. For the first time it was possible to measure the influence of the track angle on the single wire resolution of the FTDs. (orig.)

  7. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.O.; Rust, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls. (orig.)

  8. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H. O.; Rust, D. R.

    1987-03-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls.

  9. Measurement of the positron-drift time relation of a high-pressure drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruefert, W.

    1989-04-01

    As a test of its performance, the measurement of the drift time versus drift distance relation of a high pressure drift chamber using cosmic rays is described. Two multiwire proportional chambers, mounted above and below the detector, are used to define the track of the cosmic particle in the drift chamber. The drift chamber is read out by FADCs (Flash Analog to Digital Converter), and the drift time is determined from the FADC signals by the DOS- (Difference Of Samples) method. The measured drift time versus drift distance relation showed good agreement with the relation, which is expected from the spatial dependence of the electric field and the dependence of the drift velocity on this field. (orig.) [de

  10. ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Readout Sector in Lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electrons out of their atoms, which drift in the eletric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, at segments such as the one shown here, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  11. Drift chambers on the basis of Mylar tube blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Golovanov, L.; Khazins, D.; Kuritsin, A.; Pukhov, O.; Zhukov, V.

    1993-06-01

    Prototypes of drift chambers constructed of Mylar tube blocks were tested. The purpose of developing tube blocks technology was to create long chambers (up to 3-4 m). Counting and drift characteristics of the chambers for different values of the gas pressure and different diameters of sense wires are presented. The lifetime of the chambers is determined. A photoeffect in the visible spectrum on the surface of the thin film aluminium cathode, which covers the Mylar tubes was observed.

  12. Drift chambers on the basis of Mylar tube blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Golovanov, L.; Khazins, D.; Kuritsin, A.; Pukhov, U.; Zhukov, V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototypes of drift chambers constructed of Mylar tube blocks were tested. The purpose of developing tube blocks technology was to create chambers (up to 3-4 m). Counting and drift chracteristics of the chambers for different values of the gas pressure and different diameters of sense wires are presented. The lifetime of the chambers is determined. A photoeffect in the visible spectrum on the surface of the thin film aluminium cathode, which covers the Mylar tubes was observed. (orig.)

  13. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  14. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  15. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Barbosa, F.J.; Bonneau, P.; Burtin, E.; Christo, S.; Doolittle, G.; Dytman, S.A.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Klein, A.; Kossov, M.V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Magahiz, R.; Miskimen, R.A.; Murphy, L.Y.; O'Meara, J.E.; Pyron, T.D.; Qin, L.; Raue, B.A.; Schumacher, R.A.; Tuzel, W.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yegneswaran, A.

    1995-01-01

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.)

  16. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Barbosa, F.J. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bonneau, P. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Burtin, E. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Christo, S. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Doolittle, G. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dytman, S.A. [University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Gilfoyle, G.P. [University of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Hyde-Wright, C.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Kossov, M.V. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Kuhn, S.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Magahiz, R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miskimen, R.A. [University of Massachussetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Murphy, L.Y. [CE Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); O`Meara, J.E. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pyron, T.D. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Qin, L. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Raue, B.A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Schumacher, R.A. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tuzel, W. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weinstein, L.B. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yegneswaran, A. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-12-11

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.).

  17. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  18. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Ambrose, D.; Arroyo, C.; Bachman, M.; Connor, D.; Eckhause, M.; Ecklund, K.M.; Graessle, S.; Hamela, M.; Hamilton, S.; Hancock, A.D.; Hartman, K.; Hebert, M.; Hoff, C.H.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kanematsu, N.; Kuang, Y.; Lee, R.; Marcin, M.; Martin, R.D.; McDonough, J.; Milder, A.; Molzon, W.R.; Ouimette, D.; Pommot-Maia, M.; Proga, M.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Rubin, P.D.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5-mm-diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory's multiparticle spectrometer drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etkin, A.; Kramer, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A system of drift chambers is being built to replace the present spark chambers in the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Multiparticle Spectrometer. This system will handle a beam of approx. 3 million particles per second and have a resolution of 200 μm. A summary of the status of the chambers and the custom integrated circuits is presented. The data acquisition system is described. Prototype chambers have been built and tested with results that are consistent with the expected chamber properties

  20. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, K G

    1988-03-01

    Factors influencing the design of drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC and LEP are discussed including global strategy, chamber gas, cell design, and signal processing. The designs of the vertex chambers for the L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP and the Mark II experiment at the SLC are described.

  1. Two-dimensional readout in a liquid xenon ionisation chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Solovov, V; Ferreira-Marques, R; Lopes, M I; Pereira, A; Policarpo, Armando

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional readout with metal strips deposited on both sides of a glass plate is investigated aiming to assess the possibility of its use in a liquid xenon ionisation chamber for positron emission tomography. Here, we present results obtained with an alpha-source. It is shown that position resolution of <=1 mm, fwhm, can be achieved for free charge depositions equivalent to those due to gamma-rays with energy from 220 down to 110 keV.

  2. High precision straw tube chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Golutvin, I.A.; Ershov, Yu.V.

    1992-01-01

    The high precision straw chamber with cathode readout was constructed and investigated. The 10 mm straws were made of aluminized mylar strip with transparent longitudinal window. The X coordinate information has been taken from the cathode strips as induced charges and investigated via centroid method. The spatial resolution σ=120 μm has been obtained with signal/noise ratio about 60. The possible ways for improving the signal/noise ratio have been described. 7 refs.; 8 figs

  3. A high precision straw tube chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Golutvin, I.A.; Ershov, Yu.V.; Zubarev, E.V.; Ivanov, A.B.; Lysiakov, V.N.; Makhankov, A.V.; Movchan, S.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Preda, T.

    1993-01-01

    The high precision straw chamber with cathode readout was constructed and investigated. The 10 mm diameter straws were made of aluminized Mylar with transparent longitudinal window. The X-coordinate information has been taken from cathode strips as induced charges and investigated with the centroid method. The spatial resolution σ x =103 μm was obtained at a signal-to-noise ratio of about 70. The possible ways to improve the signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Dielectron analysis in p-p collisions at 3.5 GeV with the HADES spectrometer. ω-meson line shape and a new electronics readout for the multi-wire drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantola Peloni, Attilio

    2011-06-01

    four. The final part of this work is dedicated to the HADES upgrade, whose goal is among others the achievement of a reliable and fast data acquisition of the Multiwire Drift Chambers (MDCs). Chapter five presents my contribution to this successful project during the three years of my stay at GSI. (orig.)

  5. Dielectron analysis in p-p collisions at 3.5 GeV with the HADES spectrometer. {omega}-meson line shape and a new electronics readout for the multi-wire drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantola Peloni, Attilio

    2011-06-15

    . Conclusions are given in chapter four. The final part of this work is dedicated to the HADES upgrade, whose goal is among others the achievement of a reliable and fast data acquisition of the Multiwire Drift Chambers (MDCs). Chapter five presents my contribution to this successful project during the three years of my stay at GSI. (orig.)

  6. Drift chambers on the basis of mylar tubing blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.A.; Golovanov, L.B.; Kuritsin, A.A.; Pukhov, O.E.; Khazins, D.M.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.E.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna; Zhukov, V.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    We tested the models of the drift chambers, which are constructed of mylar tubing blocks. The purpose of the tubing block forming technology is to create long chambers (up to 3-4 meters). There are count and drift characteristics of the chambers for different gas pressures and different diameters of sense wires. The service time of the chambers is defined. We registered a photoeffect in the visible spectrum area, which is displayed on the surface of the mylar film cathode, covered by aluminium. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  7. Transport of Na48 Drift Chambers to Dubna

    CERN Multimedia

    GOLOVATYUK, V

    2010-01-01

    On 22 July, in the occasion of the departure of the Na48 Drift Chambers from CERN, Mikhail Itkis (acting Director of the JIINR) and Rolf Heuer (CERN Director General) visited the NA62 experimental area.

  8. Tracking chamber made of 15-mm mylar drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhin, A.; Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Plotnikov, I.

    2017-05-01

    We are presenting a drift chamber composed from three layers of mylar drift tubes with outer diameter 15 mm. The pipe is made of strip of mylar film 125 micrometers thick covered with aluminium from the both sides. A strip of mylar is wrapped around the mandrel. Pipe is created by ultrasonic welding. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g wire tension without supports and internal overpressure. About 400 such tubes were assembled. Design, quality control procedures of the drift tubes are described. Seven chambers were glued from these tubes of 560 mm length. Each chamber consists of 3 layers, 16 tubes per layer. Several chambers were tested with cosmic rays. Results of the tests, counting rate plateau and coordinate resolution are presented.

  9. Tracking chamber made of 15-mm mylar drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhin, A.; Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Plotnikov, I.

    2017-01-01

    We are presenting a drift chamber composed from three layers of mylar drift tubes with outer diameter 15 mm. The pipe is made of strip of mylar film 125 micrometers thick covered with aluminium from the both sides. A strip of mylar is wrapped around the mandrel. Pipe is created by ultrasonic welding. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g wire tension without supports and internal overpressure. About 400 such tubes were assembled. Design, quality control procedures of the drift tubes are described. Seven chambers were glued from these tubes of 560 mm length. Each chamber consists of 3 layers, 16 tubes per layer. Several chambers were tested with cosmic rays. Results of the tests, counting rate plateau and coordinate resolution are presented.

  10. Cost effective electronics for proportional and drift chambers of 'EPECUR' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.G.; Andreev, V.A.; Budkovsky, P.E.; Filimonov, E.A.; Golubev, V.V.; Kanavets, V.P.; Kats, M.M.; Koroleva, L.I.; Kovalev, A.I.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kozlov, V.S.; Krivshich, A.G.; Kulikov, V.V.; Morozov, B.V.; Nesterov, V.M.; Novinsky, D.V.; Ryltsov, V.V.; Sadler, M.E.; Sakharov, V.A.; Soboyede, D.; Sulimov, A.D.; Sumachev, V.V.; Svirida, D.N.; Trautman, V.Yu.; Walker, E.; Watson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The 'EPECUR' experimental setup is under construction at beam line 322 of the ITEP proton synchrotron. The experiment requires several large area drift chambers to provide reasonable acceptance and fine-pitch proportional chambers for beam particle tracking. The total number of electronic channels is about 7000. A new compact and cost effective readout system for these gaseous detectors was designed, prototyped and tested in the last two years. It is based on modern technologies in analog and digital electronics and data transfer protocols. This paper presents the functional description of the whole DAQ system, including test results as an illustration of its performance

  11. Tracking and vertex finding with drift chambers and neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.

    1991-09-01

    Finding tracks, track vertices and event vertices with neural networks from drift chamber signals is discussed. Simulated feed-forward neural networks have been trained with back-propagation to give track parameters using Monte Carlo simulated tracks in one case and actual experimental data in another. Effects on network performance of limited weight resolution, noise and drift chamber resolution are given. Possible implementations in hardware are discussed. 7 refs., 10 figs

  12. A drift chamber system for a toroidal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, F.J.; Christo, S.; Cuevas, C.; Doolittle, G.; Doughty, D.C.; Hutton, C.; Joyce, D.; Mecking, B.A.; Mestayer, M.D.; Niczyporuk, B.; O'Meara, J.E.; Tilles, D.; Tuzel, W.; Yegneswaran, A.

    1992-01-01

    We present design details for drift chambers to be used in the CLAS detector at CEBAF. Novel features include nonparallel endplates fabricated from composite materials, a gas mixture which includes helium to reduce multiple scattering, low wire tension, and a hexagonal cell layout. Magnetic field strength in the active region ranges from 0 to 2 T, and wire length varies from 10 to 300 cm. We discuss specific construction details for the outer drift chambers. (orig.)

  13. A drift chamber system for a toroidal detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F.J.; Christo, S.; Cuevas, C.; Doolittle, G.; Doughty, D.C.; Hutton, C.; Joyce, D.; Mecking, B.A.; Mestayer, M.D.; Niczyporuk, B.; O' Meara, J.E.; Tilles, D.; Tuzel, W.; Yegneswaran, A. (CEBAF, Newport News, VA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    We present design details for drift chambers to be used in the CLAS detector at CEBAF. Novel features include nonparallel endplates fabricated from composite materials, a gas mixture which includes helium to reduce multiple scattering, low wire tension, and a hexagonal cell layout. Magnetic field strength in the active region ranges from 0 to 2 T, and wire length varies from 10 to 300 cm. We discuss specific construction details for the outer drift chambers. (orig.).

  14. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.; Johns, K.

    1992-10-01

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We'll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers

  15. Test of a high resolution drift chamber prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comminchau, V.; Deutschmann, M.; Draheim, K.J.; Fritze, P.; Hangarter, K.; Hawelka, P.; Herten, U.; Tonutti, M.; Anderhub, H.; Fehlmann, J.; Hofer, H.; Klein, M.; Paradiso, J.A.; Schreiber, J.; Viertel, G.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of a drift chamber prototype for a colliding beam vertex detector in a test beam at DESY is described. At one (two) atmosphere gas pressure a spatial resolution of 40 μm (30 μm) per wire for one cm drift length was achieved with a 100 MHz Flash-ADC system. An excellent double track resolution of better than 300 μm over the full drift length of 5 cm can be estimated. (orig.)

  16. Studies of Read-Out Electronics and Trigger for Muon Drift Tube Detectors at High Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. For precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs-Boson and searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model, the LHC luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ is planned to be increased by a factor of ten leading to the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In order to cope with the higher background and data rates, the LHC experiments need to be upgraded. In this thesis, studies for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer are presented with respect to the read-out electronics of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) and the small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers and the Level-1 muon trigger. Due to the reduced tube diameter of sMDT chambers, background occupancy and space charge effects are suppressed by an order of magnitude compar...

  17. Continuously live image processor for drift chamber track segment triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, A.; Chen, H.K.; Dao, K.

    1999-01-01

    The first portion of the BaBar experiment Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger pipeline is the Track Segment Finder (TSF). Using a novel method incorporating both occupancy and drift-time information, the TSF system continually searches for segments in the supercells of the full 7104-wire Drift Chamber hit image at 3.7 MHz. The TSF was constructed to operate in a potentially high beam-background environment while achieving high segment-finding efficiency, deadtime-free operation, a spatial resolution of 5 simulated physics events

  18. Construction of a drift chamber prototype for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdugo, J.; Cerrada, M.; Daniel, M.; Martin, F.; Mocholi, J.; Romero, L.

    1997-01-01

    General design features of a small size drift chamber prototype are described in this report. Prototype construction has taken place at CIEMAT and we explain in detail the assembly procedure. This activity is part of a long term project to mass produce chambers for the muon barrel detector of the CMS experiment which will be installed at CERN. (Author)

  19. Trigger drift chamber for the MKII upgrade at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.

    1984-06-01

    The design and fabrication work for the small trigger drift chamber are now advanced enough to permit a fairly detailed specification of this device as it will appear for installation in the detector next fall. This note contains a description of the trigger chamber design

  20. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. H.; Wesson, D. K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A. T.; Robertson, W. J.; Walker, W. D.

    1991-06-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  1. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  2. Assembly of Drift Tubes (DT) Chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid)

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    The construction of muon drift tube chambers (DT) has been carried out in four different european institutes: Aachen (Germany), CIEMAT-Madrid (Spain), Legnaro and Turin (Italy), all of them following similar procedures and quality tests. Each chamber is composed by three or two independent units called superlayers, with four layers of staggered drift cells each. The assembly of a superlayer is a succesive glueing of aluminium plates and I-beams with electrodes previously attached, forming a rectangular and gas-tight volume. These pictures illustrate the various processes of material preparation, construction, equipment and assembly of full chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid).

  3. The 'KATOD-1' strip readout ASIC for cathode strip chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.A.; Gorbunov, N.V.; Karzhavin, V.Yu.; Khabarov, V.S.; Movchan, S.A.; Smolin, D.A.; Dvornikov, O.V.; Shumejko, N.M.; Chekhovskij, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The 'KATOD-1', a 16-channels readout ASIC, has been designed to perform tests of P3 and P4 full-scale prototypes of the cathode strip chamber for the ME1/1 forward muon station of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The ASIC channel consists of two charge-sensitive preamplifiers, a three-stage shaper with cancellation, and an output driver. The ASIC is instrumented with control of gain, in the range of (-4.2 : +5.0) mV/fC, and control of output pulse-shape. The equivalent input noise is equal to 2400 e with the slope of 12 e/pF for detector capacity up to 200 pF. The peaking time is 100 ns for the chamber signal. The ASIC has been produced by a microwave Bi-jFET technology

  4. The "KATOD-1" Strip Readout ASIC for Cathode Strip Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, I A; Karjavin, V Yu; Khabarov, V S; Movchan, S A; Smolin, D A; Dvornikov, O V; Shumeiko, N M; Tchekhovski, V A

    2001-01-01

    The "KATOD-1", a 16-channels readout ASIC, has been designed to perform tests of P3 and P4 full-scale prototypes of the cathode strip chamber for the ME1/1 forward muon station of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The ASIC channel consists of two charge-sensitive preamplifiers, a three-stage shaper with tail cancellation, and an output driver. The ASIC is instrumented with control of gain, in the range of (-4.2\\div +5.0) mV/fC, and control of output pulse-shape. The equivalent input noise is equal to 2400 e with the slope of 12 e/pF for detector capacity up to 200 pF. The peaking time is 100 ns for the chamber signal. The ASIC has been produced by a microwave Bi-jFET technology.

  5. PWCs and drift chambers at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, H.; Teramoto, Y.; Wheeler, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    At the 1977 Workshop, attempts were made to predict the behavior of proportional wire chambers at the high particle flux expected at ISABELLE. It was found that chambers running at the now widely used high gas gain would have impaired performance with regard to lifetime, efficiency, stability of gas gain, and position resolution. More information has since become available, and therefore the predictions about these properties are revised in the present study. Improvement can also be expected with much lower gas gain, a possibility that is investigated here in more detail with regard to its effect on position resolution and time resolution. The expected high multiplicity of tracks from a single event, the high event rates, and the requirement for low gas gain necessitate revision of the methods for measuring the second coordinate. Particle identification via measurement of the relativistic rise of energy loss in the chambers has been investigated in more detail than previously, with new data and calculations

  6. Behaviour of large cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, W. de; Fues, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Moss, L.

    1980-04-01

    We describe the construction and behaviour of a set of cylindrical drift chambers operating inside a superconducting solenoid with a central magnetic field of 1.3 T. The chambers are part of the 4 π detector CELLO at the e + e - storage ring PETRA in Hamburg. The chambers were designed without field shaping to keep them as simple as possible. In order to parametrize accurately the nonlinear space-time relation, we used a computer simulation of the drift process in inhomogenous electric and magnetic fields. With such a parametrization we achieved a resolution of 210 μm, averaged over the whole drift cell and angles of incidence up to 30 0 . (orig.)

  7. The drift chamber system of the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Malte, E-mail: malte.hildebrandt@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-11-01

    The MEG experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and is aiming for a sensitivity of 10{sup -13} in the branching ratio in order to probe new physics beyond the standard model. The experiment is located at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland, where one of the world's most intensive surface muon beams is located. Physics data taking started in September 2008. The drift chamber system is part of the innovative positron spectrometer of the MEG experiment and consists of 16 drift chamber modules. The system is designed to ensure precision measurement of 52.8 MeV/c positrons. Design, construction, geometrical alignment and performance of the drift chamber system are presented.

  8. Performance of the front-end signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, A.; Haller, G.M.; Usher, T.; Shypit, R.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on the performance of the front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. The electronics mounted on printed circuit boards include up to 64 channels of transimpedance amplification, analog sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control circuitry. Measurements of the time resolution, gain, noise, linearity, crosstalk, and stability of the readout electronics are described and presented. The expected contribution of the electronics to the relevant drift chamber measurement resolutions (i.e., timing and charge division) is given

  9. Mechanical structure of the TOPAZ barrel drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, T.; Maruyama, K.; Okuno, H.

    1987-07-01

    A Barrel Drift Chamber (BDC) is constructed for the TOPAZ experiment at TRISTAN, KEK. The BDC has a cylindrical shape with dimensions of 325.2 cm in inner diameter, 347.2 cm in outer diameter and 500 cm long. It consists of 1232 drift tubes made of conductive plastic cathodes, which are staggered in four layers. In this report, a design of the mechanical structure and construction procedures are described in detail. (author)

  10. Drift chambers in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2017-01-01

    In first step, the radius vs drift time calibration curve is estimated and applied to calculate DCH hit closest approach coordinates. These coordinates are used to construct hits in each DCH under the assumption of track linearity. Hits in both the DCHs are subsequently aligned and fitted to produce global linear track candidates. Eventually the hit and track reconstruction is optimized by the autocalibration method. The coordinate resolutions are estimated from Gaussian fits of the DCH hit residual spectra for different DCH planes. Furthermore, the deuteron beam momentum value is reconstructed in order to check reliability of the employed track reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Construction and test of a silicon drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, P.

    1985-06-01

    The present thesis presents the first fully applicable silicon detectors which work as drift chambers. Four different types of detectors were constructed. By a suitable geometry and electronic lay-out one- and two-dimensional position measurements were made possible. Chapter 2 describes function and construction of the detectors, chapter 3 their fabrication process. In chapter 4 construction and results of the test of a silicon drift chamber under laboratory conditions are described. By variation of the applied voltages the optimal operational conditions could be determined and material properties of the silicon, as for instance the electron mobility measured. A position resolution better than 5 μm at a drift length up to 4 mm was reached. Chapter 5 presents the results of the test of a silicon drift chamber under real experimental conditions in a particle beam of the super proton synchroton (SPS) of CERN. The best position resolution measured there is 10 μm. Chapter 6 summarizes the obtained results and discusses finally application possibilities and improvement proposals for silicon drift chambers. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Drift Chambers Simulations in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drift chambers constitute an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. GEANT programming package is employed to investigate the drift chamber response to particles produced in relativistic nuclear collisions of C+C nuclei, which are simulated by the UrQMD and LAQGSM Monte Carlo generators. These simulations are combined with the first BM@N experimental data to estimate particle track coordinates and their errors.

  13. A hybrid multiwire proportional-drift chamber for use in gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crannell, H.; Maurer, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    The direction of an incident high-energy gamma ray can be determined by accurately measuring the direction of the electron-positron pair created by the photon conversion. The operation of a hybrid multiwire-drift proportional chamber is described. Track position is obtained to within a small fraction of the anode wire spacing over a wide range of incident angles. Both track position and angle information are obtained from a single anode-plane crossing. A method of employing a multiple delay-line readout to obtain the position and direction of both members of an electron-positron pair

  14. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.H.; Wesson, D.K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A.T.; Robertson, W.J.; Walker, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider. (orig.)

  15. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers

  16. Dimethyl ether as a drift-chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Casaccia, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; D'Ali, G.; Del Papa, C.; Focardi, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Maccarrone, G.; Massam, T.; Motta, F.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Prisco, G.; Sartorelli, G.; Susinno, G.; Votano, L.; Zichichi, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna; European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor; Palermo Univ.

    1986-01-01

    We have continued the testing of dimethyl ether as a drift-chamber gas in order to improve the understanding of its properties. In particular, we report on measurement accuracy, on systematic effects, and some preliminary data on the ageing of a detector filled with dimethyl ether. (orig.)

  17. Design and performance of the large HERMES drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuther, S.; Boettcher, H.; Ferstl, M.; Gute, A.; Harder, U.; Krause, B.; Meissner, F.; Nowak, W.D.; Schmidt, F.; Schwind, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    Big planar drift chambers built for the downstream tracking system of the HERMES spectrometer are described. Using the fast non-flammable gas mixture Ar/CO 2 /CF 4 (90/5/5) average spatial resolutions of about 180 μm per plane at efficiencies above 96% have been obtained from test run data analysis. (orig.)

  18. The large size straw drift chambers of the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bychkov, V N; Dünnweber, W; Faessler, Martin A; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Geyer, R; Gousakov, Yu V; Grünemaier, A; Heinsius, F H; Ilgner, C; Ivanchenko, I M; Kekelidze, G D; Königsmann, K C; Livinski, V V; Lysan, V M; Marzec, J; Matveev, D A; Mishin, S V; Mialkovski, V V; Novikov, E A; Peshekhonov, V D; Platzer, K; San, M; Schmid, T; Shokin, V I; Sissakian, A N; Viriasov, K S; Wiedner, U; Zaremba, K; Zhukov, I A; Zlobin, Y L; Zvyagin, A

    2005-01-01

    Straw drift chambers are used for the Large Area Tracking (LAT) of the Common Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) at CERN. An active area of 130 m2 in total is covered by 12 440 straw tubes, which are arranged in 15 double layers. The design has been optimized with respect to spatial resolution, rate capability, low material budget and compactness of the detectors. Mechanical and electrical design considerations of the chambers are discussed as well as new production techniques. The mechanical precision of the chambers has been determined using a CCD X-ray scanning apparatus. Results about the performance during data taking in COMPASS are described.

  19. Design and performance of the new cathode readout proportional chambers in LASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiken, G.; Aston, D.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1980-10-01

    The design and construction of a new proportional chamber system for the LASS spectrometer are discussed. This system consists of planar and cylindrical chambers employing anode wire and cathode strip readout techniques. The good timing characteristics of anode readout combine with the excellent spatial resolution of cathode readout to provide powerful and compact detectors. Preliminary resolution data are presented along with operating characteristics of the various devices

  20. Electroluminescent drift chamber with 16 μm spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskakov, V.I.; Dolgoshein, V.A.; Lebedenko, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    Studied are the characteristics of the dft electroluminscent chamber of an original design. For insuring high spatial resolution, the chamber has been filled with xenon to a pressure of 20 atm, which substantially decreases the electron diffusion during drift. Located at the end of the drift gap is an anode wire, 50 μm in dia. A strong electric field available near the thin wire causes electroluminescence of the electrons. The signal is localized within a small volume and contribution of the luminescence time in the total duration of a signal is small. In this case no electron multiplication occurs at all and, consequently, no space charge of positive ions takes place, which makes it possible to operate at very high loadings (2x10 6 particle/s). The characteristics of the chamber are measured in a beam of the Serpukhov accelerator. Use has been made of a model comprising two chambers, 5 mm thick, located successively along the beam with the effective area being 40x40 mm. The studies and analysis performed reveal that the drift electroluminescent chamber operates reliably in the wide range of the working gas pressure at an intensity of the incident particles up to 10 5 particle/s. The best resolution is obtained at a pressure of 20 atm and it equals 16 μm

  1. PDC: A wire chamber cathode read-out on 6-bit fast ADC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, M; Gasparini, F; Meneguzzo, A T; Pitacco, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy); Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1984-06-01

    A read-out for MWPC and drift chamber is presented in which the coordinate along the sense wires is obtained by measuring the centre of gravity (CoG) of the charge induced on cathode strips or pads. The peak value of the signals coming from subsets of 8-pad cathodes are recorded by a parallel sample and hold, strobed by their own OR, and then serially digitized by one 6-bit fast ADC (FADC). The basic module of the system is a peak detector and converter (PDC) built in CAMAC cards, which could be an interesting approach to the analog signal acquisition of large particle detectors. The system has been designed to equip the central detector in an experiment at the CERN LEAR facility. A prototype of a card will be described and the results of some tests will be presented.

  2. Drift chamber performance in the field of a superconducting magnet: measurement of the drift angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.; Sherman, S.; McDonald, K.T.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of the first measurements in a study of drift chamber performance in magnetic fields up to 6 tesla. The angle of the electron drift was measured as a function of electric and magnetic field intensity. It appears that even at the high fields of superconducting magnets (3 to 6 tesla) the drift angle induced by the Lorentz force can be corrected for with tilted electric drift fields and/or the use of Xenon gas. At 3 tesla a drift field tilted at 45 0 with a magnitude of 3.5 kV/cm should restore normal operating conditions. At 4 tesla, a 45 0 tilt field would have a magnitude 5 kV/cm

  3. Stereo: cylindrical drift chamber for muon decay experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, R.D.; Carlini, R.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Frank, J.S.; Hart, V.E.; Matis, H.S.; Mischke, R.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Sennhauser, U.

    1983-01-01

    A stereo, cylindrical drift chamber has been built for use in a search for rare decay modes of the muon at LAMPF. This chamber (part of the Crystal Box detector) has 728 cells on 8 concentric annuli at alternating angles of 10 0 to 16 0 from the chamber axis and with radii from 105 to 220 mm. The basic cell cross section is (9 x 10) mm 2 and the inter-layer spacing is 4.7 mm. Preliminary results show the single-wire efficiencies to be greater than 99%. Based on results obtained from prototype chambers, we hope to achieve 170-μm resolution (including multiple scattering) when TDC offsets and sense-wire locations found in a careful inspection of the endplates are added to the track-finding algorithm

  4. Performance of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the performance of the CMS drift tube barrel muon system are described, with results based on data collected during the CMS Cosmic Run at Four Tesla. For most of these data, the solenoidal magnet was operated with a central field of 3.8 T. The analysis of data from 246 out of a total of 250 chambers indicates a very good muon reconstruction capability, with a coordinate resolution for a single hit of about 260 microns, and a nearly 100% efficiency for the drift tube cells. The resolution of the track direction measured in the bending plane is about 1.8 mrad, and the efficiency to reconstruct a segment in a single chamber is higher than 99%. The CMS simulation of cosmic rays reproduces well the performance of the barrel muon detector.

  5. Multiple time digitizers and a trigger system for drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, K.; Engster, C.; Koningsveld, L. van; Por, G.; Verweij, H.

    1980-01-01

    The architecture of a readout system is described which will be used in conjunction with the muon detector in the UA-1 experiment at the anti pp collider at CERN. In addition to measuring drift time for spatial information, the system provides a fast trigger (< 1 μs after drift time) and a second level trigger decision based on a fast microprocessor. The fast trigger part allows the use of the muon detector as an active trigger element, while a second level trigger decision using detailed digitizer data is included for adequate reduction of the trigger rate. The multipole time digitizer (MTD) is based on the use of fast RAMs (256 x 4) as 125 MHz shift registers, giving time bins of 8 ns and a time range of 2 μs (256 x 8 ns). The high input rate has imposed a fast readout and transfer to a buffer in the controller. The data in this buffer is reordered according to wire number and corresponding times. Together with look-up tables this allows fast processing of the data for a second level trigger. (orig.)

  6. Dφ vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D OE experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO 2 (95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with [9.74+8.68(|E|-1.25)] μm/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < |E| z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 μm or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 μm. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-01-01

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  8. Construction of a full-length prototype of the BESIII drift chamber and on-detector test for the BESIII drift chamber electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhonghua; Wu Linghui; Liu Jianbei; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yan Zhikang; Hunan Univ., Changsha; Chen Yuanbo; Chen Chang; Xu Meihang; Wang Lan; Ma Xiaoyan; Jin Yan; Liu Rongguang; Tang Xiao; Zhang Guifang; Zhu Qiming; Sheng Huayi; Zhu Kejun

    2007-01-01

    A full-length prototype of the BESIII drift chamber was built. The experience gained on gas sealing, high voltage supply and front-end electronics installation should be greatly beneficial to the successful construction of the BESIII drift chamber. An on-detector test of the BESIII drift chamber electronics was carried out with the constructed prototype chamber. The noise performance, drift time and charge measurements, and electronics gains were examined specifically. The final test results indicate that the electronics have a good performance and can satisfy their design requirements. (authors)

  9. Dimethylether: a low velocity, low diffusion drift chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, F.

    1983-01-01

    There are two main motivations to look for a low electron mobility gas: the first is that a low drift velocity relaxes the need to measure drift times with nanosecond (or even subnanosecond) precision; the second is that (in an ideal drift geometry), the capability of resolving two closely spaced tracks depends upon the ratio of electron mobility to ion mobility μ/sub e//μ/sub i/. Since μ/sub i/ is rather constant, the way to separate two tracks is to slow down the electrons. Many other properties are required besides low mobility and low drifting electron temperature: the gas should have a large (> 10 3 ) stable gain; it must be chemically stable and not oxic; it should not attack materials commonly used to fabricate drift chambers, etc. With these requirements in mind, we have tried a few promising (on paper) gases, either pure or in admixture with Argon. One of the gases examined, dimethylether [(CH 3 ) 2 )], has shown interesting characteristics

  10. Printed low velocity delay lines for cathode readout of proportional chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshard, R.; Chase, R.L.; Fischer, J.; Radeka, V.

    1974-01-01

    A readout which simultaneously insures a correct electric field, a satisfactory induced signal, the delay function itself, and low particle scattering is described for multiwire proportional chambers. (U.S.)

  11. Data readout system for proportional chambers; Sistema schityvaniya informatsii s proportsional`nykh kamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, N I; Sidorov, V T

    1996-12-31

    Paper studies data readout system designed for data output from proportional chambers with up to 1000 channel total number. Short descriptions of the above mentioned units made according to CAMAC standard and their main characteristics are presented here. 2 figs.

  12. Search for the best timing strategy in high-precision drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1983-06-01

    Computer simulated drift chamber pulses are used to investigate various possible timing strategies in the drift chambers. In particular, the leading edge, the multiple threshold and the flash ADC timing methods are compared. Although the presented method is general for any drift geometry, we concentrate our discussion on the jet chambers where the drift velocity is about 3 to 5 cm/μsec and the individual ionization clusters are not resolved due to a finite speed of our electronics

  13. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation; Calculo de los parametros caracteristicos de camaras de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez-Laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Assembly techniques for ultra-low mass drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assiro, R.; Cascella, M.; Grancagnolo, F.; L'Erario, A.; Miccoli, A.; Rella, S.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.

    2014-01-01

    We presents a novel technique for the fast assembly of next generation ultra low mass drift chambers offering space point resolution of the order of 100 μm and high tolerance to pile-up. The chamber design has been developed keeping in mind the requirements for the search of rare processes: high resolutions (order of 100–200 KeV/c) for particles momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution (e.g., muon and kaon decay experiment such as MEG at PSI and Mu2e and ORKA at Fermilab). We describe a novel wiring strategy enabling the semiautomatic wiring of a complete layer with a high degree of control over wire tension and position. We also present feed-through-less wire anchoring system. These techniques have been already implemented at INFN-Lecce in the construction of a prototype drift chamber to be soon tested with cosmic rays and particle beams

  15. Assembly techniques for ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiro, R.; Cascella, M.; Grancagnolo, F.; L'Erario, A.; Miccoli, A.; Rella, S.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.

    2014-03-01

    We presents a novel technique for the fast assembly of next generation ultra low mass drift chambers offering space point resolution of the order of 100 μm and high tolerance to pile-up. The chamber design has been developed keeping in mind the requirements for the search of rare processes: high resolutions (order of 100-200 KeV/c) for particles momenta in a range (50-100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution (e.g., muon and kaon decay experiment such as MEG at PSI and Mu2e and ORKA at Fermilab). We describe a novel wiring strategy enabling the semiautomatic wiring of a complete layer with a high degree of control over wire tension and position. We also present feed-through-less wire anchoring system. These techniques have been already implemented at INFN-Lecce in the construction of a prototype drift chamber to be soon tested with cosmic rays and particle beams.

  16. Status of the construction of the KLOE Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Agnello, S.

    1997-01-01

    A status report on the construction of the drift chamber for the KLOE experiment at the LNF DAΦNE Φ-factory is given. Physics requirements, detector design performance and its key mechanical features and components are briefly reviewed. The program currently consists of (i) the preparation of final detector components, complemented by (ii) extensive tests of prototypes of critical mechanical parts (like the end plates) and the ''test construction'' of a 1:1 chamber prototype. These two sub-programs are pursued in parallel. Single-component prototype checks include surveys of their shape and size, of accuracy of wire-hole drilling, measurements of their displacement or buckling under nominal load. The ''test construction'' is the debugging of mechanical assembly, survey and alignment of mechanics and of wire-stringing robotics, the actual stringing of a sample 2000 holes drilled on the prototype end plates, the measurement of electrical properties of strung wires, as well as of their mechanical tension. These extensive tests have been successfully completed; they represent an effective hands-on training of the construction group, and will allow a prompt and steady start of the drift chamber wire stringing as all necessary components became available at LNF. (orig.)

  17. Feasibility tests of a high resolution sampling radial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huth, J.

    1985-01-01

    The design concept and results of feasibility tests for a vertex detector intended for use in the TPC-PEP4/9 experiment are presented. The detector is based on a slow radial drift in dimethyl ether. High resolution localization of the avalanches at the sense wire is accomplished with nearby pickup wires and the utilization of waveform sampling electronics. The avalanche angular coordinate measurements, combined with knowledge of the electric field distribution and drift velocity permit reconstruction of the trajectory using essentially all track information. Measurements with a test chamber constructed to study characteristics of avalanche localization indicate that the recoverable track information in one centimeter of dimethyl ether at 1.5 atm is equivalent to 30 measurements of 40 μm accuracy. (orig.)

  18. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  19. Gas-mixing system for drift chambers using solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Sugano, K.; Trentlage, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    We describe an inexpensive system for mixing argon and ethane drift chamber gas which is used for the E-605 experiment at Fermilab. This system is based on the idea of intermittent mixing of gases with fixed mixing flow rates. A dual-action pressure switch senses the pressure in a mixed gas reservoir tank and operates solenoid valves to control mixing action and regulate reservoir pressure. This system has the advantages that simple controls accurately regulate the mixing ratio and that the mixing ratio is nearly flow rate independent. We also report the results of the gas analysis of various samplings, and the reliability of the system in long-term running

  20. The GlueX central drift chamber: Design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Haarlem, Y.; Meyer, C.A.; Barbosa, F.; Dey, B.; Lawrence, D.; Razmyslovich, V.; Smith, E.; Visser, G.; Whitlatch, T.; Wilkin, G.; Zihlmann, B.

    2010-01-01

    Tests and studies concerning the design and performance of the GlueX Central Drift Chamber (CDC) are presented. A full-scale prototype was built to test and steer the mechanical and electronic design. Small scale prototypes were constructed to test for sagging and to do timing and resolution studies of the detector. These studies were used to choose the gas mixture and to program a Monte Carlo simulation that can predict the detector response in an external magnetic field. Particle identification and charge division possibilities were also investigated.

  1. The CERES/NA45 radial drift Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamová, D.; Agakichiev, G.; Antończyk, D.; Appelshäuser, H.; Belaga, V.; Bielčíková, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Cherlin, A.; Damjanović, S.; Dietel, T.; Dietrich, L.; Drees, A.; Dubitzky, W.; Esumi, S. I.; Filimonov, K.; Fraenkel, Z.; Garabatos, C.; Glässel, P.; Hering, G.; Holeczek, J.; Kushpil, V.; Marín, A.; Milošević, J.; Milov, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Musa, L.; Panebrattsev, Y.; Pechenova, O.; Petráček, V.; Pfeiffer, A.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Richter, M.; Sako, H.; Schäfer, E.; Schmitz, W.; Schukraft, J.; Seipp, W.; Sharma, A.; Shimansky, S.; Stachel, J.; Šumbera, M.; Tilsner, H.; Tserruya, I.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Windelband, B.; Wurm, J. P.; Xie, W.; Yurevich, S.; Yurevich, V.

    2008-08-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of the first radial drift Time Projection Chamber (TPC) are presented. The TPC was built and installed at the CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS in the late nineties, with the objective to improve the momentum resolution of the spectrometer. The upgraded experiment took data twice, in 1999 and in 2000. After a detailed study of residual distortions a spatial resolution of 340 μm in the azimuthal and 640 μm in the radial direction was achieved, corresponding to a momentum resolution of Δp/p=√{(1%·p/GeV)2+(2%)2}.

  2. The CERES/NA45 radial drift Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073202; Antonczyk, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Bielcikova, J; Braun-Munzinger, P; Campagnolo, R; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Dubitzky, W; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Mikowiec, D; Musa, L; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pechenova, O; Petretracek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schäfer, E; Schmitz, W; Schükraft, J; Seipp, W; Sharma, A; Shimansky, S; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienoldh, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2008-01-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of the first radial drift Time Projection Chamber (TPC) are presented. The TPC was built and installed at the CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS in the late nineties, with the objective to improve the momentum resolution of the spectrometer. The upgraded experiment took data twice, in 1999 and in 2000. After a detailed study of residual distortions a spatial resolution of 340 um in the azimuthal and 640 um in the radial direction was achieved, corresponding to a momentum resolution of Dp/p = sqrt{(1% * p/GeV)^2 + (2%)^2}.

  3. Optimized readout configuration for PIXE spectrometers based on Silicon Drift Detectors: Architecture and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, R.; Grassi, N.; Guazzoni, C.; Klatka, T.

    2009-01-01

    An optimized readout configuration based on a charge preamplifier with pulsed-reset has been designed for Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to be used in Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. The customized readout electronics is able to manage the large pulses originated by the protons backscattered from the target material that would otherwise cause significant degradation of X-ray spectra and marked increase in dead time. In this way, the excellent performance of SDDs can be exploited in high-quality proton-induced spectroscopy of low- and medium-energy X-rays. This paper describes the designed readout architecture and the performance characterization carried out in a PIXE setup with MeV proton beams.

  4. Control and supervision of a time projection chamber with GEM readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, David

    2014-01-01

    To get a deeper understanding of the structure of nucleons and the strong interaction binding the constituents inside, the CBELSA/TAPS experiment investigates the resonance spectrum of baryons by meson photoproduction within the scope of the SFB/TRR 16 ''Subnuclear Structure of Matter''. In order to support and expand the physical program, the existing Inner Detector will be replaced by a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) within the next few years. This allows for the detection of charged reaction channels, which can't be measured with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment up to now, as well as for particle identification from the specific energy loss. A First prototype with GEM foils for charge amplification in front of the readout plane and suitable size for the CBELSA/TAPS experiment was built in collaboration with the TU Munich, the detector laboratory of the GSI in Darmstadt and the Stefan-Meyer-Institute of the University Vienna. The TPC has been commissioned successfully within the FOPI experiment at the GSI during several test beam campaigns. Additionally, systematic studies have been carried out with a smaller Test-TPC using a TestBench providing an accurate external track definition. As the electron drift velocity in the TPC volume is a crucial parameter for the exact track reconstruction, detailed simulations of the drift velocity and its dependency on external parameters, such as drift voltage, pressure, gas flow or temperature, have been carried out. The results of these simulations recommend a constant monitoring of all examined parameters to allow a reasonable use of the simulated drift velocities. For this purpose, and to ensure a safe and stable operation of the TPCs and the other detectors on the TestBench, the required hardware, the control software based on a data base and a graphical user interface were designed and constructed as the main part of this work. With this so-called SlowControl, it was possible to measure, control and store several parameters - e

  5. A drift chamber tracking system for muon scattering tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J.; Quillin, S.; Stapleton, M.; Steer, C.; Snow, S.

    2015-10-01

    Muon scattering tomography (MST) allows the identification of shielded high atomic number (high-Z) materials by measuring the scattering angle of cosmic ray muons passing through an inspection region. Cosmic ray muons scatter to a greater degree due to multiple Coulomb scattering in high-Z materials than low-Z materials, which can be measured as the angular difference between the incoming and outgoing trajectories of each muon. Measurements of trajectory are achieved by placing position sensitive particle tracking detectors above and below the inspection volume. By localising scattering information, the point at which a series of muons scatter can be used to reconstruct an image, differentiating high, medium and low density objects. MST is particularly useful for differentiating between materials of varying density in volumes that are difficult to inspect visually or by other means. This paper will outline the experimental work undertaken to develop a prototype MST system based on drift chamber technology. The planar drift chambers used in this prototype measure the longitudinal interaction position of an ionising particle from the time taken for elections, liberated in the argon (92.5%), carbon dioxide (5%), methane (2.5%) gas mixture, to reach a central anode wire. Such a system could be used to enhance the detection of shielded radiological material hidden within regular shipping cargo.

  6. Performance of drift chambers in a magnetic rigidity spectrometer for measuring the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, M.; Bremerich, M.; Menn, W.; Pfeifer, C.; Reimer, O.; Simon, M.; Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.; Ormes, J.F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    A drift chamber tracking system was developed and flown as part of the IMAX balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer. The drift chamber uses a hexagonal drift-cell structure and is filled with pure CO 2 gas. It operated with high efficiency in the strong and inhomogenous field of a superconducting magnet, demonstrating a spatial resolution of better than 100 μm over most of the drift path for singly charged particles, as well as for helium and lithium nuclei. The drift chamber portion of the spectrometer achieved a maximum detectable rigidity of 175 and 250 GV/c for protons and helium respectively. ((orig.))

  7. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Altenhoefer, Georg Friedrich; Heidemann, Carsten Andreas; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel Francois

    2017-01-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  8. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhöfer, Georg; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  9. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL, and propose to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector design for NA45 (CERN). This new detector will be produced at BNL and the MPI-Institute in Munich and will incorporate updated techniques which should result in a reliable device with improved performance over the UA6-type detector. The one-year budget for this proposal is $50,079. 28 refs., 2 figs

  10. Measurements of electron drift and diffusion properties in a large cylindrical drift chamber (TPC) with parallel electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    This work describes measurements on the drift of electrons in gases, using the TPC90, the prototype of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber. Tracks which were created by UV-Laser ionization have been drifted over distances of up to 1.3 m in parallel electric and magnetic fields. Electron drift properties have been systematically measured as a function of these, in several gas mixtures. (orig./HSI)

  11. The construction and performance of a large cylindrical wire chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deiters, K.; Donat, A.; Friebel, W.; Heller, R.; Kirsch, S.; Krankenhagen, R.; Lange, W.; Leiste, R.; Lohmann, W.; Lustermann, W.; Peng, Y.; Roeser, U.; Tonisch, F.; Trowitzsch, G.; Vogt, H.; Wilhelmi, M.

    1991-12-01

    The construction and performance of two large coaxial cylindrical multiwire proportional chambers with cathode readout, denoted as Z-Detector, forming the outer part of the L3 central tracking detector, are described. Three self supporting cylinders of about 1 m length and 1 m diameter, constructed as a sandwich of Kapton foil and foam, form the mechanical frame. It represents 2% of a radiation length. In each chamber one cathode layer is subdivided in helical strips and the other one in rings. The readout of the charges induced on the cathode strips and the other one in rings. The readout of the charges induced on the cathode strips provides the avalanche position along the beam (z-) direction. The detector has been running in the L3 experiment at LEP for nearly two years. The resolution of the z-measurement is 320 μm, the double track resolution is about 10 mm. The efficiency of each chamber is 96%. (orig.)

  12. Tuning of the cosmic-ray test system of the BESIII drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhi; Liu Jianbei; Qin Zhonghua; Wu Linghui; Chen Chang; Chen Yuanbo; Chen Mali; Chen Xihui; Dong Mingyi; Guan Beiju; Huang Jie; Jiang Xiaoshan; Jin Yan; Li Fei; Li Renying; Li Xiaonan; Lei Guangkun; Liu Rongguang; Luo Xiaolan; Ma Xiaoyan; Sheng Huayi; Sun Hansheng; Tang Xiao; Wang Lan; Wang Liang; Xu Meihang; Zhang Jian; Zhang Hongyu; Zhang Yinhong; Zhao Yubin; Zhao Pingping; Zhu Kejun; Zhu Qiming; Zhuang Bao'an

    2010-01-01

    The BESIII drift chamber and its subsystems need a cosmic-ray test after the chamber construction to check the chamber construction quality, testing the joint operation of the whole system and the performance of the chamber. The noise performance, drift time and charge measurements, and the scanning of channels were examined specifically. The preliminary results of the test indicate that the whole system works well. (authors)

  13. Efficiency profile method to study the hit efficiency of drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abyzov, A.; Bel'kov, A.; Lanev, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Walter, M.; Hulsbergen, W.

    2002-01-01

    A method based on the usage of efficiency profile is proposed to estimate the hit efficiency of drift chambers with a large number of channels. The performance of the method under real conditions of the detector operation has been tested analysing the experimental data from the HERA-B drift chambers

  14. Position reconstruction in drift chambers operated with Xe, $CO_{2}$ (15\\%)

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Appelshäuser, H; Bielcikova, J; Blume, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Busch, O; Catanescu, V; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Emschermann, D; Fateev, O V; Foka, P; Garabatos, C; Gunji, T; Herrmann, N; Inuzuka, M; Ivanov, M; Kislov, E; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Ludolphs, W; Mahmoud, T; Petracek, V; Petrovici, M; Radomski, S; Rusanov, I; Sandoval, A; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Schwarz, K; Simon, R S; Smykov, L P; Soltveit, H K; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Tsiledakis, G; Vulpescu, B; Wessels, J P; Windelband, B; Yurevich, V; Zanevsky, Yu; Zaudtke, O

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of position and angular resolution of drift chambers operated with a Xe, CO2 (15%) mixture. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and important systematic effects - in particular the dispersive nature of the absorption of transition radiation and non-linearities - are discussed. The measurements were carried out with prototype drift chambers of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector, but our findings can be generalized to other drift chambers with similar geometry, where the electron drift is perpendicular to the wire planes.

  15. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  16. An encoding readout method used for Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) for muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Zeng, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Cheng, J.

    2014-09-01

    A muon tomography facility has been built in Tsinghua University. Because of the low flux of cosmic muon, an encoding readout method, based on the fine-fine configuration, was implemented for the 2880 channels induced signals from the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detectors. With the encoding method, the number of the readout electronics was dramatically reduced and thus the complexity and the cost of the facility was reduced, too. In this paper, the details of the encoding method, and the overall readout system setup in the muon tomography facility are described. With the commissioning of the facility, the readout method works well. The spatial resolution of all MRPC detectors are measured with cosmic muon and the preliminary imaging result are also given.

  17. An encoding readout method used for Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) for muon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, X; Zeng, M; Wang, Y; Wang, X; Zeng, Z; Zhao, Z; Cheng, J

    2014-01-01

    A muon tomography facility has been built in Tsinghua University. Because of the low flux of cosmic muon, an encoding readout method, based on the fine-fine configuration, was implemented for the 2880 channels induced signals from the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detectors. With the encoding method, the number of the readout electronics was dramatically reduced and thus the complexity and the cost of the facility was reduced, too. In this paper, the details of the encoding method, and the overall readout system setup in the muon tomography facility are described. With the commissioning of the facility, the readout method works well. The spatial resolution of all MRPC detectors are measured with cosmic muon and the preliminary imaging result are also given

  18. Properties of a six-gap timing resistive plate chamber with strip readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammosov, V.V.; Gapienko, V.A.; Semak, A.A.; Sviridov, Yu.M.; Zaets, V.G.; Gavrishchuk, O.P.; Kuz'min, N.A.; Sychkov, S.Ya.; Usenko, E.A.; Yukaev, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Six-gap glass timing resistive plate chamber with strip readout was tested using IHEP U-70 PS test beam. The time resolution of ∼ 45 ps at efficiency larger than 98% was achieved. Position resolution along strip was estimated to be ∼1 cm

  19. A microstrip gas avalanche chamber with two-dimensional readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Massai, M.M.; Spandre, G.; Torquati, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    A microstrip gas avalanche chamber with a 200 μm anode pitch has been built and successfully tested in our laboratory. A gas gain of 10 4 and an energy resolution of 18% (FWHM) at 6 keV have been measured using a gas mixture of argon-CO 2 at atmospheric pressure. A preliminary measurement of the positional sensitivity indicates that a spatial resolution of 50 μm can be obtained. (orig.)

  20. Use of gas mixture electroluminescence for optical data readout from wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, V.A.; Rykalin, V.I.; Tskhadadze, Eh.G.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation spectra, the values of electroluminescence yield and coefficients of gas amplification of Ar and Ne mixture with inorganic and organic additions in a wire chamber operating under proportional and self-quenching streamer conditions are measured. Maximum light yield: 2x10 7 photons for Ar+acetone+white spirit gas mixture in a proportional regime and 1.1x10 7 photons for Ar+CO 2 + ethyl alcohol+ white spirit in self-quenching streamer regime is obtained. Three methods of optical data readout from the wire chambers are tested. The best results are obtained when spectrum shifting bands and fibers are placed behind the chamber cathode planes

  1. A 240-channel thick film multi-chip module for readout of silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, D.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmueller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; DiMassimo, D.; Dyke, H.; Elliott, D.; Grau, M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Humanic, T.; Jensen, P.; Kleinfelder, S.A.; Kotov, I.; Kraner, H.W.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, B.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.J.; LoCurto, G.; Middelkamp, P.; Minor, R.; Mazeh, N.; Nehmeh, S.; O'Conner, P.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S.U.; Pruneau, C.; Pinelli, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Rykov, V.; Schambach, J.; Sedlmeir, J.; Sheen, J.; Soja, B.; Stephani, D.; Sugarbaker, E.; Takahashi, J.; Wilson, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a thick film multi-chip module for readout of silicon drift (or low capacitance ∼200 fF) detectors. Main elements of the module include a custom 16-channel NPN-BJT preamplifier-shaper (PASA) and a custom 16-channel CMOS Switched Capacitor Array (SCA). The primary design criteria of the module were the minimizations of the power (12 mW/channel), noise (ENC=490 e - rms), size (20.5 mmx63 mm), and radiation length (1.4%). We will discuss various aspects of the PASA design, with emphasis on the preamplifier feedback network. The SCA is a modification of an integrated circuit that has been previously described [1]; its design features specific to its application in the SVT (Silicon Vertex Tracker in the STAR experiment at RHIC) will be discussed. The 240-channel multi-chip module is a circuit with five metal layers fabricated in thick film technology on a beryllia substrate and contains 35 custom and commercial integrated circuits. It has been recently integrated with silicon drift detectors in both a prototype system assembly for the SVT and a silicon drift array for the E896 experiment at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. We will discuss features of the module's design and fabrication, report the test results, and emphasize its performance both on the bench and under experimental conditions

  2. Construction of monitored drift tube chambers for ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer at IHEP (Protvino)

    CERN Document Server

    Bensinger, J; Borisov, A; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Goryatchev, S; Goryachev, V N; Gushchin, V; Hashemi, K S; Kojine, A; Kononov, A I; Larionov, A; Paramoshkina, E; Pilaev, A; Skvorodnev, N; Tchougouev, A; Wellenstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Trapezoidal-shaped Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will be used in end-caps of ATLAS muon spectrometer. Design and construction technology of such chambers in IHEP (Protvino) is presented. X-ray tomography results confirm desirable 20 mum precision of wire location in the chamber.

  3. A multiwire ionization chamber readout circuit using current mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawnsley, W.R.; Smith, D.; Moskven, T.

    1997-01-01

    A circuit which utilizes current mirrors has been used to apply high voltage bias to the wires of a multiwire ionization chamber (MWIC) profile monitor while still allowing measurement of the beam-induced ion-electron currents collected on the wires. Bias voltages of up to 250 V have been used while wire currents over a range of 0.5 nA to 50 nA have been measured. The circuit is unipolar but can be designed for positive or negative bias. The mirrors also provide a current gain of 10, reducing the effects of transistor leakage and extending the useful range of the circuit to lower signal levels. A module containing 32 Wilson current mirrors has been constructed and is used with a MWIC monitor in TRIUMF close-quote s Parity experiment beamline. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Development, test, and simulation of an influence drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, C.

    1992-07-01

    The experiment PS185 measuring the reaction anti pp → anti YY with strangeness S = 1 hyperons is a unique tool to study the process of anti ss quark pair creation. The so far measured anti ΛΛ and anti ΛΣ 0 channels have stimulated a lot of theoretical work and will be complemented by the charged Σ-channels anti Σ + Σ + and anti Σ - Σ - . Therefore, the PS185 apparatus has to be extended by a microvertex-detector with good spatial resolution and high rate capability. Last years in Juelich such a detector, the Induction Drift Chamber, was developed. A wire plane consists of alternating potential wires (20 μm) and anodes (7μm) asymmetrically positioned between two cathode foils defining one independent chamber. The good track resolution (≤ 25 μm) for perpendicular tracks even for high rates (≥ 10 6 events/(sec x mm 2 )) is achieved by evaluate the induced signals of the potential wires, which measure the azimuthal avalanche position with respect to the anodes. An expression is derived to describe the principles of the induced signals so that the simulation of the IDC is in good agreement with the experimental data. One central point is the derivation of an algorithm for inclined tracks. To overcome limits in the spatial resolution which arise from the fluctuation of ionisation loss, a Flash-ADC read out was used, which also gives the possibility to digitalize the track inside one plane. For the 400 channels in two FADC-Crates a real time data acquisition system with interrupt processing was developed on a VME-processor so that an event rate ≥ 100 Hz by an event length ≥ 1 kByte could be reached. The mechanical construction of the IDC allows a stack of independent planes to be built with a height of 3.5 mm for each. Results of two test runs measuring the spatial resolution are reported. (orig.) [de

  5. Recent Developments on the Silicon Drift Detector readout scheme for the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Bonazzola, G C; Bonvicini, V; Cavagnino, D; Cerello, P G; De Remigis, P; Falchieri, D; Gabrielli, A; Gandolfi, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández, R; Masetti, M; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F

    1999-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for LEB99, Snowmass, Colorado, 20-24 September 1999Recent developments of the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) readout system for the ALICE Experiment are presented. The foreseen readout system is based on 2 main units. The first unit consists of a low noise preamplifier, an analog memory which continuously samples the amplifier output, an A/D converter and a digital memory. When the trigger signal validates the analog data, the ADCs convert the samples into a digital form and store them into the digital memory. The second unit performs the zero suppression/data compression operations. In this paper the status of the design is presented, together with the test results of the A/D converter, the multi-event buffer and the compression unit prototype.Summary:In the Inner Tracker System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment the third and the fourth layer of the detectors are SDDs. These detectors provide the measurement of both the energy deposition and the bi-dimensional position of the track. In terms o...

  6. Commissioning activities of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) chambers at SX5

    CERN Multimedia

    Domenico Dattola

    2005-01-01

    After DT and RPC packages have been installed, and before their cabling, single chamber commissioning takes place. It consists of a series of performance test on the on-chamber minicrates, containing readout and trigger electronics, as well as high voltage tests and cosmic data taking. The pictures show the preparation activities for the chamber commissioning in the construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5.

  7. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 μm thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8x8 cm 2 with a pixel size of 1.27x1.27 mm 2 . Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring

  8. Large-Scale Production of Monitored Drift Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, F.; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck, S; Richter, R; Zhuravlov, V

    2016-01-01

    Precision drift tube chambers with a sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 20 microns are under construction for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. 70% of the 88 large chambers for the outermost layer of the central part of the spectrometer have been assembled. Measurements during chamber construction of the positions of the sense wires and of the sensors for the optical alignment monitoring system demonstrate that the requirements for the mechanical precision of the chambers are fulfilled.

  9. Drift chambers for a large-area, high-precision muon spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberini, C.; Bari, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Del Papa, C.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Maccarrone, G.; Massam, T.; Motta, F.; Nania, R.; Perotto, E.; Prisco, G.; Willutsky, M.; Basile, M.; Contin, A.; Palmonari, F.; Sartorelli, G.

    1987-01-01

    We have tested two prototypes of high-precision drift chamber for a magnetic muon spectrometer. Results of the tests are presented, with special emphasis on their efficiency and spatial resolution as a function of particle rate. (orig.)

  10. Track chambers based on precision drift tubes housed inside 30 mm mylar pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, A; Bozhko, N; Fakhrutdinov, R; Kozhin, A; Leontiev, B; Levin, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe drift chambers consisting of 3 layers of 30 mm (OD) drift tubes made of double sided aluminized mylar film with thickness 0.125 mm. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g tension of 50 microns sense wire located in the tube center with 10 microns precision with respect to end-plug outer surface. Such tubes allow to create drift chambers with small amount of material, construction of such chambers doesn't require hard frames. Twenty six chambers with working area from 0.8 × 1.0 to 2.5 × 2.0 m 2 including 4440 tubes have been manufactured for experiments at 70-GeV proton accelerator at IHEP(Protvino)

  11. Track chambers based on precision drift tubes housed inside 30 mm mylar pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A.; Bozhko, N.; Fakhrutdinov, R.; Kozhin, A.; Leontiev, B.; Levin, A.

    2014-06-01

    We describe drift chambers consisting of 3 layers of 30 mm (OD) drift tubes made of double sided aluminized mylar film with thickness 0.125 mm. A single drift tube is self-supported structure withstanding 350 g tension of 50 microns sense wire located in the tube center with 10 microns precision with respect to end-plug outer surface. Such tubes allow to create drift chambers with small amount of material, construction of such chambers doesn't require hard frames. Twenty six chambers with working area from 0.8 × 1.0 to 2.5 × 2.0 m2 including 4440 tubes have been manufactured for experiments at 70-GeV proton accelerator at IHEP(Protvino).

  12. A new TXRF vacuum chamber with sample changer for chemical analysis using silicon drift chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Zoeger, N.; Pepponi, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Several TXRF spectrometers for chemical analysis as well as for wafer surface analysis are commercially available. But there is no one available for chemical analysis offering the possibility to measure the samples in vacuum conditions. Vacuum of 10 -2 mbar in the sample environment helps to reduce the background due to scattering from air, thus to improve the detection limits as well as to reduce the absorption of low energy fluorescence radiation from low Z elements and extend the elemental range to be measured and removes the Ar lines from the spectrum. The x-ray group of the Atominstitut designed and fabricated a new vacuum chamber for TXRF equipped with a 12 position sample changer from Italstructures, Riva, Italy. The detector used was a 10 mm 2 silicon drift detector (KETEK, Munich, Germany), offering the advantage of electrically cooling, so no LN2 is required. The chamber was designed to be attached to a diffraction tube housing, e.g. with a fine focus Mo-x-ray tube and uses a multilayer monochromator. Spectra are stored by a small AMTEK MCA and control between sample changer and MCA communication is done by a modified AMPTEK software. The performance is expressed in detection limits of 1 pg Rb for Mo Ka excitation with 50 kV, 40 mA excitation conditions, 1000 s lifetime, obtained from a sample containing 600 pg Rb as single element standard. Details on performance, reproducibility and light element excitation and detection are presented. (author)

  13. Systematic shifts of evaluated charge centroid for the cathode read-out multiwire proportional chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, I.; Kawamoto, T.; Mizuno, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Takeshita, T.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the systematic error associtated with the charge centroid evaluation for the cathode read-out multiwire proportional chamber. Correction curves for the systematic error according to six centroid finding algorithms have been obtained by using the charge distribution calculated in a simple electrostatic mode. They have been experimentally examined and proved to be essential for the accurate determination of the irradiated position. (orig.)

  14. Pulse height measurements and electron attachment in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2 mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2003-01-01

    We present pulse height measurements in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2 gas mixtures. We investigate the attachment of primary electrons on oxygen and SF6 contaminants in the detection gas. The measurements are compared with simulations of properties of drifting electrons. We present two methods to check the gas quality: gas chromatography and Fe55 pulse height measurements using monitor detectors.

  15. Simultaneous hit finding and timing method for pulse shape analysis of drift chamber signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Schwarz, J

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for the analysis of the digitized signal waveform of drift chamber pulses is described which yields a good multihit resolution and an accurate drift time determination with little processing time. The method has been tested and evaluated with measured pulse shapes from the full size prototype of the OPAL central detector which were digitized by 100 MHz FADCs. (orig.).

  16. Simultaneous hit finding and timing method for pulse shape analysis of drift chamber signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Schwarz, J

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for the analysis of the digitized signal waveform of drift chamber pulses is described which yields a good multihit resolution and an accurate drift time determination with little processing time. The method has been tested and evaluated with measured pulse shapes from the full size prototype of the OPAL central detector which were digitized by 100 MHz FADCs.

  17. Pulse height measurements and electron attachment in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronic, A.; Appelshaeuser, H.; Blume, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bucher, D.; Busch, O.; Ramirez, A.C.A. Castillo; Catanescu, V.; Ciobanu, M.; Daues, H.; Devismes, A.; Emschermann, D.; Fateev, O.; Garabatos, C.; Herrmann, N.; Ivanov, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Petrovici, M.; Reygers, K.; Sann, H.; Santo, R.; Schicker, R.; Sedykh, S.; Shimansky, S.; Simon, R.S.; Smykov, L.; Soltveit, H.K.; Stachel, J.; Stelzer, H.; Tsiledakis, G.; Vulpescu, B.; Wessels, J.P.; Windelband, B.; Winkelmann, O.; Xu, C.; Zaudtke, O.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Yurevich, V.

    2003-01-01

    We present pulse height measurements in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO 2 gas mixtures. We investigate the attachment of primary electrons on oxygen and SF 6 contaminants in the detection gas. The measurements are compared with simulations of properties of drifting electrons. We present two methods to check the gas quality: gas chromatography and 55 Fe pulse height measurements using monitor detectors

  18. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded mark II detector at PEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Weber, P.; White, S. L.; Alvarez, M.; Calviño, F.; Fernandez, E.

    1987-04-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ˜ 90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented.

  19. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded Mark II detector at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Weber, P.; White, S.L.; Alvarez, M.; Calvino, F.; Fernandez, E.; Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona

    1987-01-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ∝90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented. (orig.)

  20. Two methods to estimate the position resolution for straw chambers with strip readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.A.; Movchan, S.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Preda, T.

    1992-01-01

    The centroid and charge-ratio methods are presented to estimate the position resolution of the straw chambers with strip readout. For the straw chambers of 10 mm in diameter, the highest position resolution was obtained for a strip pitch of 5 mm. With the centroid method and perpendicular X-ray beam, the position resolution was ≅120 μm, for the signal-to-noise ratio of 60-65. The charge-ratio method has demonstrated ≅10% better position resolution at the edges of the strip. 6 refs.; 5 figs

  1. Technical note: drifting versus anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai-Haase, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-12-01

    Stream networks have recently been discovered to be major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross-comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams with different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (2) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil collar to seal the chambers to the water surface, rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  2. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  3. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, G. D.; Glonti, L. N.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Malyshev, V. L.; Piskun, A. A.; Potrbenikov, Yu. K.; Rodionov, V. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. "Self-centering" spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  4. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, G.D.; Glonti, L.N.; Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum

  5. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Glonti, L.N., E-mail: glonti@sunse.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  6. Construction and test of new precision drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroha, H., E-mail: kroha@mpp.mpg.de; Kortner, O.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Takasugi, E.

    2017-02-11

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 μm have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new RPC trigger chambers for replacement of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer are in progress.

  7. Construction and test of new precision drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroha, H.; Kortner, O.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Takasugi, E.

    2017-02-01

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 μm have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new RPC trigger chambers for replacement of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer are in progress.

  8. The properties of the cylindrical drift chambers of the CELLO detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, U.

    1983-12-01

    In the present thesis the study of the properties of the cylindrical drift chamber of the CELLO interior detector by muons from the cosmic radiation is described. An iterative procedure for the parametrization of the timepath relation is presented. The numerical approximation obtained by means of this procedure deviated in all ranges of drift time by less than 50 μm from the experimentally determined, nonlinear time-path relation. The chamber properties were determined with and without magnetic fields: With an argon-ethane 50%/50% gas mixture a long plateau of the detection probabilities was reached. Without magnetic field by the drift chambers a mean spatial resolution of 170 μm was obtained. From the dependence of the spatial resolution from the drift path results that the drift chambers respond if the electrons from the first 2 to 3 primary ionizations reach the signal wire. The mean response probability of the drift chambers contributes to 97.5% and the overresponse probability to 3.6%. The mean spatial resolution in the magnetic field was determined by means of the chi 2 -distribution, it contributes to 170 μm. For the response probability the value of 98.3% was determined. The errors in the track parameters were determined by comparison of the cosmic ray tracks in the upper and lower half of the detector. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Track finding and track reconstruction in the internal forward drift chamber of SAPHIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umlauf, G.

    1993-03-01

    A track finding algorithm has been developed for the inner forward drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector (at ELSA in Bonn) using the Principal Components Analysis as a tool for interpolating track coordinates. The drift chamber consists of twelve planar layers with six different inclinations and is being operated in an inhomogenous magnetic field. The task of track finding is basicly split into a primary stage that defines track candidates without the use of drift-time information and a second stage that serves to verify the track candidate and to resolve the intrinsic left-right ambiguities of the drift chamber signals. Tracks with at most three missing signals can be found. (orig.) [de

  10. A 12-bit SAR ADC integrated on a multichannel silicon drift detector readout IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schembari, F., E-mail: filippo.schembari@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, via Golgi 40, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bellotti, G.; Fiorini, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, via Golgi 40, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    A 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) addressed to Silicon-Drift Detectors (SDDs) multichannel readout ASICs for X- and gamma-ray applications is presented. Aiming at digitizing output multiplexed data from the upstream analog filters banks, the converter must ensure 11-bit accuracy and a sampling frequency of about 5 MS/s. The ADC architecture is the charge-redistribution (CR) successive-approximation register (SAR). A fully differential topology has also been chosen for better rejection of common-mode noise and disturbances. The internal DAC is made of binary-scaled capacitors, whose bottom plates are switched by the SAR logic to perform the binary search of the analog input value by means of the monotonic switching scheme. The A/D converter is integrated on SFERA, a multichannel ASIC fabricated in a standard CMOS 0.35 μm 3.3 V technology and it occupies an area of 0.42 mm{sup 2}. Simulated static performance shows monotonicity over the whole input–output characteristic. The description of the circuit topology and of inner blocks architectures together with the experimental characterization is here presented. - Highlights: • X- and γ-ray spectroscopy front-ends need to readout a high number of detectors. • Design efforts are increasingly oriented to compact and low-power ASICs. • A possible solution is the on-chip integration of the analog-to-digital converter. • A 12-bit CR successive-approximation-register ADC has been developed. • It is a suitable candidate as the digitizer to be integrated in multichannel ASICs.

  11. Investigations in a drift chamber using 250 MHz analogue-digital-converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, F.A.

    1993-06-01

    The performance of a new 250 MHz FADC module was investigated in a small drift chamber system. Straight tracks were induced in the chamber volume by UV-LASER beams. The time resolution was determined from drift time measurements for four neighbouring signal wires. By use of a beam splitter a pair of parallel beams was produced. An appropriate rotation of this pair relative to the signal wire plane allowed the determination of the double hit resolution. A comparison of the obtained values with the results achieved with 100 MHz FADC modules showed that the new module is well suited for chamber read out. The attainable improvements however are small. (orig.) [de

  12. Measurement and simulation of the drift pulses and resolution in the micro-jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1983-01-01

    We have tested a prototype of a micro-jet chamber, using both a nitrogen laser and a 10GeV electron beam. The achieved resolution in the particle beam was sigma = 18μm for a lmm impact parameter and 22μm when averaging over the entire beam profile. The experimental results were compared to a Monte Carlo program which simulates the pulse shapes and resolution in drift chambers of any geometry. The main emphasis in our simulation analysis was to study various strategies for drift chambers in order to achieve the best possible timing resolution

  13. Performance of the Drift Chambers of the CMS Experiment in the Measurement of LHC Muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Fouz, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the study of the performance of the drift chambers of the CMS Barrel Muon detector operating at the LHC. Using the data obtained with pp collisions during the first months os LHC operation we have studied the drift cell efficiency and position resolution, as well as the effect of the existing background noise. The results confirm the excellent performance of the muon chambers. It is expected that it will improve further as statistics increase, thus allowing a correct calibration and alignment of these chambers. (Author) 6 refs.

  14. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-09-01

    Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  15. The front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Freytag, D.R.; Fox, J.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.; Yim, A.; Honma, A.

    1990-10-01

    The front-end signal processing electronics for the drift-chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) at the Stanford Linear Collider is described. The system is implemented with printed-circuit boards which are shaped for direct mounting on the detector. Typically, a motherboard comprises 64 channels of transimpedance amplification and analog waveform sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control and readout circuitry. The loaded motherboard thus forms a processor which records low-level wave forms from 64 detector channels and transforms the information into a 64 k-byte serial data stream. In addition, the package performs calibration functions, measures leakage currents on the wires, and generates wire hit patterns for triggering purposes. The construction and operation of the electronic circuits utilizing monolithic, hybridized, and programmable components are discussed

  16. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00218480

    2017-02-11

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 ?micons have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new R...

  17. Control and supervision of a time projection chamber with GEM readout; Steuerung und Ueberwachung einer Zeitprojektionskammer mit GEM-Auslese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, David

    2014-02-03

    To get a deeper understanding of the structure of nucleons and the strong interaction binding the constituents inside, the CBELSA/TAPS experiment investigates the resonance spectrum of baryons by meson photoproduction within the scope of the SFB/TRR 16 ''Subnuclear Structure of Matter''. In order to support and expand the physical program, the existing Inner Detector will be replaced by a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) within the next few years. This allows for the detection of charged reaction channels, which can't be measured with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment up to now, as well as for particle identification from the specific energy loss. A First prototype with GEM foils for charge amplification in front of the readout plane and suitable size for the CBELSA/TAPS experiment was built in collaboration with the TU Munich, the detector laboratory of the GSI in Darmstadt and the Stefan-Meyer-Institute of the University Vienna. The TPC has been commissioned successfully within the FOPI experiment at the GSI during several test beam campaigns. Additionally, systematic studies have been carried out with a smaller Test-TPC using a TestBench providing an accurate external track definition. As the electron drift velocity in the TPC volume is a crucial parameter for the exact track reconstruction, detailed simulations of the drift velocity and its dependency on external parameters, such as drift voltage, pressure, gas flow or temperature, have been carried out. The results of these simulations recommend a constant monitoring of all examined parameters to allow a reasonable use of the simulated drift velocities. For this purpose, and to ensure a safe and stable operation of the TPCs and the other detectors on the TestBench, the required hardware, the control software based on a data base and a graphical user interface were designed and constructed as the main part of this work. With this so-called SlowControl, it was possible to measure, control and

  18. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates and in Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00213689; Horvat, S.; Legger, F.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Richter, R.; Valderanis, Ch.; Rauscher, F.; Staude, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses drift-tube chambers for precision tracking. The performance of these chambers in the presence of magnetic field and high radiation fluxes is studied in this article using test-beam data recorded in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The measurements are compared to detailed predictions provided by the Garfield drift-chamber simulation programme.

  19. Fast non-explosive gases for drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Haggerty, H.; Oshima, N.; Yamada, R.

    1988-05-01

    Typical gases which are stock at Fermilab are Ar:C 2 H 6 (50:50) and Ar:CO 2 (80:20). Argon:Ethane has the virtue of high gas gain and a saturated drift velocity. In fact, parametrizing the drift velocity as a function of electric field we find v/sub d/(E) = v/sub o/(1/minus/e/sup -E/E/o) with v/sub o/ ≅ 5.4 cm/μsec and E/sub o/ = 160 V/cm. However, safety considerations make this gas somewhat inconvenient. The addition of alcohol as quencher also raises the saturation field to, for example, E/sub o/ ≅ 500 V/cm for 1.5% added alcohol. This gas also tends to break up in a high-beam flux environment and leave carbon deposits. The addition of alcohol to avoid such aging often takes a unit cell out of saturation over its entire volume. Finally, for collider applications it is useful to exclude free protons from the gas in order to reduce the sensitivity to the sea of slow neutrons which are present in the collider environment. In contrast, Ar:CO 2 (80:20) is a gas with more moderate gas gain. The drift velocity at high field is v/sub d/(E > 1.5 kV/cm) ≅ 5.8 cm/μsec. For most field configurations this gas does not saturate, causing a long tail in the drift time distrubtion due to low field regions in the unit cell. The virtues of this gas mixture are that it is cheap, not flammable, and stable under high-beam flux. However as the Collider Upgrade progresses, we wish to find a gas which is faster than 5.0 cm/μsec since the time separation between collisions will at some point be less than drift time of 1μsec for drift distance of 5 cm. 3 refs., 5 figs

  20. Principles of operation of multiwire proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauli, F.

    1987-01-01

    The first multiwire proportional chamber, in its modern conception, was constructed and operated in the years 1967-68. It was soon recognized that the main properties of a multiwire proportional chamber, i.e. very good time resolution, good position accuracy and self-triggered operation, are very attractive for the use of the new device in high-energy physics experiments. Today, most fast detectors contain a large number of proportional chambers, and their use has spread to many different fields of applied research, such as X-ray and heavy ion astronomy, nuclear medicine, and protein crystallography. In many respects, however, multiwire proportional chambers are still experimental devices, requiring continuous attention for good operation and sometimes reacting in unexpected ways to a change in the environmental conditions. Furthermore, in the fabrication and operation of a chamber people seem to use a mixture of competence, technical skill and magic rites, of the kind ''I do not know why I'm doing this but somebody told me to do so''. In these notes the authors illustrate the basic phenomena underlying the behaviour of a gas detector, with the hope that the reader will not only better understand the reasons for some irrational-seeming preferences (such as, for example, in the choice of the gas mixture), but will also be able better to design detectors for his specific experimental needs

  1. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Albajar, C; Arce, P; Autermann, C; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bontenackels, M; Caballero, J; Cavallo, F R; Cerrada, M; Cirio, R; Colino, N; Conti, E; de la Cruz, B; Dal Corso, F; Dallavalle, G M; Fernández, C; Fernández de Troconiz, J; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; García-Abia, P; García-Raboso, A; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giacomelli, P; Gonella, F; Gulmini, M; Hebbeker, T; Hermann, S; Höpfner, K; Jiménez, I; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Lacaprara, S; Marcellini, S; Mariotti, C; Maron, G; Maselli, S; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Montanari, C; Montecassiano, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Odorici, F; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Peroni, C; Perrotta, A; Puerta, J; Reithler, H; Romero, A; Romero, L; Ronchese, P; Rossi, A; Rovelli, T; Sacchi, R; Sowa, M; Staiano, A; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Vaniev, V; Vanini, S; Ventura, Sandro; Villanueva, C; Willmott, C; Zotto, P L; Zumerle, G

    2004-01-01

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory.

  2. Calibration and performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrett, D.; Ford, W.T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Weber, P.

    1990-05-01

    We have calibrated and studied the performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber inside the MARK II detector at the SLC. The chamber achieves 30 μm impact parameter resolution and 500 μm track-pair resolution using CO 2 /C 2 H 6 H 6 (92/8) at 2 atmospheres pressure. The chamber has successfully recorded Z 0 decays at the SLC, and resolved tracks in dense hadronic jets with good efficiency and high accuracy. 5 refs., 13 figs

  3. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar, C.; Amapane, N.; Arce, P.; Autermann, C.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bontenackels, M.; Caballero, J.; Cavallo, F.R.; Cerrada, M.; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Cruz, B. de la; Corso, F. dal; Dallavalle, G.M.; Fernandez, C.; Troconiz, J.F. de; Fouz, M.C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Garcia-Raboso, A.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Gonella, F.; Gulmini, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Jimenez, I.; Josa, I.; Lacaprara, S.; Marcellini, S.; Mariotti, C.; Maron, G.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.T.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Montecassiano, F.; Navarria, F.L.; Odorici, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Perrotta, A.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Sowa, M.; Staiano, A.; Toniolo, N.; Torassa, E.; Vaniev, V.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Villanueva, C.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.

    2004-01-01

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory

  4. Test beam analysis of the first CMS drift tube muon chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albajar, C.; Amapane, N.; Arce, P.; Autermann, C.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bontenackels, M.; Caballero, J.; Cavallo, F.R.; Cerrada, M.; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Cruz, B. de la; Corso, F. dal; Dallavalle, G.M.; Fernandez, C.; Troconiz, J.F. de E-mail: jorge.troconiz@uam.es; Fouz, M.C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Garcia-Raboso, A.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Gonella, F.; Gulmini, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Jimenez, I.; Josa, I.; Lacaprara, S.; Marcellini, S.; Mariotti, C.; Maron, G.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.T.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Montecassiano, F.; Navarria, F.L.; Odorici, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Perrotta, A.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Sowa, M.; Staiano, A.; Toniolo, N.; Torassa, E.; Vaniev, V.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Villanueva, C.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2004-06-11

    In October 2001 the first produced CMS Barrel Drift Tube (DT) Muon Chamber was tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) using a muon beam. A Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was attached to the top of the DT chamber, and, for the first time, both detectors were operated coupled together. The performance of the DT chamber was studied for several operating conditions, and for gamma rates similar to the ones expected at LHC. In this paper we present the data analysis; the results are considered fully satisfactory.

  5. Monitoring methods of drift chamber characteristics. Application to SPES III detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerboul, C.

    1984-05-01

    For the SPES III spectrometer at the Laboratoire National Saturne, a large detection system has been developed which consists of three drift chambers for localization of the particle trajectories. Performances of these detectors for high spatial resolution depend greatly on different parameters such as anode current, gas mixture, drift velocity, efficiency, etc. The present work summarizes a set of methods necessary to the control of these parameters, for achieving the high resolution essentiel for the nuclear physic at intermediate energy [fr

  6. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F. E-mail: faustgr@usc.es; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodriguez, A

    2003-10-21

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 {mu}m thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8x8 cm{sup 2} with a pixel size of 1.27x1.27 mm{sup 2}. Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring.

  7. Analytic solution of the potential and electric field of a jet type drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltin, A

    1988-02-15

    Starting from the known two-dimensional potential of a multiwire proportional chamber, the analytic expressions of the potential and the electric field are derived for a jet type drift chamber with a central wire plane of alternating sense and potential wires. The design goal of any jet chamber, namely the periodicity of the electric drift field, is imposed as a boundary condition at the beginning. In this way, the formulae are short and can be easily evaluated. In particular, expressions are given for the mean potential of the central wire plane, the drift field and the wire surface fields. Moreover, wire cathodes frequently used in jet chambers are described by analytic expressions. For a given drift field the difference of the potential as compared to a continuous metal cathode is presented. These results allowed to construct a two-dimensional computer simulation of the full OPAL jet chamber with no explicit periodicity but all its boundaries. Using field shaping electrodes a geometrically short yet quite satisfactory termination of a sense wire plane is demonstrated. Finally an example is presented, which is calculated in detail.

  8. Radiation aging studies of CO2 hydrocarbon mixtures for the SLD drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venuti, J.P.; Chadwick, G.B.

    1988-10-01

    The SLD drift chamber requires a 'slow' drifting gas and low diffusion to allow wave form digitization. CO 2 provides this but requires an admixture of a quencher to provide more gain. A test chamber with an 8 sense wire cell, such as will appear in the final chamber, was exposed to an x-ray tube while containing a variety of binary admixtures of Co 2 : 8% isobutane, 8% ethane, and 2% isopropanol. It was determined that adding small fractions of water (≤0.66%) or isopropanol (1--2%) to the Co 2 : 8% ethane, or 8% isobutane extended the useful life of the chamber so that integrated charge collections of /approximately/1 C/cm are permissible. Results and discussions are presented. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  9. Distributed drift chamber design for rare particle detection in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Bernardo, V; Caines, H; Christie, W; Costa, S; Crawford, H J; Cronqvist, M; Debbe, R; Dinnwiddie, R; Engelage, J; Flores, I; Fuzesy, R Z; Greiner, L; Hallman, T; Hoffmann, G; Huang, H Z; Jensen, P; Judd, E G; Kainz, K; Kaplan, M; Kelly, S; Lindstrom, P J; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Longacre, R; Milosevich, Z; Mitchell, J T; Mitchell, J W; Mogavero, E; Mutchler, G S; Paganis, S; Platner, E; Potenza, R; Rotondo, F; Russ, D; Sakrejda, I; Saulys, A; Schambach, J; Sheen, J; Smirnoff, N; Stokely, C L; Tang, J; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Visser, G; Whitfield, J P; Witharm, F; Witharm, R; Wright, M

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a multi plane drift chamber that was designed and constructed to function as a topological detector for the BNL AGS E896 rare particle experiment. The chamber was optimized for good spatial resolution, two track separation, and a high uniform efficiency while operating in a 1.6 T magnetic field and subjected to long term exposure from a 11.6 GeV/nucleon beam of 10 sup 6 Au ions per second.

  10. Two-coordinate mini drift chamber operating in a self-quenching streamer mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, S.P.; Smykov, L.P.; Zanevskij, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    Two-coordinate mini drift chambers operating in a self-quenching streamer mode have been developed. The tests have demonstrated these chambers to possess an extended counting plateau, a high operating stability and a high uniformity of efficiency over detecting area. The space resolution along anode wires is not worse than 250μm; the expected space resolution for the second coordinate is about 100 μm

  11. A microprocessor controlled read out system for drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Centro, Sandro; Cittolin, Sergio; Dreesen, P; Petrolo, E; Rubbia, Carlo; Schinzel, D

    1981-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. A General Purpose Microprocessor Controller GPMC has been developed for applications where CAMAC modules with complex control functions are needed. Each application requires an appropriate Interface Module (IM) to be connected to the GPMC. The GPMC consists of a 6800 Microprocessor, 16K EPROM, 2K RAM, CAMAC I/O ports and interface, a RS 232C serial interface, an Advanced Data Link controller and a port for controlling the IM, GPMC and IM are housed in a 2-U wide CAMAC module. A special IM has been designed, which has 1K bute of RAM with its own control and which allows autonomous setting and reading analog voltages through a DAC and ADC. The GPMC can take control of the IM memory and set new voltages. This system is used to control pedestals and gains of a driftchamber readout system, which is housed in a 5-U wide CAMAC module, holding 24 data cards corresponding to 24 sense wires. The data card receives pulses from the left and right end of a sense wire, amplifies and int...

  12. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Jaret; British Columbia U.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BABAR detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BABAR drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases

  13. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point

  14. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  15. A beam test of a prototype of the BESIII drift chamber in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.B.; Qin, Z.H.; Wu, L.H.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, B.A.; Chen, Y.B.; Jin, Y.; Liu, R.G.; Ma, X.Y.; Ma, Y.Y.; Tang, X.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.H.; Zhang, G.F.; Zhu, M.X.; Zhu, Q.M.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of the BESIII drift chamber was tested with He/C 3 H 8 (60/40) gas mixture in a 1T magnetic field at the π-2 beam line of KEK 12GeV PS. The drift distance-time relationship was extracted for various conditions. The performance of the chamber, such as the spatial resolution, the dE/dx resolution and the cell efficiency, was studied in detail. The dE/dx was measured as a function of βγ to calculate the particle separation power. Based on the test results, the operating voltage of the BESIII drift chamber is optimized to be 2200V, resulting in a spatial resolution better than 110μm, a cell efficiency over 98%, a dE/dx resolution better than 5% and the 3σπ/K separation at a momentum exceeding 700MeV/c. These results confirm the validation of the physics design of the BESIII drift chamber

  16. Jagiellonian University Drift Chamber Calibration and Track Reconstruction in the P349 Antiproton Polarization Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alfs, D; Moskal, P; Zieliński, M; Grzonka, D; Hauenstein, F; Kilian, K; Lersch, D; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Oelert, W; Diermaier, M; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Wolke, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Carmignotto, M; Horn, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Asaturyan, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Tadevosyan, V; Zhamkochyan, S; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Eyrich, W; Zink, A

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the P349 experiment is to test whether the antiproton production process can be itself a source of antiproton polarization. In this article, we present the motivation and details of the performed measurement. We report on the status of the analysis focusing mainly on calibration of the drift chambers and 3d track reconstruction.

  17. Drift chambers for R606 - Aachen-CERN-Harvard-Munich-Northwestern-Riverside Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    (see Annual Report of 1976, Fig. 8) The momenta of particles going through the system are measured with two sets of three drift chamber modules, two in front of the magnet and one behind, whose sizes range from about 1.5 m to 5 m.

  18. The automated stringing system for the BaBar drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsato, E.; Caracciolo, R.; Fanin, C.; Galeazzi, F.; Morandin, M.; Santi, S.; Voci, C.; Bronzini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Ferroni, F.; Fratini, K.; Morganti, S.; Patel, P.M.; Pelosi, A.; Piredda, G.; Fernholz, R.; Henderson, R.; Kelsey, M.

    2000-01-01

    After discussing the motivations for the project, the automated equipment used for the BaBar Drift Chamber stringing is described. Details are given mainly concerning the crucial points of setting-up and calibration. The focus is on the high accuracy reached by a large and complex mechanical tool

  19. A drift chamber with a new type of straws for operation in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorskiy, N.; Glonti, L.; Gusakov, Yu.; Elsha, V.; Enik, T.; Kakurin, S.; Kekelidze, V.; Kislov, E.; Kolesnikov, A.; Madigozhin, D.; Movchan, S.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Samsonov, V.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Danielsson, H.; Bendotti, J.; Degrange, J.; Dixon, N.; Lichard, P.; Morant, J.; Palladino, V.; Gomez, F. Perez; Ruggiero, G.; Vergain, M.

    2016-07-01

    A 2150×2150 mm2 registration area drift chamber capable of working in vacuum is presented. Thin-wall tubes (straws) of a new type are used in the chamber. A large share of these 9.80 mm diameter drift tubes are made in Dubna from metalized 36 μm Mylar film welded along the generatrix using an ultrasonic welding machine created at JINR. The main features of the chamber and some characteristics of the drift tubes are described. Four such chambers with the X, Y, U, V coordinates each, containing 7168 straws in total, are designed and produced at JINR and CERN. They are installed in the vacuum volume of the NA62 setup in order to study the ultra-rare decay K+ →π+ vv bar and to search for and study rare meson decays. In autumn 2014 the chambers were used for the first time for the data taking in the experimental run of the NA62 at CERN's SPS.

  20. Track recognition in the central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector at ELSA and first reconstruction of real tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, P.

    1991-02-01

    The FORTRAN program for pattern recognition in the central drift chamber of SAPHIR has been modified in order to find tracks with more than one missing wire signal and has been optimized in resolving the left/right ambiguities. The second part of this report deals with the reconstruction of some real tracks (γ → e + e - ), which were measured with SAPHIR. The efficiency of the central drift chamber and the space-to-drift time-relation are discussed. (orig.)

  1. A multi-channel integrated circuit for the readout of a microstrip gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummenacher, F.; Enz, C. (Smart Silicon Systems S.A., Lausanne (Switzerland)); Bellazzini, R. (Dipt. di Fisica, Pisa (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy))

    1992-03-15

    The design and test of an 8 channel integrated circuit for the readout of the microstrip gas chamber and other multielectrode detectors are described. The circuit is composed of 8 identical channels, each providing the amplification and the shaping of the signal delivered by the detector. The peaking time of the shaper is 25 ns and the overall amplifier gain is 8 mV/1000 e{sup -}. In addition to the analog output, each channel provides a TTL compatible digital output. The equivalent input noise is less than 700 e{sup -} rms and the total dc power consumption is about 5 mW/channel. To avoid a baseline shift due to the tail of the current issued from the detector, an adjustable pole-zero cancellation circuit has been included. (orig.).

  2. Prototype drift chamber for high energy heavy ions with a large dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Bieser, F.; Crawford, H.; Lindstrom, P.; Baumgartner, M.; Greiner, D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have constructed and tested a small prototype drift chamber designed for high energy heavy ions. When a drift chamber is used as a tracking detector for heavy projectile fragments from high energy nucleus-nucleus reactions, the major problem comes from the many spurious hits due to delta-rays. Three methods have been developed to solve this problem. The first one is to use a constant fraction discriminator to pick up the timing signal from the core ionization under the large background of delta-rays. The second one is to use pulse height information from the drift chamber to find the cell hit by the heavy ion. The last one is the idea of distributed planes. Modular planes (12 in this case) are distributed 10 cm apart on a rigid base plate to provide accurate relative positioning of the wires. The performance of the prototype chamber has been measured as a function of the high voltage bias and of the charge of the heavy ion from protons up to uranium at around 1 GeV/nucleon

  3. Physical packaging and organization of the drift chamber electronics system for the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Freytag, M.L.; Mazaheri, G.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper the logical organization, physical packaging, and operation of the drift chamber electronics for the SLD at SLAC is described. The system processes signals from approximately 7000 drift wires and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged on printed circuit boards within the detector. The circuits reside on signal-processing motherboards, controller boards, signal-transition boards, power-distribution boards, and fiber-optics-to-electrical conversion boards. The interaction and interconnection of these boards with respect to signal and control flow are presented. 11 refs., 7 figs

  4. Implementation of the Hough transform for 3D recognition of the straight tracks in drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    This work is devoted to the development of the method for 3D reconstruction of the charged-particle straight tracks in the tracking systems consisting of the drift-chamber stereo layers. The method is based on the modified Hough transform with taking into account the measurements of drift distance. The proposed program realization of the method provides the time-consuming optimization of event processing, the stable performance of the algorithm and high efficiency of the track recognition under large track-occupancy of the detector as well as under high level of noisy and dead channels

  5. Implementation of the Hough Transform for 3D Recognition of the Straight Tracks in Drift Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Belkov, A A

    2001-01-01

    This work is devoted to the development of the method for 3D reconstruction of the charged-particle straight tracks in the tracking systems consisting of the drift-chamber stereo layers. The method is based on the modified Hough transform with taking into account the measurements of drift distance. The proposed program realization of the method provides the time-consuming optimization of event processing, the stable performance of algorithm and high efficiency of the track recognition under large track-occupancy of detector as well as under high level of noisy and dead channels.

  6. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm 2 . This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track reconstruction efficiency

  7. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-06-06

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm{sup 2}. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track

  8. Directional muon jet chamber for a muon collider (Groovy Chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atac, M.

    1996-10-01

    A directional jet drift chamber with PAD readout is proposed here which can select vertex originated muons within a given time window and eliminate those muons which primarily originate upstream, using only a PAD readout. Drift time provides the Z-coordinate, and the center of gravity of charge distribution provides the r-ψ coordinates. Directionality at the trigger level is obtained by the timing measurement from the PAD hits within a given time window. Because of the long drift time between the bunch crossings, a muon collider enables one to choose a drift distance in the drift chamber as long as 50 cm. This is an important factor in reducing cost of drift chambers which have to cover relatively large areas

  9. XTR detection by means of 20 μm resolution drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskakov, V.I.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Lebedenko, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility to separate spatially the ionization losses of a relativistic charged particle and XTR quanta generated by the same particle in the laminated medium in detector was investigated. A double electroluminescent drift chamber filled with xenon at 10 atm pressure was constructed for this purpose. A detailed examination of the chamber characteristics was carried out on 3.5 GeV energy electron beam. The obtained results demonstrated the possibility to separate XTR and particle ionization spatially by means of the described method

  10. Drift chamber electronics with multi-hit capability for time and current division measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manarin, A; Pregernig, L; Rabany, M; Saban, R; Vismara, G

    1983-11-15

    Drift chambers have been installed for luminosity measurements in intersection 5 of the SPS accelerator working in panti p colliding mode. The required electronics is described. The system is able to process up to 16 hits per wire with a double pulse resolution of 40 ns; drift time and current division, with 1.25 ns and 1.6% resolution respectively, are recorded. Transconductance preamplifiers and discriminators are directly mounted on the chamber; 160 m of twisted-apir cable bring the signals to the digitizer unit. Coarse time is measured using RAM techniques, while fine time is obtained by means of a microstrip delay associated with a 100 K ECL priority encoder. Current division used a single 50 MHz Flash ADC which alows 26 dB dynamic range with 6 bit resolution. First operational results are reported.

  11. Real time track finding in a drift chamber with a VLSI neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.; Johns, K.

    1992-01-01

    In a test setup, a hardware neural network determined track parameters of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times in 6 cells of the 3-layer chamber were inputs to the Intel ETANN neural network chip which had been trained to give the slope and intercept of tracks. We compare network track parameters to those obtained from off-line track fits. To our knowledge this is the first on-line application of a VLSI neural network to a high energy physics detector. This test explored the potential of the chip and the practical problems of using it in a real world setting. We compare the chip performance to a neural network simulation on a conventional computer. We discuss possible applications of the chip in high energy physics detector triggers. (orig.)

  12. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorišin, Ján

    2018-02-01

    The drift chambers (DCH's) are an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH's are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  13. The optimization of the electrostatic field inside the ZEUS forward drift chambers: Calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobberstein, M.P.; Krawczyk, F.; Schaefer-Jotter, M.

    1990-11-01

    The electrostatic field inside small drift cells shows in general edge effects which are not negligible. These are usually corrected by field shaping wires or strips. The operating voltages of the field shaping electrodes have to be adjusted to maximize the field homogeneity. We present the underlying ideas of such an optimization procedure for the cells of the ZEUS forward drift chambers. Using the finite difference code PROFI, the optimization can be performed automatically by a multiple solution of the Poisson equation. An experimental verification of the optimal voltages was carried out measuring the gas amplifications at the six sense wires. Modifications of the drift cell geometry were necessary for calibration measurements with a laser beam. This caused additional distortions of the electrostatic field. Their influence was calculated using the MAFIA code, which allows to include open boundary conditions. (orig.)

  14. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  15. Particle identification in the relativistic rise region using a longitudinal drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, R; Bensinger, J; Boerner, H; Fukushima, Y; Hayashi, K; Ishihara, N; Inaba, S; Kohriki, T; Nakamura, S; Ogawa, K [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Oho, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1983-09-01

    Particle identification by energy loss measurement was tested using a longitudinal drift chamber equipped with a 25 MHz flash ADC. For 3 GeV/c pions the resolution sigmasub(E)/E was about 5%. The separation between pions and protons at this momentum was about 4 standard deviations. The influence of a magnetic field was examined. The deterioration of the separation was less than 15% up to a field strength of 5.2 kG.

  16. The hybridized front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber in the Stanford Linear Collider Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.; Kirsten, F.A.; Nakamura, M.

    1987-10-01

    In order to accommodate the high packaging density requirements for the front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) in the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD), the CDC front end electronics has been hybridized. The hybrid package contains eight channels of amplifiers together with all the associated circuits for calibration, event recognition and power economy switching functions. A total of 1280 such hybrids are used in the CDC

  17. Development of pattern recognition algorithms for the central drift chamber of the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusov, Viktor

    2016-11-04

    In this thesis, the development of one of the pattern recognition algorithms for the Belle II experiment based on conformal and Legendre transformations is presented. In order to optimize the performance of the algorithm (CPU time and efficiency) specialized processing steps have been introduced. To show achieved results, Monte-Carlo based efficiency measurements of the tracking algorithms in the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) has been done.

  18. Study on a cellmap for the reconstruction of cosmic ray tracks in drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Ma Yuqian

    2005-01-01

    Taking 13 Cosmic experiment (L3+C) as an example, the authors discussed a new Cellmap to reconstruct the hit in drift chamber of magnetic spectrometer for the very inclined comic-ray tracks, and compared the reconstruction results with the standard Cellmap of L3+C. It shows that, for the very inclined cosmic-ray tracks, the new Cellmap can reconstruct more hits than the standard Cellmap, and the distribution of χ 2 of track reconstruction is also improved. (authors)

  19. Beam Aborts in PEP-II Rings and Lingering Drift Chamber Currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkat, N.

    2004-01-01

    The BABAR detector at SLAC was designed to study CP-violation in B-meson decays from electron-positron collisions in the PEP-II electron-positron storage rings. Background radiation in the High Energy Ring (HER) and Low Energy Ring (LER) of PEP-II has the potential to damage the sensitive equipment in the BABAR detector. As a result, the beams in the HER and LER can be aborted to prevent such damage. In the span of a few microseconds, the HER and LER currents drop from, for example, 1450 micro Amps and 2300 micro Amps, respectively, to zero. At this time the voltage in the Drift Chamber is rapidly ramped down from a potential of 1930 V to a safe potential of 800 V, thus we would expect the currents in the Drift Chamber to quickly go to zero once the beams are aborted. However, we observe an average 15 second delay in the measured time it takes for all current in the Drift Chamber to fall below 1 micro Amp. This delay has been hypothesized as an instrumentation issue and not as a physical phenomenon. The specific sources of this error are still not completely known, but analysis suggests that it results from the interplay of the CAEN High Voltage supplies and the EPICS system and/or limitations within those systems

  20. A Drift Chamber to Measure Charged Particles at COMPASS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Robert; Compass Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A new drift chamber (DC05) will be constructed to replace two tracking detector stations based on straw tubes, ST02 and ST03 in the COMPASS spectrometer. DC05 uses the designs from DC04, a previous drift chamber designed at CEA-Saclay, France, but adds the addition of more wires for improved acceptance. In addition to more wires DC05 will also change its front end electronics using a new pre-amplifier-discriminator chip (CMAD). DC05 consists of 8 layers of anode planes and 21 layers of G-10 material frames carrying cathode planes and gas windows. The wires are orientated with two layers in the vertical x-direction, two layers in the horizontal y-direction, two layers offset +10 deg of the vertical x-direction, and two layers offset -10 deg of the vertical x-direction. The wires in parallel directions are offset half a pitch to resolve left-right ambiguities. The purpose for different wire orientations is to reconstruct the 3D space particle trajectory to fit a particle track. Each layer of wires is covered on the top and bottom by a cathode plane of carbon coated mylar. All these layers are sandwiched between two steel stiffening frames for support and noise reduction. A future drift chamber, DC06, is also being designed based off of DC05. Research funded by NSF-PHY-12-05-671 Medium Energy Nuclear Physics.

  1. Conceptual design report for the SDC barrel and intermediate muon detectors based on a jet-type drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Higashi, Y.

    1992-04-01

    We propose a jet-type drift chamber for the barrel and intermediate muon detectors of SDC. The chamber system consists of large multiwire drift chambers having a simple box-type frame structure: 2. 5 x 0.4 m 2 in cross section and maximum 9 m in length. A chamber module consists of double layers of small jet cells. The drift cell is composed of a wire plane, including 3 sense wires, and cathode plates parallel to the wire plane. The two layers in a chamber are staggered to each other by half a cell width. The jet cell is tilted such that its principle axis points to the interaction point. Such an arrangement, together with a constant drift velocity of the jet cell, allows us to design a simple and powerful trigger system for high momentum muons utilizing a drift time sum between a pair of staggered cells. The multi-hit capability will be helpful to distinguish high momentum muon tracks from associated electromagnetic debris as has been demonstrated by the Fermilab beam test T816. The maximum drift time fulfills the SDC requirement. A preliminary FEM analysis of the chamber module verified the excellent structural stiffness. It makes the support structure and the alignment system relatively simple. These features will reduce the total cost as well as ensure a good performance of the chamber system. (J.P.N.)

  2. The Drift Chambers Handbook, introductory laboratory course (based on, and adapted from, A H Walenta's course notes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ix-B GarcIa; Herrera, J GarcIa; Villasenor, L

    2005-01-01

    This handbook was written for the Drift Chambers introductory laboratory course to be held at 11th Mexican School of Particles and Fields that will be held at the Universidad Veracruzana on the campus of the University at Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We start such laboratory course with a brief review of the physics theoretical background. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector, the standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH 4 ) and a collimated 90 Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course

  3. Design and tests of the z-coordinate drift chamber system for the OPAL central detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mes, H.; Dixit, M.S.; Godfrey, L.; Hanna, D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Losty, M.J.; Oakham, F.G.; Bavaria, G.; Jeremie, H.; Lessard, L.; Lorazo, B.; Martin, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    A system of drift chambers has been designed to make high resolution measurements of the z-coordinates of charged tracks at the outer radius of the OPAL central detector at LEP. The unit module of this detector is a 25 cm drift length bidirectional cell with six sense wires in a thin 50 cm wide by 29 mm high drift slot. Tests indicate that the chamber has a wide and stable electric field operating range and its performance is unaffected by small misalignments between the drift electric field and an external magnetic field. The drift cell was found to have uniform acceptance up to its geometrical boundaries, and the z-resolution for beam tracks normal to the chamber was measured to be in the range of 40-175 μm. (orig.)

  4. Design and operation of large straw-tube drift chamber planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, C; Brown, D; Huston, J; Maul, A; Miller, R; Nyugen, A; Sorrell, L; Yosef, C [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mani, S [Physics Dept., Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Choudhary, B C; Kapoor, V; Shivpuri, R [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi Univ. (India); Baker, W; DeSoi, W; Johnstone, C; Kourbanis, I; Lukens, P; Skow, D; Wu, G H [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Alverson, G; Chang, P; Dlugosz, W; Faissler, W; Garelick, D; Glaubman, M; Lirakis, C; Pothier, E; Yasuda, T [Dept. of Physics, Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Gutierrez, P [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Hartman, K; Oh, B Y; Toothacker, W; Whitmore, J [Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Blusk, S R; Chung, W H; Engels, E Jr; Shepard, P F; Weerasundara, D D.S. [Dept. of Physics and

    1991-10-01

    We describe the design, construction and operation of a straw-tube drift chamber consisting of four X and four Y planes of 16 mm diameter straw-tubes, each 280 cm long. Straws were glued together for rigidity and were mounted into a frame which served as a gas manifold and maintained wire-to-wire precision. A novel conductive gasket was used to seal the tubes and provide electrical contact to the aluminized surface of the straws. The chamber has been successfully used in a high rate experiment (E706 at Fermilab) and has achieved its design resolution of better than 250 {mu}m per tube averaged over the whole chamber. (orig.).

  5. Drift velocity studies at a time projection chamber for various water contents in the gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, F.W.

    2007-03-01

    For the answer of different open questions in high energy physics the construction of a linear e + e - collider with a c. m. energy of up to one TeV is prepared. With this is connected a comprehensive development on detectors, which must satisfy the requirements of the planned experiments. For the track chamber a TPC is considered. Hereby it deals with a gas-based concept, which has already been proved in past experiments and which is at time further developed by means of test chambers. The composition of the gas mixtureplays hereby an important role. Impurities of the gas mixture, especially by oxygen and water from the ambient air are a fact, which occurs every time in the development phase and can scarcely be avoided. From this arose the motivation to study directly the effects of this impurities. The object of the present thesis are correlations between drift velocity and water content in the chamber gas of a TPC

  6. Construction and Test of Muon Drift Tube Chambers for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; Dubbert, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Since the start of operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on 20 November 2009, the instantaneous luminosity is steadily increasing. The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the LHC is instrumented with trigger and precision tracking chambers in a toroidal magnetic field. Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers are employed as precision tracking chambers, complemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the very forward region where the background counting rate due to neutrons and γ's produced in shielding material and detector components is too high for the MDT chambers. After several upgrades of the CERN accelerator system over the coming decade, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to be raised to about five times the LHC design luminosity. This necessitates replacement of the muon chambers in the regions with the highest background radiation rates in the so-called Small Wheels, which constitute the innermost layers of the muon spectrometer end-caps, by new detectors with higher rate cap...

  7. A 32-channels, 025 mu m CMOS ASIC for the readout of the Silicon Drift Detectors of the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Anelli, G; Anghinolfi, F; Martínez, M I; Rotondo, F

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a 32 channel ASIC prototype for the readout of the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) of the ALICE experiment. The ASIC integrates on the same chip 32 transimpedance amplifiers, a 32*256 cells analogue memory and 16 successive approximation 10 bit A /D converters. The circuit amplifies and samples at 40 MS/s the input signal in a continuous way; when an external trigger signal validates the acquisition, the sampling is stopped and the data are digitized at lower speed (0.5 MS/s). The chip has been designed and fabricated in a commercial. 0.25 mu m CMOS technology. It has been extensively tested both on a bench and connected with the detector in several beam tests. In this paper both design issues and test results are presented. The commercial technology used for the design has been yield radiation tolerant with special layout techniques. Total dose irradiation tests are also presented. (13 refs).

  8. A 32-channel, 025 mum CMOS ASIC for the readout of the silicon drift detectors of the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Anghinolfi, F; Martínez, M I; Rivetti, A; Rotondo, F

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a 32 channel ASIC prototype for the readout of the silicon drift detectors (SDDs) of the ALICE experiment. The ASIC integrates on the same substrate 32 transimpedance amplifiers, a 32 x 256 cell analogue memory and 16 successive approximation 10 bit A/D converters. The circuit amplifies and samples at 40 MS/s the input signal in a continuous way. When an external trigger signal validates the acquisition, the sampling is stopped and the data are digitized at lower speed (0.5 MS/s). The chip has been designed and fabricated in a commercial 0.25 mum CMOS technology. It has been extensively tested both on a bench and connected with a detector in several beam tests. In this paper both design issues and test results are presented. The radiation tolerance of the design has been increased by special layout techniques. Total dose irradiation tests are also presented.

  9. Construction and test of high precision drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; Kroha, Hubert; Schwegler, Philipp; Sforza, Federico

    2014-01-01

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in March 2014 new muon tracking chambers (sMDT) with drift-tubes of 15 mm diameter, half of the value of the standard ATLAS Monitored Drift-Tubes (MDT) chambers, and 10~$\\mu$m positioning accuracy of the sense wires have been constructed. The new chambers are designed to be fully compatible with the present ATLAS services but, with respect to the previously installed ATLAS MDT chambers, they are assembled in a more compact geometry and they deploy two additional tube layers that provide redundant rack information. The chambers are composed of 8 layers of in total 624 aluminium drift-tubes. The assembly of a chamber is completed within a week. A semi-automatized production line is used for the assembly of the drift-tubes prior to the chamber assembly. The production procedures and the quality control tests of the single components and of the complete chambers will be discussed. The wire position in the completed chambers have been measured by using a coordinate me...

  10. Modelling of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the ATLAS monitored drift-tube chambers in the presence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Khartchenko, D.; Kortner, O.; Kotov, S.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, R.; Staude, A.; Valderanis, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses tracking chambers consisting of up to 5m long drift tubes filled with Ar:CO 2 (93:7) at 3bar. The chambers are run in a average toroidal magnetic field of 0.4T created by 8 air core coils. They provide a track-point accuracy of 40μm if the space-to-drift-time relationship r(t) is known with 20μm accuracy. The magnetic field B influences the electron drift inside the tubes: the maximum drift time t max =700ns increases by ∼70ns/T 2 B 2 . B varies by up to +/-0.4T along the tubes of the chambers mounted near the magnet coils which translates into a variation of t max of up to 45ns. The dependence of r(t) on B must be taken into account. Test-beam measurements show that the electron drift in case of B 0 can be modelled with the required accuracy by a Langevin equation with a friction term which is slightly non-linear in the drift velocity

  11. Quality control results of the drift tubes for the ATLAS MDT-BIS chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Avramidou, R.; Dris, M.; Filippas, T.A.; Gazis, E.N.; Katsoufis, E.; Maltezos, S.; Savva, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, E.

    2006-01-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is a general purpose experiment, which will start its operation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in 2007. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the products of proton-proton collisions at c.m.s. energies of up to 14 TeV. Three Greek Universities have taken the responsibility to construct 112 BIS-MDT (Barrel Inner Small) chambers using 29 000 drift tubes of 170 cm length and 3 cm diameter that have been quality tested before assembly. This work describes the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA Q C) procedures for the drift tubes, followed at the High Energy Physics Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens, while emphasis is given on the obtained results for the above mentioned number of tubes

  12. Construction and test of the analog electronics for the planar drift chambers of the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.

    1990-03-01

    The front-end-electronics for the planar drift chambers. FTD/RTD, of the ZEUS detector, developed by Siegen University, has been tested in their performance together with a FTD testcell. This cell was operated under new high voltage conditions and showed a gas gain of G ≅ 1x10 4 . The electronics, consisting of a preamplifier, a 45 m signal cable and a postamplifier with the ability of puls shaping, had to be matched to the dynamic input range of the FADS's. This led to a completely new design of the postamplifier. Signal crosstalk in the drift cell can distort the original puls shape and possibly leads to a wrong trace reconstruction. Measurements of the crosstalk showed a 10% effect, that can be reduced by a passive crosstalk compensation to less than 5%. (orig.) [de

  13. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2018-01-01

    The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH’s are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  14. Dimethyl ether reviewed: New results on using this gas in a high-precision drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; D'Ali, G.; Del Papa, C.; Maccarrone, G.; Massam, T.; Motta, F.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Rinaldi, G.; Sartorelli, G.; Spinetti, M.; Susinno, G.; Villa, F.; Voltano, L.; Zichichi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two years ago, dimethyl ether (DME) was presented, for the first time, as a suitable gas for high-precision drift chambers. In fact our tests show that resolutions can be obtained which are better by at least a factor of 2 compared to what one can get with conventional gases. Moreover, DME is very well quenched. The feared formation of whiskers on the wires has not occurred, at least after months of use with a 10 μCi 106 Ru source. (orig.)

  15. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF; Validacion en el Test Beam del CERN/GIF de la electronica de Lectura de las Camaras de Muones del Experimento CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M. c.; Marin, J.; Oller, J. C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L. J.

    2002-07-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  16. Design and Development of a control system for the Drift Tube Chamber High Voltage Power Supply

    CERN Document Server

    Leon Vega, Luis Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper contains information related to the design and development of a control and data acquisition manager implemented in WinCC, a Siemens SCADA system. The goal was to manage a CAEN HV (High Voltage) system for powering a Drift Tube (DT) chamber of the CMS experiment. Basically, this manager consists of two sections: a friendly user interface and powerful scripts to manage the back-end. It is in charge of adjusting the power supply settings to the correct values needed for the DT Chamber operations (ON, OFF, Standby), depending of the requirements of the operator, managing automatically all the transition process. Also, the manager is in charge of configuring the archiving process for acquiring data and providing the history of the system. It also implements the monitoring of the status of each connected channel, alerting in case it is needed.

  17. Optimization and Calibration of the Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067746

    2000-01-01

    The final phase of preparations for the ATLAS experiment at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has begun. In the last decade the collaboration has carried out various test-beam experiments to study and optimize prototypes of all subdetectors under more and more realistic conditions. To enhance the detector-physical understanding, these hardware activities were complemented by detailed simulations. In parallel the development of reconstruction software has made important progress. The present work focusses on some advanced aspects of optimizing the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT) for operation as precision chambers in the Muon Spectrometer. It will be shown how this system has been tuned for maximum performance in order to meet the ambitious goals defined by the objectives of LHC particle physics. After defining the basic detector parameters, the tubes' capability of running in ATLAS's high-rate gamma radiation background was verified. Both tasks necessitated several years of gathering experience in mu...

  18. Improvement of the drift chamber system in the SAPHIR detector and first measurements of the Φ meson production at threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholmann, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    The SAPHIR detector at ELSA enables the measurement of photon induced Φ meson production from threshold up to 3 GeV in the full kinematical range. A considerable improvement of the drift chamber system is a precondition of gaining the necessary data rate in an acceptable time. The research focuses attention on the choice of the chamber gas and on a different mechanical construction, so as to minimize the negative influences of the photon beam crossing the sensitive volume of the drift chamber system. In addition, first preliminary results of the total and the differential cross section for the Φ meson production close to threshold were evaluated. (orig.)

  19. Occupancy in the CLIC ILD Time Projection Chamber using Pixelised Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The occupancy in the CLIC ILD TPC caused by the beam induced background from gamma gamma -> hadrons, e+e- pairs and beam halo muons is very high for conventional pad readout. We show that the occupancy for a pixelised TPC readout is moderate and might be a viable solution to operate a TPC at CLIC.

  20. A cylindrical drift chamber for radiative muon capture experiments at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.S.; Dawson, R.J.; Azuelos, G.; Robertson, B.C.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Ahamad, S.; Gorringe, T.P.; Serna-Angel, A.; Blecher, M.; Wright, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    In the Standard Model, the weak interaction is purely V-A in character. However in semileptonic reactions the strong force induces additional couplings. Radiative muon capture (RMC), μ - Z → ν(Z-1)γ, is a process which is particularly sensitive to the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant, g p , which is still very poorly determined experimentally. Due to the extremely small branching ratio (∼ 6 x 10 -8 ), the elementary reaction μ - p → νnγ has never been measured. Effort to date has concentrated on nuclear RMC where the branching ratio is much larger, but the interpretation of these results is hindered by nuclear structure uncertainties. A measurement is being carried out at TRIUMF to determine the rate of RMC on hydrogen to a precision of 8% leading to a determination of g p with an error of 10%. The detection system is based on a large volume cylindrical drift chamber, in an axial magnetic field, acting as an e + e - pair spectrometer with a solid angle of ≅ 2 π. The design, construction and performance of the cylindrical drift chamber are discussed

  1. Measurements of the drift velocity using a small gas chamber for monitoring of the CMS muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Frangenheim, J

    This diploma thesis presents measurements of the drift velocity of electrons in gas. A small gas detector (VDC1 ) is used. This chamber is intended for measurement and monitoring of the drift velocity in the gas of the muon chambers of the gas detector system in the barrel area of the CMS-detector2 at the European Research Center for Particle Physics CERN near Geneva. The drift velocity is, together with the drift time, a key parameter for measurements with drift chambers. The aim of this thesis is to perform test measurements to determine parameters of the chamber and also to estimate systematic errors. Beside the drift velocity, further parameters of the gas like the pressure and the temperature are measured and accounted for. For the further work with the VDCs, analysis software has been created which is used for the analysis of the measurements. Parallel to this work, necessary improvements, e.g. for the high voltage robustness, were also implemented and tested. In addition, studies and test measurements ...

  2. Building a large-area GEM-based readout chamber for the upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Gasik, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged-particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019-2020, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate up to 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. To fully exploit the LHC potential the TPC will be upgraded based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. A prototype of an ALICE TPC Outer Read-Out Chamber (OROC) was equipped with twelve large-size GEM foils as amplification stage to demonstrate the feasibility of replacing the current Multi Wire Proportional Chambers with the new technology. With a total area of $\\sim$0.76 m$^2$ it is the largest GEM-based detector built to date. The GEM OROC was installed within a test field cage and commissioned with radioactive sources.

  3. Building a large-area GEM-based readout chamber for the upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasik, P. [Physik Department E62, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Excellence Cluster ‘Origin and Structure of the Universe’, Garching (Germany)

    2017-02-11

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged-particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019–2020, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate up to 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. To fully exploit the LHC potential the TPC will be upgraded based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. A prototype of an ALICE TPC Outer Read-Out Chamber (OROC) was equipped with twelve large-size GEM foils as amplification stage to demonstrate the feasibility of replacing the current Multi Wire Proportional Chambers with the new technology. With a total area of ∼0.76 m{sup 2} it is the largest GEM-based detector built to date. The GEM OROC was installed within a test field cage and commissioned with radioactive sources.

  4. Building a large-area GEM-based readout chamber for the upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasik, P.

    2017-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged-particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019–2020, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate up to 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. To fully exploit the LHC potential the TPC will be upgraded based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. A prototype of an ALICE TPC Outer Read-Out Chamber (OROC) was equipped with twelve large-size GEM foils as amplification stage to demonstrate the feasibility of replacing the current Multi Wire Proportional Chambers with the new technology. With a total area of ∼0.76 m 2 it is the largest GEM-based detector built to date. The GEM OROC was installed within a test field cage and commissioned with radioactive sources.

  5. Discovery of multiple, ionization-created CS2 anions and a new mode of operation for drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowden-Ifft, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the surprising discovery of multiple species of ionization-created CS 2 anions in gas mixtures containing electronegative CS 2 and O 2 , identified by their slightly different drift velocities. Data are presented to understand the formation mechanism and identity of these new anions. Regardless of the micro-physics, however, this discovery offers a new, trigger-less mode of operation for the drift chambers. A demonstration of trigger-less operation is presented

  6. Pulse height measurements and electron attachment in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO{sub 2} mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, A. E-mail: a.andronic@gsi.de; Appelshaeuser, H.; Blume, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bucher, D.; Busch, O.; Ramirez, A.C.A. Castillo; Catanescu, V.; Ciobanu, M.; Daues, H.; Devismes, A.; Emschermann, D.; Fateev, O.; Garabatos, C.; Herrmann, N.; Ivanov, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Petrovici, M.; Reygers, K.; Sann, H.; Santo, R.; Schicker, R.; Sedykh, S.; Shimansky, S.; Simon, R.S.; Smykov, L.; Soltveit, H.K.; Stachel, J.; Stelzer, H.; Tsiledakis, G.; Vulpescu, B.; Wessels, J.P.; Windelband, B.; Winkelmann, O.; Xu, C.; Zaudtke, O.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Yurevich, V

    2003-02-11

    We present pulse height measurements in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. We investigate the attachment of primary electrons on oxygen and SF{sub 6} contaminants in the detection gas. The measurements are compared with simulations of properties of drifting electrons. We present two methods to check the gas quality: gas chromatography and {sup 55}Fe pulse height measurements using monitor detectors.

  7. Study of the performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube chambers in magntic fields and at high irradiation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos

    2012-07-26

    The performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers has been studied in detail using high-energy muon beams. The measurements of the drift tube properties in magnetic fields showed that inelastic collisions of the drifting electrons with the CO{sub 2} molecules in the Ar:CO{sub 2} (93:7) gas mixture of the MDT chambers have to be taken into account in the simulation of the drift properties. Such inelastic collisions are now correctly treated by the Garfield simulation programme from version 9 providing an accurate description of the behaviour of the ATLAS muon drift tubes, in particular in the magnetic field. Measurements at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN were performed to study the performance of the MDT chambers in the presence of high {gamma} ray background fluences. The chambers have a spatial resolution better than 40 {mu}m at the nominal background rates expected at the Large Hadron Collider design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a resolution better than 50 {mu}m for up to five times higher background rates. Efficient muon detection up to background counting rates of 500 kHz per tube corresponding to 35% occupancy was demonstrated.

  8. The central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector - implementation into the experiment and study of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the Bonn accelerator facility ELSA the large solid angle detector SAPHIR was built for the investigation of photon induced reactions. A main component of SAPHIR is the central drift chamber (CDC) matching the magneto gap of 1m 3 . The diameter of the in total 1828 hexagonal drift cells is about 18 mm. The subject of this paper is the implementation of the CDC in the experiment. After the description of the hardware follows the presentation of the software tools for filtering and monitoring the data, which have been developed and tested. An algorithm for extracting the space time relationship is presented. The properties of the chamber with an improved gas mixture (Helium/Neon/Isobutane8 21.25:63.75:15) have been investigated. A spatial resolution of about 200 μm was achieved. The efficiency of the chamber is 97% at a tagged photon of 5x10 4 per second crossing the chamber. (orig.) [de

  9. A high-precision X-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS Muon Monitored Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, S; Banhidi, Z; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Lampl, W; Marchesotti, M; Rangod, Stephane; Sbrissa, E; Smirnov, Y; Voss, Rüdiger; Woudstra, M; Zhuravlov, V

    2004-01-01

    A dedicated X-ray tomograph has been developed at CERN to control the required wire placement accuracy of better than 20mum of the 1200 Monitored Drift Tube Chambers which make up most of the precision chamber part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The tomograph allows the chamber wire positions to be measured with a 2mum statistical and 2mum systematic uncertainty over the full chamber cross-section of 2.2 multiplied by 0.6m**2. Consistent chamber production quality over the 4-year construction phase is ensured with a similar to 15% sampling rate. Measurements of about 70 of the 650 MDT chambers so far produced have been essential in assessing the validity and consistency of the various construction procedures.

  10. Fast readout of the COMPASS RICH CsI-MWPC chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Deschampbs, H; Kunne, F; Gerasimov, S; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Kravtchuk, N; Magnon, A; Neyret, D; Panebianco, S; Paul, S; Rebourgeard, P; Tessaroto, F

    2006-01-01

    A new readout system for CsI-coated MWPCs, used in the COMPASS RICH detector, has been proposed and tested in nominal high-rate conditions. It is based on the APV25-S1 analog sampling chip, and will replace the Gassiplex chip readout used up to now. The APV chip, originally designed for silicon microstrip detectors, is shown to perform well even with “slow” signals from a MWPC, keeping a signal-to-noise ratio of 9. For every trigger the system reads three consecutive in-time samples, thus allowing to extract information on the signal shape and its timing. The effective time window is reduced from ∼3 μs for the Gassiplex to below 400 ns for the APV25-S1 chip, reducing pile-up events at high particle rate. A significant improvement of the signal-to-background ratio by a factor 5–6 with respect to the original readout has been measured in the central region of the RICH detector. Due to its pipelined architecture, the new readout system also considerably reduces the dead time per event, allowing efficien...

  11. Fast readout of the COMPASS RICH CsI-MWPC photon chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbon, P.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Kunne, F.; Gerasimov, S.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Kravtchuk, N.; Magnon, A.; Neyret, D.; Panebianco, S.; Paul, S.; Rebourgeard, P.; Tessaroto, F.

    2006-01-01

    A new readout system for CsI-coated MWPCs, used in the COMPASS RICH detector, has been proposed and tested in nominal high-rate conditions. It is based on the APV25-S1 analog sampling chip, and will replace the Gassiplex chip readout used up to now. The APV chip, originally designed for silicon microstrip detectors, is shown to perform well even with 'slow' signals from a MWPC, keeping a signal-to-noise ratio of 9. For every trigger the system reads three consecutive in-time samples, thus allowing to extract information on the signal shape and its timing. The effective time window is reduced from ∼3 μs for the Gassiplex to below 400 ns for the APV25-S1 chip, reducing pile-up events at high particle rate. A significant improvement of the signal-to-background ratio by a factor 5-6 with respect to the original readout has been measured in the central region of the RICH detector. Due to its pipelined architecture, the new readout system also considerably reduces the dead time per event, allowing efficient data taking at higher trigger rate

  12. Development of an influence drift chamber for the measurement of associated strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, G.

    1992-07-01

    The PS185 experiment at the LEAR in the CERN, Geneve deals with the production of the lightest hyperons and mesons at their production threshold. Especially the anti ΛΛ channel and its observables were measured. Contrarily the present thesis picks up the reaction (anti pp→anti ΛΛπ 0 ) and shows for this three-particle final-state the total cross section at six different anti p momenta in the region of 1.9 GeV/c, which were obtained via missing-mass analyses and a kinetmatical fit. For the extension of the experiment to the measurement of the charged Σ's an influence drift chamber (IDC) was constructed, fabricated, and taken into operation, which satisfies the requirements concerning high position resolution, high counting-rate capability, and low mass-deposition. Test measurements have shown that the IDC fulfils with a counting rate of 10 - 7anti p/mm 2 s at a position resolution of σ=35 μm+3 μm/1deg with a mass deposition of 0.067% per chamber plane the experimental requirements. For the data acquisition a fast acquisition system (0.9 ms/event+0.6 ms/kByte) for the IDC was developed, installed, programmed, and tested. (orig.) [de

  13. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui, E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn

    2016-12-21

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH{sub 4}, Ar + 3.5% CO{sub 2} and Kr + 2.7% CO{sub 2} gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  14. Double beta decays studied by β-γ spectroscopy with a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, K.; Ejiri, H.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale ultra low background β-γ spectrometer ELEGANTS-V for studying double beta decays(ββ) of /sup 100/Mo and/or /sup 150/Nd is designed and is now under construction. It consists of drift chambers for identification of tracks and vertex of two β-rays, thin NaI(T1) or plastic scintillators for β-rays energy and NaI(T1) counters for γ- and cosmic-rays. Specifications of the spectrometer; energy resolution, detection efficiency, possible background counting rate and available ββ sources, have been evaluated. The spectrometer has extremely high sensitivities of the neutrinoless ββ decays (0νββ), two neutrino ββ decays (2νββ) and neutrinoless ββ decays followed one boson (Majoron). It may detect 0νββ decays with half lives up to T/sub 1/2/ = 1.2- 1.7 . 10/sup 23/ year. This limit corresponds to one part of million for the Majoran neutrino mass in units of the electron mass and for the right-handed weak current in units of the left handed one

  15. The construction technique of the high granularity and high transparency drift chamber of MEG II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Miccoli, A.; Panareo, M.; Pinto, C.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    The MEG experiment searches for the charged lepton flavor violating decay, μ +→ e+γ. MEG has already determined the world best upper limit on the branching ratio BRdevelop new wiring strategies. The number of wires and the stringent requirements on the precision of their position and on the uniformity of the wire mechanical tension impose the use of an automatic system to operate the wiring procedures. This wiring robot, designed and built at the INFN Lecce and University of Salento laboratories, consists of: ṡ a semiautomatic wiring machine with a high precision on wire mechanical tensioning (better than 0.5 g) and on wire positioning (20 μ m) for simultaneous wiring of multiwire layers; ṡ a contact-less infrared laser soldering tool; ṡ an automatic handling system for storing and transporting the multi-wire layers. The drift chamber is currently under construction at INFN and should be completed by the end of summer 2017 to be then delivered to PSI for commissioning.

  16. Recent developments for the pattern recognition in the central drift chamber of the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusov, Viktor; Feindt, Michael; Heck, Martin; Hauth, Thomas; Goldenzweig, Pablo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Belle II experiment is designed to perform more precise measurements (e.g. C P-violation measurements, New Physics phenomena, rare decays etc) than its predecessor, the Belle experiment. To achieve this goal, the luminosity of the experiment will be increased by a factor of 40 and as result multiple times more data will be collected. Due to this fact, faster reconstruction algorithms for the data processing need to be developed and at the same time accurate physical results should be retained. One important part in the data processing chain is the track reconstruction section. We present the development of one of the pattern recognition algorithms for the Belle II experiment based on conformal and Legendre transformations. In order to optimize the performance of the algorithm (CPU time and efficiency) we have introduced specialized processing steps. To show improvements in the results we introduce efficiency measurements of the tracking algorithms in the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) which were done using Monte-Carlo simulation of e{sup +} e{sup -} collisions followed by a full simulation of the Belle II detector.

  17. Performance of a Drift Chamber Candidate for a Cosmic Muon Tomography System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Thompson, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Armitage, J.; Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Erlandson, A.; Oakham, G. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bueno, J.; Bryman, D.; Liu, Z. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Charles, E.; Gallant, G. [Canada Border Services Agency, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Cousins, T.; Noel, S. [International Safety Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Drouin, P.-L.; Waller, D. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Stocki, T. J. [Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-12-13

    In the last decade, many groups around the world have been exploring different ways to probe transport containers which may contain illicit Special Nuclear Materials such as uranium. The muon tomography technique has been proposed as a cost effective system with an acceptable accuracy. A group of Canadian institutions (see above), funded by Defence Research and Development Canada, is testing different technologies to track the cosmic muons. One candidate is the single wire Drift Chamber. With the capability of a 2D impact position measurement, two detectors will be placed above and two below the object to be probed. In order to achieve a good 3D image quality of the cargo content, a good angular resolution is required. The simulation showed that 1mrad was required implying the spatial resolution of the trackers must be in the range of 1 to 2 mm for 1 m separation. A tracking system using three prototypes has been built and tested. The spatial resolution obtained is 1.7 mm perpendicular to the wire and 3 mm along the wire.

  18. Performance Analysis of a Bunch and Track Identifier Prototype (BTI) for the CMS Barrel Muon Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta Pelayo, J.

    2001-01-01

    This note contains a short description of the first step in the first level trigger applied to the barrel muon drift chambers of CMS: the Bunch and Track Identifier (BTI). The test beam results obtained with a BTI prototype have been also analysed BTI performance for different incidence angles and in presence of external magnetic field has been tested, as well as BTI capability as trigger device and track reconstructor. (Author) 30 refs

  19. A study of various types of electronics for drift chambers: development of a test bench and results for 1500 channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostarakis, Panayotis.

    1976-01-01

    An electronic chain to be connected with drift chambers is studied for use in High Energy Physics. Studies have been made to define the best components to be put into the elements (amplifiers, cables, TDC...). Measurements have been done to determine the characteristics of the chosen elements. A test apparatus has been built to control each channel (about 1550). Finally all chain elements have been tested [fr

  20. The Read-Out Driver for the ATLAS MDT Muon Precision Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Boterenbrood, H; Kieft, G; König, A; Vermeulen, J C; Wijnen, T A M; 14th IEEE - NPSS Real Time Conference 2005 Nuclear Plasma Sciences Society

    2006-01-01

    Some 200 MDT Read Out Drivers (MRODs) will be built to read out the 1200 MDT precision chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The MRODs receive event data via optical links (one per chamber, up to 8 per MROD), build event fragments at a maximum rate of 100 kHz, output these to the ATLAS data-acquisition system and take care of monitoring and error checking, handling and flagging. The design of the MROD-1 prototype (a 9U VME64 module in which this functionality is implemented using FPGAs and ADSP-21160 Digital Signal Processors programmed in C++) is described, followed by a presentation of results of performance measurements. Then the implications for the production version (called MROD-X) and the experience with pre-production modules of the MROD-X are discussed.

  1. Study of fast operating readout electronics and charge interpolation technique for micro cathode strip chambers (MCSC)

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A; Sagidova, Nailia

    1998-01-01

    Study of the factors limiting the spatial resolution of the MCSC caused by nonlinearity of the cathode-charge interpolation technique has been carried out using a special test arrangement that imitates the charge distribution on the cathode strips as a real MCSC and allows high precision comparison of the coordinates determined by the charge interpolation technique with the known values. We considered a MCSC with a 0.6 mm gap between the anode and the cathode strip planes and with the strip pitch of 0.9 mm. Various charge interpolation algorithms have been tested. It was demonstrated that the systematics errors in the coordinate measurements as low as 5 microns can be achieved, after applying some simple corrections, even with rather coarse sampling, when the coordinates is determined only by 2 or 3 adjacent strips. These results have been obtained with the readout electronics specially designed for fast operation of the MCSCs with the signal peaking time of 20 ns. The equivalent noise charge ss 1600e (r.m.s....

  2. On the data compression at filmless readout of the streamer chamber information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajla, I.; Ososkov, G.A.; Prikhod'ko, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is supposed that the system of filmless detecting and processing the visual information from ''RISK'' streamer chamber will comprise the effective on-line data compression algorithm. The role of the basic methodological principles of chamber image film processing in Righ Energy Physics for building up such system is analysed. On the basis of this analysis the main requirements are formulated that have to be fulfilled by the compression algorithm. The most important requirement consists in securing the possibility of the input data reprocessing, if problems in the off-line recognition occur. Using a vector system representation of primary data, the on-line data compression philosophy is proposed that embodies the following three principles: universality, parallelism and input data reconstructibility. Excluding of the recognition procedure from the on-line compression algorithm causes the compression factor reduction. The hierarchic structure of the compression algorithm consisting of (1) sorting, (2) filtering, (3) compression for an additional increasing of the compression ratio is proposed

  3. Highly Integrated Mixed-Mode Electronics for the readout of Time Projection Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    França Santos, Hugo Miguel; Musa, Luciano

    Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are one of the most prevalent particle trackers for high-energy physics experiments. Future planed TPCs for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) entail very high spatial resolution in large gas volumes, but impose low material budget for the end caps of the TPC cylinder. This constraint is not accomplished with the state-of-the-art front-end electronics because of its unsuited relatively large mass and of its associated water cooling system. To reach the required material budget, highly compact and power efficient dedicated TPC front-end electronics should be developed. This project aims at re-designing the different electronic elements with significant improvements in terms of performance, power efficiency and versatility, and developing an integrated circuit that merges all components of the front-end electronics. This chip ambitions a large volume production at low unitary cost and its employment in multiple detectors. The design of ...

  4. A large-area glass-resistive plate chamber with multistrip readout

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovici, M; Hildenbrand, K D; Augustinski, G; Ciobanu, M; Cruceru, I; Duma, M; Hartmann, O; Koczón, P; Kress, T; Marquardt, M; Moisa, D; Petris, M; Schröder, C; Simion, V; Stoicea, G; Weinert, J

    2002-01-01

    A completely new configuration of a glass resistive-plate chamber (GRPC) was built and tested. It consists of a double two-gap structure of electrodes with an active area of about 400 cm sup 2 and is read out via a central multistrip printed circuit board. In measurements with a sup 6 sup 0 Co source and p, d particles of 1.5 A GeV time resolutions better than 80 ps, position resolution along the strips of 5-6 mm and efficiencies larger than 95% were obtained using available fast standard electronics. These results open the possibility of constructing compact TOF detectors of high resolution and high granularity.

  5. Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for precise measurement of muon trajectories in the ATLAS muon spectrometer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The basic detection component of the chamber is the cylindrical, aluminium, gas-filled MDT with its central tungsten rhenium wire. Each chamber is an assembly of two parallel multilayers of MDTs separated by a spacer frame. The chambers are pictured here in building 887 on the Prévessin site where they are being tested.

  6. Method for detecting and distinguishing between specific types of environmental radiation using a high pressure ionization chamber with pulse-mode readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2017-12-19

    An environmental radiation detector for detecting and distinguishing between all types of environmental radiation, including photons, charged particles, and neutrons. A large volume high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) includes BF.sub.3 gas at a specific concentration to render the radiation detector sensitive to the reactions of neutron capture in Boron-10 isotope. A pulse-mode readout is connected to the ionization chamber capable of measuring both the height and the width of the pulse. The heavy charged products of the neutron capture reaction deposit significant characteristic energy of the reaction in the immediate vicinity of the reaction in the gas, producing a signal with a pulse height proportional to the reaction energy, and a narrow pulse width corresponding to the essentially pointlike energy deposition in the gas. Readout of the pulse height and the pulse width parameters of the signals enables distinguishing between the different types of environmental radiation, such as gamma (x-rays), cosmic muons, and neutrons.

  7. Inspection of anode and field wires for the COMPASS drift chamber, DC5, with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyuzuzo, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses a secondary pion beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN to explore the spin structure of nucleons. A new drift chamber, DC5, will be integrated into the COMPASS spectrometer to replace an aging straw tube detector. DC5 will detect muon pairs from Drell-Yan scattering of a pion-beam off a transversely polarized proton target. This data will be used to determine the correlation between transverse proton spin and the intrinsic transverse momentum of up-quarks inside the proton, the Sivers effect. DC5 is a large area planar drift chamber with 8 layers of anode-frames made of G10 fiberglass-epoxy. The G10 frames support printed circuit boards for soldering 20 μm diameter anode and 100 μm diameter field wires. The anode planes are sandwiched by 13 graphite coated Mylar cathode planes. To ensure a well-functioning of DC5, the wires were carefully tested. An optical inspection and a spectral analysis was performed with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to verify the composition and dimensions and the integrity of the gold plating on the surface of these wires. The spectra of the wires were studied at 10 and 30 keV. The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses a secondary pion beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN to explore the spin structure of nucleons. A new drift chamber, DC5, will be integrated into the COMPASS spectrometer to replace an aging straw tube detector. DC5 will detect muon pairs from Drell-Yan scattering of a pion-beam off a transversely polarized proton target. This data will be used to determine the correlation between transverse proton spin and the intrinsic transverse momentum of up-quarks inside the proton, the Sivers effect. DC5 is a large area planar drift chamber with 8 layers of anode-frames made of G10 fiberglass-epoxy. The G10 frames support printed circuit boards for soldering 20 μm diameter anode and 100 μm diameter field wires. The anode planes are sandwiched by 13

  8. A full-scale prototype for the tracking chambers of the ALICE muon spectrometer. Part II- Electronics. Preamplifier; Read-out prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtat, P.; Charlet, D.; Lebon, S.; Martin, J.M.; Sellem, R.; Wanlin, E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Electronique Physique; Douet, R.; Harroch, H.; Bimbot, L.; Jouan, D.; Kharmandarian, L.; Le Bornec, Y.; Mac Cormick, M.; Willis, N. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Institut de Physique Nucleaire

    1999-07-01

    A full scale prototype of one module of the first tracking station has already been constructed. It will be equipped with the new read-out electronics proposed for the final chambers. Before integration of the whole chain, tests have been carried out on the individual components in discrete circuit prototypes. The different parts of the chain are described, together with the tests performed. The final version with integrated circuits in then described. (author)

  9. A full-scale prototype for the tracking chambers of the ALICE muon spectrometer. Part II- Electronics. Preamplifier; Read-out prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtat, P.; Charlet, D.; Lebon, S.; Martin, J.M.; Sellem, R.; Wanlin, E.; Douet, R.; Harroch, H.; Bimbot, L.; Jouan, D.; Kharmandarian, L.; Le Bornec, Y.; Mac Cormick, M.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    A full scale prototype of one module of the first tracking station has already been constructed. It will be equipped with the new read-out electronics proposed for the final chambers. Before integration of the whole chain, tests have been carried out on the individual components in discrete circuit prototypes. The different parts of the chain are described, together with the tests performed. The final version with integrated circuits in then described. (author)

  10. Pattern recognition and resolution of the left/right ambiguities in the central drift chamber of SAPHIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewe, S.

    1989-06-01

    A FORTRAN program has been developed that applies a track following algorithm to group the signals coming from the central drift chamber into tracks, and that computes a first approximation of the position of these tracks at the signal wires. It is assumed that the tracks can be approximated locally by a helix. A track must have signals in at least four vertical layers and three stereo layers in order to be found. Tracks need not originate in the target, they may start after the first layer of the chamber, they may end before the last layer, and they may have one missing signal in a layer between their first layer and their last layer. The lower limit on a track's momentum is 50 MeV/c. Furthermore, an interactive graphical environment has been developed to display and manipulate single events. The program is currently running on a DEC VAX 3200 Workstation. (orig.) [de

  11. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for Upgrades of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in 2016/17

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00218480; Kortner, O.; Müller, F.; Nowak, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.

    2016-01-01

    Small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for the ATLAS muon detector upgrade. They possess an improved rate capability and a more compact design with respect to the existing chambers, which allows to equip detector regions uninstrument at present. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, while the sense wire positioning accuracy is improved to below ten microns. The chambers will be ready for installation in the winter shutdown 2016/17 of the Large Hadron Collider. The design and construction of the new sMDT chambers for ATLAS will be discussed as well as measurements of their precision and performance.

  12. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Y [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ball, B; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Gregory, J [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beretta, M [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P P M [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brandenburg, G W; Fries, T; Costa, J Guimaraes da; Harder, S; Huth, J [Harvard University, Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ceradini, F [INFN Roma Tre and Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Hazen, E [Boston University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, L E [Brandeis University, Department of Physics, Waltham, MA (United States); Koenig, A C [Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef, Dept. of Exp. High Energy Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lanza, A [INFN Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Mikenberg, G [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot (Israel)], E-mail: brandenburg@physics.harvard.edu (and others)

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 {mu}m, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at p{sub T}= 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  13. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Beretta, M; Boterenbrood, H; Brandenburg, G W; Ceradini, F; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Fries, T; Gregory, J; Guimarães da Costa, J; Harder, S; Hazen, E; Huth, J; Jansweijer, P P M; Kirsch, L E; König, A C; Lanza, A; Mikenberg, G; Oliver, J; Posch, C; Richter, R; Riegler, W; Spiriti, E; Taylor, F E; Vermeulen, J; Wadsworth, B; Wijnen, T A M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 microns, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT = 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  14. Semiconductor drift chamber: an application of a novel charge transport scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, E.; Rehak, P.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel charge tranport scheme in semiconductors in which the field responsible for the charge transport is independent of the depletion field. The application of the novel charge transport scheme leads to the following new semiconductor detectors: (1) Semiconductor Draft Chamber; (2) Ultra low capacitance - large semiconductor x-ray spectrometers and photodiodes; and (3) Fully depleted thick CCD. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Semiconductor Draft Chamber as a position sensing detector for high energy charged particles. Position resolution limiting factors are considered, and the values of the resolutions are given

  15. Study of properties of helium-based gas mixtures for use of low momentum and high precision measurement in drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chang; Zhang Qinjian; Ma Jimao; Huang Xiuping; Yi Kai; Zheng Shuchen

    1998-01-01

    Measured drift velocities using an uniform field drift chamber and multiplication factors obtained with proportional tubes in He-based gas mixtures He + CH 4 (80/20, 70/30) and He + iC 4 H 10 (85/15, 80/20, 70/30) are reported. The results are good agreement with calculations by Garfield Code. The Saturated drift velocity is V d ≅ 2.7 cm/μs and multiplication factor of M ≅ 10 4 -10 5 at certain working voltage is manageable in He/CH 4 (80/20) gas mixture, and it is good candidate of working gas for use of low momentum and high precision measurement in the drift chambers

  16. The automatic test system for the L3 muon drift chamber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bove, A.; Caiazzo, L.; Lanzano, S.; Manna, F.; Manto, G.; Parascandolo, L.; Parascandolo, P.; Parmentola, A.; Paternoster, G.

    1987-01-01

    We describe the system we developed to test the linearity of wire chambers amplifiers of the muon spectrometer presently in construction for the L3 experiment at LEP. The system, controlled by an Apple II computer, is capable of localizing both defective components and faults in the printed board. It will be used to perform the large scale quality control of the amplifier cards

  17. Construction and test of the final CMS Barrel Drift Tube Muon Chamber prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arneodo, M.; Banicz, K.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bethke, S.; Cerrada, M. E-mail: cerrada@ciemat.es; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Dallavalle, M.; Daniel, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanfani, A.; Fanin, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Gonella, F.; Grandi, C.; Guaita, P.; Guerzoni, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lippi, I.; Marcellini, S.; Marin, J.; Martinelli, R.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.; Migliore, E.; Mocholi, J.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Odorici, F.; Oller, J.C.; Paoletti, S.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.M.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Salicio, J.M.; Staiano, A.; Steinbeck, T.; Torassa, E.; Travaglini, R.; Ventura, L.; Ventura, S.; Vitelli, A.; Voetee, F.; Wegner, M.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2002-03-21

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper.

  18. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  19. Energy loss of pions and electrons of 1 to 6 GeV/c in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2(15\\%)

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Busch, O; Catanescu, V; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Emschermann, D; Fateev, O V; Foka, Y; Garabatos, C; Gunji, T; Herrmann, N; Inuzuka, M; Kislov, E; Lindenstruth, V; Ludolphs, W; Mahmoud, T; Petracek, V; Petrovici, M; Rusanov, I R; Sandoval, A; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Simon, R S; Smykov, L P; Soltveit, H K; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Tsiledakis, G; Vulpescu, B; Wessels, J P; Windelband, B; Xu, C; Zaudtke, O; Zanevsky, Yu; Yurevich, V

    2004-01-01

    We present measurements of the energy loss of pions and electrons in drift chambers operated with a Xe,CO2(15%) mixture. The measurements are carried out for particle momenta from 1 to 6 GeV/c using prototype drift chambers for the ALICE TRD. Microscopic calculations are performed using input parameters calculated with GEANT3. These calculations reproduce well the measured average and most probable values for pions, but a higher Fermi plateau is required in order to reproduce our electron data. The widths of the measured distributions are smaller for data compared to the calculations. The electron/pion identification performance using the energy loss is also presented.

  20. On-line data analysis and monitoring for H1 drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düllmann, Dirk

    1992-05-01

    The on-line monitoring, slow control and calibration of the H1 central jet chamber uses a VME multiprocessor system to perform the analysis and a connected Macintosh computer as graphical interface to the operator on shift. Task of this system are: - analysis of event data including on-line track search, - on-line calibration from normal events and testpulse events, - control of the high voltage and monitoring of settings and currents, - monitoring of temperature, pressure and mixture of the chambergas. A program package is described which controls the dataflow between data aquisition, differnt VME CPUs and Macintosh. It allows to run off-line style programs for the different tasks.

  1. On-line data analysis and monitoring for H1 drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duellmann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The on-line monitoring, slow control and calibration of the H1 central jet chamber uses a VME multiprocessor system to perform the analysis and a connected Macintosh computer as graphical interface to the operator on shift. Tasks of this system are: Analysis of event data including on-line track search; on-line calibration from normal events and testpulse events; control of the high voltage and monitoring of settings and currents; monitoring of temperature, pressure and mixture of the chambergas. A program package is described which controls the dataflow between data aquisition, different VME CPUs and Macintosh. It allows to run off-line style programs for the different tasks. (orig.)

  2. Study of D+ → K-π+π+ selection using the vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    1986-01-01

    Use of the vertex chamber information allows us to select D + → K - α + α + decays in Z → c anti c (Z → b anti b) events with an overall efficiency of about 15% (9%) for a signal-to-background ratio of about 4 (2). The physics which can be done with these selected decays depends on the size of the Z sample. In a sample of 10,000 hadronic Z decays, we could expect to tag about 16 D + from Z → c anti c and 11 D + from Z → b anti b events. There would be a few clean examples of b → c cascade decays where both decay vertices are well measured. With 100,000 Z decays, a good measurement of the D + production rate and x/sub D/ distribution in Z → c anti c and Z → b anti b decays could be made. We also may be able to make a reasonable measurement of the fraction of D + which have neutral parents. The D + sample could be combined with other b and c quark tagged samples to measure the Z decay assymmetry. With 1,000,000 Z decays we would have a fair chance to measure the average D + parent lifetime in Z → b anti b events. If the fraction of D + decays having neutral parents is sufficiently close to one, we could measure the charged and neutral B lifetimes

  3. Development of a triple GEM readout module for a time projection chamber and measurement accuracies of hadronic Higgs branching fractions in ννH at a 350 GeV ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The presented thesis addresses the development and evaluation of one of the detector concept for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a planned, future electron-positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV in its first construction stage. The ILC is designed to perform precision measurements of the Standard Model, especially a model-independent reconstruction of the electroweak symmetry breaking sector. In 2012, the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was an important first step and facilitates precision measurements of the Higgs boson coupling constants at the ILC. Challenging design goals have been defined for the ILC detectors in order to reach the desired measurement precisions. One of the two ILC detector concepts is the International Large Detector (ILD). A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the central tracking detector. In contrast to modern silicon tracking detectors, a TPC provides a large number of space points, and thus continuous sampling of the track parameters. Therefore, TPCs offer great pattern recognition capabilities including the identification of particle decays within the sensitive volume. The design momentum resolution of the ILD TPC is δ(1/p t )∼10 -4 GeV -1 which can be translated into a transverse spatial resolution of σ rφ ≤100 μm over the complete drift distance of 2.35 m. In the first part of the thesis, the development of a readout module for the TPC is presented which fulfills the performance requirements of the ILD TPC. The developed readout module is based on a stack of three ''Gas Electron Multiplier'' (GEM) foils and a pad readout. Thin ceramic grids are used as the support structure and spacers between the GEMs. The readout module was tested in a prototype TPC with a maximal drift distance of around 60 cm at the DESY II test beam. An additional guard ring at the upper edge of the module was introduced to minimize field distortions at the

  4. Comparison between argon/methane and argon/ethane gas mixtures in cylindrical drift chambers operating in a high transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, U.; Boer, W. de; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Sack, B.

    1983-03-01

    We compare the behaviour of two commonly used gas mixtures argon/methane (90:10) and argon/ethane (50:50) in large cylindrical drift chambers operating in a transverse magnetic field of 1.3 T. The cooler gas argon/ethane was found to exhibit considerably smaller deflection angles, which in our case leads to an improved performance of the chambers. The deflection angles have been determined from a comparison of the experimental non-linear space time relation with the one calculated from a computer simulation of the drift process. For the simulation we use a simple model with only two free parameters. These two parameters are sufficient to obtain an accurate parametrization of the non-linear space time relation. (orig.)

  5. Comparison between argon/methane and argon/ethane gas mixtures in cylindrical drift chambers operating in a high transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, U.; De Boer, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Sack, B.

    1983-01-01

    We compare the behaviour of two commonly used gas mixture argon/methane (90:10) and argon/ethane (50:50) in large cylindrical drift chambers operating in a transverse magnetic field of 1.3 T. The cooler gas argon/ethane was found to exhibit considerably smaller deflection angles, which in our case leads to an improved performance of the chambers. The deflection angles have been determined from a comparison of the experimental non-linear space-time relation with the one calculated from a computer simulation of the drift process. For the simulation we use a simple model with only two free parameters. These two parameters are sufficient to obtain an accurate parametrization of the non-linear space-time relation. (orig.)

  6. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. A Muon Trigger with high pT-resolution for Phase-II of the LHC Upgrade, based on the ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Trigger in the ATLAS end-cap region is based on Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) which have an excellent time resolution but a moderate spatial resolution. The Muon Trigger efficiency curves show that for a transverse momentum ($p_{t}$) threshold of 20 GeVc$^{-1}$ the trigger rate is mainly dominated by muons with a $p_{t}$ between 10 GeVc$^{-1}$ and 20 GeVc$^{-1}$. To cope with the expected Muon Trigger rate at HL-LHC luminosities, we propose to include the precision tracking chambers (MDT) in the Muon Trigger. According to a potential study based on ATLAS data and assuming the HL-LHC scenario, this leads to a dramatical reduction of the Muon Trigger rate below the nominal threshold. As the already existing MDT chamber read-out chain is not capable of reading out the MDT fast enough to be used for the Muon Trigger, an additional fast read-out (FRO) chain with moderate spatial resolution but low latency is necessary. To conduct fast track reconstruction and muon $p_{t}$ determination with the data acqui...

  9. R607 drift chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The experiment R607 was set-up by the Aachen-Amsterdam (NIKHEF)-CERN-Munich- Northwestern-Riverside Collaborartion to search for diffraction production of charmed particles and correlations at high longitudinal momentum. It consisted of identical septum magnet spectrometers on both downstream arms of intersection 6, each having a series of three gas Cerenkov counters for particle identification. (see also photo 7702599X)

  10. Construction of a test cell for the laser calibration of the planar ZEUS drift chambers and studies of algorithms for the analysis of FADC signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbous, H.

    1988-07-01

    The planar drift chambers (FTD 1, 2, 3) of the ZEUS forward detector (FDET) will be operated in an inhomogeneous part of the magnetic field produced by the ZEUS solenoid. The calibration of the drift chambers will therefore be performed by measuring the space-drift-time-relation in a small test cell for a variety of combinations of anti E and anti B. This will be done by means of an UV-laser. The test cell is designed to be rotated around 2 axes in the homogeneous anti B-field of a large magnet available at DESY. The laser beam enters the test cell through a quartz window and is appropriately deflected by a system of 3 mirrors. In the second part of this paper several algorithms for the analysis of FADC signals are investigated, in view of optimal spatial and double track resolution. The best results have been obtained with a newly developed method based on digital filtering. (orig.) [de

  11. The Readout Control Unit of the ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, J A; Musa, L

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector of the central barrel of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider) Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), being constructed at CERN, Geneva. It is a 88 m$^{3}$ cylinder filled with gas and divided into two drift regions by the central electrode located at its axial center. The readout chambers of the TPC are multi-wire proportional chambers with cathode pad readout. About 570 000 pads are read-out by an electronics chain of amplification, digitalization and pre-processing. One of the challenges in designing the TPC for ALICE is the design of Front End Electronics (FEE) to cope with the data rates and the channel occupancy. The Readout Control Unit (RCU), which is presented in this work, is designed to control and monitor the Front End Electronics, and to collect and ship data to the High Level Trigger and the Data Acquisition System, via the Detector Data Link (DDL - optical fibre). The RCU must be capable of reading out up to 200 Mbytes/s f...

  12. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  13. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  14. Study of a particle detector with very high spatial precision (drift chambers), and analysis of the physical phenomena governing the operation of this detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Guy.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles of drift chambers are studied and various measurements which can be performed with these chambers are described. The laws governing the passage of particles through matter are first reviewed and different transport coefficients, (velocity, scattering coefficient, characteristic energy ...) of the electrons under the influence of an electric field for different gases (argon, CO 2 , isobutane, methane, methylal) are studied. The theoretical predictions are then compared with the experimental results. The different amplification processes in the gas and the space charge effect of the positive ions on electron multiplication for large particle fluxes are also studied as well as the mobility of positive ions in different gases. After these results, the operating characteristics (efficiency, linearity of the space-time ratio, spatial resolution), with and without an external magnetic field are determined [fr

  15. Performance of the Drift Chambers of the CMS Experiment in the Measurement of LHC Muons; Prestaciones de las Camaras de Deriva del Experimento CMS en la Deteccion de Muones del LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, D.; Fouz, M. C.

    2011-05-13

    This work deals with the study of the performance of the drift chambers of the CMS Barrel Muon detector operating at the LHC. Using the data obtained with pp collisions during the first months os LHC operation we have studied the drift cell efficiency and position resolution, as well as the effect of the existing background noise. The results confirm the excellent performance of the muon chambers. It is expected that it will improve further as statistics increase, thus allowing a correct calibration and alignment of these chambers. (Author) 6 refs.

  16. Development of a triple GEM readout module for a time projection chamber and measurement accuracies of hadronic Higgs branching fractions in ννH at a 350 GeV ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix

    2016-07-15

    The presented thesis addresses the development and evaluation of one of the detector concept for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a planned, future electron-positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV in its first construction stage. The ILC is designed to perform precision measurements of the Standard Model, especially a model-independent reconstruction of the electroweak symmetry breaking sector. In 2012, the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was an important first step and facilitates precision measurements of the Higgs boson coupling constants at the ILC. Challenging design goals have been defined for the ILC detectors in order to reach the desired measurement precisions. One of the two ILC detector concepts is the International Large Detector (ILD). A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the central tracking detector. In contrast to modern silicon tracking detectors, a TPC provides a large number of space points, and thus continuous sampling of the track parameters. Therefore, TPCs offer great pattern recognition capabilities including the identification of particle decays within the sensitive volume. The design momentum resolution of the ILD TPC is δ(1/p{sub t})∼10{sup -4} GeV{sup -1} which can be translated into a transverse spatial resolution of σ{sub rφ}≤100 μm over the complete drift distance of 2.35 m. In the first part of the thesis, the development of a readout module for the TPC is presented which fulfills the performance requirements of the ILD TPC. The developed readout module is based on a stack of three ''Gas Electron Multiplier'' (GEM) foils and a pad readout. Thin ceramic grids are used as the support structure and spacers between the GEMs. The readout module was tested in a prototype TPC with a maximal drift distance of around 60 cm at the DESY II test beam. An additional guard ring at the upper edge of the module was introduced to minimize field

  17. Construction and operation of a drift-collection calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.S.; Dawson, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Large areas planar drift chambers with long drift distance (up to 50 cm) have been developed for possible use in the new Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector. Design goals included fine sampling to determine the topology of complex events with several low-energy tracks. The large scale of the experiment (> 1000 metric tons) required large area inexpensive chambers, which also had good position resolution and multi-track separation. The chambers were to be installed between thin sheets of steel to form a finegrained detector. A second goal was the sampling of dE/dx with each position measurement, in order to determine the direction and particle identity of each track. In this paper we report on the construction and operation of a prototype dectector consisting of 50 chambers, separated by 3 mm-thick steel plates. Readout of drift time and pulse height from anode wires and an orthogonal grid of bussed cathode pads utilized 6-bit flash ADC's. This application of the drift-collection calorimeter technique to a nucleon decay detector follows the investigation by a number of groups of calorimeters for high energy detectors based on long drifting

  18. The great advance in the technology of particle detectors during the year was the discovery of the properties of multiwire proportional chambers and drift chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    In these chambers each wire is an independent proportional counter with its own amplifier and logic circuit. The low cost of the associated electronics makes realistic moderately large systems, with thousands of wires. The resolution time of each wire is of the order of 100 ns, with 3mm spacing. Roger Bouclier is working on an early model tested in a PS beam-line.

  19. Carbon wire chamber at sub-atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, G., E-mail: charlesg@ipno.in2p3.fr; Audouin, L., E-mail: audouin@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bettane, J.; Dupre, R.; Genolini, B.; Hammoudi, N.; Imre, M.; Le Ven, V.; Maroni, A.; Mathon, B.; Nguyen Trung, T.; Rauly, E.

    2017-05-21

    Present in many experiments, wire and drift chambers have been used in a large variety of shapes and configurations during the last decades. Nevertheless, their readout elements has not evolved much: tungsten, sometimes gold-plated or aluminum, wires. By taking advantage of the developments in the manufacture of conducting carbon fiber, we could obtain interesting improvements for wire detectors. In this article, we present recent tests and simulations using carbon fibers to readout signal in place of traditional tungsten wires. Unlike metallic wires, their low weight guaranties a reduced quantity of material in the active area.

  20. Development of a highly selective muon trigger exploiting the high spatial resolution of monitored drift-tube chambers for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will provide the unique opportunity to explore the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC design instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons, selected due to the moderate momentum resolution of the current system. This first level trigger limitation can be overcome by including data from the precision muon drift tube (MDT) chambers. This requires the fast continuous transfer of the MDT hits to the off-detector trigger logic and a fast track reconstruction algorithm performed in the trigger logic. The feasibility of this approach was studied with LHC collision data and simulated data. Two main options for the hardware implementation will be studied with demonstrators: an FPGA based option with an embedded ARM microprocessor ...

  1. Development of a Highly Selective Muon Trigger Exploiting the High Spatial Resolution of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will provide the unique opportunity to explore the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC design instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons, selected due to the moderate momentum resolution of the current system. This first level trigger limitation can be overcome by including data from the precision muon drift tube (MDT) chambers. This requires the fast continuous transfer of the MDT hits to the off-detector trigger logic and a fast track reconstruction algorithm performed in the trigger logic. The feasibility of this approach was studied with LHC collision data and simulated data. Two main options for the hardware implementation are currently studied with demonstrators, an FPGA based option with an embedded ARM microproc...

  2. Optimization of the ATLAS (s)MDT readout electronics for high counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Nowak, Sebastian; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the ATLAS muon spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers are used for precise muon track measurement. For the high background rates expected at HL-LHC, which are mainly due to neutrons and photons produced by interactions of the proton collision products in the detector and shielding, new small-diameter muon drift tube (sMDT)-chambers with half the drift tube diameter of the MDT-chambers and ten times higher rate capability have been developed. The standard MDT readout electronics uses bipolar shaping in front of a discriminator. This shaping leads to an undershoot of same charge but opposite polarity following each pulse. With count rates also the probability of having the subsequent pulse in this undershoot increases, which leads to losses in efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to decrease this effect, discrete prototype electronics including Baseline Restoration has been developed. Results of their tests and data taken with them during muon beamtime measurements at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility will be presented. which causes a deterioration of signal pulses by preceding background hits, leading to losses in muon efficiency and drift tube spatial resolution. In order to mitigate these so-called signal pile-up effects, new readout electronics with active baseline restoration (BLR) is under development. Discrete prototype electronics with BLR functionality has been tested in laboratory measurements and in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN under high γ-irradiation rates. Results of the measurements are presented.

  3. High-rate irradiation of 15mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the "Small Wheel" tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm$^2$. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of "New Small Wheel" detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smalle...

  4. A TPC-like readout method for high precision muon-tracking using GEM-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flierl, Bernhard; Biebel, Otmar; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Hertenberger, Ralf; Klitzner, Felix; Loesel, Philipp; Mueller, Ralph [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Zibell, Andre [Julius-Maximilians-Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors are well suited for tracking of charged particles. Three dimensional tracking in a single layer can be achieved by application of a time-projection-chamber like readout mode (μTPC), if the drift time of the electrons is measured and the position dependence of the arrival time is used to calculate the inclination angle of the track. To optimize the tracking capabilities for ion tracks drift gas mixtures with low drift velocity have been investigated by measuring tracks of cosmic muons in a compact setup of four GEM-detectors of 100 x 100 x 6 mm{sup 3} active volume each and an angular acceptance of -25 to 25 . The setup consists of three detectors with two-dimensional strip readout layers of 0.4 mm pitch and one detector with a single strip readout layer of 0.25 mm pitch. All strips are readout by APV25 frontend boards and the amplification stage in the detectors consists of three GEM-foils. Tracks are reconstructed by the μTPC-method in one of the detectors and are then compared to the prediction from the other three detectors defined by the center of charge in every detector. We report our study of Argon and Helium based noble gas mixtures with carbon-dioxide as quencher.

  5. The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Renault, G; Nielsen, B S; Westergaard, J

    2005-01-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\\eta|< 0.9$. It is designed for a maximum multiplicity \\dNdy = 8000. The aim of the laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

  6. A compact and modular x- and gamma-ray detector with a CsI scintillator and double-readout Silicon Drift Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, R.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Amati, L.; Fiorini, M.; Uslenghi, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Bellutti, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Elmi, I.; Feroci, M.; Ficorella, F.; Frontera, F.; Picciotto, A.; Piemonte, C.; Rachevski, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rignanese, L. P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    A future compact and modular X and gamma-ray spectrometer (XGS) has been designed and a series of proto- types have been developed and tested. The experiment envisages the use of CsI scintillator bars read out at both ends by single-cell 25 mm2 Silicon Drift Detectors. Digital algorithms are used to discriminate between events absorbed in the Silicon layer (lower energy X rays) and events absorbed in the scintillator crystal (higher energy X rays and -rays). The prototype characterization is shown and the modular design for future experiments with possible astrophysical applications (e.g. for the THESEUS mission proposed for the ESA M5 call) are discussed.

  7. Analysis of the reaction γp → J/ψp, J/ψ → μ+μ- with the help of the planar drift chambers of the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coboeken, K.

    2000-03-01

    The software for track segment reconstruction in the forward planar drift chambers, FTD1-3, in the ZEUS experiment at the electron-proton storage ring HERA at DESY (Hamburg) has been improved and extended. A global forward track fit has been developed combining the segments in FTD1-3 with track segments in the central drift chamber and the forward muon chambers using Kalman filter techniques. Photoproduction events from the reaction ep→J/ψp, J/ψ→μ + μ - were studied. The reaction cross section as a function of the hadronic mass W in the range from 20 GeV to 130 GeV has been measured. The cross section for W between 20 and 30 GeV has been determined for the first time. This was only possible using the new developed forward track fit. This measurement fills the W gap between fixed target experiments and previous HERA measurements at higher values. (orig.)

  8. Operation of a GEM-TPC with pixel readout

    CERN Document Server

    Brezina, C; Kaminski, J; Killenberg, M; Krautscheid, T

    2012-01-01

    A prototype time projection chamber with 26 cm drift length was operated with a short-spaced triple gas electron multiplier (GEM) stack in a setup triggering on cosmic muon tracks. A small part of the anode plane is read out with a CMOS pixel application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) named Timepix, which provides ultimate readout granularity. Pixel clusters of charge depositions corresponding to single primary electrons are observed and analyzed to reconstruct charged particle tracks. A dataset of several weeks of cosmic ray data is analyzed. The number of clusters per track length is well described by simulation. The obtained single point resolution approaches 50 m at short drift distances and is well reproduced by a simple model of single-electron diffusion.

  9. Development of a focal-plane drift chamber for low-energetic pions and experimental determination of an inverse transfer matrix for the short-orbit spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.

    2004-10-01

    The three-spectrometer facility at the Mainz microtron MAMI was supplemented by an additional spectrometer, which is characterized by its short path-length and therefore is called Short Orbit Spectrometer (SOS). At nominal distance from target to SOS (66 cm) the particles to be detected cover a mean path-length between reaction point and detector of 165 cm. Thus for pion electroproduction close to threshold in comparison to the big spectrometers the surviving probability of charged pions with momentum 100 MeV/c raises from 15% to 73%. Consequently the systematic error (''myon contamination''), as for the proposed measurement of the weak form-factors G A (Q 2 ) and G P (Q 2 ), reduces significantly. The main subject of this thesis is the drift chamber for the SOS. Its small relative thickness (0.03% X 0 ), reducing multiple scattering, is optimized with regard to detecting low-energy pions. Due to the innovative character of the driftchamber geometry a dedicated software for track-reconstruction, efficiency-determination etc. had to be developed. A comfortable feature for calibrating the drift path-drift time-relation, represented by cubic splines, was implemented. The resolution of the track detector in the dispersive plane is 76 μaem for the spatial and 0.23 for the angular coordinate (most probable error) and, correspondingly, 110 μm and 0.29 in the non-dispersive plane. For backtracing the reaction quantities from the detector coordinates the inverse transfer-matrix of the spectrometer was determined. For this purpose electrons were scattered quasi-elastically from protons inside the 12 C-nucleus, thus defining the starting angles of the electrons by holes of a sieve collimator. The resulting experimental values for the angular resolution at the target amount to σ φ =1.3 mrad and σ θ =10.6 mrad resp. The momentum calibration of the SOS only can be achieved by quasi-elastic scattering (two-arm experiment). For this reason the contribution of the proton

  10. Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber : Recent R&D Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Ahlen, S.; Chernicoff, M.; Deaconu, C.; Dujmic, D.; Dushkin, A.; Fisher, P.; Henderson, S.; Inglis, A.; Kaboth, A.; Kirsch, L.; Lopez, J. P.; Monroe, J.; Ouyang, H.; Sciolla, G.; Tomita, H.; Wellenstein, H.

    2012-02-01

    The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber collaboration recently reported a dark matter limit obtained with a 10 liter time projection chamber filled with CF4 gas. The 10 liter detector was capable of 2D tracking (perpendicular to the drift direction) and 2D fiducialization, and only used information from two CCD cameras when identifying tracks and rejecting backgrounds. Since that time, the collaboration has explored the potential benefits of photomultiplier tube and electronic charge readout to achieve 3D tracking, and particle identification for background rejection. The latest results of this effort is described here.

  11. Chamber service module (CSM1) for MDT

    CERN Document Server

    Binchi, P

    2002-01-01

    CSM-1 is the second and latest version of the high speed electronic unit whose primary task is to multiplex serial data from up to 18 ASD /TDC cards located at the ends of the Monitored Drift Tubes. Each CSM will capture data from all 24 channel TDC (AMT-2 units) of a given chamber and transfer it along a single optic fiber to the MROD, the event builder and readout driver. The core of the board is a Xilinx VirtexII FPGA which will use JTAG protocol (IEEE Std. 1149.1) for logic configuration parameter loading.

  12. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. Some aspects of the applications of wire chambers in high energy physics experiments at large accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turala, M.

    1982-01-01

    An application of proportional and drift chambers in four large spectrometers at the accelerators of IHEP Serpukhov and CERN Geneva is described. An operation of wire chambers at high intensities and high multiplicities of particles is discussed. The results of investigations of their efficiencies, spatial resolution (for one and two-dimensional readout) and long term stability are presented. Problems of preselection of a given class of events are discussed. The systems for preselection of defined multiplicities or a scattering angle of particles, in which proportional chambers have been used, are described and the results of their application in the real experiments are presented. (author)

  15. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  16. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  17. Performance Analysis of a Bunch and Track Identifier Prototype (BTI) for the CMS Barrel Muon Drift Chambers; Estudio de las Prestaciones de un Prototipo de Bunch and Track Identifier (BTI) para las Camaras de Deriva de CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerta Pelayo, J.

    2001-07-01

    This note contains a short description of the first step in the first level trigger applied to the barrel muon drift chambers of CMS: the Bunch and Track Identifier (BTI). The test beam results obtained with a BTI prototype have been also analysed BTI performance for different incidence angles and in presence of external magnetic field has been tested, as well as BTI capability as trigger device and track reconstructor. (Author) 30 refs.

  18. High-rate performance of muon drift tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are studied. The resolution and efficiency of sMDT chambers at high γ-ray and proton irradiation rates well beyond the ones expected at HL-LHC have been measured and the irradiation effects understood using detailed simulations. The sMDT chambers offer an about an order of magnitude better rate capability and are an ideal replacement for the MDT chambers because of compatibility of services and read-out. The limitations of the sMDT chambers are now in the read-out electronics, taken from the MDT chambers, to which improvements for even higher rate capability are proposed.

  19. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, C., E-mail: C.Lippmann@gsi.de

    2016-07-11

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb–Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  20. Plastic flashtube chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisken, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of the use and operation of plastic flashtube chambers. Gas leaks, electric pulsing, the glow discharge, and readout methods are considered. Three distinct problems with high rate applications deal with resolving time, dead time, and polarization/neutralization of the chamber

  1. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type X-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is placed next to the anode and is maintained at a voltage intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting towards the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  2. Drift velocity studies at a time projection chamber for various water contents in the gas mixture; Driftgeschwindigkeitsstudien an einer Zeit-Projektions-Kammer (TPC) bei unterschiedlichen Wassergehalten des Kammergases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoever, F.W.

    2007-03-15

    For the answer of different open questions in high energy physics the construction of a linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with a c. m. energy of up to one TeV is prepared. With this is connected a comprehensive development on detectors, which must satisfy the requirements of the planned experiments. For the track chamber a TPC is considered. Hereby it deals with a gas-based concept, which has already been proved in past experiments and which is at time further developed by means of test chambers. The composition of the gas mixtureplays hereby an important role. Impurities of the gas mixture, especially by oxygen and water from the ambient air are a fact, which occurs every time in the development phase and can scarcely be avoided. From this arose the motivation to study directly the effects of this impurities. The object of the present thesis are correlations between drift velocity and water content in the chamber gas of a TPC.

  3. A First-Level Muon Trigger Based on the ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Chambers With High Momentum Resolution for LHC Phase II

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Ott, S; Kortner, O; Fras, M; Gabrielyan, V; Danielyan, V; Fink, D; Nowak, S; Schwegler, P; Abovyan, S

    2014-01-01

    The Level-1 (L1) trigger for muons with high transverse momentum (pT) in ATLAS is based on chambers with excellent time resolution, able to identify muons coming from a particular beam crossing. These trigger chambers also provide a fast pT-measurement of the muons, the accuracy of the measurement being limited by the moderate spatial resolution of the chambers along the deflecting direction of the magnetic field (eta-coordinate). The higher luminosity foreseen for Phase-II puts stringent limits on the L1 trigger rates, and a way to control these rates would be to improve the spatial resolution of the triggering system, drastically sharpening the turn-on curve of the L1 trigger. To do this, the precision tracking chambers (MDT) can be used in the L1 trigger, provided the corresponding trigger latency is increased as foreseen. The trigger rate reduction is accomplished by strongly decreasing the rate of triggers from muons with pT lower than a predefined threshold (typically 20 GeV), which would otherwise trig...

  4. Simulation calculations on the construction of the energy-tagged photon beam as well as development and test of the side drift chambers of the Bonn SAPHIR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, T.

    1990-01-01

    The SAPHIR-detector is built up at the continuous photon beam of the Electron Stretcher and Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The equipment is designed for investigations of reactions with more then two particles in the final state and for photon energies up to 3.5 GeV. A tagging-system determines the energy of the Bremsstrahlung-photons and a set-up of five large driftchambers measures the tracks of the charged particles. This work describes a program which was used to develop the best design of the tagging-hodoscope. In a second part the tests of the planar side-chambers and their evaluation is described. These measurements were carried out to fix the gasfilling and the parameters of the best working point. It is shown, that the chambers can reach a resolution of σ≤200 μm. (orig.) [de

  5. Measurements of ion mobility and GEM discharge studies for the upgrade of the ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00507268

    2018-02-20

    ALICE is one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The quark-gluon plasma, which is predominantly produced in lead-lead collisions at LHC, is of particular interest for ALICE. After the long shut-down 2 (2019-2021) the LHC will provide lead-lead collisions at an increased interaction rate of 50 kHz. In order to examine every event at this interaction rate the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) needs to be upgraded. The TPC’s ReadOut Chambers (ROCs) are currently multi-wire proportional chambers. To prevent space charge build-up of slow ions, drifting from the ROCs into the TPC, a gating grid is used. The corresponding closure time imposes a dead time on the TPC read out, which prohibits data taking at a readout rate higher than 3 kHz. New ROCs have therefore been designed, relying on stacks of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils for the gas amplification, allowing for continuous readout. With the new ROCs, a certain fraction of ions will be drifting at all time into the TPC. Knowing t...

  6. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  7. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzia I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD, allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs. Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  8. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzia, I.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Calcaterra, A.; Canale, N.; Capodiferro, M.; Cassariti, V.; Cerioni, S.; Chai, J. Y.; Chiozzi, S.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Dong, J.; Evangelisti, F.; Evangelisti, F.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Felici, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Gatta, M.; Greco, M.; Lavezzi, L.; Leng, C. Y.; Li, H.; Maggiora, M.; Malaguti, R.; Marcello, S.; Melchiorri, M.; Mezzadri, G.; Mignone, M.; Morello, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pellegrino, J.; Pelosi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Savrié, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Soldani, E.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Tskhadadze, E.; Verma, S.; Wheadon, R.; Yan, L.

    2018-01-01

    Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD), allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  9. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  10. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  11. Precision Muon Tracking at Future Hadron Colliders with sMDT Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; Müller, Felix; Nowak, Sebastian; Richter, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Small-diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) chambers are a cost-effective technology for high-precision muon tracking. The rate capability of the sMDT chambers has been extensively tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in view of expected rates at future high-energy hadron colliders. Results show that it fulfills the requirements over most of the acceptance of muon detectors. The optimization of the read-out electronics to further increase the rate capability of the detectors is discussed. Chambers of this type are under construction for upgrades of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at high LHC luminosities. Design and construction procedures have been optimized for mass production while providing a precision of better than 10 micrometers in the sense wire positions and the mechanical stability required to cover large areas.

  12. Wire chamber gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, we describe new developments in gas mixtures which have occurred during the last 3--4 years. In particular, we discuss new results on the measurement and modeling of electron drift parameters, the modeling of drift chamber resolution, measurements of primary ionization and the choice of gas for applications such as tracking, single electron detection, X-ray detection and visual imaging. In addition, new results are presented on photon feedback, breakdown and wire aging

  13. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  14. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  15. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  16. A digital reader for condenser ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuermer, K.

    1978-01-01

    A reader for condenser chambers is described which has a completely automatic reading/charging operation, a modern digital readout presentation, and two full decades of exposure readout for each dosimeter type. The calibration and operation of the instrument are given

  17. MUON DETECTOR: BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT) AND ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    After months of cosmics data taking the drift tube (DT) detector is in good shape, ready for LHC beams. Several hundreds of millions of cosmics events have been recorded; out of those, more than 90% were triggered by the DT system. Data integrity analyses have shown a very reliable read-out system, also during high rate tests. With a 98% of the detector operational, only awaiting the arrival of some low voltage modules and for the completion of the DT Track Finder system, data taking is starting to become routine job. These continuous running exercises have been very useful to study performance and reliability of the detector in a medium term period, allowing understanding and fixing failures that have occurred with low frequency. Drift tubes have become a very stable system, becoming a service of muon triggering for the tracker after its final installation. During the last months, major efforts have taken place in synchronization tasks, within the DT system (250 chambers) and also with the rest of the CMS su...

  18. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  19. Contribution to Diogene detector drift chambers study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.

    1981-06-01

    Diogene detector has been brought into operation at Saclay with the collaboration of Strasbourg CRN and Clermont-Ferrand LPC. The Diogene essential characteristic is its solid angle near four pi, allowing complete exclusive measurements. Diogene characteristics allow to detect an important multiplicity of charged particles in coincidence, to measure their impulse until a transverse impulse around 1 GeV/c, and to identify them by their energy loss measurement. These general characteristics are exposed after some brief recalls on charged particle detection and migration counters. Technical aspects of the prototype are examined. It has been built to test fabrication technology, choice exactness and performance estimation validity. These detector performance estimation calculations that may be waited for in tracks reconstruction, impulse and energy loss resolution are exposed. Before, the electrostatics study for the prototype is reviewed. The temporary balance of already carried out tests is made [fr

  20. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woody Craig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10×10×10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10×10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2×10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ∼ 100 μm per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10×10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constructed and is currently being tested in the lab with sources and cosmic rays, and additional tests are planned in the future to study the detector in a test beam.

  1. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Craig; Azmoun, Babak; Majka, Richard; Phipps, Michael; Purschke, Martin; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2018-02-01

    A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10×10×10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10×10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2×10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ˜ 100 μm per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10×10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constructed and is currently being tested in the lab with sources and cosmic rays, and additional tests are planned in the future to study the detector in a test beam.

  2. Performance study of large area encoding readout MRPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Chen, G.; Han, D.; Wang, X.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Guo, B.

    2018-02-01

    Muon tomography system built by the 2-D readout high spatial resolution Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detector is a project of Tsinghua University. An encoding readout method based on the fine-fine configuration has been used to minimize the number of the readout electronic channels resulting in reducing the complexity and the cost of the system. In this paper, we provide a systematic comparison of the MRPC detector performance with and without fine-fine encoding readout. Our results suggest that the application of the fine-fine encoding readout leads us to achieve a detecting system with slightly worse spatial resolution but dramatically reduce the number of electronic channels.

  3. Performance and Future Upgrades of the CMS Drift Tube Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Redondo Ferrero, David Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. The DT system keeps evolving in order to cope with long term operational challenges, as well as future constraints for rate reduction imposed by future increases of LHC luminosity, maintaining the highest possible efficiency. During the first long LHC shutdown (LS1) a significant number of improvements and upgrades started being implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. Ever since LS1, each LHC winter shutdown is used to install and test these new developments towards HL-LHC.Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several modifications will be required. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope with the new environment. Also the second level of the readout system needs to be redesigned to minimize event processing ...

  4. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  5. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  6. The IBL Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Dopke, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Flick, T; Gabrielli, A; Kugel, A; Maettig, P; Morettini, P; Polini, A; Schroer, N

    2010-01-01

    The first upgrade for the ATLAS pixel detector will be an additional layer, which is called IBL (Insertable B-Layer). To readout this new layer having new electronics assembled an update of the readout electronics is necessary. The aim is to develop a system which is capable to read out at a higher bandwidth and also compatible with the existing system to be integrated into it. The talk will describe the necessary development to reach a new readout system, concentrating on the requirements of a newly designed Back of Crate card as the optical interface in the counting room.

  7. The IBL Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Dopke, J; Flick, T; Gabrielli, A; Kugel, A; Maettig, P; Morettini, P; Polini, A; Schroer, N

    2011-01-01

    The first upgrade for the ATLAS Pixel Detector will be an additional layer, which is called IBL (Insertable B-Layer). To readout this new layer, having new electronics, an update of the readout electronics is necessary. The aim is to develop a system which is capable to read out at a higher bandwidth, but also compatible with the existing system to be integrated into it. This paper will describe the necessary development to reach a new readout system, concentrating on the requirements of a newly designed Back of Crate card as the optical interface in the counting room.

  8. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  9. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb–Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  10. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepankiewicz, A., E-mail: Adam.Szczepankiewicz@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Institute of Computer Science, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-07-11

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb–Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  11. Readout Architecture for Hybrid Pixel Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)694170; Westerlund, Tomi; Wyllie, Ken

    The original contribution of this thesis to knowledge are novel digital readout architectures for hybrid pixel readout chips. The thesis presents asynchronous bus-based architecture, a data-node based column architecture and a network-based pixel matrix architecture for data transportation. It is shown that the data-node architecture achieves readout efficiency 99 % with half the output rate as a bus-based system. The network-based solution avoids ``broken'' columns due to some manufacturing errors, and it distributes internal data traffic more evenly across the pixel matrix than column-based architectures. An improvement of $>$ 10 % to the efficiency is achieved with uniform and non-uniform hit occupancies. Architectural design has been done using transaction level modeling ($TLM$) and sequential high-level design techniques for reducing the design and simulation time. It has been possible to simulate tens of column and full chip architectures using the high-level techniques. A decrease of $>$ 10 in run-time...

  12. A Preliminary Study on Time Projection Chamber Simulation for Fission Cross Section Measurements with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Woon; Lee, Youngouk; Kim, Jae Cheon

    2014-01-01

    We present the details of the TPC simulation with Geant4 and show the results. TPC can provide more information than a fission chamber in that it is possible to distinguish different particle types. Simulations are conducted for uranium and plutonium targets with 20MeV neutrons. The simulation results are compared with the reference and show reasonable results. This is the first phase of study for realizing a TPC in the NFS at RAON, and we have more work to do, such as applying an electric field, signal processing in the simulation, and manufacturing of a TPC. The standard in fission cross section measurement is a fission chamber. It is basically just two parallel plates separated by a few centimeters of gas. A power supply connected to the plates sets up a moderate electric field. The target is deposited onto one of the plates. When fission occurs, the fragments ionize the gas, and the electric field causes the produced electrons to drift to the opposite plate, which records the total energy deposited in the chamber. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a gas ionization detector similar to a fission chamber. However, it can measure the charged particle trajectories in the active volume in three dimensions by adding several readouts on the pad plane (fission chamber has only one readout one a pad plane). The specific ionization for each particle track enables the TPC to distinguish different particle types. A TPC will be used for fission cross section measurements in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) at RAON. As a preliminary study, we present details of TPC simulation with Geant4 and discuss the results

  13. OPAL jet chamber full-scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL was tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration, and readout are described. Operating experience was gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  14. Silicon Drift Detectors development for position sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2007-01-01

    Novel Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) with multi-linear architecture specifically intended for 2D position sensing and imaging applications are presented and their achievable spatial, energy and time resolution are discussed. The capability of providing a fast timing of the interaction with nanosecond time resolution is a new available feature that allows operating the drift detector in continuous readout mode for coincidence imaging applications either with an external trigger or in self-timing. The application of SDDs with multi-linear architecture to Compton electrons' tracking within a single silicon layer and the achieved experimental results will be discussed

  15. Gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type x-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is disposed adjacent the anode and is maintained at a voltsge intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting toward the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  16. Development of a time projection chamber with micro-pixel electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Orito, Reiko; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    A time projection chamber (TPC) based on a gaseous chamber with micro-pixel electrodes (μ-PIC) has been developed for measuring three-dimensional tracks of charged particles. The μ-PIC with a detection area of 10x10 cm 2 consists of a double-sided printing circuit board. Anode pixels are formed with 0.4 mm pitch on strips aligned perpendicular to the cathode strips in order to obtain a two-dimensional position. In the TPC with drift length of 8 cm, 4 mm wide field cage electrodes are aligned at 1 mm spaces and a uniform electric field of about 0.4 kV/cm is produced. For encoding of the three-dimensional position a synchronous readout system has been developed using Field Programmable Gate Arrays with 40 MHz clock. This system enables us to reconstruct the three-dimensional track of the particle at successive points like a cloud chamber even at high event rate. The drift velocity of electrons in the TPC was measured with the tracks of cosmic muons for 3 days, during which the TPC worked stably with the gas gain of 3000. With a radioisotope of gamma-ray source the three-dimensional track of a Compton scattered electron was taken successfully

  17. Principle and applications of Controlled-Drift Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Controlled-Drift Detector is a fully depleted silicon detector that allows 2D position sensing and energy spectroscopy of X-rays in the range 0.5-30 keV with imaging capability up to 100 kframe/s, event timing of few ns and limited readout channels. In this paper we review the Controlled-Drift Detector operating principle and we present its applications in X-ray absorption imaging and in Compton electrons tracking

  18. First operation and performance of a 200 lt double phase LAr LEM-TPC with a 40x76 $\\cm^2$ readout

    CERN Document Server

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Natterer, D Lussi G; Nguyen, K; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Viant, T

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design, construction, and operation of a first large area double-phase liquid argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC). The detector has a maximum drift length of 60 cm and the readout consists of a $40\\times 76$ cm$^2$ LEM and 2D projective anode to multiply and collect drifting charges. Scintillation light is detected by means of cryogenic PMTs positioned below the cathode. To record both charge and light signals, we have developed a compact acquisition system, which is scalable up to ton-scale detectors with thousands of charge readout channels. The acquisition system, as well as the design and the performance of custom-made charge sensitive preamplifiers, are described. The complete experimental setup has been operated for a first time during a period of four weeks at CERN in the cryostat of the ArDM experiment, which was equipped with liquid and gas argon purification systems. The detector, exposed to cosmic rays, recorded events with a single-ch...

  19. READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR A HIGH-RATE CSC DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OCONNOR, P.; GRATCHEV, V.; KANDASAMY, A.; POLYCHRONAKOS, V.; TCHERNIATINE, V.; PARSONS, J.; SIPPACH, W.

    1999-01-01

    A readout system for a high-rate muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is described. The system, planned for use in the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, uses two custom CMOS integrated circuits to achieve good position resolution at a flux of up to 2,500 tracks/cm 2 /s

  20. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype

  1. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes system of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. During the first Long Shutdown of LHC (LS1) a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during phase 1 will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system.In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO).Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope wi...

  2. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes System of CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. In 2013 and 2014 a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors: DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO). Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope with the new rate and radiation environment. This paper will present, along with the main system improvements implemented in the system, the first performance results from data collected at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy during 2016, confirming the satisfactory operation of both DT performance and the TwinMux system. A review of the present status and plans for the DT system upgrades will be also described.

  3. Readout electronic for multichannel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kulibaba, V I; Naumov, S V

    2001-01-01

    Readout electronics based on the 128-channel chip 'Viking' (IDE AS inc., Norway) is considered. The chip 'Viking' integrates 128 low noise charge-sensitive preamplifiers with tunable CR-(RC) sup 2 shapers,analog memory and multiplexed readout to one output. All modules of readout electronics were designed and produced in KIPT taking into account the published recommendations of IDE AS inc.

  4. Readout electronic for multichannel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulibaba, V.I.; Maslov, N.I.; Naumov, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    Readout electronics based on the 128-channel chip 'Viking' (IDE AS inc., Norway) is considered. The chip 'Viking' integrates 128 low noise charge-sensitive preamplifiers with tunable CR-(RC) 2 shapers,analog memory and multiplexed readout to one output. All modules of readout electronics were designed and produced in KIPT taking into account the published recommendations of IDE AS inc

  5. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of ∼2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of ∼25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs

  6. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 μm in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed

  7. Triangular tube proportional wire chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badtke, D H; Bakken, J A; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B J; Chien, C Y; Madansky, L; Matthews, J A.J.; Pevsner, A; Spangler, W J [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA); Lee, K L [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1981-10-15

    We report on the characteristics of the proportional tube chamber system which has been constructed for muon identification in the PEP-4 experiment at SLAC. The mechanical and electrical properties of the extruded aluminum triangular tubes allow these detectors to be used as crude drift chambers.

  8. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolsma, H.P.T.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 μm rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.)

  9. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolsma, H P.T.

    1996-04-19

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 {mu}m rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.).

  10. Cosmic ray test system for the ATLAS thin gap chamber modules at KOBE

    CERN Document Server

    Suigmoto, T; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ichimiya, R; Ikeno, M; Ishii, K; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Kurashige, H; Mima, T; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nakaune, Y; Nozaki, M; Ohshita, H; Okumura, K; Sasaki, O; Suzuki, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Uda, J; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    Thin gap chamber modules giving function of forward muon trigger to the ATLAS detector in the LHC experiment have been constructed at High Energy Research Organization (KEK) in Japan and their performances have been checked at Kobe University. A large-scale test system specially designed for measuring uniformity of the detection efficiencies and the timing resolution of 8 TGC modules at the same time was successfully operated. Each TGC module had 72 anode wire channels and 64 cathode strip channels (in total 1088 readout channels for 8 modules). Drift tubes consisted of 12 layers (total 428 tubes), between which the TGC modules are put, determined trajectories of cosmic rays. Hit pattern and timing of all detector signals (Trigger counter. Drift tubes and TGCs) were measured by using VME modules. In regular data acquisition situation, i.e. about effective 19 Hz trigger rate from scintillation counters and 73% tracking efficiency by the drift tubes, the detection efficiency of each layer by 5 mm * 5 mm region ...

  11. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilbert, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns ionization chambers with particular reference to air-equivalent ionization chambers. In order to ensure that similar chambers have similar sensitivities and responses the surface of the chamber bounding the active volume carries a conducting material, which may be a colloidal graphite, arranged in the form of lines so that the area of the conducting material occupies only a small proportion of the area of said surface. (U.S.)

  12. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  13. A compact readout system for multi-pixel hybrid photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datema, C.P.; Meng, L.J.; Ramsden, D.

    1999-01-01

    Although the first Multi-pixel Hybrid Photodiode (M-HPD) was developed in the early 1990s by Delft Electronic Products, the main obstacle to its application has been the lack of availability of a compact read-out system. A fast, parallel readout system has been constructed for use with the earlier 25-pixel tube with High-energy Physics applications in mind. The excellent properties of the recently developed multi-pixel hybrid photodiodes (M-HPD) will be easier to exploit following the development of the new hybrid read-out circuits described in this paper. This system will enable all of the required read-out functions to be accommodate on a single board into which the M-HPD is plugged. The design and performance of a versatile system is described in which a trigger-signal, derived from the common-side of the silicon anode in the M-HPD, is used to trigger the readout of the 60-anode pixels in the M-HPD. The multi-channel amplifier section is based on the use of a new, commercial VLSI chip, whilst the read-out sequencer uses a chip of its own design. The common anode signal is processed by a fast amplifier and discriminator to provide a trigger signal when a single event is detected. In the prototype version, the serial analogue output data-stream is processed using a PC-mounted, high speed ADC. Results obtained using the new read-out system in a compact gamma-camera and with a small muon tracking-chamber demonstrate the low-noise performance of the system. The application of this read-out system in other position-sensitive or multi-anode photomultiplier tube applications are also described

  14. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. Operating experience has been gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  15. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstreom, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-05-22

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. The operating experience gathered since the summer of 1984 and the chamber performance as measured by its spatial resolution and ability to identify particles are also given.

  16. A very large multigap resistive plate chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Cerron-Zeballos, E; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kim, D W; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lee, S C; Platner, E D; Roberts, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A

    1999-01-01

    We have built and tested a very large multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC). We discuss the suitability of the multigap RPC for the construction of large area modules. We give details of the construction technique and results from a scan across the surface of the chamber. We also report on the implementation of `half-strip resolution', where we improve the spatial resolution by a factor 2 without increasing the number of read-out channels. (9 refs).

  17. Pad readout for gas detectors using 128-channel integrated preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.; Drees, A.; Glassel, P.

    1988-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional readout scheme for gas detectors is presented which uses small metal pads with 2.54 mm pitch as an anode. The pads are read out via 128-channel VLSI low-noise preamplifier/multiplexer chips. These chips are mounted on 2.8x2.8 cm/sup 2/ modules which are directly plugged onto the detector backplane, daisy-chained with jumpers and read out sequentially. The readout has been successfully tested with a low-pressure, two-step, TMAE-filled UV-RICH detector prototype. A single electron efficiently of >90% was observed at moderate chamber gains (<10/sup 6/). The method offers high electronic amplification, low noise, and high readout speed with a very flexible and compact design, suited for space-limited applications

  18. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00390105

    2016-07-11

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC instantaneous luminosity in Run 1. The first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the moderate momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be su?ciently reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6 microseconds. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the HL-LHC operating conditions at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fast trigger processor.

  19. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC design luminosity. The Level-1 muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the limited momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be sufficient reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6~$\\mu$s. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the high HL-LHC background rates at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fas trigger processor.

  20. A new Highly Selective First Level ATLAS Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC's instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum sub-trigger threshold muons due to the poor momentum resolution at trigger level caused by the moderate spatial resolution of the resistive plate and thin gap trigger chambers. This limitation can be overcome by including the data of the precision muon drift tube chambers in the first level trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and a fast MDT track reconstruction. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain was successfully tested under HL-LHC operating conditions at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility. It could be shown that the data provided by the demonstrator can be processed with a fast track reconstruction algorithm on an ARM CPU within the 6 microseconds latency...

  1. Resistive-strips micromegas detectors with two-dimensional readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byszewski, M.; Wotschack, J.

    2012-02-01

    Micromegas detectors show very good performance for charged particle tracking in high rate environments as for example at the LHC. It is shown that two coordinates can be extracted from a single gas gap in these detectors. Several micromegas chambers with spark protection by resistive strips and two-dimensional readout have been tested in the context of the R&D work for the ATLAS Muon System upgrade.

  2. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are

  3. Tests of the data acquisition system and detector control system for the muon chambers of the CMS experiment at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Michael Christian

    2009-01-01

    The Phys. Inst. III A of RWTH Aachen University is involved in the development, production and tests of the Drift Tube (DT) muon chambers for the barrel muon system of the CMS detector at the LHC at CERN (Geneva). The present thesis describes some test procedures which were developed and performed for the chamber local Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, as well as for parts of the Detector Control System (DCS). The test results were analyzed and discussed. Two main kinds of DAQ tests were done. On the one hand, to compare two different DAQ systems, the chamber signals were split and read out by both systems. This method allowed to validate them by demonstrating, that there were no relevant differences in the measured drift times, generated by the same muon event in the same chamber cells. On the other hand, after the systems were validated, the quality of the data was checked. For this purpose extensive noise studies were performed. The noise dependence on various parameters (threshold,HV) was investigated quantitatively. Also detailed studies on single cells, qualified as ''dead'' and ''noisy'' were done. For the DAQ tests a flexible hardware and software environment was needed. The organization and installation of the supplied electronics, as well as the software development was realized within the scope of this thesis. The DCS tests were focused on the local gas pressure read-out components, attached directly to the chamber: pressure sensor, manifolds and the pressure ADC (PADC). At first it was crucial to proof, that the calibration of the mentioned chamber components for the gas pressure measurement is valid. The sensor calibration data were checked and possible differences in their response to the same pressure were studied. The analysis of the results indicated that the sensor output depends also on the ambient temperature, a new experience which implied an additional pedestal measurement of the chamber gas pressure sensors at CMS. The second test sequence

  4. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  5. A two-dimensional detector with delay line readout for slow neutron fields measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremukhina, G.A.; Chernenko, S.P.; Ivanov, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the description of a two-dimensional detector of slow neutrons together with its readout and data acquisition electronics based on a PC/AT> The detector with a sensitive area of 260x140 mm 2 is based on a high pressure multiwire proportional chamber with delay line readout and gas filling of 3.0 atm. 3 He + propane. 25 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Timing and Readout Contorl in the LHCb Upgraded Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In 2019, the LHCb experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade where its detectors electronics and entire readout system will be changed to read-out events at the full LHC rate of 40 MHz. In this paper, the new timing, trigger and readout control system for such upgrade is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the distribution of the clock, timing and synchronization information across the entire readout system using generic FTTH technology like Passive Optical Networks. Moreover the system will be responsible to generically control the Front-End electronics by transmitting configuration data and receiving monitoring data, offloading the software control system from the heavy task of manipulating complex protocols of thousands of Front-End electronics devices. The way in which this was implemented is here reviewed with a description of results from first implementations of the system, including usages in test-benches, implementation of techniques for timing distribution and latency control."

  7. Advances on fission chamber modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Geslot, Benoit; Veenhof, Rob

    2013-06-01

    In-vessel, online neutron flux measurements are routinely performed in mock-up and material testing reactors by fission chambers. Those measurements have a wide range of applications, including characterization of experimental conditions, reactor monitoring and safety. Depending on the application, detectors may experience a wide range of constraints, of several magnitudes, in term of neutron flux, gamma-ray flux, temperature. Hence, designing a specific fission chamber and measuring chain for a given application is a demanding task. It can be achieved by a combination of experimental feedback and simulating tools, the latter being based on a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics. A computation route that simulates fission chambers, named CHESTER, is presented. The retrieved quantities of interest are the neutron-induced charge spectrum, the electronic and ionic pulses, the mean current and variance, the power spectrum. It relies on the GARFIELD suite, originally developed for drift chambers, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ code to assess the drift parameters of electrons within the filling gas, and the SRIM code to evaluate the stopping range of fission products. The effect of the gamma flux is also estimated. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the experimental data available to date. In a near future, a comprehensive experimental programme will be undertaken to qualify the route using the known neutron sources, mock-up reactors and wide choice of fission chambers, with a stress on the predictiveness of the Campbelling mode. Depending on the results, a refinement of the modelling and an effort on the accuracy of input data are also to be considered. CHESTER will then make it possible to predict the overall sensitivity of a chamber, and to optimize the design for a given application. Another benefit will be to increase the

  8. MWPC with highly segmented cathode pad readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbe, R.; Fischer, J.; Lissauer, D.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments being conducted with high energy heavy ion beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at CERN have shown the importance of developing position sensitive detectors capable of handling events with high multiplicity in environments of high track density as will also be the case in future high luminosity colliders like SSC and RHIC. In addition, these detectors are required to have a dynamic range wide enough to detect minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions like oxygen or silicon. We present here a description of work being done on a prototype of such a detector at BNL. Results from a similar counter are also presented in this Conference. The ''pad chamber'' is a detector with a cathode area subdivided into a very large number of pixel-like elements such that a charged particle traversing the detector at normal incidence leaves an induced charge on a few localized pads. The pads are interconnected by a resistive strip, and readout amplifiers are connected to the resistive strip at appropriate, carefully determined spacings. The pattern of tracks in a multi-hit event is easily recognized, and a centroid-finding readout system allows position determination to a small fraction of the basic cell size. 5 refs., 9 figs

  9. The knife-edge chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barasch, E.F.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Drew, M.M.; Elliott, S.M.; Lee, B.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Popovic, M.; Smith, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the design for a new technology for particle track detectors is described. Using standard IC fabrication techniques, a pattern of microscopic knife edges and field-shaping electrodes can be fabricated on a silicon substrate. The knife-edge chamber uniquely offers attractive performance for the track chambers required for SSC detectors, for which no present technology is yet satisfactory. Its features include: excellent radiation hardness (10 Mrad), excellent spatial resolution (∼20 μm), short drift time (20 ns), and large pulse height (1 mV)

  10. A novel silicon drift detector with two dimensional drift time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijzen, E.A.; Schooneveld, E.M.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W.; Sarro, P.M.; Van den Bogaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    Until now silicon drift detectors with two dimensional position resolution made use of drift time measurement in one dimension only. The resolution in the other dimension was obtained by dividing the collecting anode into small pixels. In this paper we present a new type of drift detector that uses drift time measurements for both dimensions. The design consists of concentric quadrilateral closed strips with a small collecting anode in the centre. At first electrons will travel perpendicular to the strips until they reach a diagonal. Then they will proceed along this diagonal until they are collected at the centre. Position resolution in two dimensions can be obtained when both the time the electrons need to reach the diagonal and the time they need to reach the centre are measured. The latter is obtained from the collecting anode, the former from a diagonal strip present at the back side of the detector. Compared to common 2D drift detectors this detector offers the advantage of a small amount of readout electronics. It also has the advantage of having just one small collecting anode with a very low capacitance, resulting in low noise and therefore in a good energy resolution. ((orig.))

  11. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  12. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  13. PEP quark search proportional chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S I; Harris, F; Karliner, I; Yount, D [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA); Ely, R; Hamilton, R; Pun, T [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.; Guryn, W; Miller, D; Fries, R [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA)

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (lambdasub(i)) and is followed in both arms each with 45/sup 0/ <= theta <= 135/sup 0/, ..delta..phi=90/sup 0/ by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 lambdasub(i) thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 lambdasub(i) thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH/sub 4/ gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be >98% for q=1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q=1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  14. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  15. Rectangular drift tube characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the study of the characteristics of a 50 x 100 mm aluminium drift tube are presented. The tube was filled with argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures. With 16 per cent methane concentration the largest deviation from a linear relation between the drift time and the drift path over 50 mm is less than 2 mm. The tube filled with argon-isobutane mixture is capable of operating in a limited streamer mode

  16. MUON DETECTOR BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT)

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabrizio Gasparini

    The DT system is made of 250 chambers, installed in the five wheels of the CMS Iron Yoke. Each wheel is subdivided in 10 sectors of four chambers each. Two sectors per wheel, the top and bottom ones, are equipped with 5 chambers, the large outer MB4s being split in two. The electronics for local, i.e. chamber, readout and generation of trigger primitives sits on Minicrates installed on each chamber (on-detector electronics). The data from each chamber are collected and synchronized by the off-detector electronics, sitting on the Wheel towers and organized per sector. HV and LV are organized per sector and per quarter (3 sectors) of each wheel respectively, DAQ and DCS have one branch per wheel. At the end of the February CMS Week the central wheel was fully operational and the two positive wheels, YB+1 and +2, fully commissioned. They were successfully moved over the vacuum tank and closed against YB0. The negative wheels were still open, with DT commissioning and final LV and DCS cabling being completed ...

  17. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  18. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report

  19. Reconstruction of data in low-mass magnetostrictive chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The reconstruction of spark positions in a set of low-mass spark chambers with remote magnetostrictive readout, used in a study of the reaction π - p → K 0 Λ, is described. The main detectors used were optical spark chambers but in order to provide information close to the vertices low-mass magnetostrictive chambers were fitted inside the cone of the superconducting polarised target magnet. (U.K.)

  20. Ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Although a variety of solid-state and chemical methods for measuring radiation dose have been developed in recent decades and calorimetry can now provide an absolute standard of reference, ionization dosimetry retains its position as the most widely used, most convenient, and, in most situations, most accurate method of measuring either exposure or absorbed dose. The ionization chamber itself is the central element in this system of dosimetry. In this chapter the principles governing the construction and operation of ionization chambers of various types are examined. Since the ionization chambers now in general use are nearly all of commercial manufacture, the emphasis is on operating characteristics and interpretation of measurements rather than on details of construction, although some knowledge of the latter is often required when applying necessary corrections to the measured quantities. Examples are given of the construction of typical chambers designed for particular purposes, and the methods of calibrating them are discussed

  1. The PAUCam readout electronics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Jorge; Illa, José M.; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; de Vicente, Juan; Castilla, Javier; Casas, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    The PAUCam is an optical camera with a wide field of view of 1 deg x 1 deg and up to 46 narrow and broad band filters. The camera is already installed on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in the Canary Islands, Spain and successfully commissioned during the first period of 2015. The paper presents the main results from the readout electronics commissioning tests and include an overview of the whole readout electronics system, its configuration and current performance.

  2. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  3. Recent developments in wire chamber tracking at SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogren, H.

    1990-01-01

    All of the major SSC proposed detectors use wire chambers in their tracking systems. The feasibility of wire chambers in an SSC detector has now been established by a number of groups planning detectors at SSC. The major advances during the past year in understanding straw tube drift chambers are presented and several innovations in gaseous wire chambers are discussed. The R and D section will concentrate on progress in drift cell design, electronics and signal processing, and engineering aspects of the tracking designs

  4. First test of a CMS DT chamber equipped with full electronics in a muon beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    A CMS DT chamber of MB3 type, equipped with the final version of a minicrate (containing all on-chamber trigger and readout electronics), was tested in a muon beam for the first time. The beam was bunched in 25 ns spills, allowing an LHC-like response of the chamber trigger. This test confirmed the excellent performance of the trigger design.

  5. Design and construction of the CDF central tracking chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedeschi, F.; Berge, J.P.; Bofill, J.; Dell'Orso, M.; Foster, G.W.; Hrycyk, M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kowalski, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Meara, J.; Patrick, J.; Tinsley, D.; Wagner, R.L.; Yarema, R.; Byon, A.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a large drift chamber of a novel design well adapted for operation in high magnetic fields and in the high track density environment of hadron colliders. (orig.)

  6. Design of large size segmented GEM foils and Drift PCB for CBM MUCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, J.; Dubey, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    Triple GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier), sector shaped detectors will be used for Muon tracking in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at Anti-proton Ion Research (FAIR) facility at Darmstadt, Germany. The sizes of the detectors modules in the Muon Chambers (MUCH) are of the order of 1 meter with active area of about 75cms. Progressive pad geometry is chosen for the readout from these detectors. In construction of these chambers, three GEM foils are stacked on top of each other in a 3/2/2/2 gap configuration. The GEM foils are double layered copper clad 50μm thin Kapton foil. Each GEM foil has millions of holes on it. Foils of large surface area are prone to damages due to discharges owing to the high capacitance of the foil. Hence, these foils have their top surfaces divided into segments of about 100 sq.cm. Further segmentation may be necessary when there are high rate requirements, as in the case of CBM. For the GEM foils of CBM MUCH, a 24 segment layout has been adopted. Short-circuit in any of the GEM-holes will make entire foil un-usable. To reduce such occurrences, segment to segment isolation using opto-coupler in series with the GEM-foil segments has been introduced. Hence, a novel design for GEM chamber drift-PCB and foils has been made. In this scheme, each segment is powered and controlled individually. At the same time, the design takes into account, the space constraints, not only in x-y plane, but also in the z, due to compact assembly of MUCH detector layers

  7. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...... data set from a Spanish bank....

  8. Time dependent drift Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The motion of individual charged particles in a given magnetic and an electric fields is discussed. An idea of a guiding center distribution function f is introduced. The guiding center distribution function is connected to the asymptotic Hamiltonian through the drift kinetic equation. The general non-stochastic magnetic field can be written in a contravariant and a covariant forms. The drift Hamiltonian is proposed, and the canonical gyroradius is presented. The proposed drift Hamiltonian agrees with Alfven's drift velocity to lowest non-vanishing order in the gyroradius. The relation between the exact, time dependent equations of motion and the guiding center equation is clarified by a Lagrangian analysis. The deduced Lagrangian represents the drift motion. (Kato, T.)

  9. A time projection chamber for the crystal barrel experiment at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaab, Dimitri; Ball, Markus; Beck, Reinhard; Ketzer, Bernhard [HISKP, Bonn University (Germany); Collaboration: CBELSA/TAPS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CBELSA/TAPS experiment focuses on baryon spectroscopy by photoproduction processes off nucleons. For this purpose the experiment consists of an inner detector and an outer detector. The outer Crystal Barrel detector mainly measures photons from the decaying resonance. For charged particle identification and in order to obtain their direction, the Inner Detector consists of three layers of scintillating fibers. This inner detector will be replaced by a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). It offers improved track reconstruction capabilities, a robust pattern recognition and, if operated in a magnetic field, an excellent momentum resolution. Moreover, one obtains a particle identification of charged particles via the specific energy loss. A TPC has been developed for the FOPI experiment which also fits to the Crystal Barrel dimensions. It operates in continuous mode using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) as pre-amplification stage. For the TPC detector the calibration of the detector is crucial since parameters such as drift velocity or field inhomogenities have a direct impact on the detector performance. For the CBELSA TPC a calibration system is planned, which is based on the T2K calibration system. Here, the photoelectric effect is used to release electrons at well-known positions on the cathode, which drift towards the readout plane and show the integrated spatial distortions.

  10. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  11. Cloud Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina

    Cloud Chamber takes its roots in a performance project, titled The Guests 做东, devised by Verina Gfader for the 11th Shanghai Biennale, ‘Why Not Ask Again: Arguments, Counter-arguments, and Stories’. Departing from the inclusion of the biennale audience to write a future folk tale, Cloud Chamber......: fiction and translation and translation through time; post literacy; world picturing-world typing; and cartographic entanglements and expressions of subjectivity; through the lens a social imaginary of worlding or cosmological quest. Art at its core? Contributions by Nikos Papastergiadis, Rebecca Carson...

  12. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  15. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  16. Electronic readout for THGEM detectors based on FPGA TDCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Tobias; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Joerg, Philipp; Koenigsmann, Kay; Kremser, Paul; Kunz, Tobias; Michalski, Christoph; Schopferer, Sebastian; Szameitat, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS-II RICH upgrade Group

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the RD51 programme the characteristics of a new detector design, called THGEM, which is based on multi-layer arrangements of printed circuit board material, is investigated. The THGEMs combine the advantages for covering gains up to 10{sup 6} in electron multiplication at large detector areas and low material budget. Studies are performed by extending the design to a hybrid gas detector by adding a Micromega layer, which significantly improves the ion back flow ratio of the chamber. With the upgrade of the COMPASS experiment at CERN a MWPC plane of the RICH-1 detector will be replaced by installing THGEM chambers. This summarizes to 40k channels of electronic readout, including amplification, discrimination and time-to-digital conversion of the anode signals. Due to the expected hit rate of the detector we design a cost-efficient TDC, based on Artix7 FPGA technology, with time resolution below 100 ps and sufficient hit buffer depth. To cover the large readout area the data is transferred via optical fibres to a central readout system which is part of the GANDALF framework.

  17. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  18. MICROMEGAS chambers for hadronic calorimetry at a future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Blaha, J.; Cap, S.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Dalmaz, A.; Drancourt, C.; Espargiliere, A.; Gaglione, R.; Gallet, R.; Geffroy, N.; Giomataris, I.; Jaquemier, J.; Karyotakis, Y.; Peltier, F.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.

    2009-01-01

    Prototypes of MICROMEGAS chambers, using bulk technology and analog readout, with 1x1cm2 readout segmentation have been built and tested. Measurements in Ar/iC4H10 (95/5) and Ar/CO2 (80/20) are reported. The dependency of the prototypes gas gain versus pressure, gas temperature and amplification gap thickness variations has been measured with an 55Fe source and a method for temperature and pressure correction of data is presented. A stack of four chambers has been tested in 200GeV/c and 7GeV/c muon and pion beams respectively. Measurements of response uniformity, detection efficiency and hit multiplicity are reported. A bulk MICROMEGAS prototype with embedded digital readout electronics has been assembled and tested. The chamber layout and first results are presented.

  19. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.

    1986-01-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed in fall 1983 to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. The chamber had to be placed within the existing central drift chamber, making access for repairs difficult and costly. Therefore for detector elements thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes (straws) were used because of their simplicity and robustness. The diameter of the drift tubes was 6.9 mm. The radial extent of the proposed chamber was from 3 cm to 10 cm, the inner wall of the central drift. It was clear that radiation levels, from synchrotron x-rays and overfocussed electrons, were potentially high. Since the drift distance is short in the straws, it was desirable to operate them at the highest possible gas gain, to achieve the best spatial resolution. There was a likelihood of drawing large currents in the chamber and thus causing radiation damage. Therefore a study of radiation hardness under the conditions of their proposed design was undertaken. In tests, argon-hydrocarbon mixtures consistently became unusable at ∼0.05 C/cm collected charge, due to anode buildup. Argon-CO 2 mixtures, while underquenched, were operational to 0.25 C/cm, at which point loss of cathode material became intolerable. Argon-xenon-CO 2 proved to be quenched as well as argon-hydrocarbons, but was limited by cathode damage. The MAC vertex chamber has operated at a distance of 4.6 cm from the e + e - interaction point at PEP for two years and has shown no aging effects

  20. Construction and manufacture of large size straw-chambers of the COMPASS spectrometer tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Gorbacheva, N.M.; Gusakov, Yu.V.

    2002-01-01

    We report the construction and preliminary testing of 3.6 and 3.2 m long straw tube drift chambers consisting of 672 and 864 channels, respectively. The design considerations, the development of several new techniques are described. The 15 two-layer straw drift chambers have been built for the experiment COMPASS at CERN

  1. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1995-05-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T ν (x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  2. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D.J.; Rehm, K.E.; Tang, X.D.

    2007-01-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction

  3. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  4. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  5. Performance of a time-projection chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fancher, D; Hilke, H J; Loken, S; Martin, P; Marx, J N; Nygren, D R; Robrish, P; Shapiro, G; Urban, M; Wenzel, W [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1979-05-15

    The design and operation of a position sensitive three-dimensional drift chamber with the capability of ionization sampling is reported. This detector allows simultaneous measurements of the momentum and the mass of charged particles. The device is a prototype for a large detector system to be built at the PEP storage ring facility.

  6. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions

  7. Resistive Plate Chambers for Imaging Calorimetry - the DHCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Repond, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The DHCAL, the Digital Hadron Calorimeter, is a prototype calorimeter based on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). The design emphasizes the imaging capabilities of the detector in an effort to optimize the calorimeter for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the reconstruction of hadronic jet energies in a colliding beam environment. The readout of the chambers is segmented into 1 x 1 cm2 pads, each read out with a 1-bit (single threshold) resolution. The prototype with approximately 500,000 readout channels underwent extensive testing in both the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This talk presents preliminary findings from the analysis of data collected at the test beams.

  8. Upgrade of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Frontend Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Junjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT system is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 μm, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT=1 TeV. To cope with large amount of data and high event rate expected from the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade, ATLAS plans to use the MDT detector at the first-trigger level to improve the muon transverse momentum resolution and reduce the trigger rate. The new MDT trigger and readout system will have an output event rate of 1 MHz and a latency of 6 us at the first-level trigger. The signals from MDT tubes are first processed by an Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator (ASD) ASIC, and the binary differential signals output by the ASDs are then router to the Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) ASIC, where the arrival times of leading and trailing edges are digitized in a time bin of 0.78 ns which leads to an RMS timing error of 0.25 n...

  9. Time expansion chamber and single ionization cluster measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walenta, A.H.

    1978-10-01

    The time expansion chamber (TEC), a new type of drift chamber, allows the measurement of microscopic details of ionization. The mean drift time interval from subsequent sngle ionization clusters of a relativistic particle in the TEC can be made large enough compared to the width of a anode signal to allow the recording of the clusters separately. Since single primary electrons can be detected, the cluster counting would allow an improved particle separation using the relativistic rise of primary ionization. In another application, very high position accuracy for track detectors or improved energy resolution may be obtained. Basic ionization phenomena and drift properties can be measured at the single electron level

  10. Large proportional chambers for muon detection in the CELLO experiment at PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksan, R.; Bouchez, J.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Durand, A.; Francinet, G.; Gaidot, A.; Heitzmann, J.; Martin, H.; Maillet, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the muon detector in the CELLO experiment. This detector is composed of one layer of proportional chambers placed after a total of 5 interaction lengths of matter. These chambers have cathode read-out, thus enabling the unambiguous determination of coordinates. A total of 32 chambers has been built in order to cover 95% of the total solid angle. The read-out electronics use the FILAS intergrated chips made by EFCIS. Data concentration is done by a multiplexing system which addresses only those chambers which have some information. The precision is poor, but sufficient for muon detection: sigma = +-6 mm. (orig.)

  11. Test of high time resolution MRPC with different readout modes for the BESIII upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Sun, Y.J., E-mail: sunday@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Li, C., E-mail: licheng@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Heng, Y.K.; Qian, S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences(IHEP), Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Chen, H.F.; Chen, T.X. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Dai, H.L. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences(IHEP), Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Fan, H.H.; Liu, S.B. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Liu, S.D.; Jiang, X.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences(IHEP), Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China); Shao, M.; Tang, Z.B.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, Z.G. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China(USTC), Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics(USTC-IHEP) (China)

    2014-11-01

    In order to further enhance the particle identification capability of the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII), it is proposed to upgrade the current end-cap time-of-flight (eTOF) detector with multi-gap resistive plate chamber (MRPC). The prototypes, together with the front end electronics (FEE) and time digitizer (TDIG) module have been tested at the E3 line of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) to study the difference between the single and double-end readout MRPC designs. The time resolutions (sigma) of the single-end readout MRPC are 47/53 ps obtained by 600 MeV/c proton/pion beam, while that of the double-end readout MRPC is 40 ps (proton beam). The efficiencies of three MRPC modules tested by both proton and pion beam are better than 98%. For the double-end readout MRPC, no incident position dependence is observed.

  12. A new PCI card for readout in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Floris, M; Marras, D; Usai, G L; David, A

    2004-01-01

    Recently some high energy physics experiments started to adopt readout systems based on the PCI architecture. In this context a new PCI card that can be adapted to several readout schemes has been designed. The card contains a large 64 MB local buffer, programmable FPGA logic and a PLX PCI bridge. The solution to use a PCI bridge external to the programmable logic allows to greatly simplify projects at the level of the on-board local bus. The card is presently used as the basic readout unit of the NA60 experiment. In this context, coupling it to different mezzanine cards it is possible to create interfaces to VME/CAMAC modules or to custom front-end electronics as for the case of the silicon vertex detector. Moreover, it is used as a readout test system for the ALICE muon chambers. (10 refs).

  13. Construction and test of a full-scale prototype of an ATLAS muon spectrometer tracking chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscossa, A.; Cambiaghi, M.; Conta, C.; Ferrari, R.; Fraternali, M.; Freddi, A.; Iuvino, G.; Lanza, A.; Livan, M.; Negri, A.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Vercellati, F.; Vercesi, V.; Bagnaia, P.; Bini, C.; Capradossi, G.; Ciapetti, G.; Creti, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Iannone, M.; Lacava, F.; Mattei, A.; Nisati, L.; Oberson, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Rosati, S.; Veneziano, S.; Zullo, A.; Daly, C.H.; Davisson, R.; Guldenmann, H.; Lubatti, H.J.; Zhao, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have built a full scale prototype of the precision tracking chambers (Monitored Drift Tubes, MDT) for the muon spectrometer of the Atlas Experiment at the LHC collider. This article describes in detail the procedures used in constructing the drift tubes and in assembling the chamber. It presents data showing that the required mechanical precision has been achieved as well as test beam results displaying the over all chamber performance. The article presents data demonstrating the derivation of the space-time relation of the drift tubes by the autocalibration procedure using real data from the tracks crossing the chamber. Autocalibration is the procedure which must be used during run time

  14. Drift Scale THM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  15. Detector for recoil nuclei stopping in the spark chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksanyan, A.S.; Asatiani, T.L.; Ivanov, V.I.; Mkrtchyan, G.G.; Pikhtelev, R.N.

    1974-01-01

    A detector consisting of the combination of a drift and a wide gap spark chambers and designed to detect recoil nuclei stopping in the spark chamber gas is described. It is shown, that by using an appropriate discrimination the detector allows to detect reliably the recoil nuclei in the presence of intensive electron and γ-quanta beams

  16. Streamlined Calibration of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Precision Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, DS; The ATLAS collaboration; Dai, T; Diehl, EB; Ferretti, C; Hindes, JM; Zhou, B

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer is comprised of nearly 1200 optically Monitored Drifttube Chambers (MDTs) containing 354,000 aluminum drift tubes. The chambers are configured in barrel and endcap regions. The momentum resolution required for the LHC physics reach (dp/p = 3% and 10% at 100 GeV and 1 TeV) demands rigorous MDT drift tube calibration with frequent updates. These calibrations (RT functions) convert the measured drift times to drift radii and are a critical component to the spectrometer performance. They are sensitive to the MDT gas composition: Ar 93%, CO2 7% at 3 bar, flowing through the detector at arate of 100,000 l hr−1. We report on the generation and application of Universal RT calibrations derived from an inline gas system monitor chamber. Results from ATLAS cosmic ray commissioning data are included. These Universal RTs are intended for muon track reconstuction in LHC startup phase.

  17. Microsecond-scale X-ray imaging with Controlled-Drift Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Galimberti, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Rehak, P.; Strueder, L.

    2006-01-01

    The Controlled-Drift Detector is a fully-depleted silicon detector that allows 2-D position sensing and energy spectroscopy of X-rays in the range 0.5-20keV with excellent time resolution (few tens of μs) and limited readout channels. In this paper we review the Controlled-Drift Detector operating principle and we present the X-ray imaging and spectroscopic capabilities of Controlled Drift Detectors in microsecond-scale experiments and the more relevant applications fields

  18. Measurement and Compensation of BPM Chamber Motion in HLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. W.; Sun, B. G.; Cao, Y.; Xu, H. L.; Lu, P.; Li, C.; Xuan, K.; Wang, J. G.

    2010-06-01

    Significant horizontal drifts in the beam orbit in the storage ring of HLS (Hefei Light Source) have been seen for many years. What leads to the motion of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) chamber is thermal expansion mainly caused by the synchrotron light. To monitor the BPM chamber motions for all BPMs, a BPM chamber motion measurement system is built in real-time. The raster gauges are used to measure the displacements. The results distinctly show the relation between the BPM chamber motion and the beam current. To suppress the effect of BPM chamber motion, a compensation strategy is implemented at HLS. The horizontal drifts of beam orbit have been really suppressed within 20μm without the compensation of BPM chamber motion in the runtime.

  19. Measurement and Compensation of BPM Chamber Motion in HLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. W.; Sun, B. G.; Cao, Y.; Xu, H. L.; Lu, P.; Li, C.; Xuan, K.; Wang, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Significant horizontal drifts in the beam orbit in the storage ring of HLS (Hefei Light Source) have been seen for many years. What leads to the motion of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) chamber is thermal expansion mainly caused by the synchrotron light. To monitor the BPM chamber motions for all BPMs, a BPM chamber motion measurement system is built in real-time. The raster gauges are used to measure the displacements. The results distinctly show the relation between the BPM chamber motion and the beam current. To suppress the effect of BPM chamber motion, a compensation strategy is implemented at HLS. The horizontal drifts of beam orbit have been really suppressed within 20μm without the compensation of BPM chamber motion in the runtime.

  20. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  1. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  2. Studies of field distortions in a time projection chamber for the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will allow to do precision measurements of Standard Model parameter and to search for new physics. The ILD detector concept, which is developed for the ILC, uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as central tracking device. The momentum resolution goal for the ILD TPC is δ(1/p t ) ≅ 10 -4 (GeV/c) -1 at a magnetic field of B=3.5 T. Field distortions of the magnetic or electric field inside the sensitive volume of the TPC distort the momentum measurements. Therefore, one needs to keep them under control and correct them with high precision. In this thesis the main sources of field distortions in the TPC are identified and their effects are determined. Furthermore, possibilities to reduce the identified field distortions are presented. One known source of distortions of the electric field are ions, produced by the gas amplification in the TPC anode, that drift into the sensitive volume of the TPC. In the first part of this work the creation of these ions in Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), which are used for the gas amplification, is studied. It will be shown that the resulting field distortions are not acceptable at the ILD TPC. By tuning the parameters of the gas amplification at the anode the field distortion can be reduced, which is shown in measurements and simulations. In addition measurements using a modified GEM show that it is possible to further reduce the field distortions with such a GEM. In the second part of this work field distortions arising at boundaries between individual readout modules are investigated using simulation studies. It will be shown in simulations, which are verified by measurement results, that these field distortions significantly influence the readout module performance. Based on the simulation results the GEM based readout module developed at DESY is optimised and the field distortions are reduced. These performance improvements could also be verified in measurements. Finally, a laser

  3. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  4. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  5. HARP: high-pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco-Luque, M.; Fabjan, C.W.; Frandsen, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx. 200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described

  6. Digital column readout architectures for hybrid pixel detector readout chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poikela, T; Plosila, J; Westerlund, T; Buytaert, J; Campbell, M; Gaspari, M De; Llopart, X; Wyllie, K; Gromov, V; Kluit, R; Beuzekom, M van; Zappon, F; Zivkovic, V; Brezina, C; Desch, K; Fu, Y; Kruth, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two digital column architectures suitable for sparse readout of data from a pixel matrix in trigger-less applications are presented. Each architecture reads out a pixel matrix of 256 x 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. The first architecture has been implemented in the Timepix3 chip, and this is presented together with initial measurements. Simulation results and measured data are compared. The second architecture has been designed for Velopix, a readout chip planned for the LHCb VELO upgrade. Unlike Timepix3, this has to be tolerant to radiation-induced single-event effects. Results from post-layout simulations are shown with the circuit architectures

  7. Clean industrial room for drift tube assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glonti, G.L.; Gongadze, A.L.; Evtukhovich, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volume (∼ 190 m 3 ), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2%). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer. (author)

  8. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  9. Fast Filter Central Drift Chamber Program. MAC Note 404

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.

    1979-01-01

    A fast filter of the central detector tracking program was developed and tested. The search for tracks is conducted as in the full linking program - from the outermost layer hit to the next layer in. Any hit is accepted within a road centered which is large enough to allow for stero displacement and any curvature. With the fast filter, this is continued to the innermost layer, with five or more hits accepted as a track

  10. Performance of the Soudan II honeycomb drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.; Barrett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Soudan II nucleon decay project is in the process of building 260 identical 5-ton fine grained calorimeter modules for the study of nucleon decay and cosmic ray physics in the Soudan Iron Mine in Minnesota. Several of these modules have been studied on a cosmic ray test stand on the surface at Argonne National Lab. Several have been installed on location in the mine, 700 m under the surface (2200 mwe overburden). In addition, many studies of trigger efficiency, pattern recognition and background rejection have been done using Monte Carlo techniques

  11. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  12. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  13. Electron Drift Properties in High Pressure Gaseous Xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simón, A.; et al.

    2018-04-05

    Gaseous time projection chambers (TPC) are a very attractive detector technology for particle tracking. Characterization of both drift velocity and diffusion is of great importance to correctly assess their tracking capabilities. NEXT-White is a High Pressure Xenon gas TPC with electroluminescent amplification, a 1:2 scale model of the future NEXT-100 detector, which will be dedicated to neutrinoless double beta decay searches. NEXT-White has been operating at Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) since December 2016. The drift parameters have been measured using $^{83m}$Kr for a range of reduced drift fields at two different pressure regimes, namely 7.2 bar and 9.1 bar. The results have been compared with Magboltz simulations. Agreement at the 5% level or better has been found for drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion and transverse diffusion.

  14. R and D of MPGD-readout TPC for the International Linear Collider experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonamine, R

    2012-01-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is chosen for the central tracker of the ILD detector, one of two detector concepts planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Physics goals at the ILC will require a TPC with a position resolution of 100 μm and superior track separation, which are not achievable with a conventional Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) readout. A MPGD readout offers improved position resolution and track separation due to measuring the signal at the anode and minimization of E × B effect. For several years, the LC TPC collaboration has been developing a MPGD readout using various small TPC prototypes and the Large Prototype TPC that is operated in a test beam at DESY. The MPGD technologies being tested are GEM and Micromegas with resistive charge broadening, with both traditional pad and CMOS pixel readout. Readout modules with both GEM and Micromegas gas amplification have achieved a position resolution on the order of 100 μm at B = 1 T. In this paper we report on the recent R and D toward the ILD TPC.

  15. Study on time response properties of ionization chamber in profile gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentao; Shen Yixiong; Wang Liqiang; Hao Pengfei

    2011-01-01

    The drift time of ions in the ionization chamber was measured by means of using a shortly pulsed X-ray device and through analyzing the voltage signals on the load resistor of the chamber recorded by a digital oscilloscope. By using this method, the time response properties of the ionization chamber in the profile gauge were studied, results of ion drift time for ionization chambers with different internal structures, different voltages and different gas pressures were introduced and the sources of error were discussed. The experiment results show that the time response of ionization chamber in profile gauge meets the requirement of on-line hot strip measuring. (authors)

  16. Construction and test of sMDT chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasugi, Eric; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the ATLAS muon spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube chambers (MDTs) are used for precise tracking measurements. In order to increase the geometric acceptance and rate capability, new chambers have been designed and are under construction to be installed in ATLAS during the winter shutdown of 2016/17 of the LHC. The new chambers have a drift tube diameter of 15 mm (compared to 30 mm of the other MDTs) and are therefore called sMDT chambers. This presentation reports on the progress of chamber construction and on the results of quality assurance tests.

  17. Quality control of ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, Adrian

    ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Its Muon Spectrometer will require ∼ 5500m2 of precision tracking chambers to measure the muon tracks along a spectrometer arm of 5m to 15m length, embedded in a magnetic field of ∼ 0.5T. The precision tracking devices in the Muon System will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs). Approximately 370,000 MDTs will be assembled into ∼ 1200 drift chambers. The performance of the MDT chambers is very much dependent on the mechanical quality of the chambers. The uniformity and stability of the performance can only be assured providing very high quality control during production. Gas tightness, high-voltage behaviour and dark currents are global parameters which are common to gas detectors. For all chambers, they will be tested immediately after the chamber assembly at every production site. Functional tests, for example radioactive source scans and cosmic-ray runs, will be performed in order to establish detailed performan...

  18. Tapping with intentional drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardy, A.N.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    When tapping a desired frequency, subjects tend to drift away from this target frequency. This compromises the estimate of the correlation between inter-tap intervals (ITIs) as predicted by the two-level model of Wing and Kristofferson which consists of an internal timer ('clock') and motor delays.

  19. Inland drift sand landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat to society, especially agriculture and housing. At present we conserve these landscapes as important Natura 2000 priority habitats. In this book you may find these

  20. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem