WorldWideScience

Sample records for drag force acting

  1. Experimental evaluation of the drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a rotating prolate spheroid

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Kvurt, Y.; Miles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a spheroid rotating around its axis of symmetry and moving perpendicularly to this axis in initially quiescent water were studied using experimental data and numerical simulation. The prolate spheroid with ratio of the axes 4/3 was speeded up in special device, which ensured the required rotational and translational velocity in the given plane. A video system was used to record the spheroid motion in water. Using the video records the sph...

  2. Experimental investigation of drag force, Magnus force and drag torque acting on rough sphere moving in calm water

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Chára, Z. (Zdeněk); Vlasák, P. (Pavel)

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments with a rotating golf ball moving quasi-steadily in calm water. The motion of the ball was recorded on a digital video camera. The dimensionless drag force, Magnus force, and drag torque coefficients were determined from the comparison of the calculated translational and angular velocities and trajectory with experimental ones for the rough particle. The proper value of the correction coefficients were established from condition of the best fittin...

  3. Drag and Lift Force Acting on a Rotational Spherical Particle in a Logarithmic Boundary Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wei-jiang; CHE De-fu; XU Tong-mo

    2006-01-01

    The drag and lift forces acting on a rotational spherical particle in a logarithmic boundary flow are numerically studied. The effects of the drag velocity and rotational speed of the sphere on the drag force are examined for the particle Reynolds number from 50 to 300 and for the dimensionless rotational angular speed of 0≤Ω≤1.0. The influence of dimensionless roughness height z0of the wall is also evaluated for z0≤10. The results show that the drag forces on a sphere both in a logarithmic flow and in a uniform unsheared flow increase with the increase of the drag velocity. For 50≤Rep≤300, the drag coefficient (-C)D increases with decreased roughness height z0. The time-averaged drag coefficient is also significantly affected by rotational speed of the sphere and roughness height z0 . The lift coefficient -CL increases with increased rotational speed and decreases with increased roughness height.

  4. Drag force acting on a neuromast in the fish lateral line trunk canal. II. Analytical modelling of parameter dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Joseph A C

    2009-07-01

    In Part I of this two-part study, the coupled flows external and internal to the fish lateral line trunk canal were consecutively calculated by solving the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations numerically in each domain. With the external flow known, the solution for the internal flow was obtained using a parallelepiped to simulate the neuromast cupula present between a pair of consecutive pores, allowing the calculation of the drag force acting on the neuromast cupula. While physically rigorous and accurate, the numerical approach is tedious and inefficient since it does not readily reveal the parameter dependencies of the drag force. In Part II of this work we present an analytically based physical-mathematical model for rapidly calculating the drag force acting on a neuromast cupula. The cupula is well approximated as an immobile sphere located inside a tube-shaped canal segment of circular cross section containing a constant property fluid in a steady-periodic oscillating state of motion. The analytical expression derived for the dimensionless drag force is of the form |F(N)/(|P(L) - P(R)|pi(D/2)(2) = f(d/D, L(t)/D, omega(*)(D), where |F(N)| is the amplitude of the drag force; |P(L)-P(R)| is the amplitude of the pressure difference driving the flow in the interpore tube segment; d/D is the ratio of sphere diameter to tube diameter; L(t)/D is the ratio of interpore tube segment length to tube diameter; and omega(*)(D) = omega(D/2)(2) /v is the oscillating flow kinetic Reynolds number (a dimensionless frequency). Present results show that the dimensionless drag force amplitude increases with decreasing L(t)/D and maximizes in the range 0.65< or =d/D< or =0.85, depending on the values of L(t)/D and omega(*)(D). It is also found that in the biologically relevant range of dimensionless frequencies 1< or = omega(*)(D) < or =20 and segment lengths 4< or =L(t)/D< or =16, the sphere tube (neuromast-canal) system acts as a low-pass filter for values d/D< or =0.75, approximately

  5. Numerical Calculation of the Drag Force Acting on a Solid Particle Pushed by a Solid/Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of insoluble particles in a metal casting depends primarily on the interaction of the particles with the solid/liquid interface (SLI) during the solidification process. The balance of the forces acting on the particle essentially determines whether a particle will be engulfed or pushed by the SLI. An important component of this force balance is the drag force generated by the particle motion in front of the SLI. Previously developed mathematical models for particle/SLI interaction made use of steady-state solutions of this force provided by the lubrication theory. However, our numerical model based on the SLI tracking approach shows that the steady-state approach is inappropriate to model the interaction process and that at steady-state the theoretical solution underestimates the drag force. It was found that regression analysis of steady-state numerical solutions for cylindrical particles moving normal to a flat SLI gives a relationship of the form: Abstract The distribution of insoluble particles in a metal casting depends primarily on the interaction of the particles with the solid/liquid interface (SLI) during the solidification process. The balance of the forces acting on the particle essentially determines whether a particle will be engulfed or pushed by the SLI. An important component of this force balance is the drag force generated by the particle motion in front of the SLI. Previously developed mathematical models for particle/SLI interaction made use of steady-state solutions of this force provided by the lubrication theory. However, our numerical model based on the SLI tracking approach shows that the steady-state approach is inappropriate to model the interaction process and that at steady-state the theoretical solution underestimates the drag force. It was found that regression analysis of steady-state numerical solutions for cylindrical particles moving normal to a flat SLI gives a relationship of the form: F(sub D, sup num) =sqoare

  6. The drag force during the transient regime

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, P V S; de Oliveira, P M C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the drag force acting on a cylinder in a wind tunnel. The inspiration comes from an experimental result: a small, light ball falls on air; its speed increases, reaches a maximum, decreases and finally stabilizes. This surprising breaking behavior is due to the gradual formation of the so-called von K\\'arm\\'an street of air vortices behind the ball: while it is not completely formed, the transient drag force is smaller than the known steady state value and the ball can reach speeds higher than its final value. To show it, we treat the similar problem of a cylinder inside a wind tunnel suddenly switched on, by solving the Navier-Stokes dynamic equation. We use a finite difference method with successive relaxations on a grid. We also treat the case of a rotating cylinder, leading to the Magnus force. The novelty is the method we use to calculate these forces, which avoids the traditional surface integration of velocity gradients; the latter demands a very precise determination of the ve...

  7. Analytical calculation of the drag force near drag crisis of a falling sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, Armando V D B; Branco, N S

    2010-01-01

    We obtain analitically the $v^2$ dependence of the drag force on a falling sphere close to the drag crisis, as well as the drag coefficient at the drag crisis, with excellent agreement with experiment. We take into account the effects of viscosity in creating a turbulent boundary layer and perform the calculations using the Navier-Stokes equation.

  8. Ion drag force in plasmas at high electronegativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I; Yu, M Y; Stenflo, L; Xu, S

    2005-07-01

    The electric as well as the positive- and negative-ion drag forces on an isolated dust grain in an electronegative plasma are studied for large negative-ion densities, when the negative ions are not Boltzmann distributed. The investigation is carried out for submicrometer dust particles, so that the theory of Coulomb scattering is applicable for describing ion-dust interaction. Among the forces acting on the dust grain, the negative-ion drag force is found to be important. The effects of the negative-ion density, neutral-gas pressure, and dust-grain size on the forces are also considered. It is shown that by increasing the density of the negative ions one can effectively manipulate the dust grains. Our results imply that both dust voids and balls can be formed.

  9. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  10. Collisional Effects on Nonlinear Ion Drag Force for Small Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution appropriate for ion drift driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if non-linear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided.

  11. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite U(1) chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Long; Ge, Xian-Hui [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Wu, Shang-Yu [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Yau Shing Tung Center, Hsinchu (China); National Center for Theoretical Science, Hsinchu (China)

    2016-05-15

    We perform the calculation of the drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic N = 4 SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a U(1) chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any value of the anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of the anisotropy. We find the effect of the chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for our charged solution. (orig.)

  12. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  13. Balancing acts: drag queens, gender and faith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Blum, Constance R

    2004-01-01

    While engaged in research on the same-sex marriage debate in mainline denominations, I interviewed 23 LGBT Christians, four of whom were drag queens. While it is not possible to generalize from such a small sample, the drag queens in this study insist on maintaining their identity as Christians despite the hegemonic discourse that renders faith and LGBT identities mutually exclusive. They developed innovative approaches to reconciling their gender and sexual identities with their spirituality. Their innovations are potentially liberating not just for them personally, but for LGBT people generally because they challenge Christianity's rigid dichotomies of gender and sexuality.

  14. Drag force in a charged N = 4 SYM plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, Elena [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Colima (Mexico); Gueijosa, Alberto [Departamento de Fisica de Altas Energias, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-543, D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2006-11-15

    Following recent developments, we employ the AdS/CFT correspondence to determine the drag force exerted on an external quark that moves through an N = 4 super-Yang-Mills plasma with a non-zero R-charge density (or, equivalently, a non-zero chemical potential). We find that the drag force is larger than in the case where the plasma is neutral, but the dependence on the charge is non-monotonic.

  15. Skin-friction drag analysis from the forced convection modeling in simplified underwater swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, G; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Mai, T H; Lodini, A

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with skin-friction drag analysis in underwater swimming. Although lower than profile drag, skin-friction drag remains significant and is the second and only other contribution to total drag in the case of underwater swimming. The question arises whether varying the thermal gradient between the underwater swimmer and the pool water may modify the surface shear stress distribution and the resulting skin-friction drag acting on a swimmer's body. As far as the authors are aware, such a question has not previously been addressed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of this thermal gradient by using the integral formalism applied to the forced convection theory. From a simplified model in a range of pool temperatures (20-30 degrees C) it was demonstrated that, whatever the swimming speeds, a 5.3% reduction in the skin-friction drag would occur with increasing average boundary-layer temperature provided that the flow remained laminar. However, as the majority of the flow is actually turbulent, a turbulent flow analysis leads to the major conclusion that friction drag is a function of underwater speed, leading to a possible 1.5% reduction for fast swimming speeds above 1m/s. Furthermore, simple correlations between the surface shear stress and resulting skin-friction drag are derived in terms of the boundary-layer temperature, which may be readily used in underwater swimming situations.

  16. Drag force in wind tunnels: A new method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P. V. S.; Girardi, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2017-02-01

    A rigid object of general shape is fixed inside a wind tunnel. The drag force exerted on it by the wind is determined by a new method based on simple basic Physics concepts, provided one has a solver, any solver, for the corresponding dynamic Navier-Stokes equation which determines the wind velocity field around the object. The method is completely general, but here we apply it to the traditional problem of a long cylinder perpendicular to the wind.

  17. The Role of Drag in the Energetics of Strongly Forced Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, Emily

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the Earth, where frictional heating is typically neglected in atmospheric modeling, we show that drag mechanisms could act as an important heat source in the strongly-forced atmospheres of some exoplanets, with the potential to alter the circulation. We modify the standard formalism of the atmospheric energy cycle to explicitly track the loss of kinetic energy and the associated frictional (re)heating, for application to exoplanets such as the asymmetrically heated "hot Jupiters" and gas giants on highly eccentric orbits. We establish that an understanding of the dominant drag mechanisms and their dependence on local atmospheric conditions is critical for accurate modeling, not just in their ability to limit wind speeds, but also because they could possibly change the energetics of the circulation enough to alter the nature of the flow. We discuss possible sources of drag and estimate the strength necessary to significantly influence the atmospheric energetics. As we show, the frictional heatin...

  18. Drag and propulsive forces in electric sails with negative polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Torres, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    An electric solar sail (E-sail) is a recent propellantless propulsion concept for a direct exploration of the Solar System. An E-sail consists of a set of bare, conductive tethers at high positive/negative bias, prone to extract solar wind momentum by Coulomb deflection of protons. Additionally, a negatively biased E-sail has been proposed as a concept for de-orbiting space debris with drag forces produced in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The present work focuses on the negative-bias case with a sheath that must be correctly modeled for a flowing plasma ambient. Ion scattering within the sheath and the resulting force are determined for several plasma conditions. Since the plasma flow does reduce the effective range for the ion scattering within the sheath, the resulting force is then reduced. Tethers at very high negative bias should be required for extremely high plasma flow.

  19. Lateral-drag Casimir forces induced by anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Nefedov, Igor S

    2016-01-01

    We predict the existence of lateral drag forces near the flat surface of an absorbing slab of an anisotropic material. The forces originate from the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, when the anisotropy axis of the material forms a certain angle with the surface. In this situation, the spatial spectra of the fluctuating electromagnetic fields becomes asymmetric, different for positive and negative transverse wave vectors components. Differently from the case of van der Waals interactions in which the forward-backward symmetry is broken due to the particle movement or in quantum noncontact friction where it is caused by the mutual motion of the bodies, in our case the lateral motion results merely from the anisotropy of the slab. This new effect, of particular significance in hyperbolic materials, could be used for the manipulation of nanoparticles.

  20. Lateral-drag propulsion forces induced by anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, Igor S; Rubi, J Miguel

    2017-07-21

    We predict the existence of lateral drag forces near the flat surface of an absorbing slab made of an anisotropic material. The forces originate from the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, when the anisotropy axis of the material forms a certain angle with the surface. In this situation, the spatial spectra of the fluctuating electromagnetic fields becomes asymmetric, different for positive and negative transverse wave vectors components. Differently from the case of van der Waals interactions in which the forward-backward symmetry is broken due to the particle movement, in our case the lateral motion results merely from the anisotropy of the slab. This new effect, of particular significance in hyperbolic materials, could be used for the manipulation of nanoparticles.

  1. Binaries traveling through a gaseous medium: Dynamical drag forces and internal torques

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F J

    2014-01-01

    Using time-dependent linear theory, we investigate the morphology of the gravitational wake induced by a binary, whose center of mass moves at velocity Vcm against a uniform background of gas. For simplicity, we assume that the binary's components are on circular orbits about their common center of mass. The consequences of dynamical friction is twofold. First, gas dynamical friction may drag the binary's center of mass and cause the binary to migrate. Second, drag forces also induce a braking torque, which causes the orbits of the binary components to shrink. We compute the drag forces acting on one component of the binary due to the gravitational interaction with its own wake. We show that the dynamical friction force responsible to decelerate the binary's center of mass is smaller than it is in the point-mass case because of the loss of gravitational focusing. We show that the braking internal torque depends on the Mach numbers of each binary component about their center of mass, and also on the Mach numbe...

  2. Drag force in a string model dual to large-N QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Talavera, P

    2007-01-01

    We compute the drag force exerted on a quark and a di-quark systems in a background dual to large-N QCD at finite temperature. We find that appears a drag force in the former setup with flow of energy proportional to the mass of the quark while in the latter there is no dragging as in other studies. We also review the screening length.

  3. Drag force in a string model dual to large-N QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talavera, Pere [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    We compute the drag force exerted on a quark and a di-quark systems in a background dual to large-N QCD at finite temperature. We find that appears a drag force in the former setup with flow of energy proportional to the mass of the quark while in the latter there is no dragging as in other studies. We also review the screening length.

  4. Characterization of aerodynamic drag force on single particles: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    An electrodynamic balance was used to measure the drag coefficient and also to record the size and shape of spheres, and coal and oil shale particles (100 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m in size). The electrodynamic balance consisted of a central, and two end electrodes. The resulting electric field stably suspended a charged particle. A suspended particle, back illuminated by a light emitting diode, was viewed by a video camera. The image was analyzed for particle position control and was calibrated to give the diameter of spheres, or the area equivalent diameter of nonspherical particles. The drag coefficient was calculated from the air velocity and the dc voltage required to keep the particle at the balance center. The particle Reynolds number varied from 0.2 to 13. Three particles each of coal and oil shale were captured and photographed by a scanning electron microscope and the motion of all the particles was recorded on video tape. Drag coefficient vs Reynolds number data for spheres agreed well with correlations. Data for thirteen particles each of coal and oil shale indicated a power law relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number. All these particles exhibited higher drag than spheres and were also observed to rotate. The rotation, however, did not affect the drag coefficient. The choice of characteristic dimension affects the drag characteristics of oil shale more strongly than for coal, owing to the flake-like shape of oil shale. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. EFFECT OF AERATOR ON HYDRAULIC DRAG ACTING ON A CHUTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Han-gen; LI Xin; ZHOU Jing; JIN Qiao

    2005-01-01

    The formulae used to calculate the friction in the non-uniform flow chute were examined with the experimental data, and the results show that the accuracy of the formula is enough for engineering applications. A comparison between the results of friction respectively from the uniform flow assumption and the non-uniform flow approximation indicates that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter in the case of steep chute. The hydraulic drag on a steep chute with aerators was measured on the hydraulic model directly and the coefficient of the aerator effect on the drag was obtained. The variation patterns of the wall shear just downstream of the aerators were investigated and the mechanism of the increase in the drag by aerator were analyzed qualitatively with the measured water-depths just downstream the aerators.

  6. Direct Measurements of Drag Forces in C. elegans Crawling Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S.

    2014-01-01

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm’s body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode’s body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode. PMID:25418179

  7. No Winglets: What a Drag...Argument for Adding Winglets to Large Air Force Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    22134-5068 MASTER OF MILITARY STUDIES NO WINGLETS : WHAT A DRAG... ARGUMENT FOR ADDING WINGLETS TO LARGE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT ,SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE No Winglets ...What a Drag...Argument for Adding Winglets to Large Air Force Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  8. Alignment of dust particles by ion drag forces in subsonic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-University, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The role of ion drag forces for the alignment of dust particles is studied for subsonic flows. While alignment by wake-field attraction is a well known mechanism for supersonic flows, it is argued here that ion-scattering forces become more important in subsonic ion flows. A model of non-overlapping collisions is introduced and numerical results are discussed. For typical conditions of dusty plasma experiments, alignment by drag forces is found strong enough to overcome the destabilizing force from Coulomb repulsion between dust particles. It turns out that the major contribution to the horizontal restoring force originates from the transverse momentum transfer, which is usually neglected in ion drag force calculations because of an assumed rotational symmetry of the flow.

  9. Drag force and surface roughness measurements on freshwater biofouled surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrewartha, J; Perkins, K; Sargison, J; Osborn, J; Walker, G; Henderson, A; Hallegraeff, G

    2010-05-01

    The detrimental effect of biofilms on skin friction for near wall flows is well known. The diatom genera Gomphonema and Tabellaria dominated the biofilm mat in the freshwater open channels of the Tarraleah Hydropower Scheme in Tasmania, Australia. A multi-faceted approach was adopted to investigate the drag penalty for biofouled 1.0 m x 0.6 m test plates which incorporated species identification, drag measurement in a recirculating water tunnel and surface characterisation using close-range photogrammetry. Increases in total drag coefficient of up to 99% were measured over clean surface values for biofouled test plates incubated under flow conditions in a hydropower canal. The effective roughness of the biofouled surfaces was found to be larger than the physical roughness; the additional energy dissipation was caused in part by the vibration of the biofilms in three-dimensions under flow conditions. The data indicate that there was a roughly linear relationship between the maximum peak-to-valley height of a biofilm and the total drag coefficient.

  10. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  11. Anisotropic Drag Force from 4D Kerr-AdS Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Atmaja, Ardian Nata

    2010-01-01

    Using AdS/CFT we investigate the effect of angular-momentum-induced anisotropy on the instantaneous drag force of a heavy quark. The dual description is that of a string moving in the background of a Kerr-AdS black holes. The system exhibits the expected focussing of jets towards the impact parameter plane. We put forward that we can use the connection between this focussing behavior and the angular momentum induced pressure gradient to extrapolate the pressure gradient correction to the drag force that can be used for transverse elliptic flow in realistic RHIC. The result is recognizable as a relativisitic pressure gradient force.

  12. On drag forces and jet quenching in strongly-coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, Elena [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Gueijosa, Alberto [Departamento de Fisica de Altas Energias, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-543, Mexico D.F.04510 (Mexico)

    2006-12-15

    We compute the drag force experienced by a heavy quark that moves through plasma in a gauge theory whose dual description involves arbitrary metric and dilaton fields. As a concrete application, we consider the cascading gauge theory at temperatures high above the deconfining scale, where we obtain a drag force with a non-trivial velocity dependence. We compare our results with the jet-quenching parameter for the same theory, and find qualitative agreement between the two approaches. Conversely, we calculate the jet-quenching parameter for N = 4 super-Yang-Mills with an R-charge density (or equivalently, a chemical potential), and compare our result with the corresponding drag force.

  13. Effects of turbulence on the drag force on a golf ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the drag force on a golf ball dropped vertically into a tank of water. As observed previously in air, the drag coefficient drops sharply when the flow becomes turbulent. The experiment would be suitable for undergraduate students since it can be undertaken at low ball speeds and since the effects of turbulence are easily observed on video film. A modified golf ball was used to show how a ball with a smooth and a rough side, such as a cricket ball, is subject to a side force when the ball surface itself is asymmetrical in the transverse direction.

  14. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale.

  15. Noetherian symmetries of noncentral forces with drag term

    CERN Document Server

    Ghose-Choudhury, A; Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Leach, P G L

    2016-01-01

    We consider the Noetherian symmetries of second-order ODEs subjected to forces with nonzero curl. Both position and velocity dependent forces are considered. In the former case the first integrals are shown to follow from the symmetries of the celebrated Emden-Fowler equation.

  16. An Optimal Angle of Launching a Point Mass in a Medium with Quadratic Drag Force

    CERN Document Server

    Chudinov, P

    2005-01-01

    A classic problem of the motion of a point mass (projectile) thrown at an angle to the horizon is reviewed. The air drag force is taken into account with the drag factor assumed to be constant. Analytic approach is used for investigation. The problem of finding an optimal angle of launching a point mass in a medium with quadratic drag force is considered. An equation for determining a value of this angle is obtained. After finding the optimal angle of launching, eight main parameters of the point mass motion are analytically determined. These parameters are used to construct analytically six main functional relationships of the problem. Simple analytic formulas are used to solve two problems of optimization aimed to maximize the flight range of a point mass and minimize the initial speed of the point mass for getting to the given point on the plane. The motion of a baseball is presented as an example.

  17. Response spectrum method for extreme wave loading with higher order components of drag force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Tabeshpour Mohammad; Mani, Fatemi Dezfouli; Mohammad Ali, Dastan Diznab; Saied, Mohajernasab; Saied, Seif Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Response spectra of fixed offshore structures impacted by extreme waves are investigated based on the higher order components of the nonlinear drag force. In this way, steel jacket platforms are simplified as a mass attached to a light cantilever cylinder and their corresponding deformation response spectra are estimated by utilizing a generalized single degree of freedom system. Based on the wave data recorded in the Persian Gulf region, extreme wave loading conditions corresponding to different return periods are exerted on the offshore structures. Accordingly, the effect of the higher order components of the drag force is considered and compared to the linearized state for different sea surface levels. When the fundamental period of the offshore structure is about one third of the main period of wave loading, the results indicate the linearized drag term is not capable of achieving a reliable deformation response spectrum.

  18. Reynolds-dependence of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction induced by spanwise forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how increasing the value of the Reynolds number $Re$ affects the ability of spanwise-forcing techniques to yield turbulent skin-friction drag reduction. The control strategy is the streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity (Quadrio {\\em et al. J. Fluid Mech.}, vol. 627, 2009, pp. 161--178). The study builds upon an extensive drag-reduction database created with Direct Numerical Simulation of a turbulent channel flow for two, 5-fold separated values of $Re$, namely $Re_\\tau=200$ and $Re_\\tau=1000$. The sheer size of the database, which for the first time systematically addresses the amplitude of the forcing, allows a comprehensive view of the drag-reducing characteristics of the traveling waves, and enables a detailed description of the changes occurring when $Re$ increases. The effect of using a viscous scaling based on the friction velocity of either the non-controlled flow or the drag-reduced flow is described. In analogy with other wall-based drag reduction techniques, like ...

  19. Observation and numerical experiments for drag coefficient under typhoon wind forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiqiu; Zhou, Liangming; Li, Shuiqing; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a study on drag coefficients under typhoon wind forcing based on observations and numerical experiments. The friction velocity and wind speed are measured at a marine observation platform in the South China Sea. Three typhoons: SOULIK (2013), TRAMI (2013) and FITOW (2013) are observed at a buoy station in the northeast sea area of Pingtan Island. A new parameterization is formulated for the wind drag coefficient as a function of wind speed. It is found that the drag coefficient ( C d ) increases linearly with the slope of 0.083×10-3 for wind speed less than 24 m s-1. To investigate the drag coefficient under higher wind conditions, three numerical experiments are implemented for these three typhoons using SWAN wave model. The wind input data are objective reanalysis datasets, which are assimilated with many sources and provided every six hours with the resolution of 0.125°×0.125°. The numerical simulation results show a good agreement with wave observation data under typhoon wind forcing. The results indicate that the drag coefficient levels off with the linear slope of 0.012×10-3 for higher wind speeds (less than 34 m s-1) and the new parameterization improvese the simulation accuracy compared with the Wu (1982) default used in SWAN.

  20. Effect of the drag force on the orbital motion of the broad-line region clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Khajenabi, Fazeleh

    2016-01-01

    We investigate orbital motion of cold clouds in the broad line region of active galactic nuclei subject to the gravity of a black hole and a force due to a nonisotropic central source and a drag force proportional to the velocity square. The intercloud is described using the standard solutions for the advection-dominated accretion flows. Orbit of a cloud decays because of the drag force, but the typical time scale of falling of clouds onto the central black hole is shorter comparing to the linear drag case. This time scale is calculated when a cloud is moving through a static or rotating intercloud. We show that when the drag force is a quadratic function of the velocity, irrespective of the initial conditions and other input parameters, clouds will generally fall onto the central region much faster than the age of whole system and since cold clouds present in most of the broad line regions, we suggest that mechanisms for continuous creation of the clouds must operate in these systems.

  1. Projectile Motion with a Drag Force: Were the Medievals Right After All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    An educational and historical study of the projectile motion with drag forces dependent on speed shows, by simple results, that trajectories quite similar to those depicted before the Galilean era may be obtained with a realistic choice of quantities involved. Numerical simulations of the trajectory in space and velocity coordinates help us to…

  2. Effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Hyungoo

    2013-11-01

    For studies on particle-laden flows involving particle transport and dispersion, the prediction capability of hydrodynamic forces on the particle in a non-uniform flow is one of the central issues. However, existing analytical expressions and empirical correlations are mainly made based on the homogeneous flow conditions such as uniform or uniform shear flows. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers. To do so, we perform direct numerical simulations of flow over a sphere in an inhomogeneous flow. In this study, we consider three different kinds of the inhomogeneous flows: cosine, hyperbolic cosine and hyperbolic secant profiles. The Reynolds number of the sphere based on the freestream velocity and sphere diameter is 100. The present simulations show that the quasi-steady drag forces in inhomogeneous flows are reasonably estimated by standard drag law based on the relative velocity if the fluid velocity seen by the particle is evaluated by surface average. The results support Loth and Dorgan (2009)'s proposed formula. In the final presentation, the effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces would be presented in more detail.

  3. Numerical derivation of the drag force coefficient in bubble swarms using a Front Tracking model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, W.; Roghair, I.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersed gas-liquid flows are often encountered in the chemical process industry. Large scale models which describe the overall behavior of these flows use closure relations to account for the interactions between the phases, such as the drag, lift and virtual mass forces. The closure relations for

  4. Horizontal Distance Travelled by a Mobile Experiencing a Quadratic Drag Force: Normalized Distance and Parametrization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the problem of the horizontal distance travelled by a mobile experiencing a quadratic drag force. We show that by introducing a normalized distance, the problem can be greatly simplified. In order to parametrize this distance, we use the Pearson VII function, and we find that the optimal launch angle as a function of the initial…

  5. Projectile Motion with a Drag Force: Were the Medievals Right After All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    An educational and historical study of the projectile motion with drag forces dependent on speed shows, by simple results, that trajectories quite similar to those depicted before the Galilean era may be obtained with a realistic choice of quantities involved. Numerical simulations of the trajectory in space and velocity coordinates help us to…

  6. A study on forces acting on a flapping wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetiner O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the forces acting on a flapping wing, an experimental investigation is performed in steady water flow. In this study, a SD7003 airfoil undergoes combined pitching and plunging motion which simulates the forward flight of small birds. The frequency of pitching motion is equal to the frequency of plunging motion and pitch leads the plunge by a phase angle of 90 degrees. The experiments are conducted at Reynolds numbers of 2500 ≤ Re ≤ 13700 and the vortex formation is recorded using the digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV technique. A prediction of thrust force and efficiency is calculated from the average wake deficit of DPIV data, the near-wake vorticity patterns and time dependent velocity vectors are determined to comment on the thrust and drag indication. Direct force measurements are attempted using a Force/Torque sensor which is capable of measuring forces and moments in three axial directions.

  7. Tension and drag forces of flexible risers undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei-jian; Fu, Shi-xiao; Li, Man; Gao, Yun; Ma, Lei-xin

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the variation in the tension and the distribution of drag force coefficients along flexible risers under vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in a uniform flow for Reynolds numbers ( Re) up to 2.2×105. The results show that the mean tension is proportional to the square of the incoming current speed, and the tension coefficient of a flexible riser undergoing VIV can be up to 12. The mean drag force is uniformly and symmetrically distributed along the axes of the risers undergoing VIV. The corresponding drag coefficient can vary between 1.6 and 2.4 but is not a constant value of 1.2, as it is for a fixed cylinder in the absence of VIV. These experimental results are used to develop a new empirical prediction model to estimate the drag force coefficient for flexible risers undergoing VIV for Reynolds number on the order of 105, which accounts for the effects of the incoming current speed, the VIV dominant modal number and the frequency.

  8. The Effects of Drag and Tidal Forces on the Orbits of High-Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Benjamin, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, orbital constraints have been obtained for several high velocity cloud complexes surrounding the Milky Way: Complex GCP (Smith Cloud), Complex A, Complex H, Complex GCN, and the Magellanic Stream. We summarize what is known about the orbits of these clouds and and discuss how well each of these complexes fits a balistic trajectory, and discuss how the length of a complex across the sky is related to the inital "fragmentation" and velocity dispersion of the clouds. We then introduce gas drag into the simulation of the orbits of these complexes. We present analytical tests of our numerical method and characterize the departure of the clouds from the ballistic trajectory as a function of drag parameters (ambient gas density and velocity and cloud column density). Using the results of these simulations we comment on the survivability and ultimate fate of HVC in the context of the different models of drag forces.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE IMPACT OF FLIGHT SPEED ON DRAG FORCE IN THE AUTOGYRO MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Czyż

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental investigation of the impact of velocity on drag force in the autogyro model. One of the methods which simulate motion of the flying object consists of using a wind tunnel. In this case, test object is stationary and the motion of air is forced by e.g. a special fan. The costs related with renting and the wind tunnel service are still very high. In this paper, the motion of the autogyro with respect to the air, was produced by fixing this model with scale to measure the drag force on the passenger car roof. The position of the object relative to the vehicle was checked on the basis of numerical analysis of the airflow around this vehicle. Based on the investigations, the field of velocity and pressure, and air flow formed around the contour of the vehicle which have been chosen, were determined. In addition, the drag force characteristic was determined as a function of velocity and it was compared with the values from the numerical analysis. This research is a form of verifying opportunities for this type of research on vehicles. The conclusions derived from the analysis of the results will be used in the future to carry out further research.

  10. An Experimental Study of the Drag Force on a Cylinder Exposed to an Argon Thermal Plasma Cross Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinTao; XiChen; 等

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data are presented concerning the drag force on a cylinder exposed to an argon plasma cross flow with temperatures about 104 K and velocities about 102 m/s.Using a method of sweeping a cylindrical probe across an argon plasma jet,the total drag force on the cylinder can be measured as a function of the lateral distance of cylindrical probe with respect to the plasma-jet axis.Through the Abel inversion,the drag force for per unit of cylinderlength and thus the drag coefflcient of cylinder have been measured under plasma conditions and compared with the values obtained from the standard drag curve of the cylinder in an isothermal flow.Experimental results show that the measured grag forces are always less than their counterparts read from the standard drag curve with the smae Reynolds numbers based on the oncoming plasma properties.Thew drag force on the cylinder exoposed to a thermal plasma flow is shown to be approximately proportional to the square root of cylinder diameter in the present experiment and it increases slightly proportional to the square root of cylinder diameter in the present experiment and if increases slightly with increasing surface temperature of the cylinder,.It is also shown that applying a voltage between the drag prode and the anode of the plasma jet generator has little effect on the drag force of cylinder under the experimental conditions.The drag force on a cylinder with finite length exposed to an argon plasma with the axis parallel to the plams jet is independent of ration of cylinder length to its dismeter L/d for the cases when L/d≤1.

  11. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  12. CFD modeling of liquid-solid fluidization: Effect of drag correlation and added mass force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao yan Huang

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely used to study the hydrodynamics of gas-solid fluidization; however,its applications in liquid-solid fluidization are relatively rare.In this study,CFD simulations of a liquid-solid fluidized bed are carried out,focusing on the effect of drag correlation and added mass force on the hydrodynamics of liquid-solid fluidization.It is shown that drag correlation has a significant effect on the simulation results and the correlation proposed by Beetstra et al.(2007) gives the best agreement with experimental data.We further show that the added mass force does play an important role in CFD simulation of liquid-solid fluidization,and therefore should not be ignored in CFD simulations.

  13. A numerical study of microparticle acoustophoresis driven by acoustic radiation forces and streaming-induced drag forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Barnkob, Rune; Jensen, Mads Jakob Herring;

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the transient acoustophoretic motion of microparticles suspended in a liquid-filled microchannel and driven by the acoustic forces arising from an imposed standing ultrasound wave: the acoustic radiation force from the scattering of sound waves on the particles...... parameters using a numerical particle-tracking scheme. The model shows the transition in the acoustophoretic particle motion from being dominated by streaming-induced drag to being dominated by radiation forces as a function of particle size, channel geometry, and material properties....

  14. Investigation of Drag Force on Fibres of Bonded Spherical Elements using a Coupled CFD-DEM Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anna Lyhne; Sørensen, Henrik; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup;

    2016-01-01

    are quantified. The drag coefficient on the resolved cylinder is compared to a CFD-DEM simulation of a flexible fiber made by a chain of bonded spherical discrete elements, using a free steam drag formulation on each particle. Based on the results, a drag force model can distinguish between the outermost...... can be modelled as a multi-rigid-body system using bonded spherical DEM particles. However, the flexible objects are not resolved by the CFD mesh, and therefore modelling of fluid forces on the flexible object becomes a key issue. This study investigates the modelling of fluid forces on a rigid fiber...

  15. The 'W' prawn-trawl with emphasised drag-force transfer to its centre line to reduce overall system drag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheslav Balash

    Full Text Available For prawn trawling systems, drag reduction is a high priority as the trawling process is energy intensive. Large benefits have occurred through the use of multiple-net rigs and thin twine in the netting. An additional positive effect of these successful twine-area reduction strategies is the reduced amount of otter board area required to spread the trawl systems, which leads to further drag reduction. The present work investigated the potential of redirecting the drag-strain within a prawn trawl away from the wings and the otter boards to the centre line of the trawl, where top and bottom tongues have been installed, with an aim to minimise the loading/size of the otter boards required to spread the trawl. In the system containing the new 'W' trawl, the drag redirected to the centre-line tongues is transferred forward through a connected sled and towing wires to the trawler. To establish the extent of drag redirection to the centre-line tongues and the relative drag benefits of the new trawl system, conventional and 'W' trawls of 3.65 m headline length were tested firstly over a range of spread ratios in the flume tank, and subsequently at optimum spread ratio in the field. The developed 'W' trawl effectively directed 64% of netting-drag off the wings and onto the centre tongues, which resulted in drag savings in the field of ∼20% for the associated 'W' trawl/otter-board/sled system compared to the traditional trawl/otter-board arrangement in a single trawl or twin rig configuration. Furthermore, based on previously published data, the new trawl when used in a twin rig system is expected to provide approximately 12% drag reduction compared to quad rig. The twin 'W' trawl system also has benefits over quad rig in that a reduced number of cod-end/By-catch Reduction Device units need to be installed and attended each tow.

  16. Compensation Method for Die Shift Caused by Flow Drag Force in Wafer-Level Molding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wafer-level packaging (WLP is a next-generation semiconductor packaging technology that is important for realizing high-performance and ultra-thin semiconductor devices. However, the molding process, which is a part of the WLP process, has various problems such as a high defect rate and low predictability. Among the various defect factors, the die shift primarily determines the quality of the final product; therefore, predicting the die shift is necessary to achieve high-yield production in WLP. In this study, the die shift caused by the flow drag force of the epoxy molding compound (EMC is evaluated from the die shift of a debonded molding wafer. Experimental and analytical methods were employed to evaluate the die shift occurring during each stage of the molding process and that resulting from the geometrical changes after the debonding process. The die shift caused by the EMC flow drag force is evaluated from the data on die movements due to thermal contraction/expansion and warpage. The relationship between the die shift and variation in the die gap is determined through regression analysis in order to predict the die shift due to the flow drag force. The results can be used for die realignment by predicting and compensating for the die shift.

  17. Numerical and experimental investigations of drag force on scaled car model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnusamy Nallusamy Selvaraju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment were involved to observe the aerodynamic characteristics of car model. The investigation of aerodynamic characteristics on car model were difficult by using wind tunnel. It provides more comprehensive experimental data as a reference to validate the numerical simulation. In the wind tunnel experiments, the pressures on various ports over the car model were measured by using pressure scanner (64 bit channels. The drag force was calculated based on experimental and computational results. The realizable k-e model was employed to compute the aerodynamic drag and surface pressure distribution over a car model simulated at various wind velocity. The tetrahedron mesh approach was used to discretize the computational domain for accuracy. The computational results showed a good agreement with the experimental data and the results revealed that the induced aerodynamic drag determines the best car shape. In order to reveal the internal connection between the aerodynamic drag and wake vortices, the turbulent kinetic, re-circulation length, position of vortex core, and velocity profile in the wake were investigated by numerical analysis.

  18. Performance losses of drag-reducing spanwise forcing at moderate values of the Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental problem in the field of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction is to determine the performance of the available control techniques at high values of the Reynolds number Re. We consider active, predetermined strategies based on spanwise forcing (oscillating wall and streamwise-traveling waves applied to a plane channel flow), and explore via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) up to Reτ = 2100 the rate at which their performance deteriorates as Re is increased. To be able to carry out a comprehensive parameter study, we limit the computational cost of the simulations by adjusting the size of the computational domain in the homogeneous directions, compromising between faster computations and the increased need of time-averaging the fluctuating space-mean wall shear-stress. Our results, corroborated by a few full-scale DNS, suggest a scenario where drag reduction degrades with Re at a rate that varies according to the parameters of the wall forcing. In agreement with already available information, keeping them at their low-Re optimal value produces a relatively quick decrease of drag reduction. However, at higher Re the optimal parameters shift towards other regions of the parameter space, and these regions turn out to be much less sensitive to Re. Once this shift is accounted for, drag reduction decreases with Re at a markedly slower rate. If the slightly favorable trend of the energy required to create the forcing is considered, a chance emerges for positive net energy savings also at large values of the Reynolds number.

  19. Influence of hydrogen concentration on Fe2O3 particle reduction in fluidized beds under constant drag force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Guo; Han Gao; Jin-tao Yu; Zong-liang Zhang; Zhan-cheng Guo

    2015-01-01

    The fixed-gas drag force from a model calculation method that stabilizes the agitation capabilities of different gas ratios was used to explore the influence of temperature and hydrogen concentration on fluidizing duration, metallization ratio, utilization rate of reduction gas, and sticking behavior. Different hydrogen concentrations from 5vol%to 100vol%at 1073 and 1273 K were used while the drag force with the flow of N2 and H2 (N2:2 L·min−1;H2:2 L·min−1) at 1073 K was chosen as the standard drag force. The metallization ratio, mean reduc-tion rate, and utilization rate of reduction gas were observed to generally increase with increasing hydrogen concentration. Faster reduction rates and higher metallization ratios were obtained when the reduction temperature decreased from 1273 to 1073 K. A numerical relation among particle diameter, particle drag force, and fluidization state was plotted in a diagram by this model.

  20. DRAG FORCE IN DENSE GAS-PARTICLE TWO-PHASE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow over a stationary particle in a dense gas-particle two-phase flow have been carried out for small Reynolds numbers (less than 100).In order to study the influence of the particles interaction on the drag force,three particle arrangements have been tested:a single particle,two particles placed in the flow direction and many particles located regularly in the flow field.The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in the three-dimensional space using finite volume method.For the first and second cases,the numerical results agree reasonably well with the data in literature.For the third case,i.e.,the multiparticle case,the influence of the particle volume fraction and Reynolds numbers on the drag force has been investigated.The results show that the computational values of the drag ratio agree approximately with the published results at higher Reynolds numbers (from 34.2 to 68.4),but there is a large difference between them at small Reynolds numbers.

  1. DRAG FORCE IN DENSE GAS—PARTICLE TWO—PHASE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow over a stationary particle in a dense gas-particle two-phase flow have been carried out for small Reynolds numbers (leas than 100). In order to study theinfluence of the particles interaction on the drag force, three particle arrangements have been tested: asingle particle, two particles placed in the flow direction and many particles located regularly in the flowfield. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in the three-dimensional space using finite volumemethod. For the first and second cases, the numerical results agree reasonably well with the data inliterature. For the third case, i.e., the multiparticle case, the influence of the particle volume fractionand Reynolds numbers on the drag force has been investigated. The results show that the computationalvalues of the drag ratio agree approximately with the published results at higher Reynolds numbers(from 34.2 to 68.4), but there is a large difference between them at small Reynolds numbers.

  2. Drag force in bimodal cubic-quintic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Feijoo, David; Paredes, Ángel; Michinel, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    We consider a system of two cubic-quintic non-linear Schr\\"odinger equations in two dimensions, coupled by repulsive cubic terms. We analyse situations in which a probe lump of one of the modes is surrounded by a fluid of the other one and analyse their interaction. We find a realization of D'Alembert's paradox for small velocities and non-trivial drag forces for larger ones. We present numerical analysis including the search of static and traveling form-preserving solutions along with simulations of the dynamical evolution in some representative examples.

  3. A Critical Review of the Drag Force on a Sphere in the Transition Flow Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-13

    particle was performed by Millikan [10] as part of his landmark oil drop experiment. Millikan measured the drag force on oil droplets as they settled...latex particles using a modulated dynamic light scattering technique; a technique fundamentally different to that used by Millikan or Allen and Raabe...N.G., Phys. Fluids 15, 2352-2354 (2003). 10. Millikan , R.A., The Physical Review 22, 1-23 (1923). 11. Allen, M.D., and Raabe, O.G., J. Aerosol Sci

  4. Vertical force acting on partly submerged spindly cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbin Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When an object is placed on a water surface, the air-water interface deforms and a meniscus arises due to surface tension effects, which in turn produces a lift force or drag force on the partly submerged object. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanism of the vertical force acting on spindly cylinders in contact with a water surface. A simplified 2-D model is presented, and the profile of the curved air-water interface and the vertical force are computed using a numerical method. A parametric study is performed to determine the effects of the cylinder center distance, inclined angle, static contact angle, and radius on the vertical force. Several key conclusions are derived from the study: (1 Although the lift force increases with the cylinder center distance, cylinders with smaller center distances can penetrate deeper below the water surface before sinking, thereby obtaining a larger maximum lift force; (2 An increase in the inclined angle reduces the lift force, which can enable the lower cylinders fall more deeply before sinking; (3 While the effect of static contact angle is limited for angles greater than 90°, hydrophobicity allows cylinders to obtain a larger lift force and load capacity on water; (4 The lift force increases rapidly with cylinder radius, but an increase in radius also increases the overall size and weight of cylinders and decreases the proportion of the surface tension force. These findings may prove helpful in the design of supporting legs of biologically-inspired miniature aquatic devices, such as water strider robots.

  5. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  6. Determination of viscosity through terminal velocity: use of the drag force with a quadratic term in velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertchenko, Lev; Vertchenko, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    A correction to the term with quadratic dependency of the velocity in the Oseen´s drag force by a dimensionless factor is proposed in order to determine the viscosity of glycerin through the measurement of the terminal velocity of spheres falling inside the fluid. This factor incorporates the eff...

  7. Analytical model for estimating drag forces on rigid submerged structures caused by LOCA and safety relief valve ramshead air discharges. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Basic information is presented for estimating drag forces on rigid structural members submerged in a pressure suppression pool, caused by either the air discharge from a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or the air bubble oscillation following safey relief valve ramshead discharge. Methods are described for estimating acceleration (unsteady) and standard (velocity-squared) drag force components for a variety of structural geometries.

  8. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  9. Granular mixtures modeled as elastic hard spheres subject to a drag force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Reyes, Francisco; Garzó, Vicente; Santos, Andrés

    2007-06-01

    Granular gaseous mixtures under rapid flow conditions are usually modeled as a multicomponent system of smooth inelastic hard disks (two dimensions) or spheres (three dimensions) with constant coefficients of normal restitution alpha{ij}. In the low density regime an adequate framework is provided by the set of coupled inelastic Boltzmann equations. Due to the intricacy of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator, in this paper we propose a simpler model of elastic hard disks or spheres subject to the action of an effective drag force, which mimics the effect of dissipation present in the original granular gas. For each collision term ij, the model has two parameters: a dimensionless factor beta{ij} modifying the collision rate of the elastic hard spheres, and the drag coefficient zeta{ij}. Both parameters are determined by requiring that the model reproduces the collisional transfers of momentum and energy of the true inelastic Boltzmann operator, yielding beta{ij}=(1+alpha{ij})2 and zeta{ij} proportional, variant1-alpha{ij}/{2}, where the proportionality constant is a function of the partial densities, velocities, and temperatures of species i and j. The Navier-Stokes transport coefficients for a binary mixture are obtained from the model by application of the Chapman-Enskog method. The three coefficients associated with the mass flux are the same as those obtained from the inelastic Boltzmann equation, while the remaining four transport coefficients show a general good agreement, especially in the case of the thermal conductivity. The discrepancies between both descriptions are seen to be similar to those found for monocomponent gases. Finally, the approximate decomposition of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator is exploited to construct a model kinetic equation for granular mixtures as a direct extension of a known kinetic model for elastic collisions.

  10. CME Dynamics Using STEREO and LASCO Observations: The Relative Importance of Lorentz Forces and Solar Wind Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos; Bothmer, Volker

    2017-09-01

    We seek to quantify the relative contributions of Lorentz forces and aerodynamic drag on the propagation of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We use Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model fits to a representative set of 38 CMEs observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We find that the Lorentz forces generally peak between 1.65 and 2.45 R⊙ for all CMEs. For fast CMEs, Lorentz forces become negligible in comparison to aerodynamic drag as early as 3.5 - 4 R⊙. For slow CMEs, however, they become negligible only by 12 - 50 R⊙. For these slow events, our results suggest that some of the magnetic flux might be expended in CME expansion or heating. In other words, not all of it contributes to the propagation. Our results are expected to be important in building a physical model for understanding the Sun-Earth dynamics of CMEs.

  11. Analysis of the forces acting on the saltating particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theoretical model describing the saltation of sand particles in the coupled wind-sand- electricity fields, the numerical simulations of the forces acting on saltating particles, such as the aerodynamic drag force, Magnus effect, Saffman force and electrostatic force, are analyzed in com- parison to the gravity force of the particles in the steady windblown sand movement. Furthermore, the laws of the above forces vary with the friction velocity, the diameter of the sand particle, the initial an- gular velocity and the lift-off velocity are discussed.

  12. Analysis of the forces acting on the saltating particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianJun; YAN GuangHu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theoretical model describing the saltation of sand particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields, the numerical simulations of the forces acting on saltating particles, such as the aerodynamic drag force, Magnus effect, Saffman force and electrostatic force, are analyzed in com-parison to the gravity force of the particles in the steady windblown sand movement. Furthermore, the laws of the above forces vary with the friction velocity, the diameter of the sand particle, the initial an-gular velocity and the lift-off velocity are discussed.

  13. Predicting the Arrival Time of Coronal Mass Ejections with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell and Drag Force Model

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Tong; Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Ding, Mingde; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance in the study of space weather. In this paper, we make a statistical study of 21 Earth directed CMEs, exploring in particular the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with the least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hours. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than its half angular width arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be well applied to s...

  14. Drag force and transport property of a small cylinder in free molecule flow: A gas-kinetic theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changran; Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2016-08-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for aerodynamic drag force on small cylinders in the free molecule flow using the gas-kinetic theory. The derivation considers the effect of intermolecular interactions between the cylinder and gas media. Two limiting collision models, specular and diffuse scattering, are investigated in two limiting cylinder orientations with respect to the drift velocity. The earlier solution of Dahneke [B. E. Dahneke, J. Aerosol Sci. 4, 147 (1973), 10.1016/0021-8502(73)90066-9] is shown to be a special case of the current expressions in the rigid-body limit of collision. Drag force expressions are obtained for cylinders that undergo Brownian rotation and for those that align with the drift velocity. The validity of the theoretical expressions is tested against experimental mobility data available for carbon nanotubes.

  15. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  16. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic hand and its flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-07-26

    This study aims to clarify the mechanism of generating unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand during swimming in order to directly measure the forces, pressure distribution, and flow field around the hand by using a robotic arm and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The robotic arm consisted of the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand, and it was independently computer controllable in five degrees of freedom. The elbow-joint angle of the robotic arm was fixed at 90°, and the arm was moved in semicircles around the shoulder joint in a plane perpendicular to the water surface. Two-component PIV was used for flow visualization around the hand. The data of the forces and pressure acting on the hand were sampled at 200Hz and stored on a PC. When the maximum resultant force acting on the hand was observed, a pair of counter-rotating vortices appeared on the dorsal surface of the hand. A vortex attached to the hand increased the flow velocity, which led to decreased surface pressure, increasing the hydrodynamic forces. This phenomenon is known as the unsteady mechanism of force generation. We found that the drag force was 72% greater and the lift force was 4.8 times greater than the values estimated under steady flow conditions. Therefore, it is presumable that swimmers receive the benefits of this unsteady hydrodynamic force.

  17. Sharp Transition in the Lift Force of a Fluid Flowing Past Nonsymmetrical Obstacles: Evidence for a Lift Crisis in the Drag Crisis Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Patrick; Rabaud, Marc; Thomas, Goulven; Lombardi, Alessandro; Lebret, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Bluff bodies moving in a fluid experience a drag force which usually increases with velocity. However in a particular velocity range a drag crisis is observed, i.e., a sharp and strong decrease of the drag force. This counterintuitive result is well characterized for a sphere or a cylinder. Here we show that, for an object breaking the up-down symmetry, a lift crisis is observed simultaneously to the drag crisis. The term lift crisis refers to the fact that at constant incidence the time-averaged transverse force, which remains small or even negative at low velocity, transitions abruptly to large positive values above a critical flow velocity. This transition is characterized from direct force measurements as well as from change in the velocity field around the obstacle.

  18. Sharp Transition in the Lift Force of a Fluid Flowing Past Nonsymmetrical Obstacles: Evidence for a Lift Crisis in the Drag Crisis Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Patrick; Rabaud, Marc; Thomas, Goulven; Lombardi, Alessandro; Lebret, Charles

    2016-12-02

    Bluff bodies moving in a fluid experience a drag force which usually increases with velocity. However in a particular velocity range a drag crisis is observed, i.e., a sharp and strong decrease of the drag force. This counterintuitive result is well characterized for a sphere or a cylinder. Here we show that, for an object breaking the up-down symmetry, a lift crisis is observed simultaneously to the drag crisis. The term lift crisis refers to the fact that at constant incidence the time-averaged transverse force, which remains small or even negative at low velocity, transitions abruptly to large positive values above a critical flow velocity. This transition is characterized from direct force measurements as well as from change in the velocity field around the obstacle.

  19. Drag forces of common plant species in temperate streams: consequences of morphology, velocity and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2008-01-01

    Swift flow in streams may physically influence the morphology and distribution of plants. I quantified drag as a function of velocity, biomass and their interaction on the trailing canopy of seven European stream species in an experimental flume and evaluated its importance for species distribution...... a variety of environmental conditions and plant traits influences distribution. Drag on the trailing canopy usually increased 15- to 35-fold for a 100-fold increase of biomass suggesting that an even distribution of plants at low density across the stream bed offers greater resistance to downstream flow...

  20. Experimental study on the estimation method of hydrodynamic force acting on floating offshore structures; Futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu ni kuwawaru ryutairyoku no suiteiho ni kansuru jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, K.; Kato, S. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Koterayama, W. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-10

    In the design of various floating offshore structures (FOS), the functionality, safety and amenity of FOSs were examined by estimating responses of FOSs to environmental external forces such as wave, wind and flow. In this paper, the estimation method of drag acting on the whole FOS was established by combining previous study results on hydrodynamic force acting on various bodies such as Reynolds number effect (RNE), 3-D effect (TDE) and interference effect (IE). This hydrodynamic force was also compared with that obtained from the experiment result on a FOS model for TLP to confirm the applicability of this estimation method. The estimation result on the drag coefficient in steady flow by considering RNE, TDE and IE well agreed with experimental one. The drag coefficient acting on FOSs in heaving could be estimated in practically sufficient accuracy by considering drag acting on not columns but only square columns. The estimation result on the drag coefficient acting on FOSs in surging by considering RNE, TDE and IE well agreed with experimental one. 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Computation of energy for diapycnal mixing in the Baltic Sea due to internal wave drag acting on wind-driven barotropic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohr Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathways of energy supply for mixing the deep waters of the Baltic Sea is largely unknown. In this paper, a parameterization of the internal wave drag forces on barotropic motion is developed and implemented into a two-dimensional shallow water model of the Baltic Sea. The model is validated against observed sea levels. The dissipation of barotropic motion by internal wave drag that is quantified from the model results show that breaking internal waves generated by wind forced barotropic motions can contribute significantly to diapycnal mixing in the deep water of the Baltic Sea.

  2. Verification of CFD analysis methods for predicting the drag force and thrust power of an underwater disk robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung Tae-Hwan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the suitability of using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD tools, ANSYSCFX, as an initial analysis tool for predicting the drag and propulsion performance (thrust and torque of a concept underwater vehicle design. In order to select an appropriate thruster that will achieve the required speed of the Underwater Disk Robot (UDR, the ANSYS-CFX tools were used to predict the drag force of the UDR. Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM test simulations (i.e. pure heaving and pure pitching motion by CFD motion analysis were carried out with the CFD software. The CFD results reveal the distribution of hydrodynamic values (velocity, pressure, etc. of the UDR for these motion studies. Finally, CFD bollard pull test simulations were performed and compared with the experimental bollard pull test results conducted in a model basin. The experimental results confirm the suitability of using the ANSYS-CFX tools for predicting the behavior of concept vehicles early on in their design process.

  3. Air Flows in Gravity Sewers - Determination of Wastewater Drag Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Østertoft, Kristian; Vollertsen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    of the study shows that by integrating the top/side wall shear stresses the log-law models for the air velocity distribution along the unwetted perimeter resulted in a good agreement with the friction forces calculated by use of the Colebrook-White formula for hydraulic smooth pipes. Secondly, the water......Several experiments have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of the wastewater drag and the wall frictional force acting on the headspace air in gravity sewers. The aim of the study is to improve the data basis for a numerical model of natural sewer ventilation. The results...... surface drags were found by log-law models of the velocity distribution in turbulent flows to fit velocity profiles measured from the water surface and by integrating the water surface drags along the wetted perimeter, mean water surface drags were found and a measure of the water surface drag coefficient...

  4. The hemodynamic and embolizing forces acting on thrombi--II. The effect of pulsatile blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmadjian, D

    1986-01-01

    A previous analysis (Basmadjian, J. Biomechanics 17, 287-298, 1984) of the embolizing forces acting on thrombi in steady Poiseuille flow has been extended to pulsatile blood flow conditions in the major blood vessels. We show that for incipient and small compact thrombi up to 0.1 mm height, the maximum embolizing stresses can be calculated from the corresponding 'quasi-steady' viscous drag forces and measured maximum wall shear. Their magnitude is from 5 to 30 times (tau w)Max, the maximum wall shear stress during the cardiac cycle in the absence of thrombi. For larger thrombi, inertial and 'history' effects have to be taken into account, leading to embolizing stresses in excess of 100 Pa (1000 dyn cm-2).

  5. Dynamics of drag and force distributions for projectile impact in a granular medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ciamarra, M P; Lee, A T; Goldman, D I; Swinney, H L; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Lara, Antonio H.; Lee, Andrew T.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2003-01-01

    Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations on a projectile penetrating a two-dimensional granular medium reveal that the mean deceleration of the projectile is constant and proportional to the impact velocity. Thus, the time taken for a projectile to decelerate to a stop is independent of its impact velocity. The simulations show that the probability distribution function of forces on grains is time-independent during a projectile's penetration of the medium. At all times the force distribution function decreases exponentially for large forces.

  6. Spontaneous concentrations of solids through two-way drag forces between gas and sedimenting particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrechts, Michiel; Capelo, Holly L; Blum, Jürgen; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of sedimenting particles depends on the dust-to-gas ratio of the fluid. Linear stability analysis shows that solids settling in the Epstein drag regime would remain homogeneously distributed in non-rotating incompressible fluids, even when dust-to-gas ratios reach unity. However, the non-linear evolution has not been probed before. Here, we present numerical calculations indicating that in a particle-dense mixture solids spontaneously mix out of the fluid and form swarms overdense in particles by at least a factor 10. The instability is caused by mass-loaded regions locally breaking the equilibrium background stratification. The driving mechanism depends on non-linear perturbations of the background flow and shares some similarity to the streaming instability in accretion discs. The resulting particle-rich swarms may stimulate particle growth by coagulation. In the context of protoplanetary discs, the instability could be relevant for aiding small particles to settle to the midplane in the outer...

  7. A methodology for highly accurate results of direct numerical simulations: Drag force in dense gas–solid flows at intermediate Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Y.; Kriebitzsch, S.H.L.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations with an iterative immersed boundary method (IBM) are performed to predict the drag force for gas–solid flows at intermediate Reynolds number (Re). A methodology is developed to obtain highly accurate IBM results at relatively low computational cost. First of all, “resolution-free” gas–so

  8. Performance Level Differences in Swimming: A Meta-Analysis of Passive Drag Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havriluk, Rod

    2005-01-01

    The streamline is a basic position for competitive swimming starts mid turns and has been used in many studies on resistive forces. However, there is a wide yahweh, of theoretical interpretations in these studies, leading to diverse and questionable conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine performance level differences in the…

  9. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems...

  10. Effects of biofouling development on drag forces of hull coatings for ocean-going ships: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholdt, Asger; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Olsen, S. M.;

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a systematic overview of the literature and describes the experimental methods used to quantify the drag of hull coatings. It also summarizes the findings of hull coating's drag performance and identifies the main parameters impacting it. The advantages and disadvantages...... of the reported methods listed in this review provide an assessment of the most efficient methods to quantify the drag performance of hull coatings. This review determines that drag performance of hull coating technology varies depending on whether the coating condition is newly applied, after dynamic or static...

  11. Evaluating drag force and geometric optimisation of pipeline inspection gadget (PIG body with bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ramírez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  A pipeline inspection gadget (PIG is a device used to run through pipelines for cleaning, measurement and inspection operations. By-pass is the name for one or a set of orifices allowing flow from back to front of a PIG. It is used for speed control or to improve cleaning operations results. By-pass prevents speed excursions in gas pipelines thereby avoiding damage to the PIG or the pipe. Studies and algorithms have been developed to simulate the dynamics of PIGs running inside pipes. Most studies have been for gas pipelines; these have helped to design some PIG models. This work summarises a particular stage during a PIG design project. This PIG will work in liquid pipelines and can stop in the line for inspection and maintenance tasks. Studying fluid force on a PIG when it has low or zero speed is needed for evaluating project feasibility and conceptual design. Selecting a PIG form to minimise the force of interaction with fluid allows a low weight design and lower energy loss.  

  12. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  13. A SIMPLIFIED THEORY FOR UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN AIRFOIL FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    A simplified theoretical method based on the quasi-steady wing theory was proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil flying in non-uniform flow. Comparison between the theoretical results and the numerical results based on nonlinear theory was made. It shows that the simplified theory is a good approximation for the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil flying above sea-waves. From on the simplified theory it is also found that an airfoil can get thrust from a wave-disturbed airflow and thus the total drag is reduced. And the relationship among the thrust, the flying altitude, the flying speed and the wave parameters was worked out and discussed.

  14. Dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping: A new numerical tool for three-dimensional analysis of particle trajectories in a dielectrophoretic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoerzer, Markus; Szydzik, Crispin; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco Javier; Tang, Xinke; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a widely used means of manipulating suspended particles within microfluidic systems. In order to efficiently design such systems for a desired application, various numerical methods exist that enable particle trajectory plotting in two or three dimensions based on the interplay of hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic forces. While various models are described in the literature, few are capable of modeling interactions between particles as well as their surrounding environment as these interactions are complex, multifaceted, and computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive when considering a large number of particles. In this paper, we present a numerical model designed to enable spatial analysis of the physical effects exerted upon particles within microfluidic systems employing dielectrophoresis. The model presents a means of approximating the effects of the presence of large numbers of particles through dynamically adjusting hydrodynamic drag force based on particle density, thereby introducing a measure of emulated particle-particle and particle-liquid interactions. This model is referred to as "dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping." The resultant numerical model is used to simulate and predict particle trajectory and velocity profiles within a microfluidic system incorporating curved dielectrophoretic microelectrodes. The simulated data are compared favorably with experimental data gathered using microparticle image velocimetry, and is contrasted against simulated data generated using traditional "effective moment Stokes-drag method," showing more accurate particle velocity profiles for areas of high particle density.

  15. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  16. Drag force on an impurity below the superfluid critical velocity in a quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Andrew G; Davis, Matthew J; Roberts, David C

    2009-08-21

    The existence of frictionless flow below a critical velocity for obstacles moving in a superfluid is well established in the context of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii theory. We calculate the next order correction due to quantum and thermal fluctuations and find a nonzero force acting on a delta-function impurity moving through a quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate at all subcritical velocities and at all temperatures. The force occurs due to an imbalance in the Doppler shifts of reflected quantum fluctuations from either side of the impurity. Our calculation is based on a consistent extension of Bogoliubov theory to second order in the interaction strength, and finds new analytical solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for a gray soliton. Our results raise questions regarding the quantum dynamics in the formation of persistent currents in superfluids.

  17. Analyze of aerodynamic forces acting on the Siemens Desiro railcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin ARSENE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the influence of aerodynamic forces acting on the Siemens Desiro railcar, and the percentage of these forces in the total values of resistance to motion. In this regard the numerical simulation of the airflow is used as a method of analysis. We started from the 3D geometric model at a scale of 1:1 of the vehicle bodywork constructive form. The air flow simulation is performed taking into account the speed limits of the vehicle namely 0 km/ h and 140 km/ h, interval in which eight point values are chosen.

  18. Forces Acting on Sessile Droplet on Inclined Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Annapragada, S. Ravi; Murthy, Jayathi Y.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2009-01-01

    Although many analytical, experimental and numerical studies have focused on droplet motion, the mechanics of the droplet while still in its static state, and just before motion starts, are not well understood. A study of static droplets would shed light on the threshold voltage (or critical inclination) for initiating electrically (or gravitationally) induced droplet motion. Before the droplet starts to move, the droplet shape changes such that the forces acting at the triple contact line ba...

  19. Stochastic Modeling of Lift and Drag Dynamics to Obtain Aerodynamic Forces with Local Dynamics on Rotor Blade under Unsteady Wind Inflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan Luhur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution provides the development of a stochastic lift and drag model for an airfoil FX 79-W-151A under unsteady wind inflow based on wind tunnel measurements. Here we present the integration of the stochastic model into a well-known standard BEM (Blade Element Momentum model to obtain the corresponding aerodynamic forces on a rotating blade element. The stochastic model is integrated as an alternative to static tabulated data used by classical BEM. The results show that in comparison to classical BEM, the BEM with stochastic approach additionally reflects the local force dynamics and therefore provides more information on aerodynamic forces that can be used by wind turbine simulation codes

  20. Forces acting on a single particle in an evaporating sessile droplet on a hydrophilic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung-yeul; Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul; Koo, Junemo; Kang, Yong Tae

    2010-02-01

    The evaporating sessile droplet of a mono/didisperse colloid on a plate is a very useful and handy technique in micro/nano/bioapplications to separate, pattern, and control the particles. Although the fundamental nature of the evaporation phenomena and its applications have been extensively proposed, the crucial forces affecting a single particle motion in an evaporating droplet are not reported yet. To elucidate the impact of various forces including the drag, electrostatic, van der Waals, and surface tension forces on the particle motion in suspension, the magnitudes of them are compared using the scale analysis. In the early stage of the evaporation, in which the contact line is fixed, the motion of a single particle suspended in liquid are mostly affected by drag force. Later, with the incidence of the contact line recession, the surface tension force takes over the control of the single particle motion.

  1. Variability of Bed Drag on Cohesive Beds under Wave Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Safak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law, a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 - 4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  2. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  3. Analysis of the forces acting on beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangani, Ashok S.; Vidyadharan, Jyothish; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2016-06-01

    Detailed analysis of the forces acting on a uniform-diameter beating cilium is carried out to determine the moment generated by the inter-doublet forces acting along the length of a cilium and the results are compared with the sliding-control theory according to which the moment is a function of the interdoublet sliding. In the central part of the cilium the inter-doublet forces are found to be proportional to the inter-doublet sliding. However, in spite of the uniformity of the diameter of the cilium, the proportionality constant, known as the dynamic stiffness, is not constant along its entire length. Significant variations are observed in the regions both near the tip of the cilium and proximal to the cell body. In the tip region the magnitude of the dynamic stiffness is found to decrease. This decrease is probably due to decrease in the number density of the molecular motors in that region and in the number of doublet microtubules. The behavior in the proximal region, on the other hand, does not appear to be well described by the sliding control theory. Our analysis therefore suggests that the dynamics of ciliary beating cannot be adequately described by a simple sliding-control theory with constant dynamic stiffness. Our analysis suggests that the cilium is differentiated into a basal region optimized for the creation of a wave and a central region optimized to support a traveling wave that provides the thrust for the cell.

  4. A study on forces acting on a flapping wing

    OpenAIRE

    Cetiner O.; Fenercioglu I.; Vuruskan A.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the forces acting on a flapping wing, an experimental investigation is performed in steady water flow. In this study, a SD7003 airfoil undergoes combined pitching and plunging motion which simulates the forward flight of small birds. The frequency of pitching motion is equal to the frequency of plunging motion and pitch leads the plunge by a phase angle of 90 degrees. The experiments are conducted at Reynolds numbers of 2500 ≤ Re ≤ 13700 and the vortex formation is recorded ...

  5. Numerical modelling of the turbulent flow developing within and over a 3-d building array, part iii: a istributed drag force approach, its implementation and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    A modified k- model is used for the simulation of the mean wind speed and turbulence for a neutrally-stratified flow through and over a building array, where the array is treated as a porous medium with the drag on the unresolved buildings in the array represented by a distributed momentum sink. More specifically, this model is based on time averaging the spatially averaged Navier-Stokes equation, in which the effects of the obstacle-atmosphere interaction are included through the introduction of a distributed mean-momentum sink (representing drag on the unresolved buildings in the array). In addition, closure of the time-averaged, spatially averaged Navier-Stokes equation requires two additional prognostic equations, namely one for the time-averaged resolved-scale kinetic energy of turbulence,, and another for its dissipation rate, . The performance of the proposed model and some simplified versions derived from it is compared with the spatially averaged, time-mean velocity and various spatially averaged Reynolds stresses diagnosed from a high-resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow within and over an aligned array of sharp-edged cubes with a plan area density of 0.25. Four different methods for diagnosis of the drag coefficient CDfor the aligned cube array, required for the volumetric drag force representation of the cubes, are investigated here. We found that the model predictions for mean wind speed and turbulence in the building array were not sensitive to the differing treatments of the source and sink terms in the and equations (e.g., inclusion of only the `zeroth-order'' approximation for the source/sink terms compared with inclusion of a higher-order approximation for the source/sink terms in the and equations), implying that the higher-order approximations of these source/sink terms did not offer any predictive advantage. A possible explanation for this is the utilization of the Boussinesq linear stress-strain constitutive

  6. Numerical Method for Wave Forces Acting on Partially Perforated Caisson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜峰; 唐晓成; 金钊; 张莉; 陈洪洲

    2015-01-01

    The perforated caisson is widely applied to practical engineering because of its great advantages in effectively wave energy consumption and cost reduction. The attentions of many scientists were paid to the fluid–structure interaction between wave and perforated caisson studies, but until now, most concerns have been put on theoretical analysis and experimental model set up. In this paper, interaction between the wave and the partial perforated caisson in a 2D numerical wave flume is investigated by means of the renewed SPH algorithm, and the mathematical equations are in the form of SPH numerical approximation based on Navier–Stokes equations. The validity of the SPH mathematical method is examined and the simulated results are compared with the results of theoretical models, meanwhile the complex hydrodynamic characteristics when the water particles flow in or out of a wave absorbing chamber are analyzed and the wave pressure distribution of the perforated caisson is also addressed here. The relationship between the ratio of total horizontal force acting on caisson under regular waves and its influence factors is examined. The data show that the numerical calculation of the ratio of total horizontal force meets the empirical regression equation very well. The simulations of SPH about the wave nonlinearity and breaking are briefly depicted in the paper, suggesting that the advantages and great potentiality of the SPH method is significant compared with traditional methods.

  7. Numerical method for wave forces acting on partially perforated caisson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Tang, Xiao-cheng; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hong-zhou

    2015-04-01

    The perforated caisson is widely applied to practical engineering because of its great advantages in effectively wave energy consumption and cost reduction. The attentions of many scientists were paid to the fluid-structure interaction between wave and perforated caisson studies, but until now, most concerns have been put on theoretical analysis and experimental model set up. In this paper, interaction between the wave and the partial perforated caisson in a 2D numerical wave flume is investigated by means of the renewed SPH algorithm, and the mathematical equations are in the form of SPH numerical approximation based on Navier-Stokes equations. The validity of the SPH mathematical method is examined and the simulated results are compared with the results of theoretical models, meanwhile the complex hydrodynamic characteristics when the water particles flow in or out of a wave absorbing chamber are analyzed and the wave pressure distribution of the perforated caisson is also addressed here. The relationship between the ratio of total horizontal force acting on caisson under regular waves and its influence factors is examined. The data show that the numerical calculation of the ratio of total horizontal force meets the empirical regression equation very well. The simulations of SPH about the wave nonlinearity and breaking are briefly depicted in the paper, suggesting that the advantages and great potentiality of the SPH method is significant compared with traditional methods.

  8. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic arm and its flow field: application to the crawl stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2014-04-11

    This study aims to clarify the mechanisms by which unsteady hydrodynamic forces act on the hand of a swimmer during a crawl stroke. Measurements were performed for a hand attached to a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom independently controlled by a computer. The computer was programmed so the hand and arm mimicked a human performing the stroke. We directly measured forces on the hand and pressure distributions around it at 200 Hz; flow fields underwater near the hand were obtained via 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV). The data revealed two mechanisms that generate unsteady forces during a crawl stroke. One is the unsteady lift force generated when hand movement changes direction during the stroke, leading to vortex shedding and bound vortex created around it. This bound vortex circulation results in a lift that contributes to the thrust. The other occurs when the hand moves linearly with a large angle of attack, creating a Kármán vortex street. This street alternatively sheds clockwise and counterclockwise vortices, resulting in a quasi-steady drag contributing to the thrust. We presume that professional swimmers benefit from both mechanisms. Further studies are necessary in which 3D flow fields are measured using a 3D PIV system and a human swimmer.

  9. When superfluids are a drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  10. Gastronomiske drags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    with Jennifer Parson and Clarissa Dickson Wright (1996-1999). I will argue that the two self-declared fat women can be read as “gastronomic drags” by their transgression of a “recognizable” feminine way of “doing food”. The article is theoretically informed by the reflections on drag as subversive practice...... of appearing either too radical or not radical enough. The article concludes with some reflections on the development of the cooking show as a site for gendered negotiation from the 90’s and today....

  11. Drag Force of Non-newtonian Fluid on a Continuous Moving Surface with Strong Suction/Blowing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑连存; 张欣欣; 赫冀成

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the laminar boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid on a continuous moving flat plate with surface strong suction/blowing is made. The types of potential flows necessary for similar solutions to the boundary layer are determined and both analytical and numerical solutions are presented. It is shown that the solution of the boundary layer problem depends not only on the ratio of the velocity of the plate to the velocity of the free stream, but also on the suction/blowing parameter. The skin friction decreases with increasing the parameters of power law and blowing. In the case of existing suction, the shear force decreases with the increases of tangential velocity, the largest shear force occurs at wall and the smallest shear force occurs at the edge of the boundary layer. However, in the case of existing surface blowing, the shear force initially increases with tangentialvelocity and the biggest shear force occurs at the interior of the boundary layer, the skin friction approaches to zero as the blowing rate approaches the critical value.

  12. Significance of Neglected Hydrodynamic Forces on the Motion of Submerged Particles Acted on by External Body Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Daniel; Charonko, John; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the manipulation of submerged particles using electromagnetic body forces has drawn increasing interest from a variety of fields, particularly medicine, where electrophoretic manipulation in lab-on-a-chip applications and magnetic drug targeting have become important areas of interest. As a direct result of this increasing interest a large number of simulations have been performed investigating the performance of devices and systems whose operation is based upon these physics. In the vast majority of cases, these simulations are based upon a force balance of the applicable body force and Stokes drag. Such simulations neglect additional hydrodynamic forces, including the added mass, Basset, Saffman, and Magnus forces. In the current study, the full equations of motion containing all of the aforementioned terms are nondimensionalized leading to a set of nondimensional parameters governing the behavior of the particle. A parametric investigation is then performed by calculating particle trajectories for both Poiseuille and Womersley flows. This analysis reveals that in many cases, the forces neglected in previous simulations are significant and should not be neglected in future studies.

  13. Estimation of Coriolis Force and Torque Acting on Ares-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Ryan M.; Kulikov, Igor K.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Orr, Jeb

    2011-01-01

    A document describes work on the origin of Coriolis force and estimating Coriolis force and torque applied to the Ares-1 vehicle during its ascent, based on an internal ballistics model for a multi-segmented solid rocket booster (SRB).

  14. Global Forces in Eruptive Solar Flares: The Lorentz Force Acting on the Solar Atmosphere and the Solar Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; Bercik, D. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Hudson, H. S.

    2012-05-01

    We compute the change in the Lorentz force integrated over the outer solar atmosphere implied by observed changes in vector magnetograms that occur during large, eruptive solar flares. This force perturbation should be balanced by an equal and opposite force perturbation acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior. The resulting expression for the estimated force change in the solar interior generalizes the earlier expression presented by Hudson, Fisher, and Welsch, providing horizontal as well as vertical force components, and provides a more accurate result for the vertical component of the perturbed force. We show that magnetic eruptions should result in the magnetic field at the photosphere becoming more horizontal, and hence should result in a downward (toward the solar interior) force change acting on the photosphere and solar interior, as recently argued from an analysis of magnetogram data by Wang and Liu. We suggest the existence of an observational relationship between the force change computed from changes in the vector magnetograms, the outward momentum carried by the ejecta from the flare, and the properties of the helioseismic disturbance driven by the downward force change. We use the impulse driven by the Lorentz-force change in the outer solar atmosphere to derive an upper limit to the mass of erupting plasma that can escape from the Sun. Finally, we compare the expected Lorentz-force change at the photosphere with simple estimates from flare-driven gasdynamic disturbances and from an estimate of the perturbed pressure from radiative backwarming of the photosphere in flaring conditions.

  15. A district nurse's guide to the Forced Marriage (Civil Protection) Act 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2009-01-01

    The government considers forced marriage to be a form of domestic abuse with some 3000 cases reported to the forced marriage unit each year in the UK. Both the Home Office and the Foreign and commonwealth office consider health professionals, such as district nurses, to be ideally placed to identify, help and support the victims of forced marriage. To do this effectively district nurses must be aware of the provisions of the Forced Marriage (Civil Protection) Act 2007.

  16. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  17. Gravity Tunnel Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Concannon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to fall down a tunnel through the center of the Earth to the other side takes approximately 42 minutes, but only when given several simplifying assumptions: a uniform density Earth; a gravitational field that varies linearly with radial position; a non-rotating Earth; a tunnel evacuated of air; and zero friction along the sides of the tunnel. Though several papers have singularly relaxed the first three assumptions, in this paper we relax the final two assumptions and analyze the motion of a body experiencing these types of drag forces in the tunnel. Under such drag forces, we calculate the motion of a transport vehicle through a tunnel of the Earth under uniform density, under constant gravitational acceleration, and finally under the more realistic Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) density data. We find the density profile corresponding to a constant gravitational acceleration better models the motion through the tunnel compared to the PREM density profile, and the uniform density m...

  18. Load cell adoption in an electronic drag force flowmeter Medidor de vazão eletrônico com célula de carga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pires de Camargo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This research introduces the development of an electronic flowmeter based on the drag force that a body experiences when immersed in a fluid stream. Its main goal was the development of an Electronic Drag Force Flowmeter (EDFF using a load cell, as well as the evaluation of its performance parameters. The developed flowmeter should not require specialized labor, equipments, computers or any sophisticated and complex method, providing an easy and accurate way of flow estimation. This research was carried out in the following stages: (i EDFF mechanical structure development; (ii data acquisition system and embedded software design; and (iii evaluation of EDFF performance parameters. EDFF has routines for instantaneous flow rate measurement, interactive calibration, and also several flow meter parameter adjustments, allowing data transmission via a RS232 protocol. The real-time flow measurement task updates values of instantaneous flow rate each seven seconds, enabling unit selection. The interactive calibration routine guides users during all calibration process showing instructions on EDFF's display. A data digital filtering procedure was implemented in an embedded software using the Grubbs' Test in order to identify and to remove outliers from the acquired data. The Method of Least Squares was also implemented in the embedded software in order to calculate the fitting model coefficients on the calibration procedure. This flowmeter is able to work from 1.94 to 7.78 dm³ s-1 with an uncertainty of ± 5.7%. The coefficient of local head loss (K was close to 0.55 for Reynolds number values higher than 10(5. The developed EDFF is a low-cost and stand-alone system with potential for agricultural applications.Este estudo apresenta o desenvolvimento de um medidor de vazão baseado na força de arraste que atua em um corpo imerso em uma corrente líquida. O principal objetivo foi o desenvolvimento de um Medidor de Vazão Eletrônico tipo Força (MVEF

  19. Turbulent drag in a rotating frame

    CERN Document Server

    Campagne, Antoine; Gallet, Basile; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Moisy, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    What is the turbulent drag force experienced by an object moving in a rotating fluid? This open and fundamental question can be addressed by measuring the torque needed to drive an impeller at constant angular velocity $\\omega$ in a water tank mounted on a platform rotating at a rate $\\Omega$. We report a dramatic reduction in drag as $\\Omega$ increases, down to values as low as $12$\\% of the non-rotating drag. At small Rossby number $Ro = \\omega/\\Omega$, the decrease in drag coefficient $K$ follows the approximate scaling law $K \\sim Ro$, which is predicted in the framework of nonlinear inertial wave interactions and weak-turbulence theory. However, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements indicate that this drag reduction rather originates from a weakening of the turbulence intensity in line with the two-dimensionalization of the large-scale flow.

  20. Drag Reduction by Microvortexes in Transverse Microgrooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A transverse microgrooved surface was employed here to reduce the surface drag force by creating a slippage in bottom layer in turbulent boundary layer. A detailed simulation and experimental investigation on drag reduction by transverse microgrooves were given. The computational fluid dynamics simulation, using RNG k-ε turbulent model, showed that the vortexes were formed in the grooves and they were a main reason for the drag reduction. On the upside of the vortex, the revolving direction was consistent with the main flow, which decreased the flow shear stress by declining the velocity gradient. The experiments were carried out in a high-speed water tunnel with flow velocity varying from 17 to 19 m/s. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction was about 13%. Therefore, the computational and experimental results were cross-checked and consistent with each other to prove that the presented approach achieved effective drag reduction underwater.

  1. Drag measurements in laterally confined 2D canopies: Reconfiguration and sheltering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsu, Sylvie; Doppler, Delphine; Jerome, J. John Soundar; Rivière, Nicolas; Lance, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Plants in aquatic canopies deform when subjected to a water flow and so, unlike a rigid bluff body, the resulting drag force FD grows sub-quadratically with the flow velocity U ¯ . In this article, the effect of density on the canopy reconfiguration and the corresponding drag reduction is experimentally investigated for simple 2D synthetic canopies in an inclinable, narrow water channel. The drag acting on the canopy, and also on individual sheets, is systematically measured via two independent techniques. Simultaneous drag and reconfiguration measurements demonstrate that data for different Reynolds numbers (400-2200), irrespective of sheet width (w) and canopy spacing (ℓ), collapse on a unique curve given by a bending beam model which relates the reconfiguration number and a properly rescaled Cauchy number. Strikingly, the measured Vogel exponent V and hence the drag reduction via reconfiguration is found to be independent of the spacing between sheets and the lateral confinement; only the drag coefficient decreases linearly with the sheet spacing since a strong sheltering effect exists as long as the spacing is smaller than a critical value depending on the sheet width.

  2. Determination of the vertical ground reaction forces acting upon individual limbs during healthy and clinical gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurisse, Guillaume M; Dierick, Frédéric; Schepens, Bénédicte; Bastien, Guillaume J

    2016-01-01

    In gait lab, the quantification of the ground reaction forces (GRFs) acting upon individual limbs is required for dynamic analysis. However, using a single force plate, only the resultant GRF acting on both limbs is available. The aims of this study are (a) to develop an algorithm allowing a reliable detection of the front foot contact (FC) and the back foot off (FO) time events when walking on a single plate, (b) to reconstruct the vertical GRFs acting upon each limb during the double contact phase (DC) and (c) to evaluate this reconstruction on healthy and clinical gait trials. For the purpose of the study, 811 force measurements during DC were analyzed based on walking trials from 27 healthy subjects and 88 patients. FC and FO are reliably detected using a novel method based on the distance covered by the centre of pressure. The algorithm for the force reconstruction is a revised version of the approach of Davis and Cavanagh [24]. In order to assess the robustness of the algorithm, we compare the resulting GRFs with the real forces measured with individual force plates. The median of the relative error on force reconstruction is 1.8% for the healthy gait and 2.5% for the clinical gait. The reconstructed and the real GRFs during DC are strongly correlated for both healthy and clinical gait data (R(2)=0.998 and 0.991, respectively).

  3. The role of drag in insect hovering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Jane

    2004-11-01

    Studies of insect flight have focused on aerodynamic lift, both in quasi-steady and unsteady regimes. This is partly influenced by the choice of hovering motions along a horizontal stroke plane, where aerodynamic drag makes no contribution to the vertical force. In contrast, some of the best hoverers--dragonflies and hoverflies--employ inclined stroke planes, where the drag in the down- and upstrokes does not cancel each other. Here, computation of an idealized dragonfly wing motion shows that a dragonfly uses drag to support about three quarters of its weight. This can explain an anomalous factor of four in previous estimates of dragonfly lift coefficients, where drag was assumed to be small. To investigate force generation and energy cost of hovering flight using different combination of lift and drag, I study a family of wing motion parameterized by the inclined angle of the stroke plane. The lift-to-drag ratio is no longer a measure of efficiency, except in the case of horizontal stroke plane. In addition, because the flow is highly stalled, lift and drag are of comparable magnitude, and the aerodynamic efficiency is roughly the same up to an inclined angle about 60 degrees , which curiously agrees with the angle observed in dragonfly flight. Finally, the lessons from this special family of wing motion suggests a strategy for improving efficiency of normal hovering, and a unifying view of different wing motions employed by insects.

  4. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  5. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  6. Strong optical force acting on a dipolar particle over a multilayer substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shubo

    2015-01-01

    Optical forces acting on nano-sized particles are typically too small to be useful for particle manipulation. We theoretically and numerically demonstrate a mechanism that can significantly enhance the optical force acting on a small particle through a special type of resonant particle-substrate coupling. The resonance arises from the singular behavior of the particle's effective polarizablity in the presence of a metal-dielectric-metal multilayer substrate. We show that this phenomenon is closely related to the existence of a flat-band plasmon mode supported by the multilayer substrate.

  7. How do the substrate reaction forces acting on a gecko's limbs respond to inclines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhouyi; Dai, Zhendong; Li, Wei; Ji, Aihong; Wang, Wenbao

    2015-02-01

    Locomotion is an essential character of animals, and excellent moving ability results from the delicate sensing of the substrate reaction forces (SRF) acting on body and modulating the behavior to adapt the motion requirement. The inclined substrates present in habitats pose a number of functional challenges to locomotion. In order to effectively overcome these challenges, climbing geckos execute complex and accurate movements that involve both the front and hind limbs. Few studies have examined gecko's SRF on steeper inclines of greater than 90°. To reveal how the SRFs acting on the front and hind limbs respond to angle incline changes, we obtained detailed measurements of the three-dimensional SRFs acting on the individual limbs of the tokay gecko while it climbed on an inclined angle of 0-180°. The fore-aft forces acting on the front and hind limbs show opposite trends on inverted inclines of greater than 120°, indicating propulsion mechanism changes in response to inclines. When the incline angles change, the forces exerted in the normal and fore-aft directions by gecko's front and hind limbs are reassigned to take full advantage of limbs' different roles in overcoming resistance and in propelling locomotion. This also ensures that weight acts in the angle range between the forces generated by the front and hind limbs. The change in the distribution of SRF with a change in the incline angle is directly linked to the favorable trade-off between locomotive maneuverability and stability.

  8. Prediction of fluid forces acting on a hand model in unsteady flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Shigetada; Yanai, Toshimasa; Wilson, Barry; Takagi, Hideki; Vennell, Ross

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to predict fluid forces acting on the human hand in unsteady flow swimming conditions. A mechanical system consisting of a pulley and chain mechanism and load cell was constructed to rotate a hand model in fluid flows. To measure the angular displacement of the hand model a potentiometer was attached to the axis of the rotation. The hand model was then fixed at various angles about the longitudinal axis of the hand model and rotated at different flow velocities in a swimming flume for 258 different trials to approximate a swimmer's stroke in unsteady flow conditions. Pressures were taken from 12 transducers embedded in the hand model at a sampling frequency of 200Hz. The resultant fluid force acting on the hand model was then determined on the basis of the kinetic and kinematic data taken from the mechanical system at the frequency of 200Hz. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to acquire higher order polynomial equations that predict the fluid force acting on the accelerating hand model from the 12 pressure values. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the resultant fluid force measured and that predicted from the single best-fit polynomial equation across all trials was 5N. The method developed in the present study accurately predicted the fluid forces acting on the hand model.

  9. Generalized polarization force acting on dust grains in a dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentabet, Karima; Mayout, Saliha; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-01-01

    The polarization force acting on dust particles in a dusty plasma is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The generalized nonextensive polarization force expression is derived. As application, the modifications arising in the propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves, and dust sheath formation are analyzed. Our results should be of wide relevance to explain and interpret the sheath formation and its structure in nonequilibrium plasmas related process such as surface treatments and ion implantation.

  10. [Forces acting on foot soles during stair climbing in healthy probands and in patients with coxarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidis, E; von der Decken, C B

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the contact forces acting on the sole of the foot of healthy persons and coxarthrosis patients climbing and descending stairs. The sole contact forces were determined using an experimental set-up comprising a stair construction provided with an integrated measuring step. In healthy subjects, the forces acting on the soles of the feet while climbing stairs were found to be 1.2 times their body weight. With regard to descending stairs, a distinction must be made between "hard" and "soft" walkers. In the case of "hard" walkers, the forces acting on the soles may be as much as 2.6 times body weight. These forces can be reduced by the wearing of shock-absorbing shoes. In coxarthrosis and prostheses-bearing patients, all movements are executed more slowly when climbing or descending stairs, so that only small dynamic forces arise. The greatest loads are about 1.2 times the patient's own weight. In these patients, an effective reduction by shockabsorbing footwear is not possible.

  11. Generalized Faxén's theorem: Evaluating first-order (hydrodynamic drag) and second-order (acoustic radiation) forces on finite-sized rigid particles, bubbles and droplets in arbitrary complex flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.

    2016-11-01

    In recent times, study of complex disperse multiphase problems involving several million particles (e.g. volcanic eruptions, spray control etc.) is garnering momentum. The objective of this work is to present an accurate model (termed generalized Faxén's theorem) to predict the hydrodynamic forces on such inclusions (particles/bubbles/droplets) without having to solve for the details of flow around them. The model is developed using acoustic theory and the force obtained as a summation of infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). The first-order force is the time-dependent hydrodynamic drag force arising from the dipole component due to interaction between the gas and the inclusion at the microscale level. The second-order force however is a time-averaged differential force (contributions arise both from monopole and dipole), also known as the acoustic radiation force primarily used to levitate particles. In this work, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of particle surface and volume averages of the incoming flow properties and therefore applicable to particle sizes of the order of fluid length scale and subjected to any arbitrary flow. Moreover, this model can also be used to account for inter-particle coupling due to neighboring particles. U.S. DoE, NNSA, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, Cooperative Agreement under PSAAP-II, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  12. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2017-02-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  13. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  14. Observation of three-level rectified dipole forces acting on trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, T. T.; Duncan, B. C.; Sanchez-Villicana, V.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-06-01

    We have observed rectified dipole forces acting on three-level atoms in the cascade configuration. Laser cooled and trapped rubidium atoms are illuminated with an intense bichromatic standing wave (780 and 776 nm) tuned near resonance with the 5S1/2-->5P3/2-->5D5/2 transitions. The resulting rectified forces produce periodic potential wells (71-μm period), which localize the cold atoms. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. These forces may be useful in atom optics and laser traps.

  15. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought.

  16. Drag of Clean and Fouled Net Panels--Measurements and Parameterization of Fouling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Christian Gansel

    Full Text Available Biofouling is a serious problem in marine aquaculture and it has a number of negative impacts including increased forces on aquaculture structures and reduced water exchange across nets. This in turn affects the behavior of fish cages in waves and currents and has an impact on the water volume and quality inside net pens. Even though these negative effects are acknowledged by the research community and governmental institutions, there is limited knowledge about fouling related effects on the flow past nets, and more detailed investigations distinguishing between different fouling types have been called for. This study evaluates the effect of hydroids, an important fouling organism in Norwegian aquaculture, on the forces acting on net panels. Drag forces on clean and fouled nets were measured in a flume tank, and net solidity including effect of fouling were determined using image analysis. The relationship between net solidity and drag was assessed, and it was found that a solidity increase due to hydroids caused less additional drag than a similar increase caused by change in clean net parameters. For solidities tested in this study, the difference in drag force increase could be as high as 43% between fouled and clean nets with same solidity. The relationship between solidity and drag force is well described by exponential functions for clean as well as for fouled nets. A method is proposed to parameterize the effect of fouling in terms of an increase in net solidity. This allows existing numerical methods developed for clean nets to be used to model the effects of biofouling on nets. Measurements with other types of fouling can be added to build a database on effects of the accumulation of different fouling organisms on aquaculture nets.

  17. Drag of Clean and Fouled Net Panels – Measurements and Parameterization of Fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansel, Lars Christian; Plew, David R.; Endresen, Per Christian; Olsen, Anna Ivanova; Misimi, Ekrem; Guenther, Jana; Jensen, Østen

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling is a serious problem in marine aquaculture and it has a number of negative impacts including increased forces on aquaculture structures and reduced water exchange across nets. This in turn affects the behavior of fish cages in waves and currents and has an impact on the water volume and quality inside net pens. Even though these negative effects are acknowledged by the research community and governmental institutions, there is limited knowledge about fouling related effects on the flow past nets, and more detailed investigations distinguishing between different fouling types have been called for. This study evaluates the effect of hydroids, an important fouling organism in Norwegian aquaculture, on the forces acting on net panels. Drag forces on clean and fouled nets were measured in a flume tank, and net solidity including effect of fouling were determined using image analysis. The relationship between net solidity and drag was assessed, and it was found that a solidity increase due to hydroids caused less additional drag than a similar increase caused by change in clean net parameters. For solidities tested in this study, the difference in drag force increase could be as high as 43% between fouled and clean nets with same solidity. The relationship between solidity and drag force is well described by exponential functions for clean as well as for fouled nets. A method is proposed to parameterize the effect of fouling in terms of an increase in net solidity. This allows existing numerical methods developed for clean nets to be used to model the effects of biofouling on nets. Measurements with other types of fouling can be added to build a database on effects of the accumulation of different fouling organisms on aquaculture nets. PMID:26151907

  18. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  19. Static and Dynamic Performance Simulation of Direct-Acting Force Motor Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinghai; Ding, Jianjun; Zheng, Gang; Jiang, Kunpeng; Chen, Dongdong

    2017-07-01

    This work focuses on static and dynamic characteristics of direct-acting force motor valve. First, we analyzed the structure features and operating principle of the Mitsubishi-Hitachi force motor valve (FMV) and the operating principle of its internal permanent-magnet moving-coil force motor magnetic circuit, determined the transfer function of the FMV force motor system, and established a mathematical model for the system. Secondly, we established a static performance analysis model using the AMESIM software and utilized the model in combination with experimental results to analyze the effects of electro-hydraulic servo valve structural parameters on static characteristics. Lastly, we deduced the trajectory equation of the system, established the relationship between dynamic characteristic indexes and structural parameters, and analyzed the effects of different parameter values on the dynamic characteristics of the system. This research can provide a theoretical guidance for designing and manufacturing the FMV body.

  20. New drag laws for flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  1. Identification of impact force acting on composite laminated plates using the radiated sound measured with microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atobe, Satoshi; Nonami, Shunsuke; Hu, Ning; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2017-09-01

    Foreign object impact events are serious threats to composite laminates because impact damage leads to significant degradation of the mechanical properties of the structure. Identification of the location and force history of the impact that was applied to the structure can provide useful information for assessing the structural integrity. This study proposes a method for identifying impact forces acting on CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) laminated plates on the basis of the sound radiated from the impacted structure. Identification of the impact location and force history is performed using the sound pressure measured with microphones. To devise a method for identifying the impact location from the difference in the arrival times of the sound wave detected with the microphones, the propagation path of the sound wave from the impacted point to the sensor is examined. For the identification of the force history, an experimentally constructed transfer matrix is employed to relate the force history to the corresponding sound pressure. To verify the validity of the proposed method, impact tests are conducted by using a CFRP cross-ply laminate as the specimen, and an impulse hammer as the impactor. The experimental results confirm the validity of the present method for identifying the impact location from the arrival time of the sound wave detected with the microphones. Moreover, the results of force history identification show the feasibility of identifying the force history accurately from the measured sound pressure using the experimental transfer matrix.

  2. Analysis of unsteady flow forces acting on the thermowell in a steam turbine control stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badur, J.; Kornet, S.; Sławiński, D.; Ziółkowski, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper the phenomenon of unsteady flow forces acting on the thermowell for measuring steam temperature in a steam turbine control stage has been presented. The non-stationarity of fluid acting on the thermowell such as: Strouhal frequency, pressure amplitude, pressure peaks, pressure field, velocity field etc. have been studied analytically and numerically. There have been examined two cases of flow with changing mass flow rate, pressure and temperature in the control stage chamber of a turbine high-pressure cylinder. The problem of entry into resonance by thermowell has been described in the ASME standard PTC19.3 TW-2010 with providing detailed guidelines for thermowell designs.

  3. The acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  4. Simulation of the Clustering Phenomenon in a Fast Fluidized Bed: The Importance of Drag Correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佑楚

    2004-01-01

    Drag force is a key parameter in the numerical modeling of gas-particle flow in circulating fluidized beds. The reliability of current drag force correlations over the regime of fast fluidization has, however, not been thoroughly investigated. In this article, a drag force correlation accounting for the clustering effects for Geldart A particles is used to simulate the behaviors typical of fast fluidization, including dynamic evolution of clusters as well as time- averaged axial and lateral voidage profiles. Diverse images of clusters are captured and the time-averaged profiles of voidage are shown to be in quantitative agreement with the present empirical correlation. The results based on different constitutive correlations of drag force show the importance of the choice of drag force in modeling fast-fluidized beds. This drag force correlation, based on a simple averaging assumption, could give some basic insights about the magnitude of the drag reduction.

  5. Flow Field of Metallic Fluid Acted by Electromagnetic and Centrifugal Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Yi-qing; LUO Zong-an; JIA Guang-lin; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2004-01-01

    According to the principle of electromagnetism and hydrodynamics, a mathematical model of flow field for metallic fluid acted by electromagnetic and centrifugal forces was established. The calculation results showed that the relative velocity between metallic fluid layers rises and the absolute rotational velocity of metallic fluid falls with the increase of magnetic induction intensity. The increase of centrifugal revolution hardly affects the relative velocity between metallic fluid layers, but can enhance the absolute rotational velocity of metallic fluid.

  6. Effect of melt convection at various gravity levels and orientations on the forces acting on a large spherical particle in the vicinity of a solidification interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Sen, Subhayu; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Catalina, Adrian; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2000-04-01

    Numerical modeling was undertaken to analyze the influence of both radial and axial thermal gradients on convection patterns and velocities during solidification of pure Al and an Al-4 wt% Cu alloy. The objective of the numerical task was to predict the influence of convective velocity on an insoluble particle near a solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These predictions were then be used to define the minimum gravity level ( g) required to investigate the fundamental physics of interactions between a particle and a s/l interface. This is an ongoing NASA funded flight experiment entitled "particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces (PEP)". Steady-state calculations were performed for different gravity levels and orientations with respect to the gravity vector. The furnace configuration used in this analysis is the quench module insert (QMI-1) proposed for the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The general model of binary alloy solidification was based on the finite element code FIDAP. At a low g level of 10 -4g 0 ( g 0=9.8 m/s 2) maximum melt convection was obtained for an orientation of 90°. Calculations showed that even for this worst case orientation the dominant forces acting on the particle are the fundamental drag and interfacial forces.

  7. Simplified Models for the Drag Coefficient of a Pitched Baseball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David; Nathan, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The classic experiment to measure the drag coefficient involves dropping coffee filters. Wouldn't it be more fun to try something different? In fact, an experiment on the drag force is conducted nearly 4000 times a day during the baseball season and you have free access to this PITCHf/x data!

  8. Simplified description of optical forces acting on a nanoparticle in the Gaussian standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Jonáš, Alexandr; Liška, Miroslav

    2002-05-01

    We study the axial force acting on dielectric spherical particles smaller than the trapping wavelength that are placed in the Gaussian standing wave. We derive analytical formulas for immersed particles with relative refractive indices close to unity and compare them with the numerical results obtained by generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). We show that the axial optical force depends periodically on the particle size and that the equilibrium position of the particle alternates between the standing-wave antinodes and nodes. For certain particle sizes, gradient forces from the neighboring antinodes cancel each other and disable particle confinement. Using the GLMT we compare maximum axial trapping forces provided by the Gaussian standing-wave trap (SWT) and single-beam trap (SBT) as a function of particle size, refractive index, and beam waist size. We show that the SWT produces axial forces at least ten times stronger and permits particle confinement in a wider range of refractive indices and beam waists compared with those of the SBT.

  9. Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Astronautics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In...yaw axes and provide magnetic damping on both the pitch and yaw axes. The satellite resem- bles a shuttlecock used in badminton (see Figure 2.2). The...Control Using Atmospheric Drag Guettler, David B., Captain, USAF Air Force Institute of Technology Graduate School of Engineering and Management (AFIT

  10. Irom Chanu Sharmila and the Movement against Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Sharma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper, through the narratives of activists and Meira Paibis reiterates the slogan—repeal the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA, which is draconian and anti-people in spirit. The atroci- ty, which has been meted out on the people of Manipur because of this Act, is a profound viola- tion of human rights. Rape, mindless killings, kidnapping, fake encounters have been normalised by virtue of this Act. The youths have been badly affected due to the conflict emerging out of this Act which treats people in Manipur as ‘objects’ against the imagined boundaries of the Indian na- tion-state for security from the neighbouring nations. In this process, the lived experiences of the people have been pushed to the periphery against the massive motive of the state to protect bor- ders and the imagined nation, which is a direct offshoot of the legacy of colonialism in India. The paper has tried to capture the history of Manipur on a capsule to concretise the struggle of Irom Sharmila and the ‘hopes’ she gives to the people of Manipur for ‘peace’ and ‘justice’. Alongside, it makes a humble attempt to describe the ‘life’ of Irom Sharmila. In addition, it describes the rage of Manipuris, which have given rise to insurgency asking for ‘freedom’ through various platforms.

  11. Development of reduced drag concepts for acoustic liners using experimental methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Commercial aircraft have used acoustic liners to reduce engine noise for many years, although their drag production has been largely unstudied. The next generation of aircraft may benefit from additional surface area covered by acoustic liner, thus understanding their drag production mechanism is crucial for future designs. An accurate direct aerodynamic drag measurement technique has been developed using a force balance with linear air bearings. Using 3D-printed and conventional liners, low-drag designs are being developed. This paper will investigate the underlying fluid mechanics governing the drag production in acoustic liners and describe new attempts to reduce aerodynamic drag.

  12. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bale, Rahul; Shirgaonkar, Anup A; Neveln, Izaak D; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; MacIver, Malcolm A; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-01-01

    .... Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust...

  13. Gravitational drag on a point mass in hypersonic motion through a gaseous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Canto, J; Esquivel, A; Sanchez-Salcedo, F J

    2011-01-01

    We explore a ballistic orbit model to infer the gravitational drag force on an accreting point mass M, such as a black hole, moving at a hypersonic velocity v_{0} through a gaseous environment of density \\rho_{0}. The streamlines blend in the flow past the body and transfer momentum to it. The total drag force acting on the body, including the nonlinear contribution of those streamlines with small impact parameter that bend significantly and pass through a shock, can be calculated by imposing conservation of momentum. In this fully analytic approach, the ambiguity in the definition of the lower cut-off distance $r_{\\rm min}$ in calculations of the effect of dynamical friction is removed. It turns out that $r_{\\rm min}=\\sqrt{e}GM/2v_{0}^{2}$. Using spherical surfaces of control of different sizes, we carry out a successful comparison between the predicted drag force and the one obtained from a high resolution, axisymmetric, isothermal flow simulation. We demonstrate that ballistic models are reasonably success...

  14. Space Age Swimsuit Reduces Drag, Breaks Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A space shuttle and a competitive swimmer have a lot more in common than people might realize: Among other forces, both have to contend with the slowing influence of drag. NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate focuses primarily on improving flight efficiency and generally on fluid dynamics, especially the forces of pressure and viscous drag, which are the same for bodies moving through air as for bodies moving through water. Viscous drag is the force of friction that slows down a moving object through a substance, like air or water. NASA uses wind tunnels for fluid dynamics research, studying the forces of friction in gasses and liquids. Pressure forces, according to Langley Research Center s Stephen Wilkinson, dictate the optimal shape and performance of an airplane or other aero/hydro-dynamic body. In both high-speed flight and swimming, says Wilkinson, a thin boundary layer of reduced velocity fluid surrounds the moving body; this layer is about 2 centimeters thick for a swimmer.

  15. Helix-like biopolymers can act as dampers of force for bacteria in flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2012-06-01

    Biopolymers are vital structures for many living organisms; for a variety of bacteria, adhesion polymers play a crucial role for the initiation of colonization. Some bacteria express, on their surface, attachment organelles (pili) that comprise subunits formed into stiff helix-like structures that possess unique biomechanical properties. These helix-like structures possess a high degree of flexibility that gives the biopolymers a unique extendibility. This has been considered beneficial for piliated bacteria adhering to host surfaces in the presence of a fluid flow. We show in this work that helix-like pili have the ability to act as efficient dampers of force that can, for a limited time, lower the load on the force-mediating adhesin-receptor bond on the tip of an individual pilus. The model presented is applied to bacteria adhering with a single pilus of either of the two most common types expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, P or type 1 pili, subjected to realistic flows. The results indicate that for moderate flows (~25 mm/s) the force experienced by the adhesin-receptor interaction at the tip of the pilus can be reduced by a factor of ~6 and ~4, respectively. The uncoiling ability provides a bacterium with a "go with the flow" possibility that acts as a damping. It is surmised that this can be an important factor for the initial part of the adhesion process, in particular in turbulent flows, and thereby be of use for bacteria in their striving to survive a natural defense such as fluid rinsing actions.

  16. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction.

  17. Bionic Research on Fish Scales for Drag Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Dou; Jiadao Wang; Darong Chen

    2012-01-01

    To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way,the surface microstructure of fish scales was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction.Then comparable bionic surface mimicking fish scales was fabricated through coating technology for drag reduction.The paint mixture was coated on a substrate through a self-developed spray-painting apparatus.The bionic surface with micron-scale caves formed spontaneously due to the interfacial convection and deformation driven by interfacial tension gradient in the presence of solvent evaporation.Comparative experiments between bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a water tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction,and visible drag reduction efficiency was obtained.Numerical simulation results show that gas phase develops in solid-liquid interface of bionic surface with the effect of surface topography and partially replaces the solid-liquid shear force with gas-liquid shear force,hence reducing the skin friction drag effectively.Therefore,with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology,the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  18. Forces acting on particles in a Pelton bucket and similarity considerations for erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, A. K.; Kumar, A.; Staubli, T.

    2016-11-01

    High sediment transport rates cause severe erosion issues in hydropower plants leading to interruptions in power generation, decrease in efficiency and shutdown for repair and maintenance. For Pelton turbines operating at high head, the issue of erosion is severe, especially in components like buckets, nozzle rings and needles. Goal of the study is to develop erosion focussed guidelines for both designing as well as operating hydropower plants with Pelton runners. In this study, the flow of sediment inside a Pelton bucket with respect to forces acting on solid particles is analysed with an analytical approach by considering different dynamic forces originating from the rotation of the turbine, the curvature of the buckets, and the Coriolis effect. Further, the path of sediment particles and its effect on erosion phenomena are analysed based on the process of separation of different sized sediment particles from streamlines. The data relating to head, power, discharge, number of jet and efficiency of 250 hydropower plants installed all over the world were analysed in this study to find the major factors related to erosion in Pelton turbine bucket. From analysis of different force ratios, it is found that an increase of D/B, i.e. the ratio of pitch circle diameter and bucket width, and/or decrease of specific speed (nq) enhances erosion. As the erosion process depends significantly on nondimensional parameters D/B and nq, these are considered as similarity measures for scaling of the erosion process in the Pelton buckets of various sizes.

  19. Improvements of evaporation drag model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; XU Ji-Jun

    2004-01-01

    A special visible experiment facility has been designed and built, and an observable experiment is performed by pouring one or several high-temperature particles into a water pool in the facility. The experiment result has verified Yang's evaporation drag model, which holds that the non-symmetric profile of the local evaporation rate and the local density of vapor would bring about a resultant force on the hot particle so as to resist its motion. However, in Yang's evaporation drag model, radiation heat transfer is taken as the only way to transfer heat from hot particle to the vapor-liquid interface, and all of the radiation energy is deposited on the vapor-liquid interface and contributed to the vaporization rate and mass balance of the vapor film. In improved model heat conduction and heat convection are taken into account. This paper presents calculations of the improved model, putting emphasis on the effect of hot particle's temperature on the radiation absorption behavior of water.

  20. RESEARCH ON WAVE FORCES ACTING ON THE UNIT LENGTH OF A VERITICAL BREAKWATER BY TESTS AND A NUMERICAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jin-peng; YU Yu-xiu; ZHU Liang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D model tests and numerical simulation were performed to study the effects of wave obliquity and multidirectionality on the wave forces acting on vertical breakwaters.The variation of wave forces acting on the unit length of a breakwater was analyzed, and the results were compared with Goda's formula.A numerical model based on a short-crest wave system was used to model regular wave forces for practical use, which showed good results for those waves with small incident angles.

  1. Calculation of the static forces acting on ACV bag-finger skirts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y. N.; Hua, Y.

    A mathematical model of the geometry formation of an ACV bag-finger skirt is developed to determine skirt shape and its deflection for varying cushion pressures, and calculations for the reactions of supports of the rigid structure on the skirt at the inner and outer attachment points are obtained. The model assumption that the finger triangle of the two-dimensional bag-finger skirt turns around the inner attachment point with changing ratio of cushion pressure to bag pressure is confirmed by experiments using skirt rigs. Good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental results, and it is shown that when the cushion pressure is changing, the pressure ratio is the essential dimensionless parameter for the skirt geometry formation and its deflection, and for the forces acting on it.

  2. Study on distribution rule of sliding pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force acting on anti-sliding pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyang YU; Lei NIE

    2006-01-01

    Anti-slide pile is one of the important methods to administer landslide geological disaster because of its advantages. It plays important role in administering landslide. It is a premise of reasonable economy and technological advance to know the distribution rule and feature of the force between anti-sliding pile and surrounding rock. To determine the sliding force and remnant resistant sliding force, according to need of study, this paper sets up the geological model and mechanics model in term of a typical landslide, and analyzes the effect rule of sliding body distortion, strength and gravity to the pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force by use of the numerical model. The distribution rule of pushing force and remnant resistant sliding force of the type of landslide is given.

  3. Micro-acting Force in Boundary Layer in Low-Permeability Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yu-Liang; ZHANG Yuan; JI Bing-Yu; MU Wen-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    There are lots of reasons to restrict a low-permeability oil layer to enhance the recovery factor.Based on the research results of non-Darcy flow, microflow of water drive and micro-acting force in low permeability porous media are studied by establishing the expression of fluid viscosity factor.Numerical calculation shows that under the condition of L/S interaction, the radial velocity distribution near the solid wall changes obviously, and the curve form changes from convex to concave.The tinier the capillary radius is, the stronger the L/S interaction is.The larger the n value is, more obvionsly the flowing velocity decreases.The results will help people to deal with improving recovery factor of low permeability reservoir, and understanding the fluid flow behavior in blood capillary.%@@ There are lots of reasons to restrict a low-permeability oil layer to enhance the recovery factor.Based on the research results of non-Darcy flow, microfiow of water drive and micro-acting force in low permeability porous media are studied by establishing the expression of fluid viscosity factor.Numerical calculation shows that under the condition of L/S interaction, the radial velocity distribution near the solid wall changes obviously, and the curve form changes from convex to concave.The tinier the capillary radius is, the stronger the L/S interaction is.The larger the n value is, more obviously the flowing velocity decreases.The results will help people to deal with improving recovery factor of low permeability reservoir, and understanding the fluid How behavior in blood capillary.

  4. Induce Drag Reduction of an Airplane Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Fazle Rabbi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the aerodynamic characteristics for aircraft wing model with and without slotted winglet. When an aircraft moves forward with a high speed then a small circulatory motion of air is created at the wingtip due to the pressure difference between the upper and lower surface of the wing is called vortices. This circulatory fluid tends to leak from lower to upper surface of wing which causes downward motion is called “downwash” and generates a component of the local lift force in the direction of the free stream called induced drag. Downwash causes reduction of lift and contribute induced drag to the total drag. Drag reduction for aerial vehicles has a range of positive ramifications: reduced fuel consumption, larger operational range, greater endurance and higher achievable speeds. An experimental study is conducted to examine the potentiality of slotted winglet for the reduction of induced drag, and for the improvement of lift coefficient without increasing the span of aircraft wing. The model composed of a swept wing built from NACA 0012 airfoil. The test conducted in subsonic wind tunnel of 1m×1m rectangular test section at flow speed 25m/s placing the wing without winglet, wing with winglet at 30° inclination, wing with winglet at 60° inclination, and wing with winglet at 70° inclination at angle of attack ranging from 0 to 16 degree. The test result shows 20- 25% reduction in drag coefficient and 10-20% increase in lift coefficient by using slotted winglet.

  5. Judicial civil procedure dragging out in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rrustem Qehaja

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article tends to deal with one of the most worrying issues in the judicial system of Kosovo the problem of judicial civil procedure dragging out. The article analyses the reasons of these dragging outs of the judicial civil procedure focusing on the context of one of the basic procedural principles in civil procedure-the principle of economy or efficiency in the courts. Dragging out of civil procedure in Kosovo has put in question not only the basic principles of civil procedure, but it also challenges the general principles related to human rights and freedoms sanctioned not only by the highest legal act of the country, but also with international treaties. The article tends to give a reflection to the most important reasons that effect and influence in these dragging outs of civil procedure, as well as, at the same time aims to give the necessary alternatives to pass through them by identifying dilemmas within the judicial practice. As a result, the motives of this scientific paper are exactly focused at the same time on identifying the dilemmas, as well as presenting ideas, to overstep them, including the judicial practice of the European Court of Human Rights on Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, by which it is given the possibility to offering people efficient and within a reasonable time legal protection of their rights before national courts. For these reasons, the paper elaborates this issue based on both, the legal theory and judicial practice.

  6. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    OpenAIRE

    Bale, R; Shirgaonkar, AA; Neveln, ID; Bhalla, APS; MacIver, MA; Patankar, NA

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers...

  7. Wind tunnel experiment of drag of isolated tree models in surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For very sparse tree land individual tree was the basic element of interaction between atmosphere and the surface. Drag of isolated tree was preliminary aerodynamic index for analyzing the atmospheric boundary layer of this kind of surface. A simple pendulum method was designed and carried out in wind tunnel to measure drag of isolated tree models according to balance law of moment of force. The method was easy to conduct and with small error. The results showed that the drag and drag coefficient of isolated tree increased with decreasing of its permeability or porosity. Relationship between drag coefficient and permeability of isolated tree empirically was expressed by quadric curve.

  8. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  9. Single Gradientless Light Beam Drags Particles as Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Haifeng

    2011-01-01

    is the strong nonparaxiality of the light beam, which contributes to the pulling force owing to momentum conservation. The nonparaxiality of the Bessel beam can be manipulated to possess a dragging force along both the radial longitudinal directions, i.e., a "tractor beam" with stable trajectories is achieved...

  10. Coulomb drag in quantum circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Levchenko, Alex; Kamenev, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We study drag effect in a system of two electrically isolated quantum point contacts (QPC), coupled by Coulomb interactions. Drag current exhibits maxima as a function of QPC gate voltages when the latter are tuned to the transitions between quantized conductance plateaus. In the linear regime this behavior is due to enhanced electron-hole asymmetry near an opening of a new conductance channel. In the non-linear regime the drag current is proportional to the shot noise of the driving circuit,...

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect.

  12. Drag Coefficients of Low Altitude Stationary Flight Test Airship Estimated from Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Takashi

    Flight tests were carried out to obtain aerodynamic characteristics of the low altitude stationary flight test airship. The deceleration test method was used in a flight experiment to obtain the drag coefficient. Combining with the deceleration test result, the minimum drag coefficient was acquired by equating a thrust force with the corresponding drag force at the steady level flight. As a result, 0.044±0.002 were obtained on the minimum drag coefficient of the airship. Modifications of the deceleration test data analysis are proposed to be applicable to test data obtained under non-zero attack angle etc. in the paper.

  13. Harnessing the polariton drag effect to design an electrically controlled optical switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Oleg L; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya; Kolmakov, German V

    2014-10-28

    We propose a design of a Y-shaped electrically controlled optical switch based on the studies of propagation of an exciton-polariton condensate in a patterned optical microcavity with an embedded quantum well. The polaritons are driven by a time-independent force due to the microcavity wedge shape and by a time-dependent drag force owing to the interaction of excitons in a quantum well and the electric current running in a neighboring quantum well. It is demonstrated that by applying the drag force one can direct more than 90% of the polariton flow toward the desired branch of the switch with no hysteresis. By considering the transient dynamics of the polariton condensate, we estimate the response speed of the switch as 9.1 GHz. We also propose a design of the polariton switch in a flat microcavity based on the geometrically identical Y-shaped quantum wells where the polariton flow is only induced by the drag force. The latter setup enables one to design a multiway switch that can act as an electrically controlled optical transistor with on and off functions. Finally, we performed the simulations for a microcavity with an embedded gapped graphene layer and demonstrated that in this case the response speed of the switch can be increased up to 14 GHz for the same switch size. The simulations also show that the energy gap in the quasiparticle spectrum in graphene can be utilized as an additional parameter that controls the propagation of the signals in the switch.

  14. Shell selection of hermit crabs is influenced by fluid drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Barbara; Ledesma, Rene; Alcaraz, Guillermina; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The flow around gastropod shells used by hermit crabs (Calcinus californiensis) was visualized experimentally. These crabs choose their shells according to many factors; we found that the choice of shell (shape and weight) is directly related to the drag caused over them by the exposure to wave action. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel to investigate flow differences for shells of various shapes. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to visualize the flow field. The images above show the flow field around two types of shells (Thais speciosa and Nerita scabircosta) for Reynolds numbers of O(10^5). Using a control volume analysis, the drag coefficient was inferred. Several shell geometries, orientations and mean flow velocities were tested. In this talk, the flow and drag force will be shown for the different arrangements. A discussion of the relation between drag and shape will be presented.

  15. Rotation of slender swimmers in isotropic-drag media

    CERN Document Server

    Koens, Lyndon

    2016-01-01

    The drag anisotropy of slender filaments is a critical physical property allowing swimming in low-Reynolds number flows, and without it linear translation is impossible. Here we show that, in contrast, net rotation can occur under isotropic drag. We first demonstrate this result formally by considering the consequences of the force- and torque-free conditions on swimming bodies and we then illustrate it with two examples (a simple swimmers made of three rods and a model bacterium with two helical flagellar filaments). Our results highlight the different role of hydrodynamic forces in generating translational vs.~rotational propulsion.

  16. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  17. The BMW analytic aerodynamic drag method for the Vinti satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. S.; Mistretta, G. D.; Bonavito, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    In order to retain separability in the Vinti theory of earth satellite motion when a non conservative force such as air drag is considered, a set of variational equations for the orbital elements are introduced, and expressed as functions of the transverse, radial, and normal components of the nonconservative forces acting on the system. In particular, the atmospheric density profile is written as a fitted exponential function of the eccentric anomaly, which reproduces tabular values of static model atmospheric densities at all altitudes to within ninety-eight percent and simultaneously reduces the variational equations to indefinite integrals with closed form evaluations, whose limits are in terms of the eccentric anomaly. The values of the limits for any arbitrary time interval are obtained from the Vinti program. Results of the BMW (Bonavito, Mistretta, Watson) theory for the case of the intense air drag satellites San Marco-2 and Air Force Cannonball are given. These results indicate that the satellite ephemerides produced by the BMW theory in conjunction with the Vinti program are of very high accuracy. In addition, since the program is entirely analytic, several months of ephemerides can be obtained within a few seconds of computer time.

  18. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms[superscript -1] (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N.…

  19. Innovative Flow Control Concepts for Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Whalen, Edward A.; Eppink, Jenna L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Alexander, Michael G.; Andino, Marlyn Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the technology development of two flow control concepts for aircraft drag reduction. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project worked with Boeing to demonstrate these two concepts on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The first flow control concept used Active Flow Control (AFC) to delay flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increase the side force that it generates. This may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff and landing, while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. Thirty-one sweeping jet AFC actuators were installed and successfully flight-tested on the vertical tail of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. Pilot feedback, flow cone visualization, and analysis of the flight test data confirmed that the AFC is effective, as a smoother flight and enhanced rudder control authority were reported. The second flow control concept is the Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) innovation where surfaces were engineered to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. This is necessary because something as small as an insect residue on the leading edge of a laminar flow wing design can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. Several non-stick coatings were developed by NASA and applied to panels that were mounted on the leading edge of the wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. The performance of the coated surfaces was measured and validated by the reduction in the number of bug adhesions relative to uncoated control panels flown simultaneously. Both flow control concepts (i.e., sweeping jet actuators and non-stick coatings) for drag reduction were the culmination of several years of development, from wind tunnel tests to flight tests, and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs

  20. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Force Acting Perpendicularly on a Wall Made of Concrete Blocks with Rubber Inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Maciej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper numerical analysis considering the influence of dynamical force acting on wall made of concrete blocks with rubber inserts is presented. By examining the stress values on front and back surface of the analysed wall structure model, the effectiveness of proposed solution can be measured comparing to the wall made of concrete blocks without rubber inserts. Complete numerical analysis was performed in ADINA program.

  1. Random three-dimensional jammed packings of elastic shells acting as force sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jissy; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-06-01

    In a jammed solid of granular particles, the applied stress is in-homogeneously distributed within the packing. A full experimental characterization requires measurement of all the interparticle forces, but so far such measurements are limited to a few systems in two and even fewer in three dimensions. Particles with the topology of (elastic) shells are good local force sensors as relatively large deformations of the shells result from relatively small forces. We recently introduced such fluorescent shells as a model granular system in which force distributions can be determined in three dimensions using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. An interesting aspect about these shells that differentiates them from other soft deformable particles is their buckling behavior at higher compression. This leads to deformations that do not conserve the inner volume of the particle. Here we use this system to accurately measure the contact forces in a three-dimensional packing of shells subjected to a static anisotropic compression and to shear. At small deformations forces are linear, however, for a buckled contact, the restoring force is related to the amount of deformation by a square root law, as follows from the theory of elasticity of shells. Near the unjamming-jamming transition (point J), we found the probability distribution of the interparticle forces P(f) to decay nearly exponentially at large forces, with little evidence of long-range force chains in the packings. As the packing density is increased, the tail of the distribution was found to crossover to a Gaussian, in line with other experimental and simulation studies. Under a small shear strain, up to 0.216, applied at an extremely low shear rate, we observed a shear-induced anisotropy in both the pair correlation function and contact force network; however, no appreciable change was seen in the number of contacts per particle.

  2. Random three-dimensional jammed packings of elastic shells acting as force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jissy; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-06-01

    In a jammed solid of granular particles, the applied stress is in-homogeneously distributed within the packing. A full experimental characterization requires measurement of all the interparticle forces, but so far such measurements are limited to a few systems in two and even fewer in three dimensions. Particles with the topology of (elastic) shells are good local force sensors as relatively large deformations of the shells result from relatively small forces. We recently introduced such fluorescent shells as a model granular system in which force distributions can be determined in three dimensions using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. An interesting aspect about these shells that differentiates them from other soft deformable particles is their buckling behavior at higher compression. This leads to deformations that do not conserve the inner volume of the particle. Here we use this system to accurately measure the contact forces in a three-dimensional packing of shells subjected to a static anisotropic compression and to shear. At small deformations forces are linear, however, for a buckled contact, the restoring force is related to the amount of deformation by a square root law, as follows from the theory of elasticity of shells. Near the unjamming-jamming transition (point J ), we found the probability distribution of the interparticle forces P (f ) to decay nearly exponentially at large forces, with little evidence of long-range force chains in the packings. As the packing density is increased, the tail of the distribution was found to crossover to a Gaussian, in line with other experimental and simulation studies. Under a small shear strain, up to 0.216, applied at an extremely low shear rate, we observed a shear-induced anisotropy in both the pair correlation function and contact force network; however, no appreciable change was seen in the number of contacts per particle.

  3. On Nature of Plasmonic Drag Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Light-matter momentum transfer in plasmonic materials is theoretically discussed in context of the modified plasmonic pressure mechanism, taking into account electron thermalization process. We show that our approach explains the observed in experiments relationship between the photoinduced electromotive force and absorption, emphasizes the quantum nature of plasmon-electron interaction, and allows one to correctly calculate the magnitude of the plasmon drag emf in flat metal films for the first time. We extend our theory on the films with modulated profiles and show that simple relationship between plasmonic energy and momentum transfer holds for the case of laminar electron drift and relatively small amplitudes of height modulation.

  4. A new method to calculate lateral force acting on stabilizing piles based on multi-wedge translation mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗渝; 许强; 何思明; 李新坡; 何尽川; 吴永

    2015-01-01

    A new method based on the multi-wedge translation mechanism is presented to calculate the lateral force acting on the stabilizing piles. At first, there is no assumption for the shape of potential sliding surface, it is just considered that the potential sliding surface is a composite of a number of straight lines. And then, the potential sliding mass is divided into a number of triangular wedges take with these straight lines as its base. The kinematic theorem of limit analysis is adopted to calculate the rate of external work and the rate of energy dissipation for each triangular wedge, respectively. Furthermore, the multivariate functions are established to calculate the lateral force acting on the stabilizing piles. The lateral force and the corresponding potential sliding surfaces can be obtained by an optimizational technique. At last, an example is taken to illustrate the method. The effect of soil strength parameters, slope angle and pile roughness on the lateral force and the corresponding potential sliding surface are analyzed. The result are compared with those obtained using other methods.

  5. A method for calculation of forces acting on air cooled gas turbine blades based on the aerodynamic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grković Vojin R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the mathematical model and the procedure for calculation of the resultant force acting on the air cooled gas turbine blade(s based on the aerodynamic theory and computation of the circulation around the blade profile. In the conducted analysis was examined the influence of the cooling air mass flow expressed through the cooling air flow parameter λc, as well as, the values of the inlet and outlet angles β1 and β2, on the magnitude of the tangential and axial forces. The procedure and analysis were exemplified by the calculation of the tangential and axial forces magnitudes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije: Development and building the demonstrative facility for combined heat and power with gasification

  6. Acoustic interaction forces and torques acting on suspended spheres in an ideal fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, J Henrique; Silva, G T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N spheres suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. In so doing, we utilize the partial-wave expansion method to solve the related multiple scattering problem. The acoustic interaction force and torque are computed for a sphere using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering regime). The results show that the radiation force may considerably deviates from that exerted solely by the external incident wave. In addition, we find that acoustic interaction torques arise on the droplets when a nonsymmetric effective incident wave interacts with the droplets.

  7. Experimental Study and System Identification of Hydrodynamic Force Acting on Heave Damping Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Heng-teng; FAN Ju; HUANG Xiang-lu

    2008-01-01

    Although Morison equation is often applied for simulating hydrodynamic force of marine structure, it may give poor results when non-linear behavior is severe or random wave is encountered. This leads to some modifications of Morison equation or other methods for predicting hydrodynamic force. One of them is the system identification technique. In this paper, NARMAX model theory is firstly used to identify the hydrodynamic system of heave damping plates, which are commonly installed on spar platform. Both linear and non-linear models are obtained. The comparisons between the predicted results and measured data indicate that NARMAX model can predict hydrodynamic force of a heave damping plate very well. The measured data for identification originate from forced oscillation tests, which are random records with given spectrum. The forced oscillation forms in experiment also contain simple harmonic, multi-frequency ones.

  8. Drag Torque Prediction Model for the Wet Clutches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jibin; PENG Zengxiong; YUAN Shihua

    2009-01-01

    Reduction of drag torque in disengaged wet clutch is one of important potentials for vehicle transmission improvement. The flow of the oil film in clutch clearance is investigated. A three-dimension Navier-Stokes(N-S) equation based on laminar flow is presented to model the drag torque. Pressure and speed distribution in radial and circumferential directions are deduced. The theoretical analysis reveals that oil flow acceleration in radial direction caused by centrifugal force is the key reason for the shrinking of oil film as constant feeding flow rate. The peak drag torque occurs at the beginning of oil film shrinking. A variable is introduced to describe effective oil film area and drag torque after oil film shrinking is well evaluated with the variable. Under the working condition, tests were made to obtain drag torque curves at different clutch speed and oil viscosity. The tests confirm that simulation results agree with test data. The model performs well in the prediction of drag torque and lays a theoretical foundation to reduce it.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Radial Forces Acting on Centrifugal Pump Impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaskiewicz Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of measurements and predictions of radial thrust in centrifugal pump with specific speed ns = 26. In the pump tested, a volute with rectangular cross-section was used. The tests were carried out for several rotational speeds, including speeds above and below the nominal one. Commercial code ANSYS Fluent was used for the calculations. Apart from the predictions of the radial force, the calculations of axial thrust were also conducted, and correlation between thrust and the radial force was found. In the range of the measured rotational speeds, similarity of radial forces was checked.

  10. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    -sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices...... of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well...

  11. The solution of a wedge disclination dipole interacting with an annular inclusion and the force acting on the disclination dipole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Hao-Peng; Fang Qi-Hong; Liu You-Wen

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between a wedge disclination dipole and an elastic annular inclusion is investigated. Utilizing the Muskhelishvili complex variable method, the explicit series form solutions of the complex potentials in the matrix and the inclusion region are derived. The image force acting on the disclination dipole centre is also calculated. The influence of the location of the disclination dipole and the thickness of the annular inclusion as well as the elastic dissimilarity of materials upon the equilibrium position of the disclination dipole is discussed in detail. The results show that a stable equilibrium point of the disclination dipole near the inclusion is found for certain combinations of material constant.Moreover, the force on the disclination dipole is strongly affected by the position of the disclination dipole and the thickness of annular inclusion. The repulsion force increases (or the attraction force reduces) with the increase of the thickness of the annular inclusion. An appropriate critical value of the thickness of the annular inclusion may be found to change the direction of the force on the disclination dipole. The present solutions include previous results as special cases.

  12. Experimental Study of the Forces Acting on the Tool in the Friction-Stir Welding of AA 2024 T3 Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Carrino, L.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, AA 2024 T3-rolled sheets were joined in butt joint configuration through the friction stir welding process. Different joints were carried out varying the principal process parameters (i.e., tool welding speed and tool rotational speed). The aim of this work was the study and the experimental characterization of the influence of the process parameters on the forces acting on the tool during the FSW process. Furthermore, it was studied the correlation between the forces and the grain size, in particular with the extension of the heat-affected zone. Forces acting along the axis parallel to the tool are actually greater than those acting along welding direction. All the recorded forces are strictly dependant on the process parameters adopted. No correlation has been found between the grain dimension within the weld bead and the recorded forces, while the greater the forces, the narrower the extension of the heat-affected zone.

  13. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  14. Heliospheric Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: Drag-Based Model Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Žic, T; Temmer, M

    2015-01-01

    The so-called drag-based model (DBM) simulates analytically the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in interplanetary space and allows the prediction of their arrival times and impact speeds at any point in the heliosphere ("target"). The DBM is based on the assumption that beyond a distance of about 20 solar radii from the Sun, the dominant force acting on CMEs is the "aerodynamic" drag force. In the standard form of DBM, the user provisionally chooses values for the model input parameters, by which the kinematics of the CME over the entire Sun--"target" distance range is defined. The choice of model input parameters is usually based on several previously undertaken statistical studies. In other words, the model is used by ad hoc implementation of statistics-based values of the input parameters, which are not necessarily appropriate for the CME under study. Furthermore, such a procedure lacks quantitative information on how well the simulation reproduces the coronagraphically observed kinematics of ...

  15. Acoustic Interaction Forces and Torques Acting on Suspended Spheres in an Ideal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J Henrique; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Silva, Glauber T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N objects suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. We utilize the partial-wave expansion method with translational addition theorem and re-expansion of multipole series to solve the related multiple scattering problem. We show that the acoustic interaction force and torque can be obtained using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets' radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e., Mie scattering regime). The results show that the acoustic interaction forces present an oscillatory spatial distribution which follows the pattern formed by interference between the external and rescattered waves. In addition, acoustic interaction torques arise on the absorbing droplets whenever a nonsymmetric wavefront is formed by the external and rescattered waves' interference.

  16. Application of DDA Approach to Simulation of Ice Breaking Process and Evaluation of Ice Force Acting on A Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张运良; 林皋; 李志军; 王永学

    2002-01-01

    The sea ice is idealized as an elastic-brittle material. When an ice sheet moves toward a structure, the dynamic in-teraction between ice and the structure is analyzed by the DDA (Discontinuous Deformation Analysis) approach, wherethe ice sheet and the structure are considered as assemblages of blocky masses. This has the advantages that the wholeprocess of collision between the ice and structure can be shown visually with a series of pictures. Meanwhile, the dynamicresponse of the structure at each time step after the bumping of the ice against the structure is calculated. And with theaid of inverse analysis developed by the authors, the time history of the resultant ice force exerting on the structure isevaluated. A numerical example shows that the proposed approach is suitable to the simulation of the ice-breaking processand reasonable result of ice force acting on the structure can be obtained.

  17. FORCEFUL ARRESTS: AN OVERVIEW OF SECTION 49 OF THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE ACT 51 OF 1977 AND ITS RECENT AMENDMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinda Botha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The debate concerning the use of violence by the police force is an endless one. Section 49 of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 serves as a framework for the use of violence by police officers during arrests in South Africa. While some hold the opinion that the powers of the police in this respect should be restricted, others see the 2003 redefined section 49 as a legislative guarantee of a suspect’s right to flee. Against this background this article has as its focus a critical discussion of the historical development of section 49 as well as the recent amendments of the same. The current legal position in South Africa is also compared with that in the United States of America as well as in the United Kingdom. Finally, certain conclusions and recommendations are made in order to enhance more favourable regulation of the employment of force in effecting arrests.

  18. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary layer thicknesses $\\delta_\\mathrm{s}$ and $\\delta_\\mathrm{t}$ relative to the particle radius $a$, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength $\\lambda$. This is the limit relevant to scattering of sound and ultrasound waves from micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical parti...

  19. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a viscous fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    force, which is valid for any particle radius and boundary-layer thickness provided that both of these length scales are much smaller than the wavelength of the ultrasound wave (millimeters in water at megahertz frequencies). The acoustophoretic response of suspended microparticles is predicted...

  20. EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION AND EFFECTIVE DRAG COEFFICIENT OF A BROWNIAN PARTICLE IN A PERIODIC POTENTIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyun Wang

    2011-01-01

    We study the stochastic motion of a Brownian particle driven by a constant force over a static periodic potential.We show that both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient are mathematically well-defined and we derive analytic expressions for these two quantities.We then investigate the asymptotic behaviors of the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient,respectively,for small driving force and for large driving force.In the case of small driving force,the effective diffusion is reduced from its Brownian value by a factor that increases exponentially with the amplitude of the potential.The effective drag coefficient is increased by approximately the same factor.As a result,the Einstein relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drag coefficient is approximately valid when the driving force is small.For moderately large driving force,both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient are increased from their Brownian values,and the Einstein relation breaks down. In the limit of very large driving force,both the effective diffusion and the effective drag coefficient converge to their Brownian values and the Einstein relation is once again valid.

  1. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  2. Dynamic drag of edge dislocation by circular prismatic loops and point defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malashenko, V.V., E-mail: malashenko@kinetic.ac.donetsk.u [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering of NASU, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Donetsk National Technical University, 83000 Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2009-11-15

    Motion of edge dislocation in the presence of prismatic loops and point defects is studied analytically. It is shown that at certain conditions, the velocity dependence of the drag force has two maximums and two minimums.

  3. Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft; definition of physical drag components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destarac, D. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France); Van der Vooren, J. [Senior research scientist, retired, Hoekse Waard (Netherlands)

    2004-09-01

    Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft on the basis of calculated viscous flow is discussed. Unique definitions for viscous drag plus wave drag and for induced drag are established. The concept of additive through flow drag is introduced. Drag/thrust bookkeeping is given attention. All drag components can be calculated in the flow region adjacent to the aircraft, where numerical accuracy is expectingly highest. Uniform handling of complex aircraft configurations is brought within reach. Near-field/far-field drag balances are exact. Computational aspects are discussed, in particular the elimination of spurious drag sources. Numerical examples are given for a wing-body and for a wing-body-pylon-nacelle configuration. In either case, the spurious drag sources are eliminated. Acceptable agreement is obtained for the total drag in the first case, and for the installation drag in the second case. Extension of the analysis presented to propeller-driven transport aircraft is straightforward. (author)

  4. The Davis-Bacon Act: Cost Impact on the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    June 1977 issue of the Labor Law Journal, Donald Elisburg, then Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment Standards, discussed an Executive Order...1992). 7. Elisburg, Donald. "Wage Protection Under the Davis- Bacon Act," Labor Law Journal, 28: 323-328 (June 1977). 8. Federal Acquisition...R. "Davis-Bacon: Labor’s Anachronism 1974," Labor Law Journal, 25: 404-407 (July 1974). 59 Vita Raymond Carpenter was born on 18 August 1953 in

  5. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, Rahul; Neveln, Izaak D; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; MacIver, Malcolm A; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal- istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation fram...

  6. Self-burrowing seeds: drag reduction in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wonjong; Choi, Sung Mok; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drag reduction of self-burrowing seeds in granular media. In response to environmental changes in humidity, the awn (a tail-like appendage of seed) of Pelargonium carnosum exhibits coiling-uncoiling deformation which induces the thrust and rotary motions of the head of the seed against the surface of the soil. Using various sizes of glass beads that mimic the granular soil, we measure the thrust forces required for the seed of Pelargonium carnosum to penetrate into granular media with and without rotation. Our quantitative measurements show that the rotation of the seed remarkably reduces the granular drag as compared to the drag against the non-spinning seed. This leads us to conclude that the hygroscopically active awns of Pelargonium carnosum enables its seed to dig into the relatively coarse granular soils.

  7. A design and analysis approach for drag reduction on aircraft with adaptive lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusher, Aaron Anthony

    distributions are produced which match the classical result for minimum induced drag. Application of the profile drag reduction schemes produce solutions which force the wing to operate in the low-drag-ranges of the natural-laminar-flow airfoil sections, thereby lowering profile drag. The total drag reduction schemes use a curve-fit routine that generates airfoil drag polars given flap angle and Reynolds number. The approximated drag polars allow the prediction of profile drag values to be combined with induced drag values to form a total drag function, which is utilized with a constrained nonlinear optimizer that determines best flap angles for total drag and trim. The different drag reduction schemes each produce independent flap-angle solutions and lift distributions for a given aircraft configuration and operating condition, and provide valuable insight for aerodynamic design and trade studies. The drag reduction approach is intended to be applicable to arbitrary aircraft configurations, and can be adapted to use surface incidence, twist, and flap angles as optimization variables, thereby creating a powerful and flexible aerodynamic design and analysis tool.

  8. On the Zener drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nes, E.; Ryum, N.; Hunderi, O.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between particles and a grain boundary is investigated analytically, with attention given to the interaction between a single particle and a grain boundary and to the calculation of a restraining force from many particles on a grain boundary. The results of the analysis are fully consistent with the estimate of Zener and Smith (1984). It is noted that the effects of particle shape and distribution are more important factors than the effect of the nature of the particle interface and that such effects can strongly influence recrystallization and grain growth behavior.

  9. Drag reduction by wing tip slots in a gliding Harris' hawk, Parabuteo unicinctus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker

    1995-01-01

    The anterior-most primary feathers of many birds that soar over land bend upwards and separate vertically to form slotted wing tips during flight. The slots are thought to reduce aerodynamic drag, although drag reduction has never been demonstrated in living birds. Wing theory explains how the feathers that form the tip slots can reduce induced drag by spreading vorticity horizontally along the wing and by acting as winglets, which are used on aircraft to make wings non-planar and to spread vorticity vertically. This study uses the induced drag factor to measure the induced drag of a wing relative to that of a standard planar wing with the same span, lift and speed. An induced drag factor of less than 1 indicates that the wing is non-planar. The minimum drag of a Harris' hawk gliding freely in a wind tunnel was measured before and after removing the slots by clipping the tip feathers. The unclipped hawk had 70­90 % of the drag of the clipped hawk at speeds between 7.3 and 15.0 m s-1. At a wing span of 0.8 m, the unclipped hawk had a mean induced drag factor of 0.56, compared with the value of 1.10 assumed for the clipped hawk. A Monte Carlo simulation of error propagation and a sensitivity analysis to possible errors in measured and assumed values showed that the true mean value of the induced drag factor for the unclipped hawk was unlikely to be more than 0.93. These results for a living bird support the conclusions from a previous study of a feathered tip on a model wing in a wind tunnel: the feathers that form the slotted tips reduce induced drag by acting as winglets that make the wings non-planar and spread vorticity both horizontally and vertically.

  10. Simultaneous drag and flow measurements of Olympic skeleton athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yae Eun; Digiulio, David; Peters, Steve; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    The Olympic sport of skeleton involves an athlete riding a small sled face first down a bobsled track at speeds up to 130 km/hr. In these races, the difference between gold and missing the medal stand altogether can be hundredths of a second per run. As such, reducing aerodynamic drag through proper body positioning is of first order importance. To better study the flow behavior and to improve the performance of the athletes, we constructed a static force balance system on a mock section of a bobsled track. Athlete and the sled are placed on the force balance system which is positioned at the exit of an open loop wind tunnel. Simultaneous drag force and DPIV velocity field measurements were made along with video recordings of body position to aid the athletes in determining their optimal aerodynamic body position.

  11. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya R

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relati...

  12. AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN ALBATROSS FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2005-01-01

    Numerical investigation on the dynamic mechanism has been made for an albatross to fly effectively near sea surface. Emphasizing on the effect of the sea wave,the albatross is simplified as a two-dimensional airfoil and the panel method based on the potential flow theory is employed to calculate the wave effect on the aerodynamic forces. The numerical results have been presented for the states of flying at different constant speeds with constant heights above sea level, and flying at different constant speeds with the combined oscillations of pitching and free heaving. It is shown that the albatross flight efficiency depends on not only the speed and height of flight but also the wave amplitude and the wavelength. The albatross benefits by wave effect to get thrust,so as to reduce the resistance in the circumstances of rough sea.

  13. Quantifying drag on wellbore casings in moving salt sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijermars, R.; Jackson, M. P. A.; Dooley, T. P.

    2014-08-01

    Frontier hydrocarbon development projects in the deepwater slopes of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, Santos Basin and Lower Congo Basin all require wells to cross ductile layers of autochthonous or allochthonous salt moving at peak rates of 100 mm yr-1. The Couette-Poiseuille number is introduced here to help pinpoint the depth of shear stress reversal in such salt layers. For any well-planned through salt, the probable range of creep forces of moving salt needs to be taken into account when designing safety margins and load-factor tolerance of the well casing. Drag forces increase with wellbore diameter, but more significantly with effective viscosity and speed of the creeping salt layer. The potential drag forces on cased wellbores in moving salt sheets are estimated analytically using a range of salt viscosities (1015-1019 Pa s) and creep rates (0-10 mm yr-1). Drag on perfectly rigid casing of infinite strength may reach up to 13 Giga Newton per meter wellbore length in salt having a viscosity of 1019 Pa s. Well designers may delay stress accumulations due to salt drag when flexible casing accommodates some of the early displacement and strain. However, all creeping salt could displace, fracture and disconnect well casing, eventually. The shear strength of typical heavy duty well casing (about 1000 MPa) can be reached due to drag by moving salt. Internal flow of salt will then fracture the casing near salt entry and exit points, but the structural damage is likely to remain unnoticed early in the well-life when the horizontal shift of the wellbore is still negligibly small (at less than 1 cm yr-1). Disruption of casing and production flow lines within the anticipated service lifetime of a well remains a significant risk factor within distinct zones of low-viscosity salt which may reach ultrafast creep rates of 100 mm yr-1.

  14. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ogata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechanical shear.

  15. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  16. Drag reduction in turbulent MHD pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is a preliminary study devoted to verifying whether or not direct simulations of turbulent Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) flows in liquid metals reproduce experimental observations of drag reduction. Two different cases have been simulated by a finite difference scheme which is second order accurate in space and time. In the first case, an external azimuthal magnetic field is imposed. In this case, the magnetic field acts on the mean axial velocity and complete laminarization of the flow at N(sub a) = 30 has been achieved. In the second case, an axial magnetic field is imposed which affects only fluctuating velocities, and thus the action is less efficient. This second case is more practical, but comparison between numerical and experimental results is only qualitative.

  17. Drag force of submarine landslides mudflow impacting on a suspended pipeline%海底泥流冲击悬跨管道拖曳力系数分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏伟; 王立忠; 国振; 袁峰

    2015-01-01

    Submarine landslide is one of the most dangerous geological disasters for the subsea installation of petroleum production. Under the action of the seawater, submarine landslide will change to slurry and impact on a submarine suspended pipeline. Computational fluid dynamics ( CFD ) is one of numerical methods employed to analyze the landslides impacting on the suspended pipeline. Herschel-Bulkley model is adopted, which is more suitable for modeling viscous slurry, to simulate slurry impacting on submarine pipeline. The effects of the suspending height from seabed are also discussed. The study finds that normal drag coefficient increases with the rising of the suspending height. When a critical suspending height is reached, the drag coefficient is constant.%海底滑坡是海洋油气工程最危险的地质灾害之一,直接影响海底管线运营安全。滑坡体失稳滑动过程中,由于海水掺和作用逐渐加速转变成快速滑动泥流,冲击海底悬跨管道。基于当前国际通用的计算流体动力学( CFD)方法,采用赫巴模型描述快速滑动泥流,计算分析海底滑坡冲击悬跨管道的受力特性,重点分析悬跨高度对管道法向拖曳力系数的影响。研究发现,管道法向拖曳力系数随悬跨高度的增长而增大,当达到某一悬跨高度时,管道拖曳力系数保持稳定。

  18. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  19. Estimation of the Perturbing Accelerations Induced on the LARES Satellite by Neutral Atmosphere Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Pardini, Carmen; Lucchesi, David Massimo; Peron, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The laser-ranged satellite LARES is expected to provide new refined measurements of relativistic physics, as well as significant contributions to space geodesy and geophysics. The very low area-to-mass ratio of this passive and dense satellite was chosen to reduce as much as possible the disturbing effects of non-gravitational perturbations. However, because of its height, about 1450 km compared with about 5800-5900 km for the two LAGEOS satellites, LARES is exposed to a much stronger drag due to neutral atmosphere. From a precise orbit determination, analyzing the laser ranging normal points of LARES over a time span of about 3.7 years, it was found an average semi-major axis decay rate of -0.999 m per year, corresponding to a non-conservative net force with a mean along-track acceleration of -1.444 x 10^-11 m/s^2. By means of a modified version of the SATRAP (ISTI/CNR) code, the neutral drag perturbation acting on LARES was evaluated over the same time span, taking into account the real evolution of solar a...

  20. A framework for understanding drag parameterizations for coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Johanna H.; Hench, James L.

    2011-08-01

    In a hydrodynamic sense, a coral reef is a complex array of obstacles that exerts a net drag force on water moving over the reef. This drag is typically parameterized in ocean circulation models using drag coefficients (CD) or roughness length scales (z0); however, published CD for coral reefs span two orders of magnitude, posing a challenge to predictive modeling. Here we examine the reasons for the large range in reported CD and assess the limitations of using CD and z0 to parameterize drag on reefs. Using a formal framework based on the 3-D spatially averaged momentum equations, we show that CD and z0 are functions of canopy geometry and velocity profile shape. Using an idealized two-layer model, we illustrate that CD can vary by more than an order of magnitude for the same geometry and flow depending on the reference velocity selected and that differences in definition account for much of the range in reported CD values. Roughness length scales z0 are typically used in 3-D circulation models to adjust CD for reference height, but this relies on spatially averaged near-bottom velocity profiles being logarithmic. Measurements from a shallow backreef indicate that z0 determined from fits to point measurements of velocity profiles can be very different from z0 required to parameterize spatially averaged drag. More sophisticated parameterizations for drag and shear stresses are required to simulate 3-D velocity fields over shallow reefs; in the meantime, we urge caution when using published CD and z0 values for coral reefs.

  1. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    , such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states, which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  2. Vapor layers reduce drag without the crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Berry, Joseph; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    The drag of a solid sphere moving in fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number, Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re 3 ×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect, can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as 600. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length captures the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  3. Drag measurements on a laminar-flow body of revolution in the 13-inch magnetic suspension and balance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel drag force measurements were taken on a laminar flow body of revolution free of support interference. This body was tested at zero incidence in the NASA Langley 13 in. Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The primary objective of these tests was to substantiate the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 in. MSBS. The drag force calibrations and wind-on repeatability data provide a means of assessing these capabilities. Additional investigations include: (1) the effects of fixing transition; (2) the effects of fins installed in the tail; and (3) surface flow visualization using both liquid crystals and oil flow. Also two simple drag prediction codes were used to assess their usefulness in estimating overall body drag.

  4. Turbulent drag reduction by polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Daniel [Van der Waals-Zeeman Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65 1018, XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Amarouchene, Yacine [CPMOH, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence cedex (France); Wagner, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany); Douady, Stephane [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Cadot, Olivier [ENSTA, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-04-13

    The reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of polymers is studied experimentally. We first address the question of where the action of the polymers is taking place. Subsequently, we show that there is a direct correlation of drag reduction with the elongational viscosity of the polymers. For this, the reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of the biopolymer DNA is studied. These results open the way for a direct visualization study of the polymer conformation in a turbulent boundary layer.

  5. Drag Effects in Charm Photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Norrbin, E

    1999-01-01

    We have refined a model for charm fragmentation at hadron colliders. This model can also be applied to the photoproduction of charm. We investigate the effect of fragmentation on the distribution of produced charm quarks. The drag effect is seen to produce charm hadrons that are shifted in rapidity in the direction of the beam remnant. We also study the importance of different production mechanisms such as charm in the photon and from parton showers.

  6. WATER TUNNEL EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON THE DRAG REDUCTION CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TRAVELING WAVY WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yan; LU Chuan-jing; SI Ting; ZHU Kun

    2011-01-01

    Drag reduction experiment of the traveling wavy wall at high Reynolds number is conducted. A suit of traveling wavy wall device is developed. The drag forces of the traveling wavy wall with various wave speeds ( c ) are measured under different water speeds (U) in the K15 cavitation water tunnel and are compared with that of the flat plate. The results show that the mean drag force of the traveling wavy wall have decreased and then increased with oscillation frequency increasing at the same flow speed.Under different flow speeds, when traveling wave wall reached to the minimum of drag force, the corresponding the ratio of the wall motion phase speed c to flow speed U, c/U is slightly different. Within the parameters of the experiment, when c/U reaches a certain value, the drag force of the traveling wavy wall can be less than that of the flat plate. The drag reduction can be up to 42%.Furthermore, as the value of c / U increases, the traveling wavy wall can restrain the separation and improve the quality of flow field.

  7. Drag reduction through wave-current interactions with a marine hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Susan; Viola, Ignazio Maria; Ingram, David

    2015-11-01

    A hydrofoil exposed to oscillating flow experiences a reduction in drag due to the Knoller-Betz effect. This is experimentally identifiable by an increasingly inverted von Kármán wake and a corresponding thrust force on the foil. The rate of drag reduction, dependent on plunge amplitude and frequency, reduces with unsteady flow phenomena at higher reduced frequencies. For experimental ease, investigations of this effect have relied on actively plunging/pitching a foil within a steady current. However, one potential application is to drag reduction in high-speed ships adopting submerged foils. In this case the foil is travelling through wave-current induced oscillatory flow, resulting in an additional dynamic variation of hydrostatic pressure across the chord; a phenomena not fully addressed in previous experiments. Here we investigate the effects of this pressure gradient on drag reduction for a stationary foil in combined waves and current, through a combination of force measurements and particle image velocimetry.

  8. Spacecraft Re-Entry Impact Point Targeting Using Aerodynamic Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Sanny R.; Bevilacqua, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The ability to re-enter the atmosphere at a desired location is important for spacecraft containing components that may survive re-entry. While impact point targeting has traditionally been initiated through impulsive burns with chemical thrusters on large vehicles such as the Space Shuttle, and the Soyuz and Apollo capsules, many small spacecraft do not host thrusters and require an alternative means of impact point targeting to ensure that falling debris do not cause harm to persons or property. This paper discusses the use of solely aerodynamic drag force to perform this targeting. It is shown that by deploying and retracting a drag device to vary the ballistic coefficient of the spacecraft, any desired longitude and latitude on the ground can be targeted provided that the maneuvering begins early enough and the latitude is less than the inclination of the orbit. An analytical solution based on perturbations from a numerically propagated trajectory is developed to map the initial state and ballistic coefficient profile of a spacecraft to its impact point. This allows the ballistic coefficient profile necessary to reach a given target point to be rapidly calculated, making it feasible to generate the guidance for the decay trajectory onboard the spacecraft. The ability to target an impact point using aerodynamic drag will enhance the capabilities of small spacecraft and will enable larger space vehicles containing thrusters to save fuel by more effectively leveraging the available aerodynamic drag.

  9. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Rahul; Shirgaonkar, Anup A; Neveln, Izaak D; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; MacIver, Malcolm A; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-12-10

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal-istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation framework helps to predict the observed height of the ribbon fin of electric knifefish, a diverse group of neotropical fish which are an important model system in sensory neurobiology. We also show how drag-thrust separation leads to models that can predict the swimming velocity of an organism or a robotic vehicle.

  10. Drag measurements on a laminar flow body of revolution in Langley's 13 inch magnetic suspension and balance system. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Low-speed wind tunnel drag force measurements were taken on a laminar flow body of revolution free of support interference. This body was tested at zero incidence in the NASA Langley 13 inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The primary objective of these tests was to substantiate the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 inch MSBS. A secondary objective was to obtain support interference free drag measurements on an axisymmetric body of interest. Both objectives were met. The drag force calibrations and wind-on repeatability data provide a means of assessing the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 inch MSBS. The measured drag coefficients for this body are of interest to researchers actively involved in designing minimum drag fuselage shapes. Additional investigations included: the effects of fixing transition; the effects of fins installed in the tail; surface flow visualizations using both liquid crystals and oil flow; and base pressure measurements using a one-channel telemetry system. Two drag prediction codes were used to assess their usefulness in estimating overall body drag. These theoretical results did not compare well with the measured values because of the following: incorrect or non-existent modeling of a laminar separation bubble on the body and incorrect of non-existent estimates of base pressure drag.

  11. Introduction of parameterized sea ice drag coefficients into ice free-drift modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Peng; LI Zhijun; HAN Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting characteristics of sea ice drift depend on the atmospheric drag coefficient (Ca) and oceanic drag coefficient (Cw). Parameterizations of drag coefficients rather than constant values provide us a way to look insight into the dependence of these characteristics on sea ice conditions. In the present study, the parameterized ice drag coefficients are included into a free-drift sea ice dynamic model, and the wind factorα and the deflection angleθ between sea ice drift and wind velocity as well as the ratio ofCa toCw are studied to investigate their dependence on the impact factors such as local drag coefficients, floe and ridge geometry. The results reveal that in an idealized steady ocean,Ca/Cw increases obviously with the increasing ice concentration for small ice floes in the marginal ice zone, while it remains at a steady level (0.2–0.25) for large floes in the central ice zone. The wind factorα increases rapidly at first and approaches a steady level of 0.018 whenA is greater than 20%. And the deflection angleθ drops rapidly from an initial value of approximate 80° and decreases slowly asA is greater than 20% without a steady level likeα. The values of these parameters agree well with the previously reported observations in Arctic. The ridging intensity is an important parameter to determine the dominant contribution of the ratio of skin friction drag coefficient (Cs’/Cs) and the ratio of ridge form drag coefficient (Cr’/Cr) to the value of Ca/Cw,α, andθ, because of the dominance of ridge form drag for large ridging intensity and skin friction for small ridging intensity among the total drag forces. Parameterization of sea ice drag coefficients has the potential to be embedded into ice dynamic models to better account for the variability of sea ice in the transient Arctic Ocean.

  12. Effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective force acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system: Analytic liquid-state theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervanyov, A I

    2016-12-28

    By making use of the polymer reference interaction site model, we analytically study the effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective forces acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system. The performed theoretical analysis has no restrictions with respect to the polymer density and relative sizes of the colloids and polymers. The polymer mediated (PM) potential acting between colloids is shown to significantly depend on the strength and range of the polymer-polymer interactions. In the nano-particle limit, where the colloid radius is much smaller than the polymer gyration radius, the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions causes only quantitative changes to the PM potential. In the opposite limit of relatively large colloids, the polymer-polymer interactions revert the sign of the total effective force acting between colloids so that this force becomes attractive at sufficiently large polymer densities. With the objective to study an intricate interplay between the attractive PM forces and steric repulsion in different polymer density regimes, we calculate the second virial coefficient B of the total effective potential acting between colloids. The dependence of B on the polymer density is discussed in detail, revealing several novel features of the PM interactions caused by the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions.

  13. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  14. Drag-free Small Satellite Platforms for Future Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. W.; Hong, S.; Nguyen, A.; Serra, P.; Balakrishnan, K.; Buchman, S.; De Bra, D. B.; Hultgren, E.; Zoellner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous satellite geodesy measurements lasting into the foreseeable future are critical for the understanding of our changing planet. It is therefore imperative that we explore ways to reduce costs, while maintaining science return. Small satellite platforms represent a promising path forward if ways can be found to reduce the size, weight, and power of the necessary instrumentation. One key enabling technology is a precision small-scale drag-free system under development at the University of Florida and Stanford University. A drag-free satellite (a) contains and shields a free-floating test mass from all non-gravitational forces, and (b) precisely measures the position of the test mass inside the satellite. A feedback control system commands thrusters to fly the 'tender' spacecraft with respect to the test mass. Thus, both test mass and spacecraft follow a pure geodesic in spacetime. By tracking the relative positions of low Earth orbiting drag-free satellites, using laser interferometry for example, the detailed shape of geodesics, and through analysis, the higher order harmonics of the Earth's geopotential can be determined. Drag-free systems can be orders of magnitude more accurate that accelerometer-based systems because they fundamentally operate at extremely low acceleration levels, and are therefore not limited by dynamic range like accelerometers. Since no test mass suspension force is required, larger gaps between the test mass and satellite are possible, which reduces the level of unwanted disturbing forces produced by the satellite itself. The small satellite platform also enables cost-effective constellations, which can increase the temporal resolution of gravity field maps by more-frequently observing given locations on the Earth. Mixed-orbit constellations can also markedly enhance observational strength, decorrelate gravity coefficient estimates, and help address the fundamental aliasing problem that exists with previous missions. The

  15. Transformance: reading the gospel in drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeffrey Q

    2004-01-01

    Despite the large body of scholarship on drag and its performance of misogyny, mimicry, and masculinity, little attention has been paid to the role of musical genres in Black drag performance and its reception. This essay explores drag performances of gospel music and its relationship with the spectator at the Biology Bar, a Black gay drag site in Chicago. By examining the shift from the club "space" to the church "place," this research locates several possibilities for queer gospel performances. Through the introduction of a theory of transformance, this essay highlights the contradictions, complications, and complexities of the relationship between the Black church and the Black gay community.

  16. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  17. Extensibility enables locomotion under isotropic drag

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic viscous drag is usually believed to be a requirement for the low Reynolds number locomotion of slender bodies such as flagella and cilia. Here we show that locomotion under isotropic drag is possible for extensible slender bodies. After general considerations, a two-ring swimmer and a model dinoflagellate flagellum are studied analytically to illustrate how extensibility can be exploited for self-propulsion without drag anisotropy. This new degree of freedom could be useful for some complex swimmer geometries and locomotion in complex fluid environments where drag anisotropy is weak or even absent.

  18. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  19. Drag-shield drop tower residual acceleration optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Fernandez De Pierola, M.; Duran, J.

    2016-07-01

    Among the forces that appear in drop towers for microgravity experiments, aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role in the residual acceleration. Buoyancy can also be critical, especially at the first instances of the drop when the low speed of the experimental platform makes the aerodynamic drag small compared with buoyancy. In this paper the perturbation method is used to formulate an analytical model which has been validated experimentally. The experimental test was conduced by undergraduate students of aerospace engineering at the Institute of Microgravity ‘Ignacio Da Riva’ of the Technical University of Madrid (IDR/UPM) microgravity tower. The test helped students to understand the influence of the buoyancy on the residual acceleration of the experiment platform. The objective of the students was to understand the physical process during the drop, identify the main parameters involved in the residual acceleration and determine the most suitable configuration for the next drop tower proposed to be built at UPM.

  20. Substructure drag effects and recrystallization textures in aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, R. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Materials; Bate, P. [Doncasters plc, Melbourne (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-10

    Many important recrystallization texture components in metals such as aluminium originate from nuclei in which the mobile high-angle boundary exists prior to, or is formed in the early stages of, annealing. Nucleation can then occur by a process known as strain-induced boundary migration (SIBM). It is possible that this process will involve several growing subgrains, and the drag from that substructure can then have a significant effect. A simple model is used to demonstrate how changes in the overall driving force for recrystallization and Zener drag can affect recrystallization textures when SIBM is involved. This is discussed in relation to experimental observations and the evidence for this process is reviewed.

  1. CAN 8-WEEKS OF TRAINING AFFECT ACTIVE DRAG IN YOUNG SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 8-weeks of training on active drag in young swimmers of both genders. Eight girls and twelve boys' belonging to the same swimming team and with regular competitive participation in national and regional events for the previous two seasons participated in this study. Active drag measurements were conducted in two different evaluation moments: at the beginning of the season and after 8 weeks of training (6.0 ± 0.15 training units per week, 21.00 ± 3.23 km per week and 3.50 ± 0.23 km per training unit. The maximal swimming velocity at the distance of 13 m, active drag and drag coefficient were measured on both trials by the method of small perturbations with the help of an additional hydrodynamic body. After 8 weeks of training, mean active drag (drag force and drag coefficient decreased in girls and boys, although no significant differences were found between the two trials. It seems that 8 weeks of swimming training were not sufficient to allow significant improvements on swimming technique

  2. Improving the durability of a drag-reducing nanocoating by enhancing its mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Zhang, Songsong; Dong, Hongyu; Han, Shihui; Wei, Hao; Shi, Feng

    2015-02-25

    The durability of superhydrophobic surface is a major problem to restrict industrial application of superhydrophobic materials from laboratory research, which can be attributed to a more general issue of mechanical stability for superhydrophobic coatings. Therefore, in order to handle this issue, we have fabricated a mechanically stable drag-reducing coating composed of elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and hydrophobic copper particles on model ships, which can resist mechanical abrasion and has displayed a durable drag-reducing effect. In comparison with normal Au superhydrophobic coatings, the as-prepared PDMS/copper coatings showed durable drag reduction performance with a similar drag-reducing rate before (26%) and after (24%) mechanical abrasion. The mechanism for the enhanced mechanical stability and maintained drag reduction of the superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated through characterizations of surface morphology, surface wettability, and water adhesive force evaluation before and after abrasion. This is the first demonstration to realize the application of durable drag reduction by improving the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic coatings. We do believe that superhydrophobic surfaces with good resistance to mechanical abrasion or scratching may draw wide attention and gain significant applications with durable drag-reducing properties.

  3. Grafted natural polymer as new drag reducing agent: An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Hayder A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation introduces a new natural drag reducing agent which has the ability to improve the flow in pipelines carrying aqueous or hydrocarbon liquids in turbulent flow. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus mucilage drag reduction performance was tested in water and hydrocarbon (gas-oil media after grafting. The drag reduction test was conducted in a buildup closed loop liquid circulation system consists of two pipes 0.0127 and 0.0381 m Inside Diameter (ID, four testing sections in each pipe (0.5 to 2.0 m, tank, pump and pressure transmitters. Reynolds number (Re, additive concentration and the transported media type (water and gas-oil, were the major drag reduction variables investigated. The experimental results show that, new additive drag reduction ability is high with maximum percentage of drag reduction (%Dr up to 60% was achieved. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction ability increased by increasing the additive concentration. The %Dr was found to increase by increasing the Re by using the water-soluble additive while it was found to decrease by increasing the Re when using the oil-soluble additive. The %Dr was higher in the 0.0381 m ID pipe. Finally, the grafted and natural mucilage showed high resistance to shear forces when circulated continuously for 200 seconds in the closed-loop system.

  4. Investigation of drag reduction through a flapping mechanism on circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Md. Asafuddoula; Gupta, Avijit Das; Rana, M. D. Juwel; Ahmed, Dewan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    During flapping wing, a bird develops sufficient lift force as well as counteracts drag and increases its speed through different orientations of feathers on the flapping wings. Differently oriented feathers play a significant role in drag reduction during flying of a bird. With an objective to investigate the effect of installation of such flapping mechanism as a mean of drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder, this concept has been implemented through installation of continuous and mini flaps, made of MS sheet metal, where flaps are oriented at different angles as like feathers of flapping wings. The experiments are carried out in a subsonic wind tunnel. After validation and comparison with conventional result of drag analysis of a single cylinder, effects of flapping with Reynolds number variation, implementation of different orientations of mini flaps and variation of different interspacing distance between mini flaps are studied to find the most effective angle of attack of drag reduction on the body of circular cylinder. This research show that, installation of continuous flap reduces value of drag co-efficient, CD up to 66%, where as mini flaps are found more effective by reducing it up to 73%. Mini flaps of L/s=6.25, all angled at 30O, at the 30O angular position on the body of circular cylinder has been found the most effective angle of attack for drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder.

  5. Drag reduction by means of dimpled surfaces in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nesselrooij, M.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Schrijer, F. F. J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct force measurements and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to investigate the drag and flow structure caused by surfaces with patterns of shallow spherical dimples with rounded edges subject to turbulent boundary layers. Drag reduction of up to 4 % is found compared to a flat surface. The largest drag reduction was found at the highest tested Reynolds number of 40,000 (based on dimple diameter). A favorable trend promises further improvements at higher Reynolds numbers. PIV revealed the absence of significant separation inside the dimples but did show the existence of a converging/diverging flow in the upstream and downstream dimple half, respectively. This leads to the rejection of theories proposed by other authors concerning the mechanism responsible for drag reduction. Instead, a fundamental dependence on pattern orientation is observed. Furthermore, preliminary Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations have been compared with the PIV data. Although the large-scale mean flows show good agreement, the numerical simulation predicts no drag reduction. As the RANS approach is inherently incapable of resolving effects on the behavior of small-scale turbulence structure, the origin of drag reduction is attributed to effects on the small-scale turbulence, which is not resolved in the simulations. It is argued that dimples, when placed in well-designed patterns to create the necessary large-scale flow structure, lead to drag reduction by affecting the turbulent structures in the boundary layer, possibly in a way similar to spanwise oscillations of the wall.

  6. Forces on wheels and fuel consumption in cars

    CERN Document Server

    Güémez, J

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by real classroom discussions, we analyse the forces acting on moving vehicles, specifically friction forces on the wheels. In usual cars, with front-wheel drive, when the car accelerates these forces are in the forward direction in the front wheels, but they are in the opposite direction in the rear wheels. The situation may be intriguing for students, but it may also be helpful and stimulating to clarify the role of friction forces on rolling objects. In this article we also study thermodynamical aspects of an accelerating car, relating the distance traveled with the amount of fuel consumed. The fuel consumption is explicitly shown to be Galilean invariant and we identify the Gibbs free energy as the relevant quantity that enters in the thermodynamical description of the accelerating car. The more realistic case of the car's motion taking into account the dragging forces is also discussed.

  7. Error analysis and assessment of unsteady forces acting on a flapping wing micro air vehicle: free flight versus wind-tunnel experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, J V; Percin, M; van Oudheusden, B W; Remes, B; de Wagter, C; de Croon, G C H E; de Visser, C C

    2015-08-20

    An accurate knowledge of the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on a bio-inspired, flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV) is crucial in the design development and optimization cycle. Two different types of experimental approaches are often used: determination of forces from position data obtained from external optical tracking during free flight, or direct measurements of forces by attaching the FWMAV to a force transducer in a wind-tunnel. This study compares the quality of the forces obtained from both methods as applied to a 17.4 gram FWMAV capable of controlled flight. A comprehensive analysis of various error sources is performed. The effects of different factors, e.g., measurement errors, error propagation, numerical differentiation, filtering frequency selection, and structural eigenmode interference, are assessed. For the forces obtained from free flight experiments it is shown that a data acquisition frequency below 200 Hz and an accuracy in the position measurements lower than ± 0.2 mm may considerably hinder determination of the unsteady forces. In general, the force component parallel to the fuselage determined by the two methods compares well for identical flight conditions; however, a significant difference was observed for the forces along the stroke plane of the wings. This was found to originate from the restrictions applied by the clamp to the dynamic oscillations observed in free flight and from the structural resonance of the clamped FWMAV structure, which generates loads that cannot be distinguished from the external forces. Furthermore, the clamping position was found to have a pronounced influence on the eigenmodes of the structure, and this effect should be taken into account for accurate force measurements.

  8. Diffusivity and hydrodynamic drag of nanoparticles at a vapor-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplik, Joel; Maldarelli, Charles

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of the surface diffusivity of colloidal spheres translating along a vapor-liquid interface show an unexpected decrease in diffusivity, or increase in surface drag (from the Stokes-Einstein relation), when the particles situate further into the vapor phase. However, direct measurements of the surface drag from the colloid velocity due to an external force find the expected decrease with deeper immersion into the vapor. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusivity and force experiments for a nanoparticle with a small surface roughness at a vapor-liquid interface to examine the effect of contact line fluctuations. The drag calculated from both calculations agree and decrease as the particle positions further into the vapor. The surface drag is smaller than the bulk liquid drag due to the partial submersion into the liquid and the finite thickness of the interfacial zone relative to the nanoparticle size. We observe weak contact line fluctuations and transient pinning events, but these do not give rise to an anomalous increase in drag in this system.

  9. Visualizing Spacetime Curvature via Frame-Drag Vortexes and Tidal Tendexes II. Stationary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fan; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Matthews, Keith D; Owen, Robert; Thorne, Kip S

    2012-01-01

    When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (which equals the Riemann tensor in vacuum) splits into two spatial, symmetric, traceless tensors: the tidal field $E$, which produces tidal forces, and the frame-drag field $B$, which produces differential frame dragging. In recent papers, we and colleagues have introduced ways to visualize these two fields: tidal tendex lines (integral curves of the three eigenvector fields of $E$) and their tendicities (eigenvalues of these eigenvector fields); and the corresponding entities for the frame-drag field: frame-drag vortex lines and their vorticities. These entities fully characterize the vacuum Riemann tensor. In this paper, we compute and depict the tendex and vortex lines, and their tendicities and vorticities, outside the horizons of stationary (Schwarzschild and Kerr) black holes; and we introduce and depict the black holes' horizon tendicity and vorticity (the normal-normal components of $E$ and $B$ on the horizon). For Schwarzschil...

  10. Drag Coefficient of Thin Flexible Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Gurram, Harika

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of drag coefficients of thin flexible cylindrical wires are described for the Reynolds number range between 250 - 1000. Results indicate that the coefficient values are about 20 to 30 percent lower than the reported laminar flow values for rigid cylinders. Possible fluid dynamics mechanism causing the reduction in drag will be discussed.

  11. Determination of the surface drag coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the dependence of the surface drag coefficient on stability, wind speed, mesoscale modulation of the turbulent flux and method of calculation of the drag coefficient. Data sets over grassland, sparse grass, heather and two forest sites are analyzed. For significantly unstable ...

  12. Polymer flexibility and turbulent drag reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer-induced drag reduction is the phenomenon by which the friction factor of a turbulent flow is reduced by the addition of small amounts of high-molecular-weight linear polymers, which conformation in solution at rest can vary between randomly coiled and rodlike. It is well known that drag redu

  13. DRAG ON SUBMICRON NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.; Einar; Kruis

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure was developed for estimating the effective collision diameter of an aggregate composed of primary particles of any size. The coagulation coefficient of two oppositely charged particles was measured experimentally and compared with classic Fuchs theory, including a new method to account for particle non-sphericity. A second set of experiments were performed on well-defined nanoparticle aggregates at different stages of sintering, i.e. from the aggregate to the fully sintered stage. Here, electrical mobility was used to characterize the particle drag. The aggregates are being built from two different size-fractionated nanoparticle aerosols, the non-aggregated particles are discarded by an electrofilter and then they are passed through a furnace at concentrations low enough not to induce coagulation.

  14. Ultrafast photon drag detector for intersubband spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigg, Hans; Graf, Stephan; Kwakernaak, Martin H.; Margotte, Bernd; Erni, Daniel; Van Son, Peter; Köhler, Klaus

    1996-03-01

    The photon drag effect of a 2D electron gas is measured using the ps infrared pulses of the wavelength-tunable free electron laser source FELIX. The pulsed photon drag response is found to depend critically on the coupling characteristics of the electrical circuit. We therefore developed an impedance and velocity matched photon drag detector. It consists of a GaAs/AlGaAs multi quantum well sample which forms an integral part of a microstrip line. A Ge-prism enables incoupling at the critical total reflection angle. This novel transmission line integrated photon drag detector (TIP-detector) generates signal transients below 10 ps rise and fall times. Its continuous spectral response through the intersubband resonance is investigated at room temperature and at T=100 K. An analysis of the spectral lineshape of the photon drag current response yields information about the momentum relaxation times of the electrons in the ground and excited subbands.

  15. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  16. An active attitude control system for a drag sail satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Willem Herman; Jordaan, Hendrik Willem

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the development and simulation results of a full ADCS subsystem for the deOrbitSail drag sail mission. The deOrbitSail satellite was developed as part of an European FP7 collaboration research project. The satellite was launched and commissioning started on 10th July 2015. Various new actuators and sensors designed for this mission will be presented. The deOrbitSail satellite is a 3U CubeSat to deploy a 4 by 4 m drag sail from an initial 650 km circular polar low earth orbit. With an active attitude control system it will be shown that by maximising the drag force, the expected de-orbiting period from the initial altitude will be less than 50 days. A future application of this technology will be the use of small drag sails as low-cost devices to de-orbit LEO satellites, when they have reached their end of life, without having to use expensive propulsion systems. Simulation and Hardware-in-Loop experiments proved the feasibility of the proposed attitude control system. A magnetic-only control approach using a Y-Thomson spin, is used to detumble the 3U Cubesat with stowed sail and subsequently to 3-axis stabilise the satellite to be ready for the final deployment phase. Minituarised torquer rods, a nano-sized momentum wheel, attitude sensor hardware (magnetometer, sun, earth) developed for this phase will be presented. The final phase will be to deploy and 3-axis stabilise the drag sail normal to the satellite's velocity vector, using a combined Y-momentum wheel and magnetic controller. The design and performance improvements when using a 2-axis translation stage to adjust the sail centre-of-pressure to satellite centre-of-mass offset, will also be discussed, although for launch risk reasons this stage was not included in the final flight configuration. To accurately determine the drag sail's attitude during the sunlit part of the orbit, an accurate wide field of view dual sensor to measure both the sun and nadir vector direction was developed for

  17. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  18. Accurate calculation of Stokes drag for point-particle tracking in two-way coupled flows

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose and test a method for calculating Stokes drag applicable to particle-laden fluid flows where two-way momentum coupling is important. In the point-particle formulation, particle dynamics are coupled to fluid dynamics via a source term that appears in the respective momentum equations. When the particle Reynolds number is small and the particle diameter is smaller than the fluid scales, it is common to approximate the momentum coupling source term as the Stokes drag. The Stokes drag force depends on the difference between the undisturbed fluid velocity evaluated at the particle location, and the particle velocity. However, owing to two-way coupling, the fluid velocity is modified in the neighborhood of a particle, relative to its undisturbed value. This causes the computed Stokes drag force to be underestimated in two-way coupled point-particle simulations. We develop estimates for the drag force error as function of the particle size relative to the grid size. We then develop a correct...

  19. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  20. Coulomb drag between helical Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainaris, N.; Gornyi, I. V.; Levchenko, A.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity ρD exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature T . In the limit of low T ,ρD vanishes with decreasing T as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where ρD diverges at T →0 irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher T for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid—because it requires peculiar umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.

  1. Orographic drag uncertainties impact forecast skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Irina; Zadra, Ayrton; Wedi, Nils; Bacmeister, Julio

    2017-04-01

    Despite their importance for the large-scale circulation, to date the representation of drag processes remains a major source of uncertainty in global models. Among the different drag processes the representation of orographic drag is particularly challenging. This has been recently highlighted by the WMO Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE) 'Drag project' which demonstrated that the main NWP and climate models differ significantly in representation of the total parameterized surface stress and in the partitioning of surface stress among various physical processes, particularly in regions with orography. Here we discuss how uncertain is the representation of orographic drag in models, and we illustrate how this uncertainty affects the skill of medium range weather forecasts. Namely we show how different is the representation of the resolved orography even in models with similar headline horizontal resolution. We also use the results of the WGNE 'Drag project' to illustrate how much models differ in terms of the total parameterized surface stress and its partition among various processes. Finally, we use the Integrated Forecasting System of ECMWF to demonstrate how much these intermodel differences either in the resolved orography or the representation subgrid drag affect the forecast skill.

  2. The rotational barrier of ethane and some of its hexasubstituted derivatives in terms of the forces acting on the electron distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Cuevas, Gabriel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2015-07-15

    A novel and alternative explanation of the rotational barrier of ethane and several hexasubstituted derivatives, CX3CX3 (X = H, F, CH3, Cl, Br), is suggested based on the evaluation of the properties of the electron distribution. The forces exerted on the electron density of the topological atoms making up a molecule, the Ehrenfest forces, are analyzed and, with the help of the virial theorem, they are used to explain the experimental rotational barriers. According to this approach, the barrier is mainly a consequence of the decrease of the always attractive Ehrenfest forces (EFs) linking the two C atoms. In addition, the behavior of the EFs is related to a decrease of stability of the central C atoms, which is not compensated by the stabilization of the substituents. Also, during rotation from the staggered to the equilibrium conformation, the electron density at the C-C bond critical point and the electron delocalization between C atoms decrease and are accompanied by an increase of electron delocalization between the substituents. According to the analysis of the EF field lines and to the behavior of the integrated forces, the rotational barrier cannot be explained as a result of any repulsive forces acting on the electron density, although a possible interpretation of the quantum force that balances the EF in stationary states as a measure of traditional Pauli repulsions is also examined.

  3. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Marston, Jeremy O.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  4. Frame-Dragging from Charged Rotating Body

    CERN Document Server

    Dubey, Anuj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we have considered the three parameters: mass, charge and rotation to discuss their combined effect on frame dragging for a charged rotating body. If we consider the ray of light which is emitted radially outward from a rotating body then the frame dragging shows a periodic nature with respect to coordinate $\\phi$ (azimuthal angle). It has been found that the value of frame dragging obtains a maximum at, $ \\phi =\\frac{\\pi}{2}$ and a minimum at $ \\phi =\\frac{3 \\pi}{2}$.

  5. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  6. The drag of inflatable rubber de-icers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Russell G

    1938-01-01

    Force tests on rubber de-icer models of several different profiles, at approximately one-third full scale, been carried out in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel. The conventional de-icer installation, deflated, added about 15 percent to the smooth-wing drag and, inflated, added about 100 percent. An improved installation with flash attaching strips added about 10 percent, deflated. The bulging, or ballooning, of de-icers from the wing surface is described and some remedies are discussed.

  7. RPTP-alpha acts as a transducer of mechanical force on alphav/beta3-integrin-cytoskeleton linkages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wichert, Gotz; Jiang, Guoying; Kostic, Ana

    2003-01-01

    Cell motility on ECM critically depends on the cellular response to force from the matrix. We find that force-dependent reinforcement of alphav/beta3-integrin-mediated cell-matrix connections requires the receptor-like tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha). RPTPalpha colocalizes with alphav-inte...

  8. Analytical model for viscous damping and the spring force for perforated planar microstructures acting at both audible and ultrasonic frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a model for the squeezed film damping, the resistance of the holes, and the corresponding spring forces for a periodic perforated microstructure including the effects of compressibility, inertia, and rarefied gas. The viscous damping and spring forces are obtained by using the continuity equation. The analytical formula for the squeezed film damping is applied to analyze the response of an ultrasonic transducer. The inclusion of these effects in a model significantly improves the agreement with measured results. Finally, it is shown that the frequency dependence of the total damping and total spring force for a cell are very similar to those corresponding to a rectangular open microstructure without holes. A separate analysis reveals the importance of each particular correction. The most important is the compressibility correction; the inertia has to be considered only for determining the spring force and the damping force for sufficiently high frequencies. PMID:18646964

  9. The effect of finger spreading on drag of the hand in human swimming

    CERN Document Server

    van Houwelingen, Josje; Kunnen, Rudie P J; van Heijst, GertJan F; Grift, Ernst Jan; Breugem, Wim Paul; Delfos, Rene; Westerweel, Jerry; Clercx, Herman J H; van de Water, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finger spreading on hydrodynamic drag in swimming is studied both with a numerical simulation and with laboratory experiments. Both approaches are based on the exact same 3D model of the hand with attached forearm. The virtual version of the hand with forearm was implemented in a numerical code by means of an immersed boundary method and the physical version was studied in a wind tunnel experiment. An enhancement of the drag coefficient of 2 and 5% compared to the case with closed fingers was found for the numerical simulation and experiment, respectively. A 5 and 8% favourable effect on the (dimensionless) force moment at an optimal finger spreading of 10 degrees was found, which indicates that the difference is more outspoken in the force moment. Also an analytical model is proposed, using scaling arguments similar to the Betz actuator disk model, to explain the drag coefficient as a function of finger spacing.

  10. Summary of Data from the First AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David W.; Zickuhr, Tom; Vassberg, John; Agrawal, Shreekant; Wahls, Richard A.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Hemsch, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The results from the first AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop are summarized. The workshop was designed specifically to assess the state-of-the-art of computational fluid dynamics methods for force and moment prediction. An impartial forum was provided to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify areas needing additional research and development. The subject of the study was the DLR-F4 wing-body configuration, which is representative of transport aircraft designed for transonic flight. Specific test cases were required so that valid comparisons could be made. Optional test cases included constant-C(sub L) drag-rise predictions typically used in airplane design by industry. Results are compared to experimental data from three wind tunnel tests. A total of 18 international participants using 14 different codes submitted data to the workshop. No particular grid type or turbulence model was more accurate, when compared to each other, or to wind tunnel data. Most of the results overpredicted C(sub Lo) and C(sub Do), but induced drag (dC(sub D)/dC(sub L)(exp 2)) agreed fairly well. Drag rise at high Mach number was underpredicted, however, especially at high C(sub L). On average, the drag data were fairly accurate, but the scatter was greater than desired. The results show that well-validated Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes CFD methods are sufficiently accurate to make design decisions based on predicted drag.

  11. Drag bias feedback for the analytic drag control entry guidance system. [for the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The Analytic Drag Control (ADC) entry guidance has been developed and baselined for the space shuttle orbiter entry. A method is presented which corrects the orbiter entry guidance commanded bank angle for biases between navigated drag and guidance computed reference drag. This is accomplished by an integral feedback technique, which uses the drag bias information to adjust the difference between navigated and reference altitude rate used by the ADC guidance. The method improves the capability of the ADC guidance system by compensating for any error source which causes a bias between the navigated drag and reference drag profile. These errors include navigated altitude rate errors, atmosphere dispersions, and roll attitude deadband effects. A discussion of the method and results of digital computer entry simulations is presented.

  12. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  13. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  14. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  15. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  16. Drag sails for space debris mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Lourens; Lappas, Vaios; Erb, Sven

    2015-04-01

    The prudence for satellites to have a mitigation or deorbiting strategy has been brought about by the ever increasing amount of debris in Earth orbit. Drag augmentation is a potentially passive method for de-orbiting in LEO but its collision risk mitigation efficiency is sometimes underestimated by not taking all the relevant factors into account. This paper shows that using drag augmentation from a deployable drag-sail to de-orbit a satellite in LEO will lead to a reduction in collision risk. In order to support this finding, the models that are needed in order to evaluate the collision risk of a decaying object under drag conditions are presented. A comparison is performed between the simpler Area-Time-Product (ATP) and more precise collision risk analysis, and the effects that are overlooked in the simple ATP calculation are explained.

  17. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  18. Mammography Screening in a Large Health System Following the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Heidi D; Weerasinghe, Roshanthi; Wang, Lian; Grunkemeier, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Practice recommendations for mammography screening were issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in 2009 and expansion of insurance coverage was provided under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act soon thereafter, yet the influence of these changes on screening practices in the United States is not known. To determine changes in mammography screening and their associations with new practice recommendations and the Affordable Care Act, we examined patient-level data from 249,803 screening mammograms from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012 in a large community-based health system in the northwestern United States. Associations were determined by an intervention analysis of time-series data method. Among women screened, 64% were age 50-74 years; 84% self-identified as white race; 62% had commercial insurance; and 70% were seen in facilities located in metropolitan areas. Practice recommendations were associated with decreased screening volumes among women age Act was associated with increased screening among women age 50-74 (+184.3 mammograms/month; +7.2% change; P=0.001), but not women Act was associated with increased screening for women with Medicare, Medicaid, or other noncommercial sources of payment. Mammography screening volumes in a large community health system decreased among women age Act were associated with increased screening volumes among women age 50-74.

  19. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 224 Altus Air Force Base Solar Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Bryan J.

    2010-09-30

    The principal goal of this project was to evaluate altus Air Force Base for building integrated silicon or thin film module photovoltaic opportunities. This report documents PNNL's efforts and documents study conclusions.

  20. Numerically modelling tidal dissipation with bottom drag in the oceans of Titan and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Hamish C. F. C.; Matsuyama, Isamu

    2017-01-01

    Icy satellites that contain subsurface oceans require sufficient thermal energy to prevent the liquid portion of their interiors from freezing. We develop a numerical finite difference model to solve the Laplace Tidal Equations on a sphere in order to simulate tidal flow and thermal energy dissipation in these oceans, neglecting the presence of an icy lid. The model is applied to Titan and Enceladus, where we explore how Rayleigh (linear) and bottom (quadratic) drag terms affect dissipation. The latter drag regime can only be applied numerically. We find excellent agreement between our results and recent analytical work. Obliquity tide Rossby-wave resonant features become independent of ocean thickness under the bottom drag regime for thick oceans. We show that for Titan, dissipation from this Rossby-wave resonance can act to dampen the rate of outward orbital migration by up to 40% for Earth-like values of bottom drag coefficient. Gravity-wave resonances can act to cause inward migration, although this is unlikely due to the thin oceans required to form such resonances. The same is true of all eccentricity tide resonances on Enceladus, such that dissipation becomes negligible for thick oceans under the bottom drag regime.

  1. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-06

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  2. The Mechanism of Drag Reduction around Bodies of Revolution Using Bionic Non-Smooth Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-mei Tian; Lu-quan Ren; Qing-ping Liu; Zhi-wu Han; Xiao Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Bionic non-smooth surfaces (BNSS) can reduce drag. Much attention has been paid to the mechanism of shear stress reduction by riblets. The mechanism of pressure force reduction by bionic non-smooth surfaces on bodies of revolution has not been, well investigated. In this work CFD simulation has revealed the mechanism of drag reduction by BNSS, which may work in three ways. First, BNSS on bodies of revolution may lower the surface velocity of the medium, which prevents the sudden speed up of air on the cross section. So the bottom pressure of the model would not be disturbed sharply, resulting in less energy loss and drag reduction. Second, the magnitude of vorticity induced by the bionic model becomes smaller because, due to the sculpturing, the growth of tiny air bubbles is avoided. Thus the large moment of inertia induced by large air bubble is reduced. The reduction of the vorticity could reduce the dissipation of the eddy. So the pressure force could also be reduced. Third, the thickness of the momentum layer on the model becomes less which, according to the relationship between the drag coefficient and the momentum thickness, reduces drag.

  3. Collisions and drag in debris discs with eccentric parent belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Kirchschlager, F.; Sende, J. A.; Wolf, S.

    2017-08-01

    Context. High-resolution images of circumstellar debris discs reveal off-centred rings that indicate past or ongoing perturbation, possibly caused by secular gravitational interaction with unseen stellar or substellar companions. The purely dynamical aspects of this departure from radial symmetry are well understood. However, the observed dust is subject to additional forces and effects, most notably collisions and drag. Aims: To complement the studies of dynamics, we therefore aim to understand how the addition of collisional evolution and drag forces creates new asymmetries and strengthens or overrides existing ones. Methods: We augmented our existing numerical code Analysis of Collisional Evolution (ACE) by an azimuthal dimension, the longitude of periapse. A set of fiducial discs with global eccentricities ranging from 0 to 0.4 was evolved over gigayear timescales. Size distribution and spatial variation of dust were analysed and interpreted. We discuss the basic impact of belt eccentricity on spectral energy distributions and images. Results: We find features imposed on characteristic timescales. First, radiation pressure defines size cut-offs that differ between periapse and apoapse, resulting in an asymmetric halo. The differences in size distribution make the observable asymmetry of the halo depend on wavelength. Second, collisional equilibrium prefers smaller grains on the apastron side of the parent belt, reducing the effect of pericentre glow and the overall asymmetry. Third, Poynting-Robertson drag fills the region interior to an eccentric belt such that the apastron side is more tenuous. Interpretation and prediction of the appearance in scattered light is problematic when spatial and size distribution are coupled.

  4. Predicting lethal entanglements as a consequence of drag from fishing gear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Hoop, Julie Marie

    2016-01-01

    assessment. Abstract Large whales are frequently entangled in fishing gear and sometimes swim while carrying gear for days to years. Entangled whales are subject to additional drag forces requiring increased thrust power and energy expenditure over time. To classify entanglement cases and aid potential...

  5. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  6. Locomotion and drag in wet and dry granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daniel; Kuckuk, Robyn; Sharpe, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Many animals move within substrates such as soil and dry sand; the resistive properties of such granular materials (GM) can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the relevant physics of drag and penetration. We developed a system to create homogeneous wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus) a desert-generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (~ 30 seconds) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics (and ``slip'') were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ~ 3 × more resistive than dry GM, suggesting that during burial the lizard operated near its maximum force producing capability and was thus constrained by environmental properties. work supported by NSF PoLS.

  7. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  8. Fast and accurate prediction for aerodynamic forces and moments acting on satellites flying in Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuhon; Huang, Fei; Hu, Pengju; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental prerequisite for satellites operating in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is the availability of fast and accurate prediction of non-gravitational aerodynamic forces, which is characterised by the free molecular flow regime. However, conventional computational methods like the analytical integral method and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique are found failing to deal with flow shadowing and multiple reflections or computationally expensive. This work develops a general computer program for the accurate calculation of aerodynamic forces in the free molecular flow regime using the test particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) method, and non-gravitational aerodynamic forces actiong on the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite is calculated for different freestream conditions and gas-surface interaction models by the computer program.

  9. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  10. Identification of the nonlinear excitation force acting on a bowed string using the dynamical responses at remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debut, V.; Antunes, J. [ITN, ADL, P-2686 Sacavem Codex (Portugal); Delaune, X. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, Lab Etud Dynam, F-01101 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2010-07-01

    For achieving realistic numerical simulations of bowed string instruments, based on physical modeling, a good understanding of the actual friction interaction phenomena is of great importance. Most work published in the field including our own has assumed that bow/string frictional forces behave according to the classical Coulomb stick-slip model, with an empirical velocity-dependent sliding friction coefficient. Indeed, the basic self-excited string motions (such as the Helmholtz regime) are well captured using such friction model. However, recent work has shown that the tribological behavior of the bow/string rosin interface is rather complex, therefore the basic velocity-dependent Coulomb model may be an over-simplistic representation of the friction force. More specifically, it was suggested that a more accurate model of the interaction force can be achieved by coupling the system dynamical equations with a thermal model which encapsulates the complex interface phenomena. In spite of the interesting work performed by Askenfelt, a direct measurement of the actual dynamical friction forces without disturbing the string motion is quite difficult. Therefore, in this work we develop a modal-based identification technique making use of inverse methods and optimization techniques, which enables the identification of the interface force, as well as the string self-excited motion, from the dynamical reactions measured at the string end supports. The method gives convincing results using simulated data originated from nonlinear computations of a bowed string. Furthermore, in cases where the force identifications are very sensitive to errors in the transfer function modal parameters, we suggest a method to improve the modal frequencies used for the identifications. Preliminary experimental results obtained using a basic bowing device, by which the string is excited with the stick of the bow, are then presented. Our identifications, from the two dynamical string reactions

  11. Bluff body drag manipulation using pulsed jets and Coanda effect

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, Diogo; Noack, Bernd R; Spohn, Andreas; Ruiz, Tony

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the effects of unsteady forcing on the wake and drag of a square back blunt body. In combination with a Coanda effect, shear-layer forcing by periodic blowing of wall bounded jets allows to recover over 30 % of the base pressure. The actuation frequency is an order of magnitude higher than the natural shear-layer instabilities. High frequency Coanda blowing leads to a thinner time-averaged wake. The effect of this form shaping is analyzed by pressure taps on the rear side of the model in combination with PIV measurements. Velocity components of the mean field indicate a pressure recovery and favorable mean curvature effects across the separated shear layers in the region close to the rear end of the blunt body when actuation is applied. The wake dynamics further downstream, however, remains very similar to the unforced oscillatory wake mode.

  12. Effect of electromagnetic force and anode gas on electrolyte flow in aluminum electrolysis cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nai-jun; XIA Xiao-xia; BAO Sheng-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Based on the commercial computational fluid dynamics software CFX-4.3, electrolyte flow fields in a 156 kA pre-baked anode aluminum electrolysis cell were investigated in three different cases where the electrolyte melt was driven by different kinds of force, i.e. electromagnetic force only, the anode gas drag force only and both of the former two forces. The results show that when electromagnetic force was introduced only, most of the electrolyte moves horizontally; when anode gas drag force was introduced only, the electrolyte flows mainly around each anode with small circulation; when electromagnetic force and anode gas drag force were both introduced together, the structure of the electrolyte flow fields and the velocity of electrolyte are similar to that of the case where only anode gas drag force is used. The electrolyte flow fields are mainly determined by the anode gas drag force.

  13. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  14. Facial expressions and speech acts: experimental evidences on the role of the upper face as an illocutionary force indicating device in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaneschi, Filippo; Passarelli, Marcello; Chiorri, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Language scientists have broadly addressed the problem of explaining how language users recognize the kind of speech act performed by a speaker uttering a sentence in a particular context. They have done so by investigating the role played by the illocutionary force indicating devices (IFIDs), i.e., all linguistic elements that indicate the illocutionary force of an utterance. The present work takes a first step in the direction of an experimental investigation of non-verbal IFIDs because it investigates the role played by facial expressions and, in particular, of upper-face action units (AUs) in the comprehension of three basic types of illocutionary force: assertions, questions, and orders. The results from a pilot experiment on production and two comprehension experiments showed that (1) certain upper-face AUs seem to constitute non-verbal signals that contribute to the understanding of the illocutionary force of questions and orders; (2) assertions are not expected to be marked by any upper-face AU; (3) some upper-face AUs can be associated, with different degrees of compatibility, with both questions and orders.

  15. Drag Coefficient and Foam in Hurricane Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbraikh, E.; Shtemler, Y.

    2016-12-01

    he present study is motivated by recent findings of saturation and even decrease in the drag coefficient (capping) in hurricane conditions, which is accompanied by the production of a foam layer on the ocean surface. As it is difficult to expect at present a comprehensive numerical modeling of the drag coefficient saturation that is followed by wave breaking and foam production, there is no complete confidence and understanding of the saturation phenomenon. Our semi-empirical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, Cd , with the reference wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. The proposed model treats the efficient air-sea aerodynamic roughness length as a sum of two weighted aerodynamic roughness lengths for the foam-free and foam-covered conditions. On the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage,αf, combined with direct wind speed measurements in hurricane conditions, which provide the minimum of the effective drag coefficient, Cd for the sea covered with foam. The present model yields Cd10 versus U10 in fair agreement with that evaluated from both open-ocean and laboratory measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in the range of U10 from low to hurricane speeds. The present approach opens opportunities for drag coefficient modeling in hurricane conditions and hurricane intensity estimation by the foam-coverage value using optical and radiometric measurements.

  16. On the development of lift and drag in a rotating and translating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Alcantara, Antonio; Sanmiguel-Rojas, Enrique; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2014-11-01

    The two-dimensional flow around a rotating cylinder is investigated numerically using a vorticity forces formulation with the aim of analyzing the flow structures, and their evolutions, that contribute to the lift and drag forces on the cylinder. The Reynolds number, based on the cylinder diameter and steady free-stream speed, considered is Re = 200 , while the non-dimensional rotation rate (ratio of the surface speed and free-stream speed) selected were α = 1 and 3. For α = 1 the wake behind the cylinder for the fully developed flow is oscillatory due to vortex shedding, and so are the lift and drag forces. For α = 3 the fully developed flow is steady with constant (high) lift and (low) drag. Each of these cases is considered in two different transient problems, one with angular acceleration of the cylinder and constant speed, and the other one with translating acceleration of the cylinder and constant rotation. Special attention is paid to explaining the mechanisms of vortex shedding suppression for high rotation (when α = 3) and its relation to the mechanisms by which the lift is enhanced and the drag is almost suppressed when the fully developed flow is reached. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  17. Self-determined shapes and velocities of giant near-zero drag gas cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Klaseboer, Evert; Jetly, Aditya; Mansoor, Mohammad M; Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-09-01

    Minimizing the retarding force on a solid moving in liquid is the canonical problem in the quest for energy saving by friction and drag reduction. For an ideal object that cannot sustain any shear stress on its surface, theory predicts that drag force will fall to zero as its speed becomes large. However, experimental verification of this prediction has been challenging. We report the construction of a class of self-determined streamlined structures with this free-slip surface, made up of a teardrop-shaped giant gas cavity that completely encloses a metal sphere. This stable gas cavity is formed around the sphere as it plunges at a sufficiently high speed into the liquid in a deep tank, provided that the sphere is either heated initially to above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid or rendered superhydrophobic in water at room temperature. These sphere-in-cavity structures have residual drag coefficients that are typically less than [Formula: see text] those of solid objects of the same dimensions, which indicates that they experienced very small drag forces. The self-determined shapes of the gas cavities are shown to be consistent with the Bernoulli equation of potential flow applied on the cavity surface. The cavity fall velocity is not arbitrary but is uniquely predicted by the sphere density and cavity volume, so larger cavities have higher characteristic velocities.

  18. Self-determined shapes and velocities of giant near-zero drag gas cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2017-09-09

    Minimizing the retarding force on a solid moving in liquid is the canonical problem in the quest for energy saving by friction and drag reduction. For an ideal object that cannot sustain any shear stress on its surface, theory predicts that drag force will fall to zero as its speed becomes large. However, experimental verification of this prediction has been challenging. We report the construction of a class of self-determined streamlined structures with this free-slip surface, made up of a teardrop-shaped giant gas cavity that completely encloses a metal sphere. This stable gas cavity is formed around the sphere as it plunges at a sufficiently high speed into the liquid in a deep tank, provided that the sphere is either heated initially to above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid or rendered superhydrophobic in water at room temperature. These sphere-in-cavity structures have residual drag coefficients that are typically less than Embedded Image those of solid objects of the same dimensions, which indicates that they experienced very small drag forces. The self-determined shapes of the gas cavities are shown to be consistent with the Bernoulli equation of potential flow applied on the cavity surface. The cavity fall velocity is not arbitrary but is uniquely predicted by the sphere density and cavity volume, so larger cavities have higher characteristic velocities.

  19. Transonic Drag Prediction on a DLR-F6 Transport Configuration Using Unstructured Grid Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Frink, N. T.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Rausch, R. D.; Milholen, W. E.

    2004-01-01

    A second international AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW-II) was organized and held in Orlando Florida on June 21-22, 2003. The primary purpose was to inves- tigate the code-to-code uncertainty. address the sensitivity of the drag prediction to grid size and quantify the uncertainty in predicting nacelle/pylon drag increments at a transonic cruise condition. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the DPW-II computational results from three state-of-the-art unstructured grid Navier-Stokes flow solvers exercised on similar families of tetrahedral grids. The flow solvers are USM3D - a tetrahedral cell-centered upwind solver. FUN3D - a tetrahedral node-centered upwind solver, and NSU3D - a general element node-centered central-differenced solver. For the wingbody, the total drag predicted for a constant-lift transonic cruise condition showed a decrease in code-to-code variation with grid refinement as expected. For the same flight condition, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon total drag and the nacelle/pylon drag increment predicted showed an increase in code-to-code variation with grid refinement. Although the range in total drag for the wingbody fine grids was only 5 counts, a code-to-code comparison of surface pressures and surface restricted streamlines indicated that the three solvers were not all converging to the same flow solutions- different shock locations and separation patterns were evident. Similarly, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon solutions did not appear to be converging to the same flow solutions. Overall, grid refinement did not consistently improve the correlation with experimental data for either the wingbody or the wing/body/nacelle pylon configuration. Although the absolute values of total drag predicted by two of the solvers for the medium and fine grids did not compare well with the experiment, the incremental drag predictions were within plus or minus 3 counts of the experimental data. The correlation with experimental incremental drag was not

  20. Offset of a Drag-Free Sensor from the Center of Gravity of Its Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    The drag-free satellite is one that encloses a proof mass, shielding it from atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure (SRP). By sensing the location of the proof mass in the body and using thrusters to force the spacecraft to follow the proof mass in a closed-loop fashion, the effects of drag and SRP may be eliminated from the spacecraft orbit. Thus, several benefits may be gained, including improved ephemeris propagation and reduced operational costs. The package including the proof mass and the location sensing equipment may be considered as a single sensor; if generalized, such a sensor could be manufactured and used more easily in satellite designs, similar to how current missions use, for example, rate gyros and magnetometers. The flight heritage of the technology has been such that the proof mass sensor is a primary facet of the mission, allowing it to dominate design considerations. In particular, this paper discusses the effects that may be expected if a generalized drag-free sensor is placed some distance away from the spacecraft center of gravity. The proof mass will follow a given gravitational orbit, and a separation from the spacecraft center of gravity places the spacecraft itself in a different orbit from the proof mass, requiring additional fuel just to maintain function of the drag- free sensor. Conclusions include some guiding principles for determining whether certain mission characteristics may restrict or preclude the use of drag-free sensors for that mission. These principles may be used both by mission planners considering drag-free missions and by hardware designers considering or pursuing the development of such generalized sensors.

  1. Aerodynamic drag of a transiting sphere by large-scale tomographic-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, W.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2017-07-01

    A method is introduced to measure the aerodynamic drag of moving objects such as ground vehicles or athletes in speed sports. Experiments are conducted as proof-of-concept that yield the aerodynamic drag of a sphere towed through a square duct in stagnant air. The drag force is evaluated using large-scale tomographic PIV and invoking the time-average momentum equation within a control volume in a frame of reference moving with the object. The sphere with 0.1 m diameter moves at a velocity of 1.45 m/s, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 10,000. The measurements in the wake of the sphere are conducted at a rate of 500 Hz within a thin volume of approximately 3 × 40 × 40 cubic centimeters. Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles are used as flow tracers. The terms composing the drag are related to the flow momentum, the pressure and the velocity fluctuations and they are separately evaluated. The momentum and pressure terms dominate the momentum budget in the near wake up to 1.3 diameters downstream of the model. The pressure term decays rapidly and vanishes within 5 diameters. The term due to velocity fluctuations contributes up to 10% to the drag. The measurements yield a relatively constant value of the drag coefficient starting from 2 diameters downstream of the sphere. At 7 diameters the measurement interval terminates due to the finite length of the duct. Error sources that need to be accounted for are the sphere support wake and blockage effects. The above findings can provide practical criteria for the drag evaluation of generic bluff objects with this measurement technique.

  2. Lift and Drag Measurements of Superhydrophobic Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Samrat; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For several years, superhydrophobic surfaces which are chemically hydrophobic with micron or nanometer scale surface features have been considered for their ability to reduce drag and produce slip in microfluidic devices. More recently it has been demonstrated that superhydrophobic surfaces reduce friction coefficient in turbulent flows as well. In this talk, we will consider that modifying a hydrofoil's surface to make it superhydrophobic has on the resulting lift and drag measurements over a wide range of angles of attack. Experiments are conducted over the range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000hydrofoil is made superhydrophobic. The hydrofoils are coated Teflon that has been hot embossed with a 325grit stainless steel woven mesh to produce a regular pattern of microposts. In addition to fully superhydrophobic hydrofoils, selectively coated symmetrical hydrofoils will also be examined to study the effect that asymmetries in the surface properties can have on lift and drag. Partially funded by NSF CBET-1334962.

  3. The centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive tipepidine produces antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Inoue, Masako; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2009-12-14

    The antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine was studied in rats. Tipepidine at 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p. reduced immobility in the forced swimming test and tipepidine at 40 mg/kg, i.p. increased climbing in the test. The drug at 40 mg/kg, i.p. had no effect on the locomotor activity and motor coordination. These results suggest that tipepidine may be a novel drug with antidepressant-like activity.

  4. 3D-modeling for determination of axial forces acting in elements of the end zone of power turbogenerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A.Haydenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A field mathematical model of the end zone of a powerful generator type TVV-1000-2U3 in the 3D-setting is developed. Modelling of the nominal mode of turbogenerator operation is done. The distribution of the electromagnetic field, eddy currents, and the Ampere force appearing in such elements of the end zone of turbogenerator as the pressure plate, push pins and electrically conductive screen.

  5. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Patir, Adnan; Page, Kristopher; Lu, Yao; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2017-06-08

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown that the low energy surface treatment decreased the adhesion of water molecules to the surface of the boat resulting in a reduction of the drag force. Additionally, a robust superhydrophobic surface was fabricated through layer-by-layer coating using adhesive double side tape and the paint, and after a 100 cm abrasion test with sand paper, the surface still retained its water repellency, enhanced buoyancy and drag reduction.

  6. Medição precisa das forças de aceleração em cabos Precise measurement of acceleration forces acting on cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Moraes do Nascimento

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available Certos problemas do uso do cinto de segurança ainda não foram resolvidos, sendo importante a determinação precisa das forças nos cabos. Existem vários métodos que, da maneira que são aplicados, são de pouca precisão. Com o objetivo de suspender essa imprecisão são apresentados três métodos e aperfeiçoado um outro de determinação da força exercida no cabo. Um desses métodos aplica-se a países subdesenvolvidos.Certain problems related to the use of safety belts remain unsolved, important among them being the exact determination of forces acting on cables. Various methods of calculation, severely limited because of the way in which they are applied, are presented. Three methods with a view to surpassing these limits are presented and another for the calculation of the forces acting on a cable is perfected. One of these methods is applicable in developing countries.

  7. A Two-Wave Scheme for Orographic Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuan; CAI Ninghao; TANG Jinyun

    2008-01-01

    When the magnitude of sub-scale ographic forcing is comparable with explicitly ordinary dynamic forcing, the drag effect reduced by ographic gravity wave is to be significant for maintaining dynamic balance of atmo-spheric circulation, as well as the momentum and energy transport. Such sub-scale ographic forcing should be introduced into numerically atmospheric model by means of drag being parameterized. Furthermore, the currently mature ographic gravity wave drag (OGWD) parameterization, i.e., the so-called first-generation(based on lineal single-wave theoretical framework) or the second-generation drag parameterization (includ-ing an important extra forcing by the contribution of critical level absorption), cannot correctly and effectly describe the vertical profile of wave stress under the influence of ambient wind shearing. Based on aforemen-tioned consideration, a new two-wave scheme was proposed to parameterize the ographic gravity wave drag by means of freely propagating gravity waves. It starts with a second order WKB approximation, and treats the wave stress attenuations caused by either the selective critical level absorption or the classical critical level absorption explicitly; while in the regions where critical levels are absent, it transports the wave stress vertically by two sinusoidal waves and deposits them and then damps them according to the wave saturation criteria. This scheme is thus used to conduct some sample computations over the Dabie Mountain region of East China, as an example. The results showed that the new two-wave scheme is able to model the vertical distribution of the wave stress more realistically.

  8. Effects of surface drag on upper-level frontogenesis within a developing baroclinic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tan, Zhemin; Chu, Kekuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface drag on upper-level front with a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5). To this end, a new and simple potential vorticity intrusion (PVI) index is proposed to quantitatively describe the extent and path that surface drag affects upper-level front. From a PV perspective, the formation of the upper-level front is illustrated as the tropopause folding happens from the stratosphere. The PVI index shows a good correlation with the minimum surface pressure, and tends to increase with the deepening of the surface cyclone and upper-level front. The surface drag acts to damp and delay the development of upper-level front, which could reduce the growth rate of the PVI index. However, the damping presents different effects in different development stages. It is the most significant during the rapid development stage of the surface cyclone. Compared with no surface drag cases, the tropopause is less inclined to intrude into the troposphere due to the surface drag. Positive feedback between the surface cyclone and upper-level front could accelerate the development of the frontal system.

  9. Tuned liquid dampers with a Keulegan-Carpenter number-dependent screen drag coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, J. A.; Love, J. S.; Tait, M. J.; Wilson, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    The amplitude-dependent damping associated with a tuned liquid damper (TLD) equipped with slat-type screens produces a device that performs optimally at a targeted response amplitude. Increasing the slat height produces a screen whose drag coefficient is dependent on the Keulegan-Carpenter number (KC), which may improve the TLD performance. This new type of TLD is modeled as an equivalent mechanical model with damping that is dependent on both KC and the response amplitude. An experimental shake table testing program is undertaken to study the influence of KC on the TLD response and to validate the model. A power fit is performed on the experimentally determined screen drag coefficient and KC values to express the drag coefficient as a function of KC and the steady flow drag coefficient. Predicted frequency response plots of sloshing forces and energy dissipation per cycle are in agreement with experimental results. A structure-TLD system model is developed to theoretically study the performance of this new TLD. Nonlinear shallow water wave theory is used to validate the output of the mechanical model. Results indicate that a KC-dependent screen drag coefficient produces a more robust TLD whose performance is maintained over a broader range of structural response amplitudes.

  10. Global effect of local skin friction drag reduction in spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Stroh, A; Schlatter, P; Frohnapfel, B

    2016-01-01

    A numerical investigation of two locally applied drag reducing control schemes is carried out in the configuration of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL). One control is designed to damp near-wall turbulence and the other induces constant mass flux in the wall-normal direction. Both control schemes yield similar local drag reduction rates within the control region. However, the flow development downstream of the control significantly differs: persistent drag reduction is found for the uniform blowing case whereas drag increase is found for the turbulence damping case. In order to account for this difference the formulation of a global drag reduction rate is suggested. It represents the reduction of the streamwise force exerted by the fluid on a finite length plate. Furthermore, it is shown that the far downstream development of the TBL after the control region can be described by a single quantity, namely a streamwise shift of the uncontrolled boundary layer, i.e. a changed virtual origin. B...

  11. Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.K.; Roig, L.C.; Jenter, H.L.; Visser, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydraulic data collected in a flume fitted with pans of sawgrass were analyzed to determine the vertically averaged drag coefficient as a function of vegetation characteristics. The drag coefficient is required for modeling flow through emergent vegetation at low Reynolds numbers in the Florida Everglades. Parameters of the vegetation, such as the stem population per unit bed area and the average stem/leaf width, were measured for five fixed vegetation layers. The vertically averaged vegetation parameters for each experiment were then computed by weighted average over the submerged portion of the vegetation. Only laminar flow through emergent vegetation was considered, because this is the dominant flow regime of the inland Everglades. A functional form for the vegetation drag coefficient was determined by linear regression of the logarithmic transforms of measured resistance force and Reynolds number. The coefficients of the drag coefficient function were then determined for the Everglades, using extensive flow and vegetation measurements taken in the field. The Everglades data show that the stem spacing and the Reynolds number are important parameters for the determination of vegetation drag coefficient. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Observations from varying the lift and drag inputs to a noise prediction method for supersonic helical tip speed propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Previous comparisons between calculated and measured supersonic helical tip speed propeller noise show them to have different trends of peak blade passing tone versus helical tip Mach number. It was postulated that improvements in this comparison could be made first by including the drag force terms in the prediction and then by reducing the blade lift terms at the tip to allow the drag forces to dominate the noise prediction. Propeller hub to tip lift distributions were varied, but they did not yield sufficient change in the predicted lift noise to improve the comparison. This result indicates that some basic changes in the theory may be needed. In addition, the noise predicted by the drag forces did not exhibit the same curve shape as the measured data. So even if the drag force terms were to dominate, the trends with helical tip Mach number for theory and experiment would still not be the same. The effect of the blade shock wave pressure rise was approxmated by increasing the drag coefficient at the blade tip. Predictions using this shock wdave approximation did have a curve shape similar to the measured data. This result indicates that the shock pressure rise probably controls the noise at supersonic tip speed and that the linear prediction method can give the proper noise trend with Mach number.

  13. Office of Inspector General report on audit of work force restructuring under Section 3161 of the National Defense Authorization Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    As authorized by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal year 1993, Department of Energy (Department) policy is to provide educational assistance to terminated contractor employees who were impacted by the Department`s downsizing. A terminated employee is anyone who voluntarily or involuntarily departs due to a reduction in employment under a Departmental restructuring plan. The objectives of the audit were to determine if the Department provided (1) reasonable means for terminated contractor employees to obtain training to qualify for new employment and (2) reasonable compensation to southern Nevada for any impact the Department`s downsizing had on the community.

  14. On the estimation method of hydrodynamic forces acting on a huge floating structure; Choogata futai ni hataraku haryoku ryutairyoku no suiteiho ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagemoto, H.; Fujino, M.; Zhu, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    A floating structure such as an international airport is anticipated to have a length of about 5,000 m and a width of about 1,000 m. A singular point method may be used as a method to estimate force that such a floating body is subjected to from waves. In order to derive a solution with practically sufficient accuracy, 1250 elements are required in the length direction and 250 elements in the width direction, or a total of 312,500 elements. Calculating this number of elements should use finally a linear equation system handling complex coefficients comprising 312,500 elements, which would require a huge amount of calculation time. This paper proposes a method to derive solution on wave forces acting on a super-large floating structure or fluid force coefficients such as added mass coefficients and decay coefficients at a practically workable calculation amount and still without degrading the accuracy. The structure was assumed to be a box-shaped structure. Strengths of the singular points to be distributed on each element were assumed to be almost constant except for edges in lateral, oblique and longitudinal waves. Under this assumption, the interior of the floating structure excepting its edges was represented by several large elements to have reduced the number of elements. A calculation method proposed based on this conception was verified of its effectiveness. 2 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  16. Numerical investigation of the effect of sphere dimples on the drag crisis and the Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigates the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere around the critical Reynolds numbers under both stationary and self-spinning conditions by conducting Large-eddy simulations (LES) based on high resolution unstructured grids. For the stationary cases, the present calculation results validate the promotion of the drag crisis at a relatively lower Reynolds number due to the golf ball dimples. It also shows that the golf ball dimples have a limited effect on the time-dependent lateral force development in the subcritical regime, whereas the dimples are beneficial in suppressing the lateral force oscillations in the supercritical regimes. With spin parameter Γ = 0.1, the drag coefficients for the spinning smooth sphere increase slightly in all Reynolds number regimes when compared to the stationary cases, whereas for the spinning golf ball, the drag force decreases in the critical regime and increases in the supercritical regime. For both spinning models, the inverse Magnus effect was reproduced in the critical regime, whereas in the supercritical regime the ordinary Magnus force was generated. Relatively weaker lift forces were also observed in the cases of the spinning golf balls when compared to the spinning smooth spheres.

  17. Legal Assessment of the Legal Force Exclusion of the 1st Prudential Procedure in the Act on Public Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Tyniewicki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available By the amendment of the Act on Public Finance of 26 July 2013, Polish legislature made a temporary suspension – till the end of 2013 – of the application of the provisions governing the Ist prudential procedure. This procedure has a crucial meaning for reducing the growth of budget deficit and in consequence – reducing public debt growth. In case of such crucial provisions for public finance, any amendments should be carried out in situations really justified and exceptional as well as with careful respecting of principles of proper legislation. In these aspects mentioned amendment rises a number of objections. For example, rapid pace of parliamentary works causes doubts about correctness of the legislative process. Therefore, in this article the author tries to make a legal assessment of the amendment of the Act on Public Finance of 26 July 2013, both from the formal and legal point of view and taking into the consideration the importance of provisions governing the prudential procedure for whole sphere of Polish public finance.

  18. ABM Drag_Pass Report Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    dragREPORT software was developed in parallel with abmREPORT, which is described in the preceding article. Both programs were built on the capabilities created during that process. This tool generates a drag_pass report that summarizes vital information from the MRO aerobreaking drag_pass build process to facilitate both sequence reviews and provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management. The script extracts information from the ENV, SSF, FRF, SCMFmax, and OPTG files, presenting them in a single, easy-to-check report providing the majority of parameters needed for cross check and verification as part of the sequence review process. Prior to dragReport, all the needed information was spread across a number of different files, each in a different format. This software is a Perl script that extracts vital summarization information and build-process details from a number of source files into a single, concise report format used to aid the MPST sequence review process and to provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management reference. This software could be adapted for future aerobraking missions to provide similar reports, review and summarization information.

  19. Turbulent drag reduction in dilute polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, K. R.; White, Christopher M.

    1998-11-01

    It is well known that the addition of small amounts of flexible polymers reduces drag in turbulent pipe flows. However, the underlying physics is still poorly understood. This paper will consider two aspects: The dependence of the onset of drag reduction on polymer concentration, and the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. The latter defines the maximum drag reduction possible for any polymer at a given Reynolds number, independent of the polymer concentration and detailed polymeric structure [1]. It is shown tentatively that a modest reworking of de Gennes' theory [2] is compatible with available experimental data. The principal element of the theory is that the polymers do not get stretched fully, but that the partially extended polymers store elastic energy and interfere with cascade mechanisms in turbulence. A conclusive understanding requires experiments in which the polymer properties that go into the theory are directly measured. [1] P.S. Virk, AIChE J., 21, 625 (1975) [2] P.G. de Gennes, Introduction to Polymer Dynamics, University of Cambridge (1990)

  20. Wind speed scaling and the drag coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Wind speed scaling in similarity law in wind-generated waves and the drag coefficient are studied. In analyzing the data in the wind wave channel, it is found that the u. scaling greatly reduces the scatter in the U10 scaling. The u. scaling has much less scatter than the scaling using other wind speeds. The friction velocity seems to play a distinctive role in wave growth. The result is important in the applications of the similarity law and in wave modeling. In theory it gives an insight into the mechanism of wind wave interaction. It is found that wave steepness is important in influencing the drag coefficient. The variability of the coefficients in the currently widely used drag form can be explained by the differences in wave steepness in the observations. A drag coefficient model with wind speed and wave steepness as parameters is proposed. An explanation for Kahma' s result that the u. scaling does not reduce the scatter in the U10 scaling is given.

  1. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  2. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    KAUST Repository

    Zedler, S. E.

    2009-04-25

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10 -3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Drag reduction on the 25 slant angle Ahmed reference body using pulsed jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Pierric [CNAM, Institut AeroTechnique (IAT), Saint Cyr l' Ecole (France); Amandolese, Xavier [CNAM, Aerodynamics Department, Saint Cyr l' Ecole (France); Aider, Jean-Luc [UMR 7636, CNRS, ESPCI ParisTech, PMMH Laboratory, Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    This paper highlights steady and unsteady measurements and flow control results obtained on an Ahmed model with slant angle of 25 in wind tunnel. On this high-drag configuration characterized by a large separation bubble along with energetic streamwise vortices, time-averaged and time-dependent results without control are first presented. The influence of rear-end periodic forcing on the drag coefficient is then investigated using electrically operated magnetic valves in an open-loop control scheme. Four distinct configurations of flow control have been tested: rectangular pulsed jets aligned with the spanwise direction or in winglets configuration on the roof end and rectangular jets or a large open slot at the top of the rear slant. For each configuration, the influence of the forcing parameters (non-dimensional frequency, injected momentum) on the drag coefficient has been studied, along with their impact on the static pressure on both the rear slant and vertical base of the model. Depending on the type and location of pulsed jets actuation, the maximum drag reduction is obtained for increasing injected momentum or well-defined optimal pulsation frequencies. (orig.)

  4. What happens to turbulent skin-friction drag reduction at high $Re$?

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Davide

    2012-01-01

    We address one of the capital problems in the field of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction, i.e. the performance of the known techniques at high values of the Reynolds number $Re$. We limit ourselves to considering open-loop techniques based on spanwise forcing (oscillating wall, streamwise-travelling waves), and explore via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) how quickly the drag reduction and net energy savings decrease when the friction Reynolds number is increased. We suggest an unexpected and interesting scenario where the performance of the drag-reduction technique degrade with $Re$ with a markedly different rate depending on the parameters. In particular, the known optimal region turns out to be such at low-$Re$ only, since there drag reduction degrades quite fast with $Re$, in line with available results. However, other regions are much less sensitive to $Re$, or insensitive at all. If one considers that the energy required to create the forcing presents a slightly favorable trend with $Re$, the pos...

  5. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.; Morzel, J.

    2009-04-01

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10-3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm.

  6. Application of water jet assisted drag bit and pick cutter for the cutting of coal measure rocks. Final technical report. [Tests of combination in different rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropchan, D.; Wang, F.D.; Wolgamott, J.

    1980-04-01

    A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of high pressure water jets on the cutting forces of drag bit cutters in sedimentary rocks. A hard and soft sandstone, shale and limestone were tested with commercially obtainable conical and plow type drag bits on the EMI linear cutting machine. About 1200 cuts were made at different bit penetration, jet orientation, and water pressure to determine the reduction of cutting forces on the bit from the use of the water jet. Both independent and interactive cutting was used. The greatest reduction in cutting forces were with both of the sandstones; the drag forces were reduced about 30 percent and the normal forces about 60 percent at 5000 psi water pressure with the nozzle behind the bit. The method was less effective in the shale, except at 10,000 psi water pressure the reduction in drag force was about 55 percent. Of the rocks tested, the limestone was least affected by the water jet. The cutting forces for the plow bit showed continuous change with wear so a machined conical bit was used for most of the testing. Tests with the plow bit did show a large reduction in cutting forces by using the water jet with worn bits. An economic analysis of equipping a drag bit tunnel boring machine indicated that the water jet system could reduce costs per foot in sandstone by up to 40 percent.

  7. A bio-inspired device for drag reduction on a three-dimensional model vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongri; Lee, Hoon; Yi, Wook; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, we introduce a bio-mimetic device for the reduction of the drag force on a three-dimensional model vehicle, the Ahmed body (Ahmed et al 1984 SAE Technical Paper 840300). The device, called automatic moving deflector (AMD), is designed inspired by the movement of secondary feathers on bird's wing suction surface: i.e., secondary feathers pop up when massive separation occurs on bird's wing suction surface at high angles of attack, which increases the lift force at landing. The AMD is applied to the rear slanted surface of the Ahmed body to control the flow separation there. The angle of the slanted surface considered is 25° at which the drag coefficient on the Ahmed body is highest. The wind tunnel experiment is conducted at Re H  = 1.0 × 10(5)-3.8 × 10(5), based on the height of the Ahmed body (H) and the free-stream velocity (U ∞). Several AMDs of different sizes and materials are tested by measuring the drag force on the Ahmed body, and showed drag reductions up to 19%. The velocity and surface-pressure measurements show that AMD starts to pop up when the pressure in the thin gap between the slanted surface and AMD is much larger than that on the upper surface of AMD. We also derive an empirical formula that predicts the critical free-stream velocity at which AMD starts to operate. Finally, it is shown that the drag reduction by AMD is mainly attributed to a pressure recovery on the slanted surface by delaying the flow separation and suppressing the strength of the longitudinal vortices emanating from the lateral edges of the slanted surface.

  8. Nacelle drag reduction: An analytically-guided experimental program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications are proposed to standard estimating procedures, as well as the BODY computer program, which predict that the drag of two nacelles will equal the drag of the fuselage. A preliminary computer analysis that considers increased dimensions for the nacelle forebody so that the noise is relatively less blunt indicates a reduction in form drag much greater than the increase in skin friction drag attributable to increased surface area.

  9. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapour layers

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Joseph D; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapour layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number shows substantial deviation from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Results obtained with liqiuds of different viscosities show that onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. The key feature o...

  10. Investigation into the Mechanism of Polymer Thread Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    drag reducers than polyacrylamides of equal molecular weight. The drag reduction increases as the Re or Cm increases. The concentrations of polymer...wall region, 10 < y’ < 100, for drag reduction to occur. The normalized distance from the wall is defined as y* = yut/v; u, is the friction velocity...AP 30, a polyacrylamide solution, with a 5000 ppm concentration on the centerline of a water flow in a glass tube, they achieved drag reduction up to

  11. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Müller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS. The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions.

  12. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  13. 14 CFR 25.699 - Lift and drag device indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag device indicator. 25.699....699 Lift and drag device indicator. (a) There must be means to indicate to the pilots the position of each lift or drag device having a separate control in the cockpit to adjust its position. In addition...

  14. Computational analysis of methods for reduction of induced drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, J. M.; Chatterjee, Animesh; Cave, Chris

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to perform a computational flow analysis of a design concept centered around induced drag reduction and tip-vortex energy recovery. The flow model solves the unsteady three-dimensional Euler equations, discretized as a finite-volume method, utilizing a high-resolution approximate Riemann solver for cell interface flux definitions. The numerical scheme is an approximately-factored block LU implicit Newton iterative-refinement method. Multiblock domain decomposition is used to partition the field into an ordered arrangement of blocks. Three configurations are analyzed: a baseline fuselage-wing, a fuselage-wing-nacelle, and a fuselage-wing-nacelle-propfan. Aerodynamic force coefficients, propfan performance coefficients, and flowfield maps are used to qualitatively access design efficacy. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with available experimental data.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of force acting on a model nano particle immersed in fluid with temperature gradient: Effect of interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Iseki, Hirotaka; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Thermophoresis of a nano particle in a fluid is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. In order to elucidate effective factors on the characteristics of thermophoresis, simple models for both the fluid and the nano particle are considered, namely, the surrounding fluid consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles and the model nano particle is a cluster consisting of several tens of LJ particles. Interaction between the fluid particle and the model nano particle is described by the LJ interaction potential or repulsive interaction potential with the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rule. As a preliminary result, the effect of mass on thermophoretic force acting on the model nano particle is investigated for both interaction potentials.

  16. Toward an Engineering Model for the Aerodynamic Forces Acting on Wind Turbine Blades in Quasisteady Standstill and Blade Installation Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunaa, Mac; Heinz, Joachim; Skrzypiński, Witold

    2016-09-01

    The crossflow principle is one of the key elements used in engineering models for prediction of the aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades in standstill or blade installation situations, where the flow direction relative to the wind turbine blade has a component in the direction of the blade span direction. In the present work, the performance of the crossflow principle is assessed on the DTU 10MW reference blade using extensive 3D CFD calculations. Analysis of the computational results shows that there is only a relatively narrow region in which the crossflow principle describes the aerodynamic loading well. In some conditions the deviation of the predicted loadings can be quite significant, having a large influence on for instance the integral aerodynamic moments around the blade centre of mass; which is very important for single blade installation applications. The main features of these deviations, however, have a systematic behaviour on all force components, which in this paper is employed to formulate the first version of an engineering correction method to the crossflow principle applicable for wind turbine blades. The new correction model improves the agreement with CFD results for the key aerodynamic loads in crossflow situations. The general validity of this model for other blade shapes should be investigated in subsequent works.

  17. A Study of Ion Drag for Ground and Microgravity Dusty Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Taylor; Thomas, Edward

    2015-11-01

    This presentation presents the results of a recent study of the interaction between charged dust particles and plasma ions through the ion drag force in a dc glow discharge plasma. Measurements of the dust particles motion are carried out using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). When an electrostatic perturbation is applied to the dust cloud, the particle motion, in response to the perturbation, is shown to reverse direction as the gas pressure is increased. An analysis of the dust particle motion and background plasma parameters suggests that there is a competition between the ion drag and electric forces on the particles. These forces are calculated for a range of pressures using detailed measurements of the plasma parameters carried out by a single Langmuir probe. The analysis of these measurements suggests that a change in the relative magnitude of the Coulomb collision ion drag compared to the electric force is a probable explanation for the observed reversal of direction of motion as the neutral gas pressure is increased. The application of these results to microgravity studies of dusty plasmas will be discussed. Support provided by NASA-JPL (JPL-RSA 1471384).

  18. Kinematics and forces of a flexible body in Karman vortex street

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG SiYing; JIA LaiBing; YIN XieZhen

    2009-01-01

    Experiments of a flexible filament in the wake of a cylinder and in free stream were conducted in a ver-tical soap film tunnel. The experiments distinctly visualized the movement of the filament. Based on the experimental kinematic results, a 2-d panel method was used to calculate the forces acting on the filament. The experiment and numerical results revealed that different from that in free stream, the filament in Karman vortex street flapped at the same frequency as the vortex street, and with smaller amplitude and larger curvature. The filament suffered an evident thrust in Karman vortex street, while a drag appeared in the case of free stream. The dependence of the drag coefficient on the phase relation between the movement of the filament and the Karman vortex street was also studied.

  19. In-depth Study on Cylinder Wake Controlled by Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 范宝春; 陈志华

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of the electromagnetic control of cylinder wake are investigated and discussed.The effects of Lorentz force are found to be composed of two parts,one is its direct action on the cylinder(the wall Lorentz force)and the other is applied to the fluid(called the field Lorentz force)near the cylinder surface.Our results show that the wall Lorentz force can generate thrust and reduce the drag; the field Lorentz force increases the drag.However,the cylinder drag is dominated by the wall Lorentz force.In addition,the field Lorentz force above the upper surface decreases the lift,while the upper wall Lorentz force increases it.The total lift is dominated by the upper wall Lorentz force.%The underlying mechanisms of the electromagnetic control of cylinder wake are investigated and discussed. The effects of Lorentz force are found to be composed of two parts, one is its direct action on the cylinder (the wall Lorentz force) and the other is applied to the fluid (called the field Lorentz force) near the cylinder surface. Our results show that the wall Lorentz force can generate thrust and reduce the drag; the Geld Lorentz force increases the drag. However, the cylinder drag is dominated by the wall Lorentz force. In addition, the field Lorentz force above the upper surface decreases the lift, while the upper wall Lorentz force increases it. The total lift is dominated by the upper wall Lorentz force.

  20. Study on estimating fluid force acting on a hull during maneuvering movement; Soju undoji no sentai ni sayosuru ryutairyoku no suitei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, K.; Kijima, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    With types of general cargo vessel and VLCC vessel as the object of discussion, a method was discussed to estimate fluid force acting theoretically on a hull during maneuvering movement, taking frame line shape into consideration. A vortex model was improved by giving consideration of time-based decay on intensity of discrete vortex lines based on the Rankine vortex. Modeling of flow fields around a hull was attempted to deal with movements in which width and draft are small as compared with the ship length, and turning angle speed and deviation angle are small. It was assumed that the ship speed is slow and effects of waves can be disregarded. Specular images of the hull were taken with regard to free surface, and handled as a double body model. Speed potential to express flow fields around a hull is required to satisfy the following five boundary conditions of Laplace, substance surface, free vortex layers, infinity and exfoliation. The potential may be handled as a two-dimensional problem in a field near the hull by using assumption of a slender and long body and conformal mapping. It was found possible to estimate hull fluid force with relatively good accuracy. Fine linear coefficients derived from the estimation were used to have performed highly accurate determination on course stabilization. 5 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Research on Drag Torque Prediction Model for the Wet Clutches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the surface tension effect and centrifugal effect, a mathematical model based on Reynolds equation for predicting the drag torque of disengage wet clutches is presented. The model indicates that the equivalent radius is a function of clutch speed and flow rate. The drag torque achieves its peak at a critical speed. Above this speed, drag torque drops due to the shrinking of the oil film. The model also points out that viscosity and flow rate effects on drag torque. Experimental results indicate that the model is reasonable and it performs well for predicting the drag torque peak.

  2. The other optimal Stokes drag profile

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    The lowest drag shape of fixed volume in Stokes flow has been known for some 40 years. It is front-back symmetric and similar to an American football with ends tangent to a cone of 60 degrees. The analogous convex axisymmetric shape of fixed surface area, which may be of interest for particle design in chemistry and colloidal science, is characterized in this paper. This "other" optimal shape has a surface vorticity proportional to the mean surface curvature, which is used with a local analysis of the flow near the tip to show that the front and rear ends are tangent to a cone of angle 30.8 degrees. Using the boundary element method, we numerically represent the shape by expanding its tangent angle in terms decaying odd Legendre modes, and show that it has 11.3% lower drag than a sphere of equal surface area, significantly more pronounced than for the fixed-volume optimal.

  3. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang;

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  4. Drag Reduction by Polymeric and Nonpolymeric Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1997-11-01

    To investigate the ``self-healing'' property of drag reducing surfactant micelles we have conducted a comparative study between high polymers and surfactants in six turbulent pipe flows (Reynolds numbers between 2000 and 90,000) with varying intensities o f secondary flow. Friction factor values are measured in a straight pipe of 185 diameters; three pipes, each turning through four 90 degree elbows, of lengths 1085 diameters, 875 diameters, and 600 diameters; and a twice-turned coiled pipe, radius of curv ature of 24 diameters and length of 290 diameters. All the flows are gravity driven to prevent degradation effects caused by pump impellers. The large stresses set up by the secondary flows degrade the fragile polymers, thus reducing their effectivness as a drag reducer. The ``self-healing'' of the micelles enables the surfactant to maintain its effectivness. We will present the ``self-healing'' characteristics of the surfactant micelles using the polymer data as the datum.

  5. Investigation on Drag Reduction of Trucks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiao-ni; LIU Zhen-yan

    2008-01-01

    A study of the mechanism of fences was given to reduce drag by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental research. A 3D mathematical model has been developed based on computational fluid dynamics software Phoenics that was capable of handling steady state, 3D flow to simulate the flow field around the truck. The experiment made in a low speed wind tunnel is used as references for validation. By analyzing the results of calculation and experiment, the flowing mechanism of the flow field around the container truck and the drag-reducing mechanism of #-shaped fences on the truck are unveiled, which provides theoretical guidance to the aerodynamic formation designing and amelioration.

  6. Model-based design of transverse wall oscillations for turbulent drag reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Moarref, Rashad

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, both experiments and simulations have demonstrated that transverse wall oscillations with properly selected amplitude and frequency can reduce turbulent drag by as much as 40%. In this paper, we develop a model-based approach for designing oscillations that suppress turbulence in a channel flow. We utilize eddy-viscosity-enhanced linearization of the turbulent flow with control in conjunction with turbulence modeling to determine skin-friction drag in a simulation-free manner. The Boussinesq eddy viscosity hypothesis is used to quantify the effect of fluctuations on the mean velocity in the flow subject to control. In contrast to the traditional approach that relies on numerical simulations, we determine the turbulent viscosity from the second order statistics of the linearized model driven by white-in-time stochastic forcing. The spatial power spectrum of the forcing is selected to ensure that the linearized model for the uncontrolled flow reproduces the turbulent energy spectrum. ...

  7. Drag Reduction of a Turbulent Boundary Layer over an Oscillating Wall and Its Variation with Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Skote

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spanwise oscillation applied on the wall under a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow is investigated using direct numerical simulation. The temporal wall forcing produces a considerable drag reduction over the region where oscillation occurs. Downstream development of drag reduction is investigated from Reynolds number dependency perspective. An alternative to the previously suggested power-law relation between Reynolds number and peak drag reduction values, which is valid for channel flow as well, is proposed. Considerable deviation in the variation of drag reduction with Reynolds number between different previous investigations of channel flow is found. The shift in velocity profile, which has been used in the past for explaining the diminishing drag reduction at higher Reynolds number for riblets, is investigated. A new predictive formula is derived, replacing the ones found in the literature. Furthermore, unlike for the case of riblets, the shift is varying downstream in the case of wall oscillations, which is a manifestation of the fact that the boundary layer has not reached a new equilibrium over the limited downstream distance in the simulations. Taking this into account, the predictive model agrees well with DNS data. On the other hand, the growth of the boundary layer does not influence the drag reduction prediction.

  8. Force balance along Isunnguata Sermia, west Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Meierbachtol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice flows when gravity acts on gradients in surface elevation, producing driving stresses. In the Isunnguata Sermia and Russel Glacier catchments of western Greenland, a 50% decline in driving stress along a flow line is juxtaposed with increasing surface flow speed. Here, these circumstances are investigated using modern observational data sources and an analysis of the balance of forces. Stress gradients in the ice mass and basal drag which resist the local driving stress are computed in order to investigate the underlying processes influencing the velocity and stress regimes. Our results show that the largest resistive stress gradients along the flowline result from increasing surface velocity. However, the longitudinal coupling stresses fail to exceed 15 kPa, or 20% of the local driving stress. Consequently, computed basal drag declines in proportion to the driving stress. In the absence of significant resistive stress gradients, other mechanisms are therefore necessary to explain the observed velocity increase despite declining driving stress. In the study area, the observed velocity - driving stress feature occurs at the long-term mean position of the equilibrium line of surface mass balance. We hypothesize that this position approximates the inland limit where surface meltwater penetrates the bed, and that the increased surface velocity reflects enhanced basal motion associated with seasonal meltwater perturbations.

  9. A Note on Disk Drag Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gunther, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    The electrical power consumed by typical magnetic hard disk drives (HDD) not only increases linearly with the number of spindles but, more significantly, it increases as very fast power-laws of speed (RPM) and diameter. Since the theoretical basis for this relationship is neither well-known nor readily accessible in the literature, we show how these exponents arise from aerodynamic disk drag and discuss their import for green storage capacity planning.

  10. Satellite Formation Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    all cases tested, and the eccentricity-minimizing control law was able to maintain the position within 4.17 feet. More recently, Wedekind considered...three different formations, in-plane, in-track, and circular, was considered. Wedekind achieved favorable results for these three formations when the...and Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004. 23. Wedekind , James T. Characterizing and Controlling the Effects of Differential Drag on Satellite Formations

  11. Drag Reduction, from Bending to Pruning

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Diego; Michelin, Sébastien; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Most plants and benthic organisms have evolved efficient reconfiguration mechanisms to resist flow-induced loads. These mechanisms can be divided into bending, in which plants reduce their sail area through elastic deformation, and pruning, in which the loads are decreased through partial breakage of the structure. In this work, we show by using idealized models that these two mechanisms or, in fact, any combination of the two, are equally efficient to reduce the drag experienced by terrestrial and aquatic vegetation.

  12. Phonon-drag effects on thermoelectric power

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, M. W.; Horing, N. J. M.; Cui, H. L.

    1995-01-01

    We carry out a calculation of the phonon-drag contribution $S_g$ to the thermoelectric power of bulk semiconductors and quantum well structures for the first time using the balance equation transport theory extended to the weakly nonuniform systems. Introducing wavevector and phonon-mode dependent relaxation times due to phonon-phonon interactions, the formula obtained can be used not only at low temperatures where the phonon mean free path is determined by boundary scattering, but also at hi...

  13. Stokes’ and Lamb's viscous drag laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, I.; Klettner, C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Since Galileo used his pulse to measure the time period of a swinging chandelier in the 17th century, pendulums have fascinated scientists. It was not until Stokes' (1851 Camb. Phil. Soc. 9 8-106) (whose interest was spurred by the pendulur time pieces of the mid 19th century) treatise on viscous flow that a theoretical framework for the drag on a sphere at low Reynolds number was laid down. Stokes' famous drag law has been used to determine two fundamental physical constants—the charge on an electron and Avogadro's constant—and has been used in theories which have won three Nobel prizes. Considering its illustrious history it is then not surprising that the flow past a sphere and its two-dimensional analog, the flow past a cylinder, form the starting point of teaching flow past a rigid body in undergraduate level fluid mechanics courses. Usually starting with the two-dimensional potential flow past a cylinder, students progress to the three-dimensional potential flow past a sphere. However, when the viscous flow past rigid bodies is taught, the three-dimensional example of a sphere is first introduced, and followed by (but not often), the two-dimensional viscous flow past a cylinder. The reason why viscous flow past a cylinder is generally not taught is because it is usually explained from an asymptotic analysis perspective. In fact, this added mathematical complexity is why the drag on a cylinder was only solved in 1911, 60 years after the drag on a sphere. In this note, we show that the viscous flow past a cylinder can be explained without the need to introduce any asymptotic analysis while still capturing all the physical insight of this classic fluid mechanics problem.

  14. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Phuc H

    2015-01-01

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relatistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -$0.4\\ pm/s^2$ (pm := picometer). This "drag" is not surprising; along track drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-$3.4\\ pm/s^2$). It is hypothesized that the drag is due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 105 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance $\\alpha$ and emissivity $\\epsilon$ of the fused silica cube-cornered laser retroreflectors (CCRs). We present results for two values of $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$: 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to ...

  15. Picosecond response of a photon drag detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmitt, M.F. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    The primary use of photon drag detectors has been with CO{sub 2} lasers at 10{mu}m. Cornmercially-available devices are limited to response times of < 0.5-1ns and voltage responsivities of <0.5{mu}V W{sup -1}. This poster paper will describe the first photon drag detector specifically designed for very fast response. Using the free-election laser FELIX at the FOM Institute in the Netherlands, a rise time of <50ps has been demonstrated, using a 5mm{sup 2} area detector with a responsivity of >1{mu}V W{sup -1} over the wavelength range 10-25{mu}m. The figure shows the clear resolution of the micropulse structure of the laser. The actual width of each pulse is a few picosecoods, with a micropulse spacing of Ins. The advantages or photon drag detectors are room-temperature operation, linear response to intensifies greater than 10{sup 6}MW cm{sup -2} and very high damage threshold. These detectors are cheap to manufacture and, using different semiconductors, can be designed for any wavelength from 1 {mu}m-5mm.

  16. Dynamic force patterns of an undulatory microswimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael D; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-05-01

    We probe the viscous forces involved in the undulatory swimming of the model organism C. elegans. Using micropipette deflection, we attain direct measurements of lateral and propulsive forces produced in response to the motion of the worm. We observe excellent agreement of the results with resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of this organism. The drag coefficients are in accordance with theoretical predictions. Using a simple scaling argument, we obtain a relationship between the size of the worm and the forces that we measure, which well describes our data.

  17. Integration of Particle-gas Systems with Stiff Mutual Drag Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of numerous mm/cm-sized particles embedded in a gaseous disk has become an important tool in the study of planet formation and in understanding the dust distribution in observed protoplanetary disks. However, the mutual drag force between the gas and the particles can become so stiff—particularly because of small particles and/or strong local solid concentration—that an explicit integration of this system is computationally formidable. In this work, we consider the integration of the mutual drag force in a system of Eulerian gas and Lagrangian solid particles. Despite the entanglement between the gas and the particles under the particle-mesh construct, we are able to devise a numerical algorithm that effectively decomposes the globally coupled system of equations for the mutual drag force, and makes it possible to integrate this system on a cell-by-cell basis, which considerably reduces the computational task required. We use an analytical solution for the temporal evolution of each cell to relieve the time-step constraint posed by the mutual drag force, as well as to achieve the highest degree of accuracy. To validate our algorithm, we use an extensive suite of benchmarks with known solutions in one, two, and three dimensions, including the linear growth and the nonlinear saturation of the streaming instability. We demonstrate numerical convergence and satisfactory consistency in all cases. Our algorithm can, for example, be applied to model the evolution of the streaming instability with mm/cm-sized pebbles at high mass loading, which has important consequences for the formation scenarios of planetesimals.

  18. The Machian contribution of the Universe to geodetic precession, frame dragging and gravitational clock effect

    CERN Document Server

    Christillin, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Gravitomagnetism resulting from SR has been applied to geodetic precession and frame dragging. The substantial contribution of the "fictitious" Coriolis force, due to the relative rotation of the rest of the Universe in the non inertial frame of the free falling but rotating satellite, has to be taken into account, giving another quantitative confirmation of Mach's arguments and of the black hole nature of our Universe. Also the gravitational clock effect has an elementary prediction in the present post Newtonian formulation.

  19. LIFT FORCE ON ROTATING SPHERE AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS AND HIGH ROTATIONAL SPEEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    The lift force on an isolated rotating sphere in a uniform flow was investigated by means of a three-dimensional numerical simulation for low Reynolds numbers (based on the sphere diameter) (Re < 68.4) and high dimensionless rotational speeds (Γ< 5). The Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian coordinate system were solved using a finite volume formulation based on SIMPLE procedure. The accuracy of the numerical simulation was tested through a comparison with available theoretical, numerical and experimental results at low Reynolds numbers, and it was found that they were in close agreement under the above mentioned ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed. From a detailed computation of the flow field around a rotational sphere in extended ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed, the results show that, with increasing the rotational speed or decreasing the Reynolds number, the lift coefficient increases. An empirical equation more accurate than those obtained by previous studies was obtained to describe both effects of the rotational speed and Reynolds number on the lift force on a sphere. It was found in calculations that the drag coefficient is not significantly affected by the rotation of the sphere. The ratio of the lift force to the drag force, both of which act on a sphere in a uniform flow at the same time, was investigated. For a small spherical particle such as one of about 100μm in diameter, even if the rotational speed reaches about 106 revolutions per minute, the lift force can be neglected as compared with the drag force.

  20. Effects of Polymer Parameters on Drag Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Abbas Mohammad

    The effects of polymer parameters on fluid drag reduction using polyethylene oxide (PEO), polyacrylamide (PAM), guar gum (GG) and hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) were investigated. Due to the unavailability of high molecular weight (MW) water-soluble polymers having narrow molecular weight distribution (MWD), an aqueous preparative size exclusion chromatography (SEC) system capable of fractionating over wide MW ranges was constructed. An online low shear viscometer, coupled to the SEC, measured the instantaneous intrinsic viscosity of the eluting polymer solution and, therefore, served as a MW detector since Mark-Houwink "K" and "a" values for all four polymers were known. With the aid of the viscometer, the SEC system was calibrated. The preparative nature of the chromatography system allowed the collection of large volumes of nearly monodisperse fractions (MWD SEC approach allowed drag reduction (DR) experiments using well-characterized, narrowly dispersed polymer solutions under controlled tube flow conditions. Correlations of drag reduction performance with primary polymer parameters (i.e., concentration, intrinsic viscosity ((eta)), volume fraction (c(eta)), number of chain links (N), and combinations thereof) were used to test the validity of several theoretical DR models. Walsh's energy model, as well as the Deborah argument, did not completely account for drag reduction behavior under all experimental conditions. Within each of the flexible or rigid polymer groups, the extensional viscosity model was successful in correlating c(eta) N with DR under all turbulent conditions. However, it failed to account for the differences in chemical structure between the two polymer groups. However, when the cellulosic repeat unit was used instead of the carbon-carbon bond as the chain link for the rigid polymers (GG and HEC), all DR versus c (eta) N curves under all turbulent conditions collapsed into a single function. This has been predicted by the recent "yo-yo" model of

  1. Comparative study of the hydrodynamic drag reducer efficiency in petroleum samples; Estudo comparativo da eficiencia de redutores de atrito hidrodinamico comerciais em amostras de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabadini, Edvaldo; Silva, Marcelo Alves da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Ziglio, Claudio Marcos; Carvalho, Carlos Henrique Monteiro de; Rocha, Nelson de Oliveira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In this work the efficiency of five commercial additives which produce drag reduction in petroleum was determined and compared. The studies were carried out in a rheometer using samples of petroleum from Bacia de Campos diluted in 50% of toluene. For such purpose the rheometer acts as a 'torquemeter', in which the magnitude of the drag reduction promoted by the additive is directly proportional to the difference in torque applied to maintain the sample in a specific flow rate. The obtained results have shown excellent capability of the additives to promote drag reduction (up to 20%) and small difference of efficiency among the additives was detectable. (author)

  2. Pre-Test Assessment of the Upper Bound of the Drag Coefficient Repeatability of a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; L'Esperance, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new method is presented that computes a pre{test estimate of the upper bound of the drag coefficient repeatability of a wind tunnel model. This upper bound is a conservative estimate of the precision error of the drag coefficient. For clarity, precision error contributions associated with the measurement of the dynamic pressure are analyzed separately from those that are associated with the measurement of the aerodynamic loads. The upper bound is computed by using information about the model, the tunnel conditions, and the balance in combination with an estimate of the expected output variations as input. The model information consists of the reference area and an assumed angle of attack. The tunnel conditions are described by the Mach number and the total pressure or unit Reynolds number. The balance inputs are the partial derivatives of the axial and normal force with respect to all balance outputs. Finally, an empirical output variation of 1.0 microV/V is used to relate both random instrumentation and angle measurement errors to the precision error of the drag coefficient. Results of the analysis are reported by plotting the upper bound of the precision error versus the tunnel conditions. The analysis shows that the influence of the dynamic pressure measurement error on the precision error of the drag coefficient is often small when compared with the influence of errors that are associated with the load measurements. Consequently, the sensitivities of the axial and normal force gages of the balance have a significant influence on the overall magnitude of the drag coefficient's precision error. Therefore, results of the error analysis can be used for balance selection purposes as the drag prediction characteristics of balances of similar size and capacities can objectively be compared. Data from two wind tunnel models and three balances are used to illustrate the assessment of the precision error of the drag coefficient.

  3. Integration of Particle-Gas Systems with Stiff Mutual Drag Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chao-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulation of numerous mm/cm-sized particles embedded in a gaseous disk has become an important tool in the study of planet formation and in understanding the dust distribution in observed protoplanetary disks. However, the mutual drag force between the gas and the particles can become so stiff, particularly because of small particles and/or strong local solid concentration, that an explicit integration of this system is computationally formidable. In this work, we consider the integration of the mutual drag force in a system of Eulerian gas and Lagrangian solid particles. Despite the entanglement between the gas and the particles under the particle-mesh construct, we are able to devise a numerical algorithm that effectively decomposes the globally coupled system of equations for the mutual drag force and makes it possible to integrate this system on a cell-by-cell basis, which considerably reduces the computational task required. We use an analytical solution for the temporal evolution of each cell...

  4. Wigs, laughter, and subversion: Charles Busch and strategies of drag performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the strategies of drag performer/ playwright Charles Busch. His performance aesthetic is explored and shown to be subversive even though its initial impulse is to entertain. Basing my arguments on the work of Judith Butler, Elin Diamond, and others, I argue that drag queens like Busch can not only entertain but also make audiences question and criticize through drag's power to create a Brechtian alienation effect and historicize the subject. After showing how he can be viewed as a drag queen, I give a brief biography and discuss such contested terms as "camp" and "gay sensibility." I then focus on Busch's staged reading of Ibsen's Hedda Gahler andA Doll's House, both done in one afternoon at Theatre for The New City (6 May 2000). By examining the performance of Busch and his fellow actors, I demonstrate how a contemporary relevancy is achieved by having the roles played by a female impersonator whose acting choices are filtered through a gay sensibility. The ongoing dialectic between spectator and performer creates a historicized moment in performance that underscores the gender dynamics in unexpected and stimulating ways.

  5. The Relationship between Power Generated by Thrust and Power to Overcome Drag in Elite Short Distance Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Zamparo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    At constant average speed (v), a balance between thrust force (Ft) and drag force (Fd) should occur: Ft−Fd = 0; hence the power generated by thrust forces (Pt = Ft·v) should be equal to the power needed to overcome drag forces at that speed (Pd = Fd·v); the aim of this study was to measure Pt (tethered swims), to estimate Pd in active conditions (at sprint speed) and to compare these values. 10 front crawl male elite swimmers (expertise: 93.1 ± 2.4% of 50 m world record) participated to the study; their sprint speed was measured during a 30 m maximal trial. Ft was assessed during a 15 s tethered effort; passive towing measurement were performed to determine speed specific drag in passive conditions (kP = passive drag force/v2); drag force in active conditions (Fd = kA·v2) was calculated assuming that kA = 1.5·kP. Average sprint speed was 2.20 ± 0.07 m·s-1; kA, at this speed, was 37.2 ± 2.7 N·s2·m-2. No significant differences (paired t-test: p > 0.8) were observed between Pt (399 ± 56 W) and Pd (400 ± 57 W) and a strong correlation (R = 0.95, p < 0.001) was observed between these two parameters. The Bland-Altman plot indicated a good agreement and a small, acceptable, error (bias: -0.89 W, limits of agreement: -25.5 and 23.7 W). Power thrust experiments can thus be suggested as a valid tool for estimating a swimmer’s power propulsion. PMID:27654992

  6. Drag generation by interfacial waves at an inversion/thermocline in non-hydrostatic flow past an axisymmetric obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel A. C.; Paci, Alexandre; Belleudy, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The drag associated with 3D trapped lee waves generated at a density interface by an axisymmetric obstacle is evaluated using a linear non-hydrostatic model. These waves propagate at temperature inversions capping the boundary layer in the atmosphere, or at the oceanic thermocline, generated by, for example, drifting ice keels. They are responsible for near-surface drag that may be misrepresented as turbulent form drag in numerical models. This drag receives contributions from a continuous wavenumber range forced by the obstacle, in contrast with 2D flow (where only discrete wave modes exist), as the waves are able to vary their angle of incidence with respect to the incoming flow to satisfy their dispersion relationship. Hence (and again in contrast with 2D linear flow), the drag is non-zero both for subcritical and supercritical flow, and attains a maximum for a value of the Froude number slightly smaller than 1. This drag maximum has lower magnitude than in the hydrostatic limit, due to the effect of wave dispersion. The drag calculated from the model is in good agreement with that obtained from experiments carried out in a laboratory water flume that use axisymmetric obstacles of different heights, especially for the lowest obstacle (as would be expected). The best agreement is achieved when the effects of both a rigid lid bounding the fluid layer further away from the obstacle, and friction (represented as a Rayleigh damping), are taken into account. The model is not as quantitatively accurate when the highest obstacle used in the experiments is considered, as this corresponds to stronger flow nonlinearity. But, even in that case, the model has a qualitatively correct behaviour, which is much more accurate than the 3D hydrostatic or 2D non-hydrostatic limits. This suggests that 3D and non-hydrostatic effects to a large extent determine the drag behaviour observed in the experiments. The wave signatures associated with this behaviour are dominated by transverse

  7. Drag-free Spacecraft Technologies: criticalities in the initialization of geodesic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Present and future space missions rely on systems of increasingly demanding performance for being successful. Drag-free technology is one of the technologies that is fundamental for LISA-Pathfinder, an ESA mission whose launch is planned for the end of September 2015. A purely drag-free object is defined by the absence of all external forces other than gravity. This is not a natural condition and thus requires a proper design of a spacecraft, whose core is an object in free-fall, called test mass (TM). The purity of the drag-free orbit depends on the spacecraft capability of protecting the TM from disturbances, which indeed has limitations. According to a NASA study, such a concept provides substantial economies for LEO satellites. At the same time, a drag-free motion is required in many missions of fundamental physics. eLISA is an ESA concept mission aimed at opening a new window to the universe, black holes, and massive binary systems by means of gravitational waves. LISA-Pathfinder is in charge of proving ...

  8. Phonon focusing and electron–phonon drag in semiconductor crystals with degenerate charge-carrier statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleyev, I. G., E-mail: kuleev@imp.uran.ru; Kuleyev, I. I.; Bakharev, S. M.; Ustinov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    We study the effect of anisotropy in elastic properties on the electron–phonon drag and thermoelectric phenomena in gapless semiconductors with degenerate charge-carrier statistics. It is shown that phonon focusing leads to a number of new effects in the drag thermopower at low temperatures, when diffusive phonon scattering from the boundaries is the predominant relaxation mechanism. We analyze the effect of phonon focusing on the dependences of the thermoelectromotive force (thermopower) in HgSe:Fe crystals on geometric parameters and the heat-flow directions relative to the crystal axes in the Knudsen regime of the phonon gas flow. The crystallographic directions that ensure the maximum and minimum values of the thermopower are determined and the role of quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse phonons in the drag thermopower in HgSe:Fe crystals at low temperatures is analyzed. It is shown that the main contribution to the drag thermopower comes from slow quasi-transverse phonons in the directions of focusing in long samples.

  9. Design of a cusped field thruster for drag-free flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Chen, P. B.; Sun, Q. Q.; Hu, P.; Meng, Y. C.; Mao, W.; Yu, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Drag-free flight has played a more and more important role in many space missions. The thrust control system is the key unit to achieve drag-free flight by providing a precise compensation for the disturbing force except gravity. The cusped field thruster has shown a significant potential to be capable of the function due to its long life, high efficiency, and simplicity. This paper demonstrates a cusped field thruster's feasibility in drag-free flight based on its instinctive characteristics and describes a detailed design of a cusped field thruster made by Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). Furthermore, the performance test is conducted, which shows that the cusped field thruster can achieve a continuously variable thrust from 1 to 20 mN with a low noise and high resolution below 650 W, and the specific impulse can achieve 1800 s under a thrust of 18 mN and discharge voltage of 1000 V. The thruster's overall performance indicates that the cusped field thruster is quite capable of achieving drag-free flight. With the further optimization, the cusped field thruster will exhibit a more extensive application value.

  10. The wall shear force on a liquid droplet adhering to a solid surface under an imposed shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtay, Royi; Frankel, Itzchak

    2011-11-01

    We focus on large droplet viscosities typical of those appearing in the upper respiratory tract of CF or chronically ventilated patients. To further simplify the problem we assume vanishingly small capillary numbers and consider (non-deformable) hemispherical droplets. Under these assumptions the problem decouples into (i) the external problem of imposed shear flow over a planar solid wall with a hemispherical protuberance which is simulated by means of a commercially available finite - volume code and (ii) the inner Stokes flow animated by the now prescribed shear stress distribution over the liquid surface. The latter problem is addressed through use of series expansions in spherical harmonics. The interaction between the caterpillar inner - fluid motion and the solid substrate results in a shear force adding to the external - flow drag force acting in the downstream direction. Throughout the range of outer - flow Reynolds numbers considered (0.05-50) this interaction contributes over 35% of the total hydrodynamic force acting to dislodge the droplet.

  11. Ultraviolet microbeam irradiations of epithelial and spermatocyte spindles suggest that forces act on the kinetochore fibre and are not generated by its disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurck, T; Forer, A; Pickett-Heaps, J

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) microbeam irradiations of crane-fly spermatocyte and newt epithelial spindles severed kinetochore fibres (KT-fibres), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs): the remnant KT-fibre consists of two "stubs," a pole-stub attached to the pole and a KT-stub attached to the kinetochore. KT-stubs remained visible but pole-stubs soon became undetectable [Forer et al., 1996]. At metaphase, in both cell types the KT-stub often changed orientation immediately after irradiation and its tip steadily moved poleward. In spermatocytes, the chromosome attached to the KT-stub remained at the equator as the KT-stub elongated. In epithelial cells, the KT-stub sometimes elongated as the associated chromosome remained at the equator; other times the associated chromosome moved poleward together with the KT-stub, albeit only a short distance toward the pole. When an ARB was generated at anaphase, chromosome(s) with a KT-stub often continued to move poleward. In spermatocytes, this movement was accompanied by steady elongation of the KT-stub. In epithelial cells, chromosomes accelerated polewards after irradiation until the KT-stubs reached the pole, after which chromosome movement returned to normal speeds. In some epithelial cells fine birefringent fibres by chance were present along one edge of ARBs; these remnant fibres buckled and broke as the KT-stub and chromosome moved polewards. Similarly, KT-stubs that moved into pole stubs (or astral fibres) caused the pole stubs (or astral fibres) to bend sharply from the point of impact. Our results contradict models of chromosome movement that postulate that force is generated by the kinetochore disassembling the KT-fibre. Instead, these results suggest that poleward directed forces act on the KT-fibre and the KT-stub and suggest that continuity of microtubules between kinetochore and pole is not obligatory for achieving anaphase motion to the pole.

  12. Modeling atmospheric drag effect on Mangalyaan Mars orbiter during geocentric, heliocentric and areocentric trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Interplanetary missions are susceptible to gravitational and non-gravitational perturbing forces at every trajectory phase, assuming that the man made rockets and thrusters work as expected. These forces are mainly due to planetary and solar-forcing-induced perturbations during geocentric, heliocentric and Martian trajectories, and before orbit insertion. In this study, we analyzed perturbing forces and their possible effects on interplanetary and/or Mars mission satellites, before Orbit Insertion. We also model the significance of atmospheric drag force on Mangalyaan Mars orbiter mission, as a function of appropriate space environmental parameters during its 28 days in Earth's orbit (around and during perigee passage), 300 days of heliocentric and 100 days of Martian trajectory based on Earth-Mars atmosphere density ratio.

  13. A Model for Static Recrystallization with Simultaneous Precipitation and Solute Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buken, Heinrich; Kozeschnik, Ernst

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, we introduce a state parameter-based microstructure evolution model, which incorporates the effect of solute atoms and precipitates on recrystallization kinetics. The model accounts for local precipitate coarsening at grain boundaries, which promotes an average grain boundary movement even if the Zener pinning force exceeds the driving force for recrystallization. The impact of solute drag on the grain boundary mobility as well as simultaneous precipitation is discussed in detail. The model is validated on experimental data on recrystallization in V-micro-alloyed steel, where excellent agreement is achieved.

  14. Afterbody Drag. Volume 3. Literature Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    34 AGARD, Otta- wa, June 1955. 34. Faru, I., "Experimental Determination of Base Pressures at Supersonic Velocities." Bumblebee Report 106, Johns ...Taylor Model Basin Aero Report 857, January 1954. 68. Pietrangeli, G.J., "The Determination of Afterbody Drag at Transonic Speeds." Johns Hopkins...34 NASATND-7095, 1972. Coltrane , L.C., "Investigation of Two Bluff Shapes in Axial Free Flight Over a Mach Number Range from 0.35 to 2.15." NACARM L58A16

  15. Coulombic dragging of molecular assemblies on nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Petr; Sint, Kyaw; Wang, Boyang

    2009-03-01

    We show by molecular dynamics simulations that polar molecules, ions and their assemblies could be Coulombically dragged on the surfaces of single-wall carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes by ionic solutions or individual ions moving inside the nanotubes [1,2]. We also briefly discuss highly selective ionic sieves based on graphene monolayers with nanopores [3]. These phenomena could be applied in molecular delivery, separation and desalination.[3pt] [1] Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, JACS 128, 15984 (2006). [0pt] [2] Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 046103 (2008). [0pt] [3] Kyaw Sint, Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, JACS, ASAP (2008).

  16. Gravitational Capture of Asteroids by Gas Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vieira Neto

    2009-01-01

    captured by the planet got its velocity reduced and could been trapped as an irregular satellite. It is well known that, depending on the time scale of the gas envelope, an asteroid will spiral and collide with the planet. So, we simulate the passage of the asteroid in the gas envelope with its density decreasing along the time. Using this approach, we found effective captures, and have a better understanding of the whole process. Finally, we conclude that the origin of the irregular satellites cannot be attributed to the gas drag capture mechanism alone.

  17. Drag phenomena from holographic massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Brattan, Daniel K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the motion of point particles in a strongly coupled field theory with broken translation invariance. We obtain the energy and momentum loss rates and drag coefficients for a class of such particles by solving for the motion of classical strings in holographic massive gravity. At low temperatures compared to the graviton mass the behaviour of the string is controlled by the appearance of an exotic ground state with non-zero entropy at zero temperature. Additionally, we find an upper bound on the diffusion constant for a collection of these particles which is saturated when the mass of the graviton goes to zero.

  18. Drag phenomena from holographic massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baggioli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We consider the motion of point particles in a strongly coupled field theory with broken translation invariance. We obtain the energy and momentum loss rates and drag coefficients for a class of such particles by solving for the motion of classical strings in holographic massive gravity. At low temperatures compared to the graviton mass the behaviour of the string is controlled by the appearance of an exotic ground state with non-zero entropy at zero temperature. Additionally we find an upper bound on the diffusion constant for a collection of these particles which is saturated when the mass of the graviton goes to zero.

  19. Evaluation of nacelle drag using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Trapp

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Thrust and drag components must be defined and properly accounted in order to estimate aircraft performance, and this hard task is particularty essential for propulsion system where drag components are functions of engine operating conditions. The present work describes a numerical method used to calculate the drag in different nacelles, long and short ducted. Two- and three-dimensional calculations were performed, solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code. It is then possible to obtain four drag components: wave, induced, viscous and spurious drag using a far-field formulation. An expression in terms of entropy variations was shown and drag for different nacelle geometries was estimated.

  20. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a full-scale tractor-trailer combination with several add-on devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, L.C.; Steers, L.L.

    1974-12-01

    Aerodynamic drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor with a 45-foot trailer and five commercially available or potentially available add-on devices using the coast-down method. The tests ranged in velocity from approximately 30 miles per hour to 65 miles per hour and included some flow visualization. A smooth, level runway at Edwards Air Force Base was used for the tests, and deceleration measurements were taken with both accelerometers and stopwatches. An evaluation of the drag reduction results obtained with each of the five add-on devices is presented.

  1. Rotating systems, universal features in dragging and anti-dragging effects, and bounds onto angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Karkowski, Janusz; Malec, Edward; Pirog, Michal; Xie, Naqing

    2016-01-01

    We consider stationary, axially symmetric toroids rotating around spinless black holes, assuming the general-relativistic Keplerian rotation law, in the first post-Newtonian approximation. Numerical investigation shows that the angular momentum accumulates almost exclusively within toroids. It appears that various types of dragging (anti-dragging) effects are positively correlated with the ratio $M_\\mathrm{D}/m$ ($M_\\mathrm{D}$ is the mass of a toroid and $m$ is the mass of the black hole) - moreover, their maxima are proportional to $M_\\mathrm{D}/m$. The horizontal sizes of investigated toroids range from c. 50 to c. 450 of Schwarzschild radii $R_\\mathrm{S}$ of the central black hole; their mass $M_\\mathrm{D} \\in (10^{-4}m, 40m)$ and the radial size of the system is c. 500 $R_\\mathrm{S}$. We found that the relative strength of various dragging (anti-dragging) effects does not change with the mass ratio, but it depends on the size of toroids. Several isoperimetric inequalities involving angular momentum are s...

  2. Drag prediction method of powered-on civil aircraft based on thrust drag bookkeeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yufei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A drag prediction method based on thrust drag bookkeeping (TDB is introduced for civil jet propulsion/airframe integration performance analysis. The method is derived from the control volume theory of a powered-on nacelle. Key problem of the TDB is identified to be accurate prediction of velocity coefficient of the powered-on nacelle. Accuracy of CFD solver is validated by test cases of the first AIAA Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. Then the TDB method is applied to thrust and drag decomposing of a realistic aircraft. A linear relation between the computations assumed free stream Mach number and the velocity coefficient result is revealed. The thrust losses caused by nozzle internal drag and pylon scrubbing are obtained by the isolated nacelle and mapped on to the in-flight whole configuration analysis. Effects of the powered-on condition are investigated by comparing through-flow configuration with powered-on configuration. The variance on aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution is numerically studied.

  3. Drag kings in the new wave: gender performance and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkan, Kim

    2002-01-01

    In an examination of Midwestern drag king performers and communities that have emerged since the study by Volcano and Halberstam of king cultures in London, New York, and San Francisco, this article considers traditional and alternative ways of "doing drag," both performative and participatory, as a means of interrogating the proximity of a "new wave" of king culture to academic theory. Tracing the evolution of drag king performance in the Twin Cities from the 1996 workshop by Diane Torr to the formation of two distinct king troupes in the late 1990s demonstrates a particular trajectory in kinging that reflects a new consciousness and enactment of gender theory through artistic praxis. Participation plays a key role in breaking down the distance between spectator and performer in venues such as the First International Drag King Extravaganza in Columbus, Ohio, and Melinda Hubman's art installation "Performing Masculinities: Take a Chance on Gender" in Minneapolis. By engaging the "audience" in drag, the Extravaganza "Science Fair" successfully referenced drag kings' shared history with early American freak shows in a clever and critical way. Moving beyond the contest framework of early king shows, new drag king troupes like Minneapolis' Dykes Do Drag are "mixing it up" in an attempt to complicate notions of butch/femme gender roles, sexuality, and drag stereotypes.

  4. An Analytical Method for Positioning Drag Anchors in Seabed Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 刘海笑; 李新仲; 李清平; 曹静

    2015-01-01

    Positioning drag anchors in seabed soils are strongly influenced not only by the properties of the anchor and soil, but also by the characteristics of the installation line. The investigation on the previous prediction methods related to anchor positioning demonstrates that the prediction of the anchor position during dragging has inevitably introduced some key and unsubstantiated hypotheses and the applicability of these methods is limited. In the present study, the interactional system between the drag anchor and installation line is firstly introduced for the analysis of anchor positioning. Based on the two mechanical models for embedded lines and drag anchors, the positioning equations for drag anchors have been derived both for cohesive and noncohesive soils. Since the drag angle at the shackle is the most important parameter in the positioning equations, a novel analytical method that can predict both the variation and the exact value of the drag angle at the shackle is proposed. The analytical method for positioning drag anchors which combines the interactional system between the drag anchor and the installation line has provided a reasonable theoretic approach to investigate the anchor behaviors in soils. By comparing with the model flume experiments, the sensitivity, effectiveness and veracity of the positioning method are well verified.

  5. Correlated Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum-dot structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs) -- a biasdriven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach which accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling....... Interestingly, the direction of the drag current is not determined by the drive current, but by an interplay between the energy-dependent lead couplings. Studying the drag mechanism in a graphene-based CQD heterostructure, we show that the predictions of our theory are consistent with recent experiments...

  6. Bionic Research on Bird Feather for Drag Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Feng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way, the surface microstructure of bird feather was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction. Then comparative bionic surface mimicking bird feather was fabricated through hot-rolling technology for drag reduction. The microriblet film was formed on a PVC substrate through a self-developed hot-rolling equipment. The bionic surface with micron-scale riblets formed spontaneously due to the elastic-plastic deformation of PVC in high temperature and high pressure environment. Comparative experiments between micro-structured bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a wind tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction, and significant drag reduction efficiency was obtained. Numerical simulation results show that microvortex induced in the solid-gas interface of bionic surface has the effect of shear stress reduction and the small level of an additional pressure drag resulting from pressure distribution deviation on bird feather like surface, hence reducing the skin friction drag significantly. Therefore, with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology, the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  7. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  8. Drag reduction properties of superhydrophobic mesh pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldi, Nicasio R.; Dodd, Linzi E.; Xu, Ben B.; Wells, Gary G.; Wood, David; Newton, Michael I.; McHale, Glen

    2017-09-01

    Even with the recent extensive study into superhydrophobic surfaces, the fabrication of such surfaces on the inside walls of a pipe remains challenging. In this work we report a convenient bi-layered pipe design using a thin superhydrophobic metallic mesh formed into a tube, supported inside another pipe. A flow system was constructed to test the fabricated bi-layer pipeline, which allowed for different constant flow rates of water to be passed through the pipe, whilst the differential pressure was measured, from which the drag coefficient (ƒ) and Reynolds numbers (Re) were calculated. Expected values of ƒ were found for smooth glass pipes for the Reynolds number (Re) range 750-10 000, in both the laminar and part of the turbulent regimes. Flow through plain meshes without the superhydrophobic coating were also measured over a similar range (750  superhydrophobic coating, ƒ was found for 4000  superhydrophobic mesh can support a plastron and provide a drag reduction compared to a plain mesh, however, the plastron is progressively destroyed with use and in particular at higher flow rates.

  9. Improved Orbit Determination and Forecasts with an Assimilative Tool for Atmospheric Density and Satellite Drag Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Sutton, E. K.; Codrescu, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Matsuo, T.; Fedrizzi, M.; Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Thayer, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    operationally by the Air Force to specify neutral densities. As part of the analysis, we compare the drag observed by a variety of satellites which were not used as part of the assimilation-dataset and whose perigee altitudes span a range from 200km to 700 km.

  10. Stream-wise distribution of skin-friction drag reduction on a flat plate with bubble injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shijie; Chu, Ning; Yao, Yan; Liu, Jingting; Huang, Bin; Wu, Dazhuan

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the stream-wise distribution of skin-friction drag reduction on a flat plate with bubble injection, both experiments and simulations of bubble drag reduction (BDR) have been conducted in this paper. Drag reductions at various flow speeds and air injection rates have been tested in cavitation tunnel experiments. Visualization of bubble flow pattern is implemented synchronously. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method, in the framework of Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid modeling, coupled with population balance model (PBM) is used to simulate the bubbly flow along the flat plate. A wide range of bubble sizes considering bubble breakup and coalescence is modeled based on experimental bubble distribution images. Drag and lift forces are fully modeled based on applicable closure models. Both predicted drag reductions and bubble distributions are in reasonable concordance with experimental results. Stream-wise distribution of BDR is revealed based on CFD-PBM numerical results. In particular, four distinct regions with different BDR characteristics are first identified and discussed in this study. Thresholds between regions are extracted and discussed. And it is highly necessary to fully understand the stream-wise distribution of BDR in order to establish a universal scaling law. Moreover, mechanism of stream-wise distribution of BDR is analysed based on the near-wall flow parameters. The local drag reduction is a direct result of near-wall max void fraction. And the near-wall velocity gradient modified by the presence of bubbles is considered as another important factor for bubble drag reduction.

  11. "Fluid bearing" effect of enclosed liquids in grooves on drag reduction in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haosheng; Gao, Yang; Stone, Howard A.; Li, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    We report details of the fluid motion formed within and above grooves when a laminar continuous phase fluid flows over a second immiscible fluid enclosed in a grooved microchannel. Vortical structures within the transverse grooves were caused by a slip velocity at the fluid-fluid interface and act as "fluid bearings" on the boundary to lubricate the flow of the continuous phase. We investigated the drag reduction in the laminar flow in the microchannel by measuring slip at the boundaries and calculating an effective slip length, taking into account the influence of the effect of the viscosity ratio of the two fluids on the effective slip length. The "fluid bearing" effect can be used to transport high viscosity fluids using low viscosity fluids trapped in cavities to reduce drag.

  12. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  13. Static torque and drag characteristics of an S-shaped Savonius rotor and prediction of dynamic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrul Islam, A.K.M.; Quamrul Islam, M.; Razzaque, M.M. [Bangladesh University (Bangladesh). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ashref, R

    1995-12-31

    Drag and torque coefficients of a stationary S-shaped rotor have been investigated by measuring the pressure distribution on the blade surfaces for various rotor angles. The experiments have been carried out at a Reynolds number of 1.1 x 10{sup 5} in a uniform flow jet produced by an open circuit wind tunnel. The measurements indicate that the drag force, and hence the torque, varies with rotor angle. The maximum net static torque occurs at 45{sup o} of rotor angle and it becomes negative in the range of 135{sup o} to 165{sup o} of rotor angle. A quasi-steady approach has been applied for the prediction of the dynamic performance of the rotor using the static drag and torque coefficients. This method results in a fair agreement with the measured power coefficient. (Author)

  14. Stable motions of charged dust grains subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the mean interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semi-major axis.

  15. Lateral hydrodynamic interactions between an emulsion droplet and a flat surface evaluated by frictional force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Higashitani, Ko; Grieser, Franz

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a lateral atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to measure the hydrodynamic drag force acting on a microscopic emulsion droplet moving parallel to a flat surface. A tetradecane oil droplet formed in an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate was attached to a V-shaped atomic force microscopy cantilever, and lateral hydrodynamic interactions between the droplet and a flat glass surface were measured using a range of scanning velocities. The droplet was positioned either far from the oscillating surface or was pressed to the surface under a constant applied load. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using AFM to study lateral hydrodynamic interactions and lubricity between soft matter materials relevant to a large number of applications in areas as diverse as flavor delivery in foods to the applications of emulsions or emollients in personal care products.

  16. On the determination of the neutral drag coefficient in the convective boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grachev, A.A.; Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1998-01-01

    Based on the idea that free convection can be considered as a particular case of forced convection, where the gusts driven by the large-scale eddies are scaled with the Deardorff convective velocity scale, a new formulation for the neutral drag coefficient, C-Dn, in the convective boundary layer ...... for mean wind speed less than about 2 m s(-1). The new approach also clarifies several contradictory results from earlier works. Some aspects related to an alternate definition of the neutral drag coefficient and the wind speed and the stress averaging procedure are considered.......) the stratification Psi function used in the derivation of C-Dn should satisfy the theoretical free-convection limit. The new formulation is compared with the traditional relationship for C-Dn, and data collected over the sea (during the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment...

  17. Drag reduction in turbulent channel flow laden with finite-size oblate spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Ardekani, M Niazi; Breugem, W -P; Picano, F; Brandt, L

    2016-01-01

    We study suspensions of oblate rigid particles in a viscous fluid for different values of the particle volume fractions. Direct numerical simulations have been performed using a direct-forcing immersed boundary method to account for the dispersed phase, combined with a soft-sphere collision model and lubrication corrections for short-range particle-particle and particle-wall interactions. We show that the drag is reduced and the turbulent fluctuations attenuated in flows laden with oblate spheroids not only when compared to suspensions of perfect spheres but also to the single phase turbulent flow. In particular, the turbulence activity decreases to lower values than those obtained by only accounting for the effective suspension viscosity. To explain the observed drag reduction we consider the particle dynamics and the interactions of the particles with the turbulent velocity field. We report the lack of the particle layer at the wall observed for spherical particles, which was found to be responsible for inc...

  18. Measurement of crossflow forces on tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design, requirements for obtaining valid fluid-force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow-test experience is related.

  19. Validation of EMMS-based drag model using lattice Boltzmann simulations on GPUs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Zhanga; Wei Ge; Xiao wei Wang; Chao he Yang

    2011-01-01

    Interphase momentum transport in heterogeneous gas-solid systems with multi-scale structure is of great importance in process engineering.In this article,lattice Boltzmann simulations are performed on graphics processing units (GPUs),the computational power of which exceeds that of CPUs by more than one order of magnitude,to investigate incompressible Newtonian flow in idealized multi-scale particle-fluid systems.The structure consists of a periodic array of clusters,each constructed by a bundle of cylinders.Fixed pressure boundary condition is implemented by applying a constant body force to the flow through the medium.The bounce-back scheme is adopted on the fluid-solid interfaces,which ensures the no-slip boundary condition.The structure is studied under a wide range of particle diameters and packing fractions,and the drag coefficient of the structure is found to be a function of voidages and fractions of the clusters,besides the traditional Reynolds number and the solid volume fractions.Parameters reflecting multi-scale characters are,therefore,demonstrated to be necessary in quantifying the drag force of heterogeneous gas-solid system.The numerical results in the range 0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 10 and 0 < φ < 0.25are compared with Wen and Yu's correlation,Gibilaro equation,EMMS-based drag model,the Beetstra correlation and the Benyahia correlation,and good agreement is found between the simulations and the EMMS-based drag model for heterogeneous systems.

  20. Particle in cell calculation of plasma force on a small grain in a non-uniform collisional sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The plasma force on grains of specified charge and height in a collisional plasma sheath are calculated using the multidimensional particle in cell code COPTIC. The background ion velocity distribution functions for the unperturbed sheath vary substantially with collisionality. The grain force is found to agree quite well with a combination of background electric field force plus ion drag force. However, the drag force must take account of the non-Maxwellian (and spatially varying) ion distribution function, and the collisional drag enhancement. It is shown how to translate the dimensionless results into practical equilibrium including other forces such as gravity.

  1. Lift and Drag Control on a Lambda Wing Using Leading-Edge Slot Pulsation of Various Wave Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras, Constantinos; Nagib, Hassan; Durst, Franz; Heim, Ulrich

    2000-11-01

    Direct force measurements of lift and drag for a three-dimensional wing with a lambda-shaped planform are made in the Fejer Wind Tunnel at IIT using high angles of attack with and without various unsteady forcing conditions through a leading-edge slot. In addition to changing the pulsation frequency in the range of 2--200 Hz, the waveform was varied between sinusoidal, triangular and square shapes. This was made possible by a novel device called Luftikus, designed and manufactured by Dragerwerke GmbH, Lubeck, Germany, and originally tested at the Fluid Mechanics Institute (LSTM), Erlangen University, Germany. Substantial enhancements in the lift and the lift-to-drag ratio are achieved over a wide range of forcing frequencies with an optimum improvement at a particular dimensionless frequency scaling with the freestream speed and a representative chord length. However, the variation of the shape of the waveform does not lead to significant changes.

  2. Covariance analysis of differential drag-based satellite cluster flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaacov, Ohad; Ivantsov, Anatoly; Gurfil, Pini

    2016-06-01

    One possibility for satellite cluster flight is to control relative distances using differential drag. The idea is to increase or decrease the drag acceleration on each satellite by changing its attitude, and use the resulting small differential acceleration as a controller. The most significant advantage of the differential drag concept is that it enables cluster flight without consuming fuel. However, any drag-based control algorithm must cope with significant aerodynamical and mechanical uncertainties. The goal of the current paper is to develop a method for examination of the differential drag-based cluster flight performance in the presence of noise and uncertainties. In particular, the differential drag control law is examined under measurement noise, drag uncertainties, and initial condition-related uncertainties. The method used for uncertainty quantification is the Linear Covariance Analysis, which enables us to propagate the augmented state and filter covariance without propagating the state itself. Validation using a Monte-Carlo simulation is provided. The results show that all uncertainties have relatively small effect on the inter-satellite distance, even in the long term, which validates the robustness of the used differential drag controller.

  3. Lift and drag of cetacean flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mark; Weber, Paul; Howle, Laurens; Fish, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Field observation and collection of biological samples has resulted in cetacean (whales, dolphins and porpoises) flipper geometry being known for most species. However, the hydrodynamic properties of cetacean flippers have not been rigorously tested and thus their performance characteristics are unknown. Here, conducting water tunnel testing using scale models of cetacean flippers derived via computed tomography (CT) scans, as well as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, we present a baseline work to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of cetacean flippers. We found that flippers of similar planform shape had similar hydrodynamic performance characteristics. Furthermore, one group of flippers of planform shape similar to a modern swept wing was found to have lift coefficient versus angle of attack curves that were biphasic rather than linear in nature, which was caused by the onset of vortex-dominated lift. Drag coefficient versus angle of attack curves were found to be less dependant on planform shape.

  4. Analytical Ballistic Trajectories with Approximately Linear Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giliam J. P. de Carpentier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a practical analytical approximation of projectile trajectories in 2D and 3D roughly based on a linear drag model and explores a variety of different planning algorithms for these trajectories. Although the trajectories are only approximate, they still capture many of the characteristics of a real projectile in free fall under the influence of an invariant wind, gravitational pull, and terminal velocity, while the required math for these trajectories and planners is still simple enough to efficiently run on almost all modern hardware devices. Together, these properties make the proposed approach particularly useful for real-time applications where accuracy and performance need to be carefully balanced, such as in computer games.

  5. Methods for Accurate Free Flight Measurement of Drag Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes experimental methods for free flight measurement of drag coefficients to an accuracy of approximately 1%. There are two main methods of determining free flight drag coefficients, or equivalent ballistic coefficients: 1) measuring near and far velocities over a known distance and 2) measuring a near velocity and time of flight over a known distance. Atmospheric conditions must also be known and nearly constant over the flight path. A number of tradeoffs are important when designing experiments to accurately determine drag coefficients. The flight distance must be large enough so that the projectile's loss of velocity is significant compared with its initial velocity and much larger than the uncertainty in the near and/or far velocity measurements. On the other hand, since drag coefficients and ballistic coefficients both depend on velocity, the change in velocity over the flight path should be small enough that the average drag coefficient over the path (which is what is really determined)...

  6. Drag reduction and improvement of material transport in creeping films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M.; Rund, A.; Aksel, N. [University of Bayreuth, Department of Applied Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that for bodies in turbulent flows a reduction of skin friction can be reached if the surface of the body is provided with small ridges aligned in the local flow direction. This surprising and counterintuitive phenomenon is called the shark-skin effect, motivated from the dermal surface morphology of sharks. In the present article we examine the possibility of resistance reduction due to a rippled surface topography in Stokes flow. We especially analyse the influence of wall riblets perpendicular to the flow direction on the mean transport velocity in gravity-driven creeping film flows following the idea that eddies generated in the valleys of the riblets act like fluid roller bearings and hence may reduce drag. Using a theoretical treatment of the Stokes equations with complex function theory, parameter studies with varying flow rate, bottom amplitude and bottom shape are presented. For the given bottom shapes the maximum enhancement of transport velocity is found by optimising the film thickness. (orig.)

  7. Octopus-inspired drag cancelation by added mass pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Giorgio-Serchi, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Recent work has shown that when an immersed body suddenly changes its size, such as a deflating octopus during rapid escape jetting, the body experiences large forces due to the variation of added-mass energy. We extend this line of research by investigating a spring-mass oscillator submerged in quiescent fluid subject to periodic changes in its volume. This system isolates the ability of the added-mass thrust to cancel the bluff body resistance (having no jet flow to confuse the analysis) and moves closer to studying how these effects would work in a sustained propulsion case by studying periodic shape-change instead of a "one-shot" escape maneuver. With a combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental results, we show that the recovery of added-mass kinetic energy can be used to completely cancel the drag of the fluid, driving the onset of sustained oscillations with amplitudes as large as four times the average body radius. Moreover, these results are fairly independent of the details of the shape-change kinematics as long as the Stokes number and shape-change number are large. In addition, the effective pumping frequency range based on parametric oscillator analysis is shown to predict large amplitude response region observed in the numerics and experiments.

  8. Effect of wind-induced drag on leaf shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louf, Jean-Francois; Ntoh Song, Pierre; Zehnbauer, Tim; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-11-01

    Under windy conditions everyone can see leaves bending and twisting. From a geometrical point of view, a leaf is composed of two parts: a large flat plate called the lamina, and a small beam called the petiole, connecting the lamina to the branch/stem. While the wind is exerting forces (e.g. drag) on the lamina, the petiole undergoes twisting and bending stresses. To survive in harsh abiotic conditions, leaves might have evolved to form in many different shapes, resulting from a coupling between the lamina and the petiole. In this study we measure the twisting modulus (G) of the petiole using a twisting setup, and its Young modulus (E) by performing tensile tests. Micro-CT scan is used to precisely measure the cross section of the petiole allowing us to calculate the second moment of inertia (I) and the second moment of area (J). We then use the non-dimensional number EI/GJ and compare it to a geometrical non-dimensional number (Lpetiole +Llamina/2)/W, where Lpetiole is the length of the petiole, Llamina the length of the lamina, and W the width of the lamina. We found a linear relation between the ratio of the bending to twisting rigidity and the leaf geometry.

  9. Estimated Drag Coefficients and Wind Structure of Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Coupled Boundary Layers Air Sea Transfer (CBLAST) experiment, an array of drifters and floats was deployed from an aircraft just ahead of Hurricane Frances during it's passage to the northwest side of the Caribbean Island chain in August, 2004. The ocean and surface air conditions prior to, during, and after Hurricane Frances were documented by multiple sensors. Two independent estimates of the surface wind field suggest different storm structures. NOAA H*WINDS, an objectively analyzed product using a combination of data collected at the reconnaissance flight level, GPS profilers (dropwindsondes), satellites, and other data, suggest a 40km radius of maximum wind. A product based on the radial momentum equation balance using \\ital{in-situ} surface pressure data and wind direction measurements from the CBLAST drifter array suggests that the radius of maximum winds was 15km. We used a regional version of the MITGCM model with closed boundaries and realistic temperature and salinity fields which was forced with these wind field products to determine which wind field leads to circulation and SST structures that are most consistent with observed sea surface temperature fields and float profile data. Best estimates of the surface wind structure are then used to estimate the appropriate drag coefficient corresponding to the maximum velocity. Our results are compared with those obtained previously.

  10. Modeling Jupiter's Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) with Wave Drag Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Rick; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    The QQO in Jupiter's atmosphere was first discovered after 7.8 micron infrared observations spanning the 1980's and 1990's detected a temperature oscillation near 10 hPa (Orton et al. 1991, Science 252, 537, Leovy et. al. 1991, Nature 354, 380, Friedson 1999, Icarus 137, 34). New observations using the Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF), have been used to characterize a complete cycle of the QQO between January 2012 and January 2016 (Greathouse et al. 2016, DPS) . These new observations not only show the thermal oscillation at 10 hPa, but they also show that the QQO extends upwards in Jupiter's atmosphere to pressures as high as 0.4 hPa. We incorporated three different wave-drag parameterizations into the EPIC General Circulation Model (Dowling et al. 1998, Icarus 132, 221) to simulate the observed Jovian QQO temperature signatures as a function of latitude, pressure and time using results from the TEXES datasets as new constraints. Each parameterization produces unique results and offers insight into the spectra of waves that likely exist in Jupiter's atmosphere to force the QQO. High-frequency gravity waves produced from convection are extremely difficult to directly observe but likely contribute a significant portion to the QQO momentum budget. We use different models to simulate the effects of waves such as these, to indirectly explore their spectrum in Jupiter's atmosphere by varying their properties. The model temperature outputs show strong correlations to equatorial and mid-latitude temperature fields retrieved from the TEXES datasets at different epochs. Our results suggest the QQO phenomenon could be more than one alternating zonal jet that descends over time in response to Jovian atmospheric forcing (e.g. gravity waves from convection).Research funding provided by the NRAO Grote Reber Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Computing resources include the NMT PELICAN cluster and the CISL

  11. Comparison of Blade Element Momentum Theory to Experimental Data Using Experimental Lift, Drag, and Power Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Tara; Miller, Mark; Kiefer, Janik; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum (BEM) codes have often been used to simulate the power output and loads on wind turbine blades without performing CFD. When computing the lift and drag forces on the blades, the coefficients of lift and drag are normally calculated by interpolating values from standard airfoil data based on the angle of attack. However, there are several empirical corrections that are needed. Due to a lack of empirical data to compare against, the accuracy of these corrections and BEM in general is still not well known. For this presentation, results from an in-house written BEM code computed using experimental lift and drag coefficient data for the airfoils of the V27 wind turbine will be presented. The data is gathered in Princeton University's High Reynolds Number Testing Facility (HRTF) at full scale Reynolds numbers and over a large range of angles of attack. The BEM results are compared to experimental data of the same wind turbine, conducted at full scale Reynolds number and TSR, also in the HRTF. Conclusions will be drawn about the accuracy of the BEM code, and the corrections, regarding the usage of standard airfoil data versus the experimental data, as well as future applications to potentially improve large-eddy simulations of wind turbines in a similar manner.

  12. Vorticity Confinement Applied to Turbulent Wing Tip Vortices for Wake-Integral Drag Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Kristopher; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the vorticity confinement (VC) approach was applied to tip vortices shed by edges of stationary wings in order to predict induced drag by far-field integration in Trefftz plane. The VC parameter was evaluated first by application to convection of vortices in 2-D uniform flow and then to tip vortices shed in 3-D simulation of finite-aspect ratio rectangular wing in subsonic flight. Dependence of VC parameter on the flight Mach number and the angle of attack was evaluated. The aerodynamic drag results with application of VC to prevent numerical diffusion are much closer to analytic lifting line theory compared to integration over surface of wing while the viscous profile drag is more accurately evaluated by surface integration. To apply VC to viscous and turbulent flows, it is shown that VC does not affect the physical rate of dissipation of vortices in viscous/turbulent flows at time scales corresponding to convection of vortices from the wing to Trefftz plane of integration. To account for turbulent effects on tip vortices, VC was applied in combination with Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, and six Reynolds stresses models of turbulence. The results are compared to experiments to validate the physical dissipation of tip vortex. This research was supported by The Dayton Area Graduate Studies Institute (DAGSI) and US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) grants in 2009-2013, US Army Research Office (ARO) in 2012-2013 and ASEE/AFRL summer faculty grant.

  13. Drag of a D-shaped bluff body under small amplitude harmonic actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-loop flow control method was used to affect the development of a turbulent wake behind a D-shaped bluff body. Loud speakers were embedded inside the bluff body to produce two zero-net-mass-flux jets through 2 mm-wide span-wise slots located along the upper and lower edges on the rear wall. The drag forces for different actuation amplitudes (Cμ, the ratio between the momentum of the actuating jets and the moment deficit caused by the bluff body and frequencies (StA were examined. The effects of the phase difference in the two jets (0 and π were also studied. It was found that when Cμ was 0.1%, a drag reduction up to 5% was achieved when the velocities of the two jets varied in phase at a frequency of StA=0.16. When the velocities of the two jets varied π out of phase, significant drag increase was observed.

  14. Drag reduction in turbulent channel laden with finite-size oblate spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi Ardekani, Mehdi; Pedro Costa Collaboration; Wim-Paul Breugem Collaboration; Francesco Picano Collaboration; Luca Brandt Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Suspensions of oblate rigid particles in a turbulent plane channel flow are investigated for different values of the particle volume fraction. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS), using a direct-forcing immersed boundary method to account for the particle-fluid interactions, combined with a soft-sphere collision model and lubrication corrections for short-range particle-particle and particle-wall interactions. We show a clear drag reduction and turbulence attenuation in flows laden with oblate spheroids, both with respect to the single phase turbulent flow and to suspensions of rigid spheres. We explain the drag reduction by the lack of the particle layer at the wall, observed before for spherical particles. In addition, the special shape of the oblate particles creates a tendency to stay parallel to the wall in its vicinity, forming a shield of particles that prevents strong fluctuations in the outer layer to reach the wall and vice versa. Detailed statistics of the fluid and particle phase will be presented at the conference to explain the observed drag reduction. Supported by the European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2013-CoG-616186, TRITOS. The authors acknowledge computer time provided by SNIC (Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing) and the support from the COST Action MP1305: Flowing matter.

  15. Transonic Drag Reduction Through Trailing-Edge Blowing on the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2017-01-01

    A third wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center where the model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap detection to determine the potential for transonic drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged ap. Recent upgrades to transonic semi-span flow control testing at the NTF have demonstrated an improvement to overall data repeatability, particularly for the drag measurement, that allows for increased confidence in the data results. The static thrust generated by the blowing slot was removed from the wind-on data using force and moment balance data from wind-o thrust tares. This paper discusses the impact of the trailing-edge blowing to the transonic aerodynamics of the FAST-MAC model in the cruise configuration, where at flight Reynolds numbers, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that an overall drag reduction and increased aerodynamic efficiency was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  16. GRAVITATIONAL DRAG ON A POINT MASS IN HYPERSONIC MOTION WITHIN A GAUSSIAN DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, J.; Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-468, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C., E-mail: jsanchez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.una.mx, E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-01-01

    We develop an analytical model for the accretion and gravitational drag on a point mass that moves hypersonically in the midplane of a gaseous disk with a Gaussian vertical density stratification. Such a model is of interest for studying the interaction between a planet and a protoplanetary disk, as well as the dynamical decay of massive black holes in galactic nuclei. The model assumes that the flow is ballistic, and gives fully analytical expressions for both the accretion rate onto the point mass and the gravitational drag it suffers. The expressions are further simplified by taking the limits of a thick and of a thin disk. The results for the thick disk reduce correctly to those for a uniform density environment. We find that for a thin disk (small vertical scaleheight compared to the gravitational radius), the accretion rate is proportional to the mass of the moving object and to the surface density of the disk, while the drag force is independent of the velocity of the object. The gravitational deceleration of the hypersonic perturber in a thin disk was found to be independent of its parameters (i.e., mass or velocity) and depends only on the surface mass density of the disk. The predictions of the model are compared to the results of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, with reasonable agreement.

  17. Gravitational drag on a point mass in hypersonic motion within a Gaussian disk

    CERN Document Server

    Cantó, J; Raga, A C

    2012-01-01

    We develop an analytical model for the accretion and gravitational drag on a point mass that moves hypersonically in the midplane of a gaseous disk with a Gaussian vertical density stratification. Such a model is of interest for studying the interaction between a planet and a protoplanetary disk, as well as the dynamical decay of massive black holes in galactic nuclei. The model considers that the flow is ballistic, and gives fully analytical expressions for both the accretion rate onto the point mass, and the gravitational drag it suffers. The expressions are further simplified by taking the limits of a thick, and of a thin disk. The results for the thick disk reduce correctly to those for a uniform density environment (Cant\\'o et al. 2011). We find that for a thin disk (small vertical scaleheight compared to the gravitational radius) the accretion rate is proportional to the mass of the moving object and to the surface density of the disk, while the drag force is independent of the velocity of the object. T...

  18. Experimental measurement of unsteady drag on shock accelerated micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady drag history of shock accelerated micro-particles in air is investigated in the Horizontal Shock Tube (HST) facility at Los Alamos National laboratory. Drag forces are estimated based on particle size, particle density, and instantaneous velocity and acceleration measured on hundreds of post-shock particle tracks. We use previously implemented 8-frame Particle Tracking Velocimetry/Anemometry (PTVA) diagnostics to analyze particles in high spatiotemporal resolution from individual particle trajectories. We use a simultaneous LED based shadowgraph to register shock location with respect to a moving particle in each frame. To measure particle size accurately, we implement a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) in synchronization with the PTVA. In this presentation, we will corroborate with more accuracy our earlier observation that post-shock unsteady drag coefficients (CD(t)) are manifold times higher than those predicted by theoretical models. Our results will also show that all CD(t) measurements collapse on a master-curve for a range of particle size, density, Mach number and Reynolds number when time is normalized by a shear velocity based time scale, t* = d/(uf-up) , where d is particle diameter, and uf and up are post-shock fluid and particle velocities.

  19. Finding the Force -- Consistent Particle Seeding for Satellite Aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Parham, J Brent

    2013-01-01

    When calculating satellite trajectories in low-earth orbit, engineers need to adequately estimate aerodynamic forces. But to this day, obtaining the drag acting on the complicated shapes of modern spacecraft suffers from many sources of error. While part of the problem is the uncertain density in the upper atmosphere, this works focuses on improving the modeling of interacting rarified gases and satellite surfaces. The only numerical approach that currently captures effects in this flow regime---like self-shadowing and multiple molecular reflections---is known as test-particle Monte Carlo. This method executes a ray-tracing algorithm to follow particles that pass through a control volume containing the spacecraft and accumulates the momentum transfer to the body surfaces. Statistical fluctuations inherent in the approach demand particle numbers in the order of millions, often making this scheme too costly to be practical. This work presents a parallel test-particle Monte Carlo method that takes advantage of b...

  20. Experimental investigation of drag coefficients of gobi surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董治宝; 屈建军; 刘小平; 张伟民; 王训明

    2002-01-01

    The response of gobi surfaces to the near-surface air flow can be characterized quantitatively by drag coefficients. By using wind tunnel tests, an attempt is made to define the relationship between the drag coefficients of gobi surfaces and gravel size and coverage. It is concluded that the drag coefficients of gobi surfaces tend to be constants when gravel coverage is over 40%-50%. Consequently, we think that the gobi deflation planes expanding vastly in the arid Northwestern China are aerodynamically stable, at least not the supplying sources of current dust storms, and therefore the emphasis on dust storm control should be paid on the so-called "earth gobi" that has low gravel coverage. The prediction model for drag coefficients of gobi surfaces has been developed by regressing drag coefficients on gravel size and coverage, the predicted results are in reasonably good agreement with wind tunnel results (R 2 = 0.94). The change of drag coefficients with gravel friction Reynolds number implies that the development extent of drag effect increases with gravel size and coverage.

  1. Drag reduction in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniello, Robert J.; Waterhouse, Nicholas E.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that periodic, micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces, previously noted for their ability to provide laminar flow drag reduction, are capable of reducing drag in the turbulent flow regime. Superhydrophobic surfaces contain micro- or nanoscale hydrophobic features which can support a shear-free air-water interface between peaks in the surface topology. Particle image velocimetry and pressure drop measurements were used to observe significant slip velocities, shear stress, and pressure drop reductions corresponding to drag reductions approaching 50%. At a given Reynolds number, drag reduction is found to increase with increasing feature size and spacing, as in laminar flows. No observable drag reduction was noted in the laminar regime, consistent with previous experimental results for the channel geometry considered. The onset of drag reduction occurs at a critical Reynolds number where the viscous sublayer thickness approaches the scale of the superhydrophobic microfeatures and performance is seen to increase with further reduction in viscous sublayer height. These results indicate superhydrophobic surfaces may provide a significant drag reducing mechanism for marine vessels.

  2. Inflight Performance of Cassini Reaction Wheel Bearing Drag in 1997-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.

    2013-01-01

    As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended missions through September 2017. Cassini is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. It uses reaction wheels to achieve high level of spacecraft pointing stability that is needed during imaging operations of several science instruments. The Cassini flight software makes in-flight estimates of reaction wheel bearing drag torque and made them available to the mission operations team. These telemetry data are being trended for the purpose of monitoring the long-term health of the reaction wheel bearings. Anomalous drag torque signatures observed over the past 15 years are described in this paper. One of these anomalous drag conditions is bearing cage instability that appeared (and disappeared) spontaneously and unpredictably. Cage instability is an uncontrolled vibratory motion of the bearing cage that can produce high-impact forces internal to the bearing that will cause intermittent and erratic torque transients. Characteristics of the observed cage instabilities and other drag torque "spikes" are described in this paper. In day-to-day operations, the reaction wheels' rates must be neither too high nor too low. To protect against operating the wheels in any undesirable conditions (such as prolonged low spin rate operations), a ground software tool named Reaction Wheel Bias Optimization Tool (RBOT) was developed for the management of the wheels. Disciplined and long-term use of this ground software has led to significant reduction in the daily consumption rate of the wheels' low spin rate dwell time. Flight experience on the use of this ground software tool as well as other lessons learned on the management of Cassini reaction wheels is given in this paper.

  3. Experimental Research on the Uplift Force Acted on the Spillway Chute Slabs%溢洪道陡槽底板上举力特性试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树宁; 杨敏; 李会平; 董天松

    2016-01-01

    基于某水电站溢洪道陡槽底板的稳定性试验研究,研究了溢洪道陡槽底板的上举力特性。分析结果表明:陡槽底板块单位面积上举力大小随着流能比 R增大而增大;底板块上举力最大值随错台高度Δ的增大有大幅增长,上举力标准差随错台高度Δ的增大有小幅增长;底板块上举力标准差和上举力最大值随着相对错台高度的增大而呈减小趋势;陡槽底板上举力概率密度基本符合正态分布;上举力优势频率集中在低频,底板块不会发生共振破坏;陡槽板块面积越大,单位面积最大上举力越小,研究成果可为设计人员提供科学的理论依据,同时可用于评估结构的稳定性。%In order to study the stability of the spillway chute slabs ,the characteristics of uplift force acted on the spillway chute slabs are investigated by performing model tests .Based on the model test results ,uplift force in unit area acted on the spillway chute slabs increases as the flow-energy ratio (R) elevated .The irregularity has a significant effect on uplift force acted on the spillway chute slabs .The standard deviation and maximum of uplift force increase as the irregularity height elevates ,at the same time ,the standard deviation and maximum of uplift force decrease as the relative irregularity height increases .Probability density of uplift force is in ac‐cordance with normal distribution .The dominant frequency of uplift force distributed in low frequency .The smaller the maximum of uplift force is ,the bigger the area of chute slabs is .

  4. Low-drag events in transitional wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Park, Jae Sung; Kushwaha, Anubhav; Dennis, David J. C.; Graham, Michael D.; Poole, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    Intermittency of low-drag pointwise wall shear stress measurements within Newtonian turbulent channel flow at transitional Reynolds numbers (friction Reynolds numbers 70 - 130) is characterized using experiments and simulations. Conditional mean velocity profiles during low-drag events closely approach that of a recently discovered nonlinear traveling wave solution; both profiles are near the so-called maximum drag reduction profile, a general feature of turbulent flow of liquids containing polymer additives (despite the fact that all results presented are for Newtonian fluids only). Similarities between temporal intermittency in small domains and spatiotemporal intermittency in large domains is thereby found.

  5. Does Polishing a Rifle Bore Reduce Bullet Drag?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    thus lower drag. A Remington 700 5R Mil-Spec chambered in 300 Winchester Magnum was used. The bullets used were a 155.5 grain Berger Fullbore Boat...drag on the bullets. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ballistic coefficient, aerodynamic drag, rifle bore, bore polishing, Remington 700 5R 16. SECURITY...A Remington 700 5R Mil-Spec chambered in 300 Winchester Magnum was used. The bullets used were a 155.5 grain Berger Fullbore Boat Tail and a 125

  6. Drag reduction of a car model by linear genetic programming control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiying; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Borée, Jacques; Harambat, Fabien

    2017-08-01

    We investigate open- and closed-loop active control for aerodynamic drag reduction of a car model. Turbulent flow around a blunt-edged Ahmed body is examined at ReH≈ 3× 105 based on body height. The actuation is performed with pulsed jets at all trailing edges (multiple inputs) combined with a Coanda deflection surface. The flow is monitored with 16 pressure sensors distributed at the rear side (multiple outputs). We apply a recently developed model-free control strategy building on genetic programming in Dracopoulos and Kent (Neural Comput Appl 6:214-228, 1997) and Gautier et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:424-441, 2015). The optimized control laws comprise periodic forcing, multi-frequency forcing and sensor-based feedback including also time-history information feedback and combinations thereof. Key enabler is linear genetic programming (LGP) as powerful regression technique for optimizing the multiple-input multiple-output control laws. The proposed LGP control can select the best open- or closed-loop control in an unsupervised manner. Approximately 33% base pressure recovery associated with 22% drag reduction is achieved in all considered classes of control laws. Intriguingly, the feedback actuation emulates periodic high-frequency forcing. In addition, the control identified automatically the only sensor which listens to high-frequency flow components with good signal to noise ratio. Our control strategy is, in principle, applicable to all multiple actuators and sensors experiments.

  7. Test of the equivalence principle in a non-drag-free spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, D.; Nobili, A. M.; Catastini, G.

    1992-04-01

    In a near Earth orbit the driving force of a possible violation of the equivalence principle is a factor 500 larger than it is on the ground. A passive attenuator allows one to reduce the high acceleration noise of the space structure, hence to perform the experiment in a non-dedicated, non-drag-free spacecraft. By means of piezoelectric rotating sensors, with frictionless diamagnetic bearings, it is possible to test the equivalence principle at room temperature to 3×10 -15, about three orders of magnitude better than achieved so far.

  8. Drag reduction by air release promotes fast ascent in jumping emperor penguins—a novel hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davenport, J.; Hughes, R.N.; Shorten, M

    2011-01-01

    (mean ± SD: 5.3 ± 1.01 m s–1), prior to jumps. Here we show evidence that penguins dive to 15 to 20 m with air in their plumage and that this compressed air is released as the birds subsequently ascend whilst maintaining depressed feathers. Fine bubbles emerge continuously from the entire plumage...... presented, we hypothesize that a significant proportion of the enhanced ascent speed is due to air lubrication reducing frictional and form drag, that ­buoyancy forces alone cannot explain the observed speeds, and that cavitation plays no part in ­bubble formation....

  9. 3D characterization of the forces in optical traps based on counter-propagation beams shaped by a spatial light modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M. V.; Lindballe, T.; Kylling, A.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental characterization of the 3D forces, acting on a trapped polystyrene bead in a counter-propagating beam geometry, is reported. Using a single optical trap with a large working distance (in the BioPhotonics Workstation), we simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal trapp...... power of 2x35 mW) for displacements in opposite directions. The Equipartition method is limited by mechanical noise and is shown to be applicable only when the total laser power in a single 10 µm counter-propagating trap is below 2x20 mW....... trapping force constants. Two different methods were used: The Drag force method and the Equipartition method. We show that the counterpropagating beams traps are simple harmonic for small displacements. The force constants reveal a transverse asymmetry as - = 9.7 pN/µm and + = 11.3 pN/µm (at a total laser...

  10. The Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Bradi B.; Locke, Susan C.; Bowers, Margaret; Sawyer, Tenita; Shang, Howard; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bloomfield, Richard A.; Gilliss, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We present the design and feasibility testing for the “Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox” (D-3 Pillbox), a skill-based educational approach that engages patients and providers, measures performance, and generates reports of medication management skills. Methods: A single-cohort convenience sample of patients hospitalized with heart failure was taught pill management skills using a tablet-based D-3 Pillbox. Medication reconciliation was conducted, and aptitude, performance (% completed), accuracy (% correct), and feasibility were measured. Results: The mean age of the sample (n = 25) was 59 (36–89) years, 50% were women, 62% were black, 46% were uninsured, 46% had seventh-grade education or lower, and 31% scored very low for health literacy. However, most reported that the D-3 Pillbox was easy to read (78%), easy to repeat-demonstrate (78%), and comfortable to use (tablet weight) (75%). Accurate medication recognition was achieved by discharge in 98%, but only 25% reported having a “good understanding of my responsibilities.” Conclusions: The D-3 Pillbox is a feasible approach for teaching medication management skills and can be used across clinical settings to reinforce skills and medication list accuracy. PMID:28282304

  11. Electromagnetically-Induced Frame-Dragging around Astrophysical Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Andrés F Gutiérrez

    2015-01-01

    Frame dragging (Lense-Thirring effect) is generally associated with rotating astrophysical objects. However, it can also be generated by electromagnetic fields if electric and magnetic fields are simultaneously present. In most models of astrophysical objects, macroscopic charge neutrality is assumed and the entire electromagnetic field is characterized in terms of a magnetic dipole component. Hence, the purely electromagnetic contribution to the frame dragging vanishes. However, strange stars may posses independent electric dipole and neutron stars independent electric quadrupole moments that may lead to the presence of purely electromagnetic contributions to the frame dragging. Moreover, recent observations have shown that in stars with strong electromagnetic fields, the magnetic quadrupole may have a significant contribution to the dynamics of stellar processes. As an attempt to characterized and quantify the effect of electromagnetic frame-dragging in this kind of astrophysical objects, an analytic soluti...

  12. Rotating cylinder drag balance with application to riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T.; Joseph, D.

    2000-12-01

    Experimental results are reported and discussed for a rotating cylinder drag balance designed to predict drag reduction by surfaces like riblets. The apparatus functions by measuring the torque applied to the inner cylinder by a fluid, such as water, that is set in motion by the controlled rotation of the outer cylinder. The instrument was validated by calibration for laminar flow and comparison of turbulent flow results to the those of G. I. Taylor. The ability to predict drag reduction was demonstrated by testing 114 m symmetric sawtooth riblets, which gave a maximum reduction of about 5% and an overall drag reduction range of 5

  13. Jet Lag a Drag on Pro Baseball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163187.html Jet Lag a Drag on Pro Baseball Players Study found traveling across time zones linked ... might be more than just tiring for pro baseball players: The resulting jet lag may actually harm ...

  14. Constraining the Drag Coefficients of Meteors in Dark Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R. T.; Jandir, P. S.; Kress, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Based on data in the aeronautics literature, we have derived functions for the drag coefficients of spheres and cubes as a function of Mach number. Experiments have shown that spheres and cubes exhibit an abrupt factor-of-two decrease in the drag coefficient as the object slows through the transonic regime. Irregularly shaped objects such as meteorites likely exhibit a similar trend. These functions are implemented in an otherwise simple projectile motion model, which is applicable to the non-ablative dark flight of meteors (speeds less than .+3 km/s). We demonstrate how these functions may be used as upper and lower limits on the drag coefficient of meteors whose shape is unknown. A Mach-dependent drag coefficient is potentially important in other planetary and astrophysical situations, for instance, in the core accretion scenario for giant planet formation.

  15. Experimental study of drag reduction in flumes and spillway tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-kui WANG; Chun-bo JIANG

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in an open flume model and spillway tunnel model were carried out using drag reduction techniques.Two drag reduction techniques were adopted in the experiments:polymer addition and coating.The drag reduction effect of a polyacrylamide(PAM)solution and dimethyl silicone oil coating were studied in the flume model experiments,and the results were analyzed.Experiments were then carried out with a model of the Xiluodu Hydropower Station,the second largest dam in China.In order to reduce the resistance,the spillway tunnels were internally coated with dimethyl silicone oil.This is the first time that these drag reduction techniques have been applied to so large a hydraulic model.The experimental results show that the coating technique can effectively increase flood discharge.The outlet velocity and the jet trajectory distance are also increased,which enhances the energy dissipation of the spillway tunnel.

  16. Development of Drag Reducing Polymer of FDR-SPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel FDR-SPC (Frictional Drag Reduction Self-Polishing Copolymer) is first synthesized in this study. The drag reducing functional radical such as PEGMA (Poly(ethylene) glycol methacrylate) has been utilized to participate in the synthesis process of the SPC. The release mechanism of drag reducing radical is accounted for the hydrolysis reaction between the FDR-SPC and seawater. The types of the baseline SPC monomers, the molecular weight and the mole fraction of PEGMA were varied in the synthesis process. The resulting SPCs were coated to the substrate plates for the subsequent hydrodynamic test for skin friction measurement. A significant reduction in Reynolds stress was observed in a range of specimen, with the maximum drag reduction being 15.9% relative to the smooth surface for PRD3-1.

  17. Collecting responses through Web page drag and drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, M Anne; Gabrys, Gareth

    2004-02-01

    This article describes how to collect responses from experimental participants using drag and drop on a Web page. In particular, we describe how drag and drop can be used in a text search task in which participants read a text and then locate and categorize certain elements of the text (e.g., to identify the main claim of a persuasive paragraph). Using this technique, participants respond by clicking on a text segment and dragging it to a screen field or icon. We have successfully used this technique in both the argument element identification experiment that we describe here and a tutoring system that we created to teach students to identify source characteristics while reading historical texts (Britt, Perfetti, Van Dyke, & Gabrys, 2000). The implementation described here exploits the capability of recent versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer Web browser to handle embedded XML documents and drag and drop events.

  18. The coupling of surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface and their combined effect on fluid drag: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-15

    Fluid drag of micro/nano fluidic systems has inspired wide scientific interest. Surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface are believed to affect fluid drag. This review summarizes the recent studies on the coupling of surface charge and slip, and their combined effect on fluid drag at micro/nano scale. The effect of pH on surface charge of borosilicate glass and silica surfaces in deionized (DI) water and saline solution is discussed using a method based on colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). The boundary slip of various oil-solid interfaces are discussed for samples with different degrees of oleophobicity prepared by nanoparticle-binder system. By changing the pH of solution or applying an electric field, effect of surface charge on slip of a smooth hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) in DI water and saline solution is studied. A theoretical model incorporating the coupling relationship between surface charge and slip is used to discuss the combined effect of surface charge-induced electric double layer (EDL) and slip on fluid drag of pressure-driven flow in a one-dimensional parallel-plates microchannel. A theoretical method is used to reduce the fluid drag. The studies show that the increasing magnitude of surface charge density leads to a decrease in slip length. The surface charge results in a larger fluid drag, and the coupling of surface charge and slip can further increase the fluid drag. Surface charge-induced EDLs with asymmetric zeta potentials can effectively reduce the fluid drag.

  19. Analysis of Electromagnetics Forces on Magnetically Suspended High-Speed Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mayer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed superexpresses (HSST developed by Japanese airlines (JAL are based on the electrodynamics principle of magnetic suspension. The track contains short-circuited coils and interaction between them and superconductive coils in the vehicle produces its suspension. The paper includes a mathematical model for traction electrodynamics suspension device HSST represented by a system of linear differential equations with coefficients varying in time. Numerical analysis of this model fields the velocity-dependent lift and drag forces acting on the system. The time distribution of the lift force exhibits certain oscillations that may be suppressed by suitable placement of several superconductive levitation wings in the vehicle. The results obtained are in a good agreement with the knowledge found by various authors on prototype vehicles.

  20. Automated design of minimum drag light aircraft fuselages and nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.; Karlin, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    The constrained minimization algorithm of Vanderplaats is applied to the problem of designing minimum drag faired bodies such as fuselages and nacelles. Body drag is computed by a variation of the Hess-Smith code. This variation includes a boundary layer computation. The encased payload provides arbitrary geometric constraints, specified a priori by the designer, below which the fairing cannot shrink. The optimization may include engine cooling air flows entering and exhausting through specific port locations on the body.

  1. The role of unsteady forces for sediment particles in bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Detian; Liu, Xiaofeng; Fu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    In engineering, bedload transport is usually predicted by a variety of formulas, and huge uncertainty is found from case to case. One of the fundamental reasons is the lack of fully understanding the dynamic behavior of bedload particles. We explore the dynamic characteristics of sediment particles transported in turbulent open-channel flows. A numerical model of sediment transport is built by combining the large eddy simulation (LES) with discrete element model (DEM) using a fully four-way coupling method. Particular attention is paid to the hydrodynamic forces acting on bedload particles. The result shows that, in addition to drag force, the unsteady forces (i.e. Basset history force and added mass force) are important (40%~60% in the summation of all the time-averaged magnitude of forces) for fine sediment particles (with a diameter of 0.5 mm), which are usually ignored for computational complexity. While the lift force has been found to be significant for gravel particles (with a diameter of 31 mm)[1], it is not relatively dominant for such fine particles (less than 3% in the summation). This helps explaining why the prediction of the same formula change greatly from case to case. The comparison with experimental data also shows great potential of the current LES-DEM model for fundamental research in bedload transport. Reference: [1] Nino, Y., & Garcia, M. (1994). Gravel saltation 2. Modeling. Water Resources Research, 30(6), 1915-1924.

  2. TURBULENCE TRANSPORT OF SURFACTANT SOLUTION FLOW DURING DRAG REDUCTION DEGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-guo; WANG De-zhong

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence transport of surfactant solution flow during drag reduction degeneration is investigated experimentally in a two-dimensional channel.Particle Image Velocimetry (P1V) system is used to take two-dimensional velocity frames in the streamwise and wall-normal plane.The additive of surfactant is cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) with the mass concentration of 25 ppm.Drag reduction degeneration happens in the CTAC solution flow,exhibiting the maximal drag reduction at Re =25000and losing drag reduction completely at Re =40 000.The velocity frames are statistically analyzed in four quadrants which are divided by the u -axis and v-axis.It is found that the phenomenon of“Zero Reynolds shear stress” is caused by the decrease of wallnormal fluctuations and its symmetrical distribution in quadrants.The increase of Reynolds number leads to the enhancement of turbulence burst phenomenon.During thc drag reduction degeneration,the CTAC solution flow contains both high turbulence intensity and drag reduction states.

  3. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  4. Drag coefficient and plant form response to wind speed in three plant species: Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus), Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens glauca.), and Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2002-12-01

    Whole-plant drag coefficients (Cd) for three plant species: Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus), Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens glauca.), and Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum) in five different porosity configurations were developed from force versus wind speed data collected with a force balance in a recirculating wind tunnel. The average Cd for the Burning Bush, Colorado Spruce, and Fountain Grass in their untrimmed forms were 0.42 (±0.03), 0.39 (±0.04), and 0.34 (±0.06), respectively. Drag curves (Cd versus flow Reynolds number (Re) function) for the Burning Bush and Colorado Spruce were found to exhibit, for the lower porosity configurations, a rise to a maximum around flow Reynolds numbers (Re = ρuhh/ν) of 2 × 105. Fountain Grass Cd was shown to be dependent upon Re to values >5 × 105. The Burning Bush and Colorado Spruce plants reduced their drag, upon reaching their maxima, by decreasing their frontal area and increasing their porosity. Maximum Cd for these plants occurred at optical porosities of ˜0.20. The Fountain Grass reduced drag at high Re by decreasing frontal area and porosity. The mechanism of drag reduction in Fountain Grass was continual reconfiguration to a more aerodynamic form as evidenced by continual reduction of Cd with Re.

  5. Storm surge and wave simulations in the Gulf of Mexico using a consistent drag relation for atmospheric and storm surge models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vatvani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To simulate winds and water levels, numerical weather prediction (NWP and storm surge models generally use the traditional bulk relation for wind stress, which is characterized by a wind drag coefficient. A still commonly used drag coefficient in those models, some of them were developed in the past, is based on a relation, according to which the magnitude of the coefficient is either constant or increases monotonically with increasing surface wind speed (Bender, 2007; Kim et al., 2008; Kohno and Higaki, 2006. The NWP and surge models are often tuned independently from each other in order to obtain good results. Observations have indicated that the magnitude of the drag coefficient levels off at a wind speed of about 30 m s−1, and then decreases with further increase of the wind speed. Above a wind speed of approximately 30 m s−1, the stress above the air-sea interface starts to saturate. To represent the reducing and levelling off of the drag coefficient, the original Charnock drag formulation has been extended with a correction term.

    In line with the above, the Delft3D storm surge model is tested using both Charnock's and improved Makin's wind drag parameterization to evaluate the improvements on the storm surge model results, with and without inclusion of the wave effects. The effect of waves on storm surge is included by simultaneously simulating waves with the SWAN model on identical model grids in a coupled mode. However, the results presented here will focus on the storm surge results that include the wave effects.

    The runs were carried out in the Gulf of Mexico for Katrina and Ivan hurricane events. The storm surge model was initially forced with H*wind data (Powell et al., 2010 to test the effect of the Makin's wind drag parameterization on the storm surge model separately. The computed wind, water levels and waves are subsequently compared with observation data. Based on the good

  6. Numerical study of acoustic streaming and radiation forces on micro particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Jakob Herring; Muller, Peter Barkholt; Barnkob, Rune;

    2012-01-01

    , and 2) Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming flow. Both effects are second order and require the solution of the full linearized Navier-Stokes equation in order to be captured correctly. The model shows the transition from streaming drag to radiation force dominated regimes. The transition...

  7. Analysis of Lorentz Force Act on Different Shapes Motionless Armature of P-MFCG%静态下 P-MFCG的不同形状电枢受力的仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹤; 吕庆敖; 李治源; 陶青青

    2011-01-01

    活塞式磁通压缩发电机(P-MFCG)作为一种可重复使用的脉冲功率发电机,在电磁发射器的供电电源方面具有广阔的应用前景.发电机电枢上所受的洛伦兹力(电磁力)对发电机的发电效能有至关重要的影响.不同形状的电枢对螺旋线圈内部磁场强度和位形分布的影响不同,在螺旋线圈内所受的洛伦兹力也不同.该文首先对电枢的受力和作用进行了理论分析,得出影响发电效率的是电枢所受洛伦兹力的轴向分量.其次,通过理论计算,得出电枢表面所受轴向力最大时,电枢表面元法向矢量与该处磁感应线矢量应当满足的关系.然后,利用电磁场有限元分析软件Ansoft,对五种不同形状电枢上感应涡流所受的洛伦兹力进行了仿真.所得数据表明圆柱状电枢所受的轴向洛伦兹力最大,锥状次之,是其70%,但都是分布在电枢的棱边上;类半椭球状电枢受力最小,但分布最均匀;而另外两种电枢的形状相比之下没有优势,不可取.这些结论为电枢的优化设计提供了理论依据,也为P-MFCG的进一步研究提供了重要参考.%As a kind of pulse generator, piston-type magnetic flux compression generator ( P-MFCG is suitable for the electromagnetic launcher. The Lorentz force acting on armature influence the generate efficiency.The shape of armature is a critical parameter, which helps to decide the distribution and intensity of magnetic field in helix winding region. With different shapes, the armatures induct different eddy currents and act different magnetic force ( Lorentz force). In this paper, analyzed the force acting on armature when it's sliding, and concluded that the bigger the Lorentz force along axial direction acted on armature, the higher the generate efficiency was. And the Lorentz force along axial direction act on armature was discovered to reach a peak value, only when the normal vector of armature infinitesimal surface and the vector of

  8. Dynamic steering beams for efficient force measurement in optical manipulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaocong Yuan; Yuquan Zhang; Rui Cao; Xing Zhao; Jing Bu; Siwei Zhu

    2011-01-01

    @@ An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported.Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium.The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force.The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead.The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.%An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported. Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium. The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force. The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead. The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.

  9. Numerical simulation of the vertical migration of Microcystis (cyanobacteria colonies based on turbulence drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongru Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The vertical migration and accumulation of Microcystis is an important process in water blooms, and colony migration is influenced by colony size and wind-wave disturbance. The vertical migration of Microcystis colonies in turbulence can be simulated in a numerical model. In this study, we model such migration by coupling the colony size and hydrodynamics, including the gravity, colony buoyancy, and the viscous drag force of turbulence. The turbulence intensity was represented by the turbulent kinetic energy (KZ; the larger the KZ, the stronger the wind-wave disturbance. The simulated vertical distribution of Microcystis well agreed with the measured values in a laboratory experiment indicating that our model can simulate the vertical distribution of Microcystis under different hydrodynamic conditions. We also found a size-dependent critical turbulent kinetic energy (TKZ, such that if the turbulent kinetic energy of water exceeds the critical value (i.e., KZ > TKZ, the colonies sink under the drag forces of turbulence; conversely, if KZ < TKZ, the colonies can overcome the turbulent mixing and float. The TKZ of each colony was linearly related to colony diameter. The model is crucial for prediction and prevention of water blooms. The simulated threshold turbulent kinetic energy, at which water blooms disappear in Lake Taihu (a large freshwater lake in the Yangtze Delta, Jiangsu Province, China, was 55.5 cm2 s−2. 

  10. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, R. P.; Passmore, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified ¼ scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward.

  11. Lift to Drag Ratio Analysis in Magnetic Levitation with an Electrodynamic Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Cordrey, Vincent; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation (MagLev) using simple permanent magnets and conductive tracks. Our investigations used a circular Halbach array with a 1 Tesla variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above or below a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields, which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed a four-inch diameter Electrodynamic Wheel using twelve Neodymium permanent magnets and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW. These forces can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW to produce magnetic levitation without coils and complex control circuitry. We achieved full levitation of the non-magnetic aluminum and copper plates. Our results confirm the expected behavior of lift to drag ratio as proportional to (L/R) ω, with L and R being the inductance and resistance of the track plate, and ω being the angular velocity of the magnetic flux. Supported by grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  12. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, R.P. [LaVisionUK Ltd, Grove, Oxon (United Kingdom); Passmore, M.A. [Loughborough University, Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified 1/4 scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of the forces acting on the tibiofemoral joint during knee extension exercises performed on an open kinetic chain strength-training machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Fagundes Loss

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to: (1 evaluate the resistive torque of an open kinetic chain strength-training machine for performing knee extensions, and (2 perform an analysis estimating internal forces in the tibiofemoral joint. During a fi rst phase of the study, measurements were taken of the machine under analysis (external forces, and then calculations were performed to estimate forces on the lower limb (internal forces. Equations were defi ned to calculate human force (HF, and the moment of muscular force (MMF. Perpendicular muscular force (MFp and joint force (JFp, axial muscular force (MF” and joint force (JF”, and total muscular force (MF and joint force (JF were all calculated. Five knee angles were analyzed (zero, 30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees. A reduction was observed in HF at higher knee angles, while MF and JF also increased at the same time. HF was always lower than the load selected on the machine, which indicates a reduced overload imposed by the machine. The reduction observed in MFp and JFp at higher knee angles indicates a lower tendency to shear the tibia in relation to the femur. At the same time, there was an increase in JF” due to higher MF”. The biomechanical model proposed in this study has shown itself adequate for the day-to-day needs of professionals who supervise orient strength training. resumo Os objetivos do presente estudo foram: (1 avaliar o torque de resistência (TR de uma máquina de musculação para a realização do exercício de extensão dos joelhos em cadeia cinética aberta e (2 realizar um ensaio teórico a partir do comportamento do TR com o intuito de estimar as forças internas na articulação tíbio-femoral. O estudo foi realizado em dois momentos: (1 medições da máquina utilizada e (2 estimativa das forças externas (na máquina e internas (no membro inferior. Foram utilizadas equações baseadas em um modelo mecânico bi-dimensional para o cálculo das componentes perpendiculares

  14. Nation Drag: Uses of the Exotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Seigel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In Uneven Encounters, the forthcoming book from which this article is excerpted, Micol Seigel chronicles the exchange of popular culture between Brazil and the United States in the years between the World Wars, and she demonstrates how that exchange affected ideas of race and nation in both countries. From Americans interpreting advertisements for Brazilian coffee or dancing the Brazilian maxixe, to Rio musicians embracing the “foreign” qualities of jazz, Seigel traces a lively, cultural back-and-forth. Along the way, she shows how race and nation are constructed together, by both non-elites and elites, and gleaned from global cultural and intellectual currents as well as local, regional, and national ones. Seigel explores the circulation of images of Brazilian coffee and of maxixe in the United States during the period just after the imperial expansions of the early twentieth century. Exoticist interpretations structured North Americans’ paradoxical sense of self as productive “consumer citizens.” Some people, however, could not simply assume the privileges of citizenship. In their struggles against racism, Afro-descended citizens living in the cities of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, New York, and Chicago encountered images and notions of each other, and found them useful. Seigel introduces readers to cosmopolitan Afro-Brazilians and African Americans who rarely traveled far but who absorbed ideas from abroad nonetheless. African American vaudeville artists saw the utility of pretending to “be” Brazilian to cross the color line on stage. Putting on “nation drag,” they passed not from one race to another but out of familiar racial categories entirely. Afro-Brazilian journalists reported intensively on foreign, particularly North American, news and eventually entered into conversation with the U.S. black press in a collaborative but still conflictual dialogue. Seigel suggests that projects comparing U.S. and Brazilian racial

  15. STATUTORY INTERPRETATION - TRAFFICKING VICTIMS PROTECTION ACT OF 2000 - SIXTH CIRCUIT DECLINES TO EXTEND FEDERAL FORCED LABOR STATUTE TO CONDUCT CRIMINALIZED UNDER STATE LAW, BASED IN PART ON FEDERALISM CONCERNS. - United States v. Toviave, 761 F.3d 623 (6th Cir. 2014)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2015-01-01

    .... Toviave, the Sixth Circuit relied on this notion of traditional state power in holding that a forced labor provision of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 did not apply to a defendant who...

  16. Forced Migration and Global Responsibility for Health; Comment on “Defining and Acting on Global Health: The Case of Japan and the Refugee Crisis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Bozorgmehr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Forced migration has become a world-wide phenomenon in the past century, affecting increasing numbers of countries and people. It entails important challenges from a global health perspective. Leppold et al have critically discussed the Japanese interpretation of global responsibility for health in the context of forced migration. This commentary complements their analysis by outlining three priority areas of global health responsibility for European Union (EU countries. We highlight important stages of the migration phases related to forced migration and propose three arguments. First, the chronic neglect of the large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs in the discourses on the “refugee crisis” needs to be corrected in order to develop sustainable solutions with a framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs. Second, protection gaps in the global system of protection need to be effectively closed to resolve conflicts with border management and normative global health frameworks. Third, effective policies need to be developed and implemented to meet the health and humanitarian needs of forced migrants; at the same time, the solidarity crisis within the EU needs to be overcome. These stakes are high. EU countries, being committed to global health, should urgently address these areas.

  17. Forced Migration and Global Responsibility for Health Comment on "Defining and Acting on Global Health: The Case of Japan and the Refugee Crisis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Razum, Oliver

    2016-11-05

    Forced migration has become a world-wide phenomenon in the past century, affecting increasing numbers of countries and people. It entails important challenges from a global health perspective. Leppold et al have critically discussed the Japanese interpretation of global responsibility for health in the context of forced migration. This commentary complements their analysis by outlining three priority areas of global health responsibility for European Union (EU) countries. We highlight important stages of the migration phases related to forced migration and propose three arguments. First, the chronic neglect of the large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the discourses on the "refugee crisis" needs to be corrected in order to develop sustainable solutions with a framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Second, protection gaps in the global system of protection need to be effectively closed to resolve conflicts with border management and normative global health frameworks. Third, effective policies need to be developed and implemented to meet the health and humanitarian needs of forced migrants; at the same time, the solidarity crisis within the EU needs to be overcome. These stakes are high. EU countries, being committed to global health, should urgently address these areas. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  18. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokaltun, Seckin [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Munroe, Norman [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Subramaniam, Shankar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  19. Drag characteristics of competitive swimming children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Stallman, Robert Keig

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to compare drag in swimming children and adults, quantify technique using the technique drag index (TDI), and use the Froude number (Fr) to study whether children or adults reach hull speed at maximal velocity (vmax). Active and passive drag was measured by the perturbation method and a velocity decay method, respectively, including 9 children aged 11.7+/-0.8 and 13 adults aged 21.4+/-3.7. The children had significantly lower active (kAD) and passive drag factor (kPD) compared with the adults. TDI (kAD/kPD) could not detect any differences in swimming technique between the two groups, owing to the adults swimming maximally at a higher Fr, increasing the wave drag component, and masking the effect of better technique. The children were found not to reach hull speed at vmax, and their Fr were 0.37+/-0.01 vs. the adults 0.42+/-0.01, indicating adults' larger wave-making component of resistance at vmax compared with children. Fr is proposed as an evaluation tool for competitive swimmers.

  20. A Clustering Genetic Algorithm for Cylinder Drag Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2002-01-01

    A real coded genetic algorithm is implemented for the optimization of actuator parameters for cylinder drag minimization. We consider two types of idealized actuators that are allowed either to move steadily and tangentially to the cylinder surface (“belts”) or to steadily blow/suck with a zero net mass constraint. The genetic algorithm we implement has the property of identifying minima basins, rather than single optimum points. The knowledge of the shape of the minimum basin enables further insights into the system properties and provides a sensitivity analysis in a fully automated way. The drag minimization problem is formulated as an optimal regulation problem. By means of the clustering property of the present genetic algorithm, a set of solutions producing drag reduction of up to 50% is identified. A comparison between the two types of actuators, based on the clustering property of the algorithm, indicates that blowing/suction actuation parameters are associated with larger tolerances when compared to optimal parameters for the belt actuators. The possibility of using a few strategically placed actuators to obtain a significant drag reduction is explored using the clustering diagnostics of this method. The optimal belt-actuator parameters obtained by optimizing the two-dimensional case is employed in three-dimensional simulations, by extending the actuators across the span of the cylinder surface. The three-dimensional controlled flow exhibits a strong two-dimensional character near the cylinder surface, resulting in significant drag reduction.

  1. Agitator tank device and drag reduction agent evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 肖博元; 汤养浩; 罗旗荣

    2008-01-01

    The device that consists of tank and disk agitator for evaluation drag reduction agents(DRA) was established.The effect of DRA was defined by testing the changes of agitator torque that drives the disk rotation.The HG-DRA for oil pipeline from Linyi to Puyang was studied by agitator tank device.The relationships between the drag reduction rate and Reynolds number,concentration,balance time were studied.The best concentration and the highest Renords number for the best drag reduction rate were confirmed.The results show that the drag reduction rate tested in agitator tank is close to that in pipeline.The maximum error of drag reduction rate between pipeline and agitator tank is 18.3%,which indicates that the agitator tank device is available to evaluate the effect of DRA for pipeline and it also has the advantages of simple,easy to be operated and using small volume of oil.Those are very helpful for operaters to know the properties of DRA and operate pipeline well.

  2. Why fibers are better turbulent drag reducing agents than polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Arnout; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-11-01

    It is typically found in literature that fibers are not as effective as drag reducing agents as polymers. However, for low concentrations, when adding charged polymers to either distilled or salt water, it is found that polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. In this study, using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone, this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we are able to explain why charged polymers showing rod-like behavior are better drag reducing agents than polymers showing coil-like behavior. Additionally, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1404940 and AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0164.

  3. Drag reduction of flow boiling with polymer additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The drag-reducing effect of polymer additive aqueous solution was investigated in flow boiling, and the polymer additives were two kinds of polyacrylamide (PAM) with relative molecular mass about 2.56×106 and 8.55×106. The frictional pressure drop was calculated according to the measured total pressure drop. The results show that the flow drag of flow boiling is reduced by adding a small amount of PAM to water when heat flux is in the range of 15.1 kW*m-2 to 47.0 kW*m-2, when the mass fraction of PAM is higher than 2.0×10-5, the drag-reducing effect is obvious. Drag-reducing effect of PAM, whose relative molecular mass is 8.55×106, is slightly better than that of 2.56×106 at the same mass fraction, and the greater the flow rate of the additive solution, the better the effect of the drag reduction.

  4. Biomimetic Drag Reduction Study on Herringbone Riblets of Bird Feather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Chen; Fugang Rao; Xiaopeng Shang; Deyuan Zhang; Ichiro Hagiwara

    2013-01-01

    Birds have gradually formed various excellent structures such as streamlined shape and hollow shaft of feather to improve their flying performance by millions of years of natural selection.As typical property of bird feather,herringbone riblets align along the shaft of each feather,which is caused by perfect link of barbs,especially for the primary and secondary feathers of wings.Such herringbone riblets of feather are assumed to have great impact on drag reduction.In this paper,microstructures of secondary feathers of adult pigeons are investigated by SEM,and their structural parameters are statistically obtained.Based on quantitative analysis of feather structure,novel biomimetic herringbone riblets with narrow smooth edge are proposed to reduce surface drag.In comparison with traditional microgroove riblets and other drag reduction structures,the drag reduction rate of the proposed biomimetic herringbone riblets is experimentally clarified up to 16%,much higher than others.Moreover,the drag reduction mechanism of herringbone riblets are also confirmed and exploited by CFD.

  5. Summary of the Fourth AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassberg, John C.; Tinoco, Edward N.; Mani, Mori; Rider, Ben; Zickuhr, Tom; Levy, David W.; Brodersen, Olaf P.; Eisfeld, Bernhard; Crippa, Simone; Wahls, Richard A.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Murayama, Mitcuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Results from the Fourth AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW-IV) are summarized. The workshop focused on the prediction of both absolute and differential drag levels for wing-body and wing-body-horizontal-tail configurations that are representative of transonic transport air- craft. Numerical calculations are performed using industry-relevant test cases that include lift- specific flight conditions, trimmed drag polars, downwash variations, dragrises and Reynolds- number effects. Drag, lift and pitching moment predictions from numerous Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics methods are presented. Solutions are performed on structured, unstructured and hybrid grid systems. The structured-grid sets include point- matched multi-block meshes and over-set grid systems. The unstructured and hybrid grid sets are comprised of tetrahedral, pyramid, prismatic, and hexahedral elements. Effort is made to provide a high-quality and parametrically consistent family of grids for each grid type about each configuration under study. The wing-body-horizontal families are comprised of a coarse, medium and fine grid; an optional extra-fine grid augments several of the grid families. These mesh sequences are utilized to determine asymptotic grid-convergence characteristics of the solution sets, and to estimate grid-converged absolute drag levels of the wing-body-horizontal configuration using Richardson extrapolation.

  6. A Conventional Liner Acoustic/Drag Interaction Benchmark Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has become a significant topic in the design of such for aircraft noise applications. In order to evaluate the benefits of concepts designed to reduce liner drag, it is necessary to establish the baseline performance of liners employing the typical design features of conventional configurations. This paper details a set of experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of a number of perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of M=0.3 and 0.5. These conventional liners are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of the resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 Hz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 dB. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the interaction between acoustic performance and drag.

  7. Nonlocal Drag of Magnons in a Ferromagnetic Bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Vignale, G.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    Quantized spin waves, or magnons, in a magnetic insulator are assumed to interact weakly with the surroundings, and to flow with little dissipation or drag, producing exceptionally long diffusion lengths and relaxation times. In analogy to Coulomb drag in bilayer two-dimensional electron gases, in which the contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electric resistivity is studied by measuring the interlayer resistivity (transresistivity), we predict a nonlocal drag of magnons in a ferromagnetic bilayer structure based on semiclassical Boltzmann equations. Nonlocal magnon drag depends on magnetic dipolar interactions between the layers and manifests in the magnon current transresistivity and the magnon thermal transresistivity, whereby a magnon current in one layer induces a chemical potential gradient and/or a temperature gradient in the other layer. The largest drag effect occurs when the magnon current flows parallel to the magnetization; however, for oblique magnon currents a large transverse current of magnons emerges. We examine the effect for practical parameters, and find that the predicted induced temperature gradient is readily observable.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Two Low-Drag Supercavitating Hydrofoils at Speeds up to 200 Feet per Second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Kenneth W.; Johnson, Virgil E., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made in the Langley highspeed hydrodynamics facility to determine the force and moment characteristics of two hydrofoils (one having an aspect ratio of 1 and the other having an aspect ratio of 3) designed to have improved lift-drag ratios when operating under either supercavitating or ventilated conditions. Measurements were made of lift, drag, and pitching moment over a range of angles of attack from 40 to 200 for depths of submersion varying from 0 to approximately 1 chord. The range of speed for the investigation was from 110 to 200 feet per second. When the upper surface of the hydrofoils was completely unwetted, the experimental values of lift and drag forces were in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained from the zero-cavitation-number theory. The theoretical values for minimum angle of attack for operation with the upper surface of the hydrofoil unwetted define the lower limits of angle of attack for which the experimental values of lift coefficient are either in agreement with or slightly greater than those predicted by theory.

  9. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  10. Development of a Mechanism for Measuring Forces and Aligning Moment Acting on the Steering Wheels of a Four-Wheel Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajiahmad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a low-cost dynamometer for rolling, steered wheels is described. The dynamometer was constructed to determine whether such an instrumented mechanism was practical. Four S-beam load cells, an Opto-counter and a potentiometer were used to obtain all moments, and forces using dynamic and kinematic analysis. Minimal simplifying assumptions considered for the required calculations. Overturning, aligning and rolling resistance moments besides vertical force are directly measured by the load cells. The Opto-counter detects wheel angular velocity and the potentiometer was used to measure the steering angle. The results showed that the mechanism was very well calibrated with a coefficient of determination of over 0.99 and can be used to define wheel dynamic behavior.

  11. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  12. CubeSat testing of Coulomb drag propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka; Toivanen, Petri; Rauhala, Timo; Haeggström, Edward; Grönland, Tor-Arne

    2016-01-01

    In Coulomb drag propulsion, a long high voltage tether or system of tethers gathers momentum from a natural plasma stream such as solar wind or ionospheric plasma ram flow. A positively polarised tether in the solar wind can be used for efficient general-purpose interplanetary propellantless propulsion (the electric solar wind sail or E-sail), whereas a negatively polarised tether in LEO can be used for efficient deorbiting of satellites (the plasma brake). Aalto-1 is a 3-U cubesat to be launched in May 2016. The satellite carries three scientific experiments including 100 m long Coulomb drag tether experiment. The tether is made of four 25 and 50 micrometre diameter aluminium wires that are ultrasonically bonded together every few centimetre intervals. The tether can be charged by an onboard voltage source up to one kilovolt positive and negative. The Coulomb drag is measured by monitoring the spin rate.

  13. Fatal truck-bicycle accident involving dragging for 45 km.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintschar, M; Darok, M; Roll, P

    2003-08-01

    Vehicle-bicycle accidents with subsequent dragging of the rider over long distances are extremely rare. The case reported here is that of a 16-year-old mentally retarded bike rider who was run over by a truck whose driver failed to notice the accident. The legs of the victim became trapped by the rear axle of the trailer and the body was dragged over 45 km before being discovered under the parked truck. The autopsy revealed that the boy had died from the initial impact and not from the dragging injuries which had caused extensive mutilation. The reports of the technical expert and the forensic pathologist led the prosecutor to drop the case against the truck driver for manslaughter.

  14. Does an active adjustment of aerodynamic drag make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The article concerns evaluation of the possible impact of the gap between the tractor and semitrailer on the aerodynamic drag coefficient. The aim here is not to adjust this distance depending on the geometrical shape of the tractor and trailer, but depending solely on the speed of articulated vehicle. All the tests have form of numerical simulations. The method of simulation is briefly explained in the article. It considers various issues such as the range and objects of tests as well as the test conditions. The initial (pre-adaptive) and final (after adaptation process) computational meshes have been presented as illustrations. Some of the results have been presented in the form of run chart showing the change of value of aerodynamic drag coefficients in time, for different geometric configurations defined by a clearance gap between the tractor and semitrailer. The basis for a detailed analysis and conclusions were the averaged (in time) aerodynamic drag coefficients as a function of the clearance gap.

  15. Drag with external and pressure drop with internal flows: a new and unifying look at losses in the flow field based on the second law of thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herwig, Heinz; Schmandt, Bastian, E-mail: h.herwig@tuhh.de [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute for Thermo-Fluid Dynamics, Denickestr. 17, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Internal and external flows are characterized by friction factors and drag coefficients, respectively. Their definitions are based on pressure drop and drag force and thus are very different in character. From a thermodynamics point of view in both cases dissipation occurs which can uniformly be related to the entropy generation in the flow field. Therefore we suggest to account for losses in the flow field by friction factors and drag coefficients that are based on the overall entropy generation due to the dissipation in the internal and external flow fields. This second law analysis (SLA) has been applied to internal flows in many studies already. Examples of this flow category are given together with new cases of external flows, also treated by the general SLA-approach. (paper)

  16. Out-of-Plane Equilibrium Points in the Photogravitational CR3BP with Oblateness and P-R Drag

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish Singh; Tajudeen Oluwafemi Amuda

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the motion of a test particle around the out-of-plane equilibrium points in the circular photogravitational restricted three-body problem when the effect of radiation pressure from the smaller primary and its Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag are taken into account, and the bigger primary is modeled as an oblate spheroid. These points lie in the -plane almost directly above and below the center of the oblate primary. The equilibrium points are sought, and we observe that, there are two coordinate points 6,7 which depend on the oblateness of the bigger primary, and the radiation pressure force and P-R drag of the smaller primary. The positions and linear stability of the problem are investigated both analytically and numerically for the binary system Cen X-4. The out-of-plane equilibrium points are found to be unstable in the sense of Lyapunov due to the presence of a positive real root.

  17. Determination of increased mean drag coefficients for a cylinder vibrating at low values of Keulegan-Carpenter number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Riveros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for the development of a reliable technology for wind turbines in deepwaters.Therefore, offshore wind turbine technology is receiving great amount of attention by the research community. Nevertheless, the dynamic response prediction of the support system for offshore wind turbines is still challenging due to the nonlinear and self-regulated nature of the Vortex Induced Vibration (VIV process. In this paper, the numerical implementation of a computational fluid dynamics-based approach for determination of increased mean drag coefficient is presented. The numerical study is conducted at low values of Keulegan-Carpenter number in order to predict the increment of drag force due to cross-flow motion. The simulation results are then compared with previously developed empirical formulations. Good agreement is observed in these comparisons.

  18. Intershell resistance in multiwall carbon nanotubes: A Coulomb drag study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anders Mathias; Flensborg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the intershell resistance R-21 in a multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F) (e.g., a gate voltage), varying the chirality of the inner and outer tubes. This is done in a so-called Coulomb drag setup, where a current I-1 in one shell induces...... effects for the Coulomb drag between different tubes due to selection rules combined with mismatching of wave vector and crystal angular momentum conservation near the Fermi level. This gives rise to orders of magnitude changes in R-21 and even the sign of R-21 can change depending on the chirality...

  19. The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    We show that for an anomalous fluid carrying dissipationless chiral magnetic and/or vortical currents there is a frame in which a stationary obstacle experiences no drag, but energy and charge currents do not vanish, resembling superfluidity. However, unlike ordinary superfluid flow, the anomalous chiral currents do transport entropy in this frame. We show that the second law of thermodynamics completely determines the amounts of these anomalous non-dissipative currents in the "no-drag frame" as polynomials in temperature and chemical potential with known anomaly coefficients. These general results are illustrated and confirmed by a calculation in the chiral kinetic theory and quark-gluon plasma at high temperature.

  20. Drag reduction in electro-osmosis of polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2007-05-01

    Electro-osmosis is the preferred transport mechanism in microfluidic systems. Drag reduction in electro-osmosis of polymer solutions is observed due to polymer depletion in the electric double layer (EDL). The well-known Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation indicates that the electro-osmosis mobility is inversely proportional to the solution viscosity. For low molecular weight the polymer size (R) is smaller than the EDL thickness (λ) and the HS equation is valid. For high molecular weight (R>λ) the chains in the EDL are partially sheared and the effective viscosity is smaller than the solution viscosity. Salt addition reduces λ and can enhance drag reduction substantially.

  1. Drag and lift coefficients evolution of a Savonius rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, A.; Benghrib, D.

    1989-10-01

    The lift and drag coefficients of the rotating Savonius wind machine are determined from the pressure difference measured between the upper plane and the lower plane of a blade. Pressure measurements have been performed for two sets of experiments; the first one for U ∞ = 10 m/s and the second one for U ∞ = 12.5 m/s. In each case it is to be noted that a negative lift effect is present for low values of the tip speed ratio λ. The lift coefficient becomes positive when λ increases. The drag coefficient is of course always negative.

  2. Effects of Boattail Area Contouring and Simulated Turbojet Exhaust on the Loading and Fuselage-tail Component Drag of a Twin-engine Fighter-type Airplane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Willard E , Jr; Runckel, Jack F; Lee, Edwin E , Jr

    1958-01-01

    An investigation of a twin-engine fighter-type airplane model has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the effect on drag of a fuselage volume addition incorporating streamline contouring and more extensive boattailing of the engine shrouds. The effect of hot exhausts from the turbojet engines was simulated with hydrogen peroxide gas generators using scaled nonafterburning engine nozzles. Afterbody pressure distributions, base drag coefficients, and forces on the fuselage-tail configurations are presented at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 angles of attack of 0 degree and 4 degrees for jet pressure ratios from 1 to 7. The effect of jet operation on both the basic and modified models was generally to decrease base pressures but to increase most other afterbody pressures and, therefore, to result in an overall decrease in fuselage-tail component drag. The addition of volume to the basic model reduced the base drag coefficient by 0.0010 with the jets off and 0.0018 at a typical cruise operating condition of a jet pressure ratio of 3, a Mach number of 0.85, and an angle of attack of 4 degrees. The overall jet-off reduction in fuselage-tail component drag due to the volume addition was a maximum of 0.0040 at a Mach number of 0.90 for an angle of attack of 4 degrees.

  3. Force on a slow moving impurity due to thermal and quantum fluctuations in a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykes, Andrew [UNIV OF QUEENSLAND

    2009-01-01

    We study the drag force acting on an impurity moving through a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We are able to find exact analytical solutions of the partial differential equations to the level of the Bogoliubov approximation. At zero temperature, we find a nonzero force is exerted on the impurity at subcritical velocities, due to the scattering of quantum fluctuations. We make the following explicit assumptions: far from the impurity the system is in a quantum state given by that of a zero (or finite) temperature Bose-Einstein condensate, and the scattering process generates only causally related reflection/transmission. The results raise unanswered questions in the quantum dynamics associated with the formation of persistent currents.

  4. An optical readout system for the drag free control of the LISA spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, R.; di Fiore, L.; Garufi, F.; Grado, A.; La Rana, A.; Milano, L.

    2011-01-01

    LISA is an ESA-NASA joint project for the realization of a space interferometric gravitational wave (GW) antenna. LISA is designed for the measurement of GWs in a very low frequency band (0.1-100 mHz). The antenna is composed by three spacecraft (SC) in suitable heliocentric orbits placed at the corners of a huge equilateral triangle, each side being 5 million km long. The SCs are linked by lasers, forming a sort of optical transponder. By means of phase locking techniques, any round-trip phase delay change gives a measurement of a change in the SC distance (measured as light transit time), due to incoming GWs. An essential requirement is that the SCs are set as close as possible to pure geodetic motion, in the measurement frequency band. This is hardly fulfilled because the SCs are disturbed by several external forces, like solar radiation pressure, cosmic rays etc. In each SC there are two free falling proof masses (PM) that are as much isolated as possible by all external force but gravity. The relative position between each PM and the SC is measured, in six degrees of freedom, by the so-called inertial sensor (IS). The IS signal is then used for drag-free servo-loops that force the SC to follow the geodetic motion of the PMs. The current solution for the IS is the adoption of capacitive sensing. This gives a reliable device but poses several limitations due to back action and cross couplings. In this work, we present an optical lever sensor as an alternative solution. In particular we analyze the potential sensitivity and discuss the advantages in terms of relaxed specifications for the drag free control loops. We also report on bench-top measurements that confirm the performance in the required frequency band.

  5. Single molecule force measurements of perlecan/HSPG2: A key component of the osteocyte pericellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S; Martinez, Jerahme R; Grindel, Brian J; Frey, Eric W; Li, Jingqiang; Wang, Liyun; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    Perlecan/HSPG2, a large, monomeric heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), is a key component of the lacunar canalicular system (LCS) of cortical bone, where it is part of the mechanosensing pericellular matrix (PCM) surrounding the osteocytic processes and serves as a tethering element that connects the osteocyte cell body to the bone matrix. Within the pericellular space surrounding the osteocyte cell body, perlecan can experience physiological fluid flow drag force and in that capacity function as a sensor to relay external stimuli to the osteocyte cell membrane. We previously showed that a reduction in perlecan secretion alters the PCM fiber composition and interferes with bone's response to a mechanical loading in vivo. To test our hypothesis that perlecan core protein can sustain tensile forces without unfolding under physiological loading conditions, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to capture images of perlecan monomers at nanoscale resolution and to perform single molecule force measurement (SMFMs). We found that the core protein of purified full-length human perlecan is of suitable size to span the pericellular space of the LCS, with a measured end-to-end length of 170±20 nm and a diameter of 2-4 nm. Force pulling revealed a strong protein core that can withstand over 100 pN of tension well over the drag forces that are estimated to be exerted on the individual osteocyte tethers. Data fitting with an extensible worm-like chain model showed that the perlecan protein core has a mean elastic constant of 890 pN and a corresponding Young's modulus of 71 MPa. We conclude that perlecan has physical properties that would allow it to act as a strong but elastic tether in the LCS.

  6. Nature of the Venus thermosphere derived from satellite drag measurements (solicited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G.; Theriot, M.; Bougher, S.

    2008-09-01

    atmosphere rises on the dayside producing adiabatic cooling and drops on the nightside producing some adiabatic heating. (See figure 1). The thermosphere was discovered from drag measurements to respond to the near 27-day period of the rotating Sun, for which regions of maximum solar activity reappear every 27 days. The increased euv emission from active regions increased temperatures and thermospheric density, (See Figure 2). Fig. 2 Exospheric Temperatures Compared to 10.7cm Solar Index Second diurnal survey (12/5/79 - 3/6/80) Pioneer Venus Orbiter measurements (OAD) 11 day running means [2] Estimates were also made of the response to the 11- year Solar Cycle by combining the Pioneer Venus and Magellan data. Dayside exospheric temperatures changed about 80K over the solar cycle, [8]. Earlier estimates of temperature change gave 70K based on Lyman alpha measurements. The responses to solar variability were much weaker than on Earth due apparently to the much stronger O/CO2 cooling on Venus which tended to act as a thermostat on thermospheric temperatures. Another discovery from drag measurements was the 4 to 5 day oscillation of the Venus thermosphere [3], (See figure 3). These oscillations are interpreted as resulting from the 4-day super-rotation of the atmosphere near the cloud tops. Other indications of the super-rotation of the thermosphere come from displacement of the helium bulge and atomic hydrogen bulge from midnight to near 4AM. Fig. 3 Four to Five Day Oscillations in Thermospheric Densities Magellan 1992. During 2008, the Venus Express periapsis will be dropped from 250km down to approximately 180km to allow drag measurements to be made in the North Polar Region, [9]. Drag measurements above 200km have already been obtained from both Pioneer Venus and Magellan so measurements near 180km should be accurate. In 2009, the periapsis may be decreased to a lower altitude allowing accelerometer measurements to be obtained of drag as a function of altitude, to determine

  7. Experiments on bubble generation by a hydrofoil moving beneath the water surface for reducing ship drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ichiro; Murai, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Sakamaki, Haruki; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Ozaki, Tsubasa; Tasaka, Yuji; Oishi, Yoshihiko

    2014-04-01

    We have invented two types of hydrofoil bubble generator for drag reduction of ship that can reduce the energy for air bubble generation on the ship hull. Their fundamental process of air entrainment and subsequent bubble generation by the hydrofoil facility are described by a simple fluid dynamic model. We experimentally determined the critical velocity of the bubble generation and the relationship between air volume flow rate and the hydrofoil velocity. The magnitude of the negative pressure produced above the hydrofoil, which is a driving force of the air entrainment, depends on the shape of the hydrofoil, gap ratio (normalized depth of the hydrofoil), Reynolds number, Froude number, and angle of attack. Recent applications of the drag-reduction technology with air bubbles to a ship save about 10%-15% of the total energy consumption of the ship. The device works as a self-priming pump when the draft of the ship is shallow (hydrofoil depends on the flow condition around the hydrofoil, proper operation of compressors is necessary. We also show experimental results on optimization of hydrofoils to enhance the hydrofoil performance of air entrainment and air bubble generation.

  8. Biofilm effects on size gradation, drag coefficient and settling velocity of sediment particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-qian SHANG; Hong-wei FANG; Hui-ming ZHAO; Guo-jian HE; Zheng-hui CUI

    2014-01-01

    Sediment particles are often colonized by biofilm in a natural aquatic ecological system, especially in eutrophic water body. A series of laboratory experiments on particle size gradation, drag coefficient and settling velocity were conducted after natural sediment was colonized by biofilm for 5, 10, 15 and 20 days. Particle image acquisition, particle tracking techniques of Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry were utilized to analyze the changes of these properties. The experimental results indicate that the size gradation, the drag force exerted on bio-particles, and the settling velocity of bio-particles underwent significant change due to the growth of biofilm onto the sediment surface. The study proposes a characteristic particle size formula and a bio-particle settling velocity formula based on the regression of experiment results, that the settling velocity is only 50% to 60%as the single particle which has the same diameter and density. However, biofilm growth causes large particle which the settling velocities are approximately 10 times larger than that of primary particles. These results may be specifically used in the low energy reservoir or lake environment.

  9. Study of the triple-mass Tethered Satellite System under aerodynamic drag and J2 perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Pourya; Assadian, Nima

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of multi-tethered satellite formations consisting of three masses are studied in this paper. The triple-mass triple-tethered satellite system is modeled under the low Earth orbit perturbations of drag and Earth's oblateness and its equilibrium conditions are derived. It is modeled as three equal end-masses connected by a uniform-mass straight tether. The lengths of tethers are supposed to be constant and in this manner the angles of the plane consisting the masses are taken as the state variables of the system. The governing equations of motion are derived using Lagrangian approach. The aerodynamic drag perturbation is expressed as an external non-conservative force and the Earth oblateness (J2 perturbation) is considered as a term of potential energy. The equilibrium conditions of this system are found and their stability is investigated through the linear stability theory. Then, the results are verified by using a nonlinear simulation for three types of equilibrium conditions.

  10. Highly accurate analytic formulae for projectile motion subjected to quadratic drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    The classical phenomenon of motion of a projectile fired (thrown) into the horizon through resistive air charging a quadratic drag onto the object is revisited in this paper. No exact solution is known that describes the full physical event under such an exerted resistance force. Finding elegant analytical approximations for the most interesting engineering features of dynamical behavior of the projectile is the principal target. Within this purpose, some analytical explicit expressions are derived that accurately predict the maximum height, its arrival time as well as the flight range of the projectile at the highest ascent. The most significant property of the proposed formulas is that they are not restricted to the initial speed and firing angle of the object, nor to the drag coefficient of the medium. In combination with the available approximations in the literature, it is possible to gain information about the flight and complete the picture of a trajectory with high precision, without having to numerically simulate the full governing equations of motion.

  11. Measurements of Drag Coefficients and Rotation Rates of Free-Falling Helixes

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Omari, Abdulrhaman A.

    2016-05-01

    The motion of bacteria in the environment is relevant to several fields. At very small scales and with simple helical shapes, we are able to describe experimentally and mathematically the motion of solid spirals falling freely within a liquid pool. Using these shapes we intend to mimic the motion of bacteria called Spirochetes. We seek to experimentally investigate the linear and the rotational motion of such shapes. A better understanding of the dynamics of this process will be practical not only on engineering and physics, but the bioscience and environmental as well. In the following pages, we explore the role of the shape on the motion of passive solid helixes in different liquids. We fabricate three solid helical shapes and drop them under gravity in water, glycerol and a mixture of 30% glycerol in water. That generated rotation due to helical angle in water. However, we observe the rotation disappear in glycerol. The movement of the solid helical shapes is imaged using a high-speed video camera. Then, the images are analyzed using the supplied software and a computer. Using these simultaneous measurements, we examine the terminal velocity of solid helical shapes. Using this information we computed the drag coefficient and the drag force. We obtain the helical angular velocity and the torque applied to the solid. The results of this study will allow us to more accurately predict the motion of solid helical shape. This analysis will also shed light onto biological questions of bacteria movement.

  12. Observations on CFD Verification and Validation from the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Joseph H.; Kleb, Bil; Vassberg, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The authors provide observations from the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshops that have spanned over a decade and from a recent validation experiment at NASA Langley. These workshops provide an assessment of the predictive capability of forces and moments, focused on drag, for transonic transports. It is very difficult to manage the consistency of results in a workshop setting to perform verification and validation at the scientific level, but it may be sufficient to assess it at the level of practice. Observations thus far: 1) due to simplifications in the workshop test cases, wind tunnel data are not necessarily the “correct” results that CFD should match, 2) an average of core CFD data are not necessarily a better estimate of the true solution as it is merely an average of other solutions and has many coupled sources of variation, 3) outlier solutions should be investigated and understood, and 4) the DPW series does not have the systematic build up and definition on both the computational and experimental side that is required for detailed verification and validation. Several observations regarding the importance of the grid, effects of physical modeling, benefits of open forums, and guidance for validation experiments are discussed. The increased variation in results when predicting regions of flow separation and increased variation due to interaction effects, e.g., fuselage and horizontal tail, point out the need for validation data sets for these important flow phenomena. Experiences with a recent validation experiment at NASA Langley are included to provide guidance on validation experiments.

  13. Flow characteristics of the two tandem wavy cylinders and drag reduction phe-nomenon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹琳; 郭丛波; 熊灿

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive numerical study of 3-D laminar flow around two wavy cylinders in the tandem arrangement for spacing ratios (L/Dm ) ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 at a low Reynolds number of 100. The investigation focuses on the effects of spacing ratio (L/Dm ) and wavy surface on the 3-D near wake flow patterns, the force and pressure coefficients and the vortex shedding frequency for the two tandem wavy cylinders. Flows around the two tandem circular cylinders are also obtained for comparison. With the spacing ratio in the range of L/Dm=1.5-5.5 , unlike two tandem circular cylinders, the wavy cylinders in the tandem arrangement do not have the wake interference behaviour of three basic types. The vortex shedding behind the upstream wavy cylinder occurs at a further downstream position as compared with that of the upstream circular cylinder. This leads to the weakening of the effect of the vibration of the cylinders as well as a distinct drag reduction. The effects of the drag reduction and the control of the vibration of the two wavy cylinders in tandem become more and more evident when L/Dm³4.0, with a distinct vortex shedding in the upstream cylinder regime for the two circular cylinders in tandem.

  14. Drag balance Cubesat attitude motion effects on in-situ thermosphere density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Leonard; Santoni, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of Cubesats carrying a drag balance instrument (DBI) for in situ atmosphere density measurements is analyzed. Atmospheric drag force is measured by the displacement of two light plates exposed to the incoming particle flow. This system is well suited for a distributed sensor network in orbit, to get simultaneous in situ local (non orbit averaged) measurements in multiple positions and orbit heights, contributing to the development and validation of global atmosphere models. The implementation of the DBI leads to orbit normal pointing spinning two body system. The use of a spin-magnetic attitude control system is suggested, based only on magnetometer readings, contributing to making the system simple, inexpensive, and reliable. It is shown, by an averaging technique, that this system provides for orbit normal spin axis pointing. The effect of the coupling between the attitude dynamics and the DBI is evaluated, analyzing its frequency content and showing that no frequency components arise, affecting the DBI performance. The analysis is confirmed by Monte Carlo numerical simulation results.

  15. Complex Behavior of Forces Influencing Molten Weld Metal Flow based on Static Force Balance Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achebo, Joseph I.

    This study is aimed at investigating the forces responsible for the detachment of molten metal droplets formed at an electrode tip, which imminently and eventually drop into the weld pool during the welding process. The Equations used by Kim and Eagar in 1993 were applied to this study. It was found that the different detaching forces which are the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the drag force, were determined to be 7.154 x 10-6N, 0.05N and 1.736N respectively. Whereas, the primary retaining force, which is the surface tension force, was calculated to be 0.0195N. From the findings, since the combination of the detaching forces taken together is greater than the retaining force, detachment of the molten metal droplet must inevitably occur. The combined effect of these forces on the behaviour of molten metal during the droplet detachment process was adequately investigated in this study.

  16. Analysis of acting forces resulting from armhole structure of man's suit%西服袖窿结构的作用力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈谦; 程军红; 庹武

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the structural condition and the ready-made form of armhole is nonlinear. Through analyzing the armhole structure of man's suit, a mechanical model of the lower armhole is established, and a relationship between different forces and parameters of armhole is built. To analyze the different structural allocation of man's suit armhole and the deformation pattern of the different structural allocation, a large number of samples are tested, and the effect of the force of tangent line, normal and tensional stress on the local stability and smooth comfort of man's suit armhole are obtained.The relationships between different forces and parameter of armhole are analyzed by utilizing the mechanical model. A theoretical optimization scheme has been proposed for achieving the unity of mould and comfort of sleeves.%袖窿部位的结构条件和成品形态之间是复杂的非线性关系,通过对男西服袖窿结构进行分析,建立了一种下部袖窿的力学模型,构建了不同作用力与袖窿参数间的相互关系.为分析男西服袖窿部位的不同结构配置以及在不同配置下的袖窿变形规律,通过大量样本测试,获得男西服袖窿切线力、法线力和扭力对袖窿局部稳定性和平顺性的影响,应用力学模型分析了不同作用力与袖窿参数间的相互关系,从而对袖窿结构配置提出理论优化方案,以达到肩袖部位造型性和着装舒适性的统一.

  17. Effect of Radiation Drag on Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Nio, T; Fukue, J; Nio, Tomomi; Matsuda, Takuya; Fukue, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Hoyle-Lyttleton type accretion is investigated, by taking account of not only the effect of radiation pressure but the effect of radiation drag. We calculate the trajectories of particles for three cases: only the effect of gravity is considered (case A); the effect of radiation pressure is taken into account (case B); the effect of radiation drag as well as radiation pressure is taken into account (case C). The accretion radii for former two cases are $2GM/v_{\\infty}^2$ for case A and $2GM(1-\\Gamma)/v_{\\infty}^2$ for case B, where M is the mass of the accreted object, $v_{\\infty}$ the relative velocity, and Gamma the normalized luminosity of the accreted object. We found that the accretion radius for case C is in between those of cases A and B under the present approximation; i.e., the accretion radius decreases due to radiation pressure while it increases due to radiation drag. In addition, the accretion radius for case C becomes larger as the incident velocity becomes fast. The effect of radiation drag bec...

  18. Towards unified drag laws for inertial flow through fibrous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdchi, K.; Luding, S.

    2012-01-01

    We give a comprehensive survey of published experimental, numerical and theoretical work on the drag law correlations for fluidized beds and flow through porous media, together with an attempt of systematization. Ranges of validity as well as limitations of commonly used relations (i.e. the Ergun an

  19. Rheological and drag reduction properties of hydroxypropyl xanthan gum solutions☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Tian; Bo Fang; Leiping Jin; Yongjun Lu; Xiaohui Qiu; Hao Jin; Kejing Li

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl xanthan gum (HXG) was prepared from xanthan gum (XG) and propylene oxide under alkaline condition. Rheological and drag reduction properties of different concentrations of aqueous HXG and XG solution were studied. The micro-structure network of HXG and XG solutions was investigated by Cryo-FESEM. The re-sults showed that HXG and XG solutions could exhibit shear thinning property. The apparent viscosity of 6 g·L−1 HXG solution was 1.25 times more than that of 6 g·L−1 XG solution. The storage modulus G′and the loss modulus G″of HXG solutions were greater than those of XG solutions, and thixotropic and viscoelastic prop-erties were more significant in HXG solutions. The HXG and XG solutions reduced the pressure drop of straight pipe, and the maximum drag reduction of 1 g·L−1 HXG and XG in smooth tube reached 72.8%and 68.1%, respec-tively. Drag reduction rate was increased as the concentration increased. The HXG solution may become a new polymeric drag reducer.

  20. Superhydrophobic drag reduction in laminar flows: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2016-12-01

    A gas in between micro- or nanostructures on a submerged superhydrophobic (SHPo) surface allows the liquid on the structures to flow with an effective slip. If large enough, this slippage may entail a drag reduction appreciable for many flow systems. However, the large discrepancies among the slippage levels reported in the literature have led to a widespread misunderstanding on the drag-reducing ability of SHPo surfaces. Today we know that the amount of slip, generally quantified with a slip length, is mainly determined by the structural features of SHPo surfaces, such as the pitch, solid fraction, and pattern type, and further affected by secondary factors, such as the state of the liquid-gas interface. Reviewing the experimental data of laminar flows in the literature comprehensively and comparing them with the theoretical predictions, we provide a global picture of the liquid slip on structured surfaces to assist in rational design of SHPo surfaces for drag reduction. Because the trapped gas, called plastron, vanishes along with its slippage effect in most application conditions, lastly we discuss the recent efforts to prevent its loss. This review is limited to laminar flows, for which the SHPo drag reduction is reasonably well understood.