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Sample records for downstream reporter gene

  1. Downstream reporter gene imaging for signal transduction pathway of dopamine type 2 receptor

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    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Midicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The Dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signal pathway regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of proteins including cAMP reponse element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor. In this study, we developed a reporter strategy using the GAL4 fusion CREB to assess the phosphorylation of CREB, one of the targets of the D2R signal transduction pathway. We used three plasmids: GAL4 fusion transactivator (pCMV-CREB), firefly luciferase reporter with GAL4 binding sites (pG5-FLUC), and D2R plasmid (pCMV-D2R). Group 1 293T cells were transiently transfected with pCMV-CREB and pG5-FLUC, and group 2 cells were transfected with all three plasmids. Transfected cells were stimulated with different concentrations of dopamine (0-200 M). For animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells (1x10{sup 6}) were subcutaneously injected on the left and right thigh of six nude mice, respectively. Dopamine stimiulation was performed with intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA incombination with carbidopa, a peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor. Bioluminescence optical imaging studies were performed before and after L-DOPA injection. In cell culture studies, group 1 cells showed strong luciferase activity which implies direct activation of the signaling pathway due to growth factors contained in culture medium. Group 2 cells showed strong luciferase activity and a further increase after administration of dopamine. In animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells showed bioluminescence signal before L-DOPA injection, but signal from group 2 cells significantly increased 12 h after L-DOPA injection. The signal from group 1 cells disappeared thereafter, but group 2 cells continued to show signal until 36 h of L-DOPA injection. This study demonstrates imaging of the D2R signal transduction pathway and should be useful for noninvasive imaging of downstream effects of G-coupled protein pathways.

  2. RNA polymerase II pausing downstream of core histone genes is different from genes producing polyadenylated transcripts.

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    Krishanpal Anamika

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq analyses performed in various eukaryotic organisms, analysed RNA Polymerase II (Pol II pausing around the transcription start sites of genes. In this study we have further investigated genome-wide binding of Pol II downstream of the 3' end of the annotated genes (EAGs by ChIP-seq in human cells. At almost all expressed genes we observed Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs suggesting that Pol II pausing 3' from the transcription units is a rather common phenomenon. Downstream of EAGs Pol II transcripts can also be detected by global run-on and sequencing, suggesting the presence of functionally active Pol II. Based on Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs we could distinguish distinct clusters of Pol II pause patterns. On core histone genes, coding for non-polyadenylated transcripts, Pol II occupancy is quickly dropping after the EAG. In contrast, on genes, whose transcripts undergo polyA tail addition [poly(A(+], Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs can be detected up to 4-6 kb. Inhibition of polyadenylation significantly increased Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs at poly(A(+ genes, but not at the EAGs of core histone genes. The differential genome-wide Pol II occupancy profiles 3' of the EAGs have also been confirmed in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, indicating that Pol II pauses genome-wide downstream of the EAGs in mammalian cells. Moreover, in mES cells the sharp drop of Pol II signal at the EAG of core histone genes seems to be independent of the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of Pol II. Thus, our study uncovers a potential link between different mRNA 3' end processing mechanisms and consequent Pol II transcription termination processes.

  3. Integrative analysis of RUNX1 downstream pathways and target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Joëlle; Simpson, Ken M; Escher, Robert; Buchet-Poyau, Karine; Beissbarth, Tim; Carmichael, Catherine; Ritchie, Matthew E; Schütz, Frédéric; Cannon, Ping; Liu, Marjorie; Shen, Xiaofeng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Raskind, Wendy H; Horwitz, Marshall S; Osato, Motomi; Turner, David R; Speed, Terence P; Kavallaris, Maria; Smyth, Gordon K; Scott, Hamish S

    2008-01-01

    Background The RUNX1 transcription factor gene is frequently mutated in sporadic myeloid and lymphoid leukemia through translocation, point mutation or amplification. It is also responsible for a familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD-AML). The disruption of the largely unknown biological pathways controlled by RUNX1 is likely to be responsible for the development of leukemia. We have used multiple microarray platforms and bioinformatic techniques to help identify these biological pathways to aid in the understanding of why RUNX1 mutations lead to leukemia. Results Here we report genes regulated either directly or indirectly by RUNX1 based on the study of gene expression profiles generated from 3 different human and mouse platforms. The platforms used were global gene expression profiling of: 1) cell lines with RUNX1 mutations from FPD-AML patients, 2) over-expression of RUNX1 and CBFβ, and 3) Runx1 knockout mouse embryos using either cDNA or Affymetrix microarrays. We observe that our datasets (lists of differentially expressed genes) significantly correlate with published microarray data from sporadic AML patients with mutations in either RUNX1 or its cofactor, CBFβ. A number of biological processes were identified among the differentially expressed genes and functional assays suggest that heterozygous RUNX1 point mutations in patients with FPD-AML impair cell proliferation, microtubule dynamics and possibly genetic stability. In addition, analysis of the regulatory regions of the differentially expressed genes has for the first time systematically identified numerous potential novel RUNX1 target genes. Conclusion This work is the first large-scale study attempting to identify the genetic networks regulated by RUNX1, a master regulator in the development of the hematopoietic system and leukemia. The biological pathways and target genes controlled by RUNX1 will have considerable importance in disease progression in both

  4. Integrative analysis of RUNX1 downstream pathways and target genes

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    Liu Marjorie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RUNX1 transcription factor gene is frequently mutated in sporadic myeloid and lymphoid leukemia through translocation, point mutation or amplification. It is also responsible for a familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD-AML. The disruption of the largely unknown biological pathways controlled by RUNX1 is likely to be responsible for the development of leukemia. We have used multiple microarray platforms and bioinformatic techniques to help identify these biological pathways to aid in the understanding of why RUNX1 mutations lead to leukemia. Results Here we report genes regulated either directly or indirectly by RUNX1 based on the study of gene expression profiles generated from 3 different human and mouse platforms. The platforms used were global gene expression profiling of: 1 cell lines with RUNX1 mutations from FPD-AML patients, 2 over-expression of RUNX1 and CBFβ, and 3 Runx1 knockout mouse embryos using either cDNA or Affymetrix microarrays. We observe that our datasets (lists of differentially expressed genes significantly correlate with published microarray data from sporadic AML patients with mutations in either RUNX1 or its cofactor, CBFβ. A number of biological processes were identified among the differentially expressed genes and functional assays suggest that heterozygous RUNX1 point mutations in patients with FPD-AML impair cell proliferation, microtubule dynamics and possibly genetic stability. In addition, analysis of the regulatory regions of the differentially expressed genes has for the first time systematically identified numerous potential novel RUNX1 target genes. Conclusion This work is the first large-scale study attempting to identify the genetic networks regulated by RUNX1, a master regulator in the development of the hematopoietic system and leukemia. The biological pathways and target genes controlled by RUNX1 will have considerable importance in disease

  5. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse upstream regulators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. N. Shukla; J. Nagaraju

    2010-09-01

    Sex determination, an integral precursor to sexual reproduction, is required to generate morphologically distinct sexes. The molecular components of sex-determination pathways regulating sexual differentiation have been identified and characterized in different organisms. The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best characterized candidate so far, and is conserved from worms (mab3 of Caenorhabditis elegans) to mammals (Dmrt-1). Studies of dsx homologues from insect species belonging to different orders position them at the bottom of their sex-determination cascade. The dsx homologues are regulated by a series of upstream regulators that show amazing diversity in different insect species. These results support the Wilkin’s hypothesis that evolution of the sex-determination cascade has taken place in reverse order, the bottom most gene being most conserved and the upstream genes having been recruited at different times during evolution. The pre-mRNA of dsx is sex-specifically spliced to encode male or female-specific transcription factors that play an important role in the regulation of sexually dimorphic characters in different insect species. The generalization that dsx is required for somatic sexual differentiation culminated with its functional analysis through transgenesis and knockdown experiments in diverse species of insects. This brief review will focus on the similarities and variations of dsx homologues that have been investigated in insects to date.

  6. Detection, Validation, and Downstream Analysis of Allelic Variation in Gene Expression

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    Ciobanu, Daniel C.; Lu, Lu; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Wang, Xusheng; Jagalur, Manjunatha; Morris, John A.; Taylor, William L.; Dietz, Klaus; Simon, Perikles; Williams, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Common sequence variants within a gene often generate important differences in expression of corresponding mRNAs. This high level of local (allelic) control—or cis modulation—rivals that produced by gene targeting, but expression is titrated finely over a range of levels. We are interested in exploiting this allelic variation to study gene function and downstream consequences of differences in expression dosage. We have used several bioinformatics and molecular approaches to estimate error rates in the discovery of cis modulation and to analyze some of the biological and technical confounds that contribute to the variation in gene expression profiling. Our analysis of SNPs and alternative transcripts, combined with eQTL maps and selective gene resequencing, revealed that between 17 and 25% of apparent cis modulation is caused by SNPs that overlap probes rather than by genuine quantitative differences in mRNA levels. This estimate climbs to 40–50% when qualitative differences between isoform variants are included. We have developed an analytical approach to filter differences in expression and improve the yield of genuine cis-modulated transcripts to ∼80%. This improvement is important because the resulting variation can be successfully used to study downstream consequences of altered expression on higher-order phenotypes. Using a systems genetics approach we show that two validated cis-modulated genes, Stk25 and Rasd2, are likely to control expression of downstream targets and affect disease susceptibility. PMID:19884314

  7. Discovery and characterization of novel vascular and hematopoietic genes downstream of etsrp in zebrafish.

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    Gustavo A Gomez

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Etsrp is required for vasculogenesis and primitive myelopoiesis in zebrafish. When ectopically expressed, etsrp is sufficient to induce the expression of many vascular and myeloid genes in zebrafish. The mammalian homolog of etsrp, ER71/Etv2, is also essential for vascular and hematopoietic development. To identify genes downstream of etsrp, gain-of-function experiments were performed for etsrp in zebrafish embryos followed by transcription profile analysis by microarray. Subsequent in vivo expression studies resulted in the identification of fourteen genes with blood and/or vascular expression, six of these being completely novel. Regulation of these genes by etsrp was confirmed by ectopic induction in etsrp overexpressing embryos and decreased expression in etsrp deficient embryos. Additional functional analysis of two newly discovered genes, hapln1b and sh3gl3, demonstrates their importance in embryonic vascular development. The results described here identify a group of genes downstream of etsrp likely to be critical for vascular and/or myeloid development.

  8. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  9. Autonomous regulation of the insect gut by circadian genes acting downstream of juvenile hormone signaling.

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    Bajgar, Adam; Jindra, Marek; Dolezel, David

    2013-03-12

    In temperate regions, the shortening day length informs many insect species to prepare for winter by inducing diapause. The adult diapause of the linden bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, involves a reproductive arrest accompanied by energy storage, reduction of metabolic needs, and preparation to withstand low temperatures. By contrast, nondiapause animals direct nutrient energy to muscle activity and reproduction. The photoperiod-dependent switch from diapause to reproduction is systemically transmitted throughout the organism by juvenile hormone (JH). Here, we show that, at the organ-autonomous level of the insect gut, the decision between reproduction and diapause relies on an interaction between JH signaling and circadian clock genes acting independently of the daily cycle. The JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant and the circadian proteins Clock and Cycle are all required in the gut to activate the Par domain protein 1 gene during reproduction and to simultaneously suppress a mammalian-type cryptochrome 2 gene that promotes the diapause program. A nonperiodic, organ-autonomous feedback between Par domain protein 1 and Cryptochrome 2 then orchestrates expression of downstream genes that mark the diapause vs. reproductive states of the gut. These results show that hormonal signaling through Methoprene-tolerant and circadian proteins controls gut-specific gene activity that is independent of circadian oscillations but differs between reproductive and diapausing animals.

  10. Associations between a locus downstream DRD1 gene and cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis.

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    Andreou, Dimitrios; Söderman, Erik; Axelsson, Tomas; Sedvall, Göran C; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G

    2016-04-21

    Dopamine activity, mediated by the catecholaminergic neurotransmitter dopamine, is prominent in the human brain and has been implicated in schizophrenia. Dopamine targets five different receptors and is then degraded to its major metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA). We hypothesized that genes encoding dopamine receptors may be associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HVA concentrations in patients with psychotic disorder. We searched for association between 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the five dopamine receptor genes i.e., DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and DRD5, and the CSF HVA concentrations in 74 patients with psychotic disorder. Nominally associated SNPs were also tested in 111 healthy controls. We identified a locus, located downstream DRD1 gene, where four SNPs, rs11747728, rs11742274, rs265974 and rs11747886, showed association with CSF HVA concentrations in psychotic patients. The associations between rs11747728, which is a regulatory region variant, and rs11742274 with HVA remained significant after correction for multiple testing. These associations were restricted to psychotic patients and were absent in healthy controls. The results suggest that the DRD1 gene is implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and support the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  11. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2012

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    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2013-08-15

    In this nineteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2012 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 38 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 98% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last nineteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the fourth year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  12. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2012-07-15

    In this eighteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2011 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 34 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 96% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last eighteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the third year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  13. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

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    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Hee, E-mail: mhkim1@yuhs.ac [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  14. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages

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    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production. PMID:25751122

  15. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production.

  16. Mechanisms contributing to differential regulation of PAX3 downstream target genes in normal human epidermal melanocytes versus melanoma cells.

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    Bartlett, Danielle; Boyle, Glen M; Ziman, Mel; Medic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug resistant form of skin cancer. It arises from melanocytes, the pigment producing cells of the skin. The formation of these melanocytes is driven by the transcription factor PAX3 early during embryonic development. As a result of alternative splicing, the PAX3 gene gives rise to eight different transcripts which encode isoforms that have different structures and activate different downstream target genes involved in pathways of cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. Furthermore, post-translational modifications have also been shown to alter the functions of PAX3. We previously identified PAX3 downstream target genes in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Here we assessed the effects of PAX3 down-regulation on this panel of target genes in primary melanocytes versus melanoma cells. We show that PAX3 differentially regulates various downstream target genes involved in cell proliferation in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. To determine mechanisms behind this differential downstream target gene regulation, we performed immunoprecipitation to assess post-translational modifications of the PAX3 protein as well as RNAseq to determine PAX3 transcript expression profiles in melanocytes compared to melanoma cells. Although PAX3 was found to be post-translationally modified, there was no qualitative difference in phosphorylation and ubiquitination between melanocytes and melanoma cells, while acetylation of PAX3 was reduced in melanoma cells. Additionally, there were differences in PAX3 transcript expression profiles between melanocytes and melanoma cells. In particular the PAX3E transcript, responsible for reducing melanocyte proliferation and increasing apoptosis, was found to be down-regulated in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. These results suggest that alternate transcript expression profiles activate different downstream target genes leading to the melanoma phenotype.

  17. The expression and localization of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 in human trophoblasts.

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    Xiao-Hua Shi

    Full Text Available The protein N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1 is implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and cellular stress response. NDRG1 is expressed in primary human trophoblasts, where it promotes cell viability and resistance to hypoxic injury. The mechanism of action of NDRG1 remains unknown. To gain further insight into the intracellular action of NDRG1, we analyzed the expression pattern and cellular localization of endogenous NDRG1 and transfected Myc-tagged NDRG1 in human trophoblasts exposed to diverse injuries. In standard conditions, NDRG1 was diffusely expressed in the cytoplasm at a low level. Hypoxia or the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride, but not serum deprivation, ultraviolet (UV light, or ionizing radiation, induced the expression of NDRG1 in human trophoblasts and the redistribution of NDRG1 into the nucleus and cytoplasmic membranes associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and microtubules. Mutation of the phosphopantetheine attachment site (PPAS within NDRG1 abrogated this pattern of redistribution. Our results shed new light on the impact of cell injury on NDRG1 expression patterns, and suggest that the PPAS domain plays a key role in NDRG1's subcellular distribution.

  18. CypA, a gene downstream of HIF-1α, promotes the development of PDAC.

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    Huan Zhang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α is a highly important transcription factor involved in cell metabolism. HIF-1α promotes glycolysis and inhibits of mitochondrial respiration in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. In response to tumor hypoxia, cyclophilin A (CypA is over-expressed in various cancer types, and is associated with cell apoptosis, tumor invasion, metastasis, and chemoresistance in PDAC. In this study, we showed that both HIF-1α and CypA expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and tumor stage. The expression of CypA was correlated with HIF-1α. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of CypA markedly decreased or increased following the suppression or over-expression of HIF-1α in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that HIF-1α could directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE in the CypA promoter regions and regulated CypA expression. Consistent with other studies, HIF-1α and CypA promoted PDAC cell proliferation and invasion, and suppressed apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, we proved the combination effect of 2-methoxyestradiol and cyclosporin A both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggested that,CypA, a gene downstream of HIF-1α, could promote the development of PDAC. Thus, CypA might serve as a potential therapeutic target for PDAC.

  19. Germ line transcription in mice bearing neor gene downstream of Igamma3 exon in the Ig heavy chain locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Maha; Oruc, Zeliha; Dougier, Hei-Lanne; Essawi, Tamer; Cogné, Michel; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2006-04-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) is preceded by germ line transcription that initiates from promoters upstream of switch (S) sequences and terminates downstream of associated constant genes. Previous work showed that germ line transcripts and their processing are required for CSR and that germ line transcription is regulated in a major part by a regulatory region located downstream of the Ig heavy chain locus. This long-range, polarized effect can be disturbed by inserting an expressed neomycine resistance (neo(r)) gene. To contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of such a long-distance regulation, we generated knock-in mice in which a neo(r) gene was inserted downstream of Igamma3 exon leaving intact all the necessary elements for germ line transcription and splicing. We show that the expressed neo(r) gene interferes with transcription initiation from Igamma3, and that it impairs but does not block S recombination to Cgamma3. Moreover, we show for the first time that the neo(r) gene provides through chimeric neo(r)-Cgamma3 transcripts the necessary elements for splicing of germ line transcripts by activating two novel cryptic splice sites, one in the coding region of the intronless neo(r) gene and the other in the Igamma3-Cgamma3 intron.

  20. N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1 Is Fused to ERG in Prostate Cancer

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    Dorothee Pflueger

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A step toward the molecular classification of prostate cancer was the discovery of recurrent erythroblast transformation. specific rearrangements, most commonly fusing the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to ERG. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion is observed in around 90% of tumors that overexpress the oncogene ERG. The goal of the current study was to complete the characterization of these ERG-overexpressing prostate cancers. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription.polymerase chain reaction assays, we screened 101 prostate cancers, identifying 34 cases (34% with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. Seven cases demonstrated ERG rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization without the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion messenger RNA transcripts. Screening for known 5' partners, we determined that three cases harbored the SLC45A3-ERG fusion. To discover novel 5' partners in these ERG-overexpressing and ERG-rearranged cases, we used paired-end RNA sequencing. We first confirmed the utility of this approach by identifying the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion in a known positive prostate cancer case and then discovered a novel fusion involving the androgen-inducible tumor suppressor, NDRG1 (N-myc downstream regulated gene 1, and ERG in two cases. Unlike TMPRSS2-ERG and SCL45A3-ERG fusions, the NDRG1-ERG fusion is predicted to encode a chimeric protein. Like TMPRSS2, SCL45A3 and NDRG1 are inducible not only by androgen but also by estrogen. This study demonstrates that most ERG-overexpressing prostate cancers harbor hormonally regulated TMPRSS2-ERG, SLC45A3-ERG, or NDRG1-ERG fusions. Broader implications of this study support the use of RNA sequencing to discover novel cancer translocations.

  1. Reduced expression of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in human thyroid cancer

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    Ma Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 was initially cloned in our laboratory. Previous results have shown that NDRG2 expressed differentially in normal and cancer tissues. Specifically, NDRG2 mRNA was down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers, and over-expression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. NDRG2 also exerts important functions in cell differentiation and tumor suppression. However, it remains unclear whether NDRG2 participates in carcinogenesis of the thyroid. Methods In this study, we investigated the expression profile of human NDRG2 in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas, by examining tissues from individuals with thyroid adenomas (n = 40 and carcinomas (n = 35, along with corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot methods were utilized to determine both the protein and mRNA expression status of Ndrg2 and c-Myc. Results The immunostaining analysis revealed a decrease of Ndrg2 expression in thyroid carcinomas. When comparing adenomas or carcinomas with adjacent normal tissue from the same individual, the mRNA expression level of NDRG2 was significantly decreased in thyroid carcinoma tissues, while there was little difference in adenoma tissues. This differential expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blotting. However, there were no significant correlations of NDRG2 expression with gender, age, different histotypes of thyroid cancers or distant metastases. Conclusion Our data indicates that NDRG2 may participate in thyroid carcinogenesis. This finding provides novel insight into the important role of NDRG2 in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Future studies are needed to address whether the down-regulation of NDRG2 is a cause or a consequence of the progression from a normal thyroid to a carcinoma.

  2. Profiling of promoter occupancy by the SND1 transcriptional coactivator identifies downstream glycerolipid metabolic genes involved in TNFα response in human hepatoma cells.

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    Arretxe, Enara; Armengol, Sandra; Mula, Sarai; Chico, Yolanda; Ochoa, Begoña; Martínez, María José

    2015-12-15

    The NF-κB-inducible Staphylococcal nuclease and tudor domain-containing 1 gene (SND1) encodes a coactivator involved in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. While SND1 is known to interact with certain transcription factors and activate client gene expression, no comprehensive mapping of SND1 target genes has been reported. Here, we have approached this question by performing ChIP-chip assays on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and analyzing SND1 binding modulation by proinflammatory TNFα. We show that SND1 binds 645 gene promoters in control cells and 281 additional genes in TNFα-treated cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of bound probes identified motifs for established partners and for novel transcription factors including HSF, ATF, STAT3, MEIS1/AHOXA9, E2F and p300/CREB. Major target genes were involved in gene expression and RNA metabolism regulation, as well as development and cellular metabolism. We confirmed SND1 binding to 21 previously unrecognized genes, including a set of glycerolipid genes. Knocking-down experiments revealed that SND1 deficiency compromises the glycerolipid gene reprogramming and lipid phenotypic responses to TNFα. Overall, our findings uncover an unexpected large set of potential SND1 target genes and partners and reveal SND1 to be a determinant downstream effector of TNFα that contributes to support glycerophospholipid homeostasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma during inflammation.

  3. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  4. A gene necessary for normal male courtship, yellow, acts downstream of fruitless in the Drosophila melanogaster larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Mark David; Radovic, Anna; Wittkopp, Patricia J; Long, Anthony D

    2003-04-01

    The fruitless (fru) gene is a member of the Drosophila melanogaster somatic sex determination genetic pathway. Although it has been hypothesized that the primary function of fru is to regulate a genetic hierarchy specifying development of adult male courtship behavior, genes acting downstream of fru have not yet been identified. Here we demonstrate that the yellow (y) gene is genetically downstream of fru in the 3(rd)-instar larval brain. Yellow protein is present at elevated levels in neuroblasts, which also show expression of male-specific FRU proteins, compared to control neuroblasts without FRU. A location for y downstream of fru in a genetic pathway was experimentally demonstrated by analysis of fru mutants lacking transcription of zinc-finger DNA binding domains, and of animals with temporal, spatial, or sexual mis-expression of male-specific FRU. A subset of fru and y mutants is known to reduce levels of a specific behavioral component of the male courtship ritual, wing extension, and FRU and Yellow were detected in the general region of the brain whose maleness is necessary for development of that behavior. We therefore hypothesized that ectopic expression of Yellow in the 3(rd)-instar brain, in a y null background, would rescue low levels of wing extension and male competitive mating success, and this was found to be the case. Overall, these data suggest that y is a downstream member of the fru branch of the D. melanogaster sex determination hierarchy, where it plays a currently unknown role in the development of adult male wing extension during courtship.

  5. Occurrence and removal of antibiotics and the corresponding resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants: effluents' influence to downstream water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Jiao, Yanan; Baig, Shams Ali; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence of 8 antibiotics [3 tetracyclines (TCs), 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim (TMP)], 12 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 types of bacteria [no antibiotics, anti-TC, anti-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and anti-double], and intI1 in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were assessed and their influences in downstream lake were investigated. Both WWTPs' effluent demonstrated some similarities, but the abundance and removal rate varied significantly. Results revealed that biological treatment mainly removed antibiotics and ARGs, whereas physical techniques were found to eliminate antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARBs) abundance (about 1 log for each one). UV disinfection did not significantly enhance the removal efficiency, and the release of the abundantly available target contaminants from the excess sludge may pose threats to human and the environment. Different antibiotics showed diverse influences on the downstream lake, and the concentrations of sulfamethazine (SM2) and SMX were observed to increase enormously. The total ARG abundance ascended about 0.1 log and some ARGs (e.g., tetC, intI1, tetA) increased due to the high input of the effluent. In addition, the abundance of ARB variation in the lake also changed, but the abundance of four types of bacteria remained stable in the downstream sampling sites.

  6. Strong inhibition of fimbrial 3 subunit gene transcription by a novel downstream repressive element in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Boulanger, Alice; Hinton, Deborah M; Stibitz, Scott

    2014-08-01

    The Bvg-regulated promoters for the fimbrial subunit genes fim2 and fim3 of Bordetella pertussis behave differently from each other both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Pfim2 is significantly stronger than Pfim3 , even though predictions based on the DNA sequences of BvgA-binding motifs and core promoter elements would indicate the opposite. In vitro Pfim3 demonstrated robust BvgA∼P-dependent transcriptional activation, while none was seen with Pfim2 . This apparent contradiction was investigated further. By swapping sequence elements we created a number of hybrid promoters and assayed their strength in vivo. We found that, while Pfim3 promoter elements upstream of the +1 transcriptional start site do indeed direct Bvg-activated transcription more efficiently than those of Pfim2 , the overall promoter strength of Pfim3  in vivo is reduced due to sequences downstream of +1 that inhibit transcription more than 250-fold. This element, the DRE (downstream repressive element), was mapped to the 15 bp immediately downstream of the Pfim3 +1. Placing the DRE in different promoter contexts indicated that its activity was not specific to fim promoters, or even to Bvg-regulated promoters. However it does appear to be specific to Bordetella species in that it did not function in Escherichia coli.

  7. In vivo expression of MHC class I genes depends on the presence of a downstream barrier element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helit Cohen

    Full Text Available Regulation of MHC class I gene expression is critical to achieve proper immune surveillance. In this work, we identify elements downstream of the MHC class I promoter that are necessary for appropriate in vivo regulation: a novel barrier element that protects the MHC class I gene from silencing and elements within the first two introns that contribute to tissue specific transcription. The barrier element is located in intergenic sequences 3' to the polyA addition site. It is necessary for stable expression in vivo, but has no effect in transient transfection assays. Accordingly, in both transgenic mice and stably transfected cell lines, truncation of the barrier resulted in transcriptional gene silencing, increased nucleosomal density and decreased histone H3K9/K14 acetylation and H3K4 di-methylation across the gene. Significantly, distinct sequences within the barrier element govern anti-silencing and chromatin modifications. Thus, this novel barrier element functions to maintain transcriptionally permissive chromatin organization and prevent transcriptional silencing of the MHC class I gene, ensuring it is poised to respond to immune signaling.

  8. A tissue and developmental specific enhancer is located downstream from the human β-globin gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kollias (George); J. Hurst; E. de Boer (Ernie); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe human P-globin gene is part of a multigene family and is expressed specifically in adult human erythroid tissue (for review, 1). When the human P-globin is introduced into fertilized mouse eggs, it is first activated in foetal liver and remains expressed in adult erythroid tissues

  9. Ascl1 is a required downstream effector of Gsx gene function in the embryonic mouse telencephalon

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    Allen Zegary J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeobox gene Gsx2 (formerly Gsh2 is known to regulate patterning in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE of the embryonic telencephalon. In its absence, the closely related gene Gsx1 (previously known as Gsh1 can partially compensate in the patterning and differentiation of ventral telencephalic structures, such as the striatum. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this compensation remain unclear. Results We show here that in the Gsx2 mutants Gsx1 is expressed in only a subset of the ventral telencephalic progenitors that normally express Gsx2. Based on the similarities in the expression of Gsx1 and Ascl1 (Mash1 within the Gsx2 mutant LGE, we examined whether Ascl1 plays an integral part in the Gsx1-based recovery. Ascl1 mutants show only modest alterations in striatal development; however, in Gsx2;Ascl1 double mutants, striatal development is severely affected, similar to that seen in the Gsx1;Gsx2 double mutants. This is despite the fact that Gsx1 is expressed, and even expands, in the Gsx2;Ascl1 mutant LGE, comparable to that seen in the Gsx2 mutant. Finally, Notch signaling has recently been suggested to be required for normal striatal development. In spite of the fact that Notch signaling is severely disrupted in Ascl1 mutants, it actually appears to be improved in the Gsx2;Ascl1 double mutants. Conclusion These results, therefore, reveal a non-proneural requirement of Ascl1 that together with Gsx1 compensates for the loss of Gsx2 in a subset of LGE progenitors.

  10. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  11. Anomalous altered expressions of downstream gene-targets in TP53-miRNA pathways in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sanga; Mukherjee, Nupur; Das, Smarajit; Das, Pijush; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, continues to grow. Change in the expression of TP53 in HNSCC affects its downstream miRNAs and their gene targets, anomalously altering the expressions of the five genes, MEIS1, AGTR1, DTL, TYMS and BAK1. These expression alterations follow the repression of TP53 that upregulates miRNA-107, miRNA- 215, miRNA-34 b/c and miRNA-125b, but downregulates miRNA-155. The above five so far unreported genes are the targets of these miRNAs. Meta-analyses of microarray and RNA-Seq data followed by qRT-PCR validation unravel these new ones in HNSCC. The regulatory roles of TP53 on miRNA-155 and miRNA-125b differentiate the expressions of AGTR1 and BAK1in HNSCC vis-à-vis other carcinogenesis. Expression changes alter cell cycle regulation, angiogenic and blood cell formation, and apoptotic modes in affliction. Pathway analyses establish the resulting systems-level functional and mechanistic insights into the etiology of HNSCC.

  12. Anomalous altered expressions of downstream gene-targets in TP53-miRNA pathways in head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sanga; Mukherjee, Nupur; Das, Smarajit; Das, Pijush; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, continues to grow. Change in the expression of TP53 in HNSCC affects its downstream miRNAs and their gene targets, anomalously altering the expressions of the five genes, MEIS1, AGTR1, DTL, TYMS and BAK1. These expression alterations follow the repression of TP53 that upregulates miRNA-107, miRNA- 215, miRNA-34 b/c and miRNA-125b, but downregulates miRNA-155. The above five so far unreported genes are the targets of these miRNAs. Meta-analyses of microarray and RNA-Seq data followed by qRT-PCR validation unravel these new ones in HNSCC. The regulatory roles of TP53 on miRNA-155 and miRNA-125b differentiate the expressions of AGTR1 and BAK1in HNSCC vis-à-vis other carcinogenesis. Expression changes alter cell cycle regulation, angiogenic and blood cell formation, and apoptotic modes in affliction. Pathway analyses establish the resulting systems-level functional and mechanistic insights into the etiology of HNSCC. PMID:25186767

  13. Elongation factor 1 alpha1 and genes associated with Usher syndromes are downstream targets of GBX2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Roeseler

    Full Text Available Gbx2 encodes a DNA-binding transcription factor that plays pivotal roles during embryogenesis. Gain-and loss-of-function studies in several vertebrate species have demonstrated a requirement for Gbx2 in development of the anterior hindbrain, spinal cord, inner ear, heart, and neural crest cells. However, the target genes through which GBX2 exerts its effects remain obscure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with direct sequencing (ChIP-Seq analysis in a human prostate cancer cell line, we identified cis-regulatory elements bound by GBX2 to provide insight into its direct downstream targets. The analysis revealed more than 286 highly significant candidate target genes, falling into various functional groups, of which 51% are expressed in the nervous system. Several of the top candidate genes include EEF1A1, ROBO1, PLXNA4, SLIT3, NRP1, and NOTCH2, as well as genes associated with the Usher syndrome, PCDH15 and USH2A, and are plausible candidates contributing to the developmental defects in Gbx2(-/- mice. We show through gel shift analyses that sequences within the promoter or introns of EEF1A1, ROBO1, PCDH15, USH2A and NOTCH2, are directly bound by GBX2. Consistent with these in vitro results, analyses of Gbx2(-/- embryos indicate that Gbx2 function is required for migration of Robo1-expressing neural crest cells out of the hindbrain. Furthermore, we show that GBX2 activates transcriptional activity through the promoter of EEF1A1, suggesting that GBX2 could also regulate gene expression indirectly via EEF1A. Taken together, our studies show that GBX2 plays a dynamic role in development and diseases.

  14. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC: signaling pathways, downstream genes, interacting proteins, and regulation of tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K; Dasgupta, Santanu; Hu, Bin; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), also known as metadherin (MTDH) and lysine-rich CEACAM1 coisolated (LYRIC), was initially cloned in 2002. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has emerged as an important oncogene that is overexpressed in multiple types of human cancer. Expanded research on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has established a functional role of this molecule in several crucial aspects of tumor progression, including transformation, proliferation, cell survival, evasion of apoptosis, migration and invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance. The multifunctional role of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in tumor development and progression is associated with a number of signaling cascades, and recent studies identified several important interacting partners of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in regulating cancer promotion and other biological functions. This review evaluates the current literature on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC function relative to signaling changes, interacting partners, and angiogenesis and highlights new perspectives of this molecule, indicating its potential as a significant target for the clinical treatment of various cancers and other diseases.

  15. Looking downstream: the role of cyclic AMP-regulated genes in axonal regeneration

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    Mustafa M Siddiq

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels has proven to be one of the most effective means of overcoming inhibition of axonal regeneration by myelin-associated inhibitors such as myelin-associated glycoprotein, Nogo, and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein. Pharmacological manipulation of cAMP through the administration of dibutyryl cAMP or rolipram leads to enhanced axonal growth both in vivo and in vitro, and importantly, upregulation of cAMP within dorsal root ganglion neurons is responsible for the conditioning lesion effect, which indicates that cAMP plays a significant role in the endogenous mechanisms that promote axonal regeneration. The effects of cAMP are transcription-dependent and are mediated through the activation of protein kinase A and the transcription factor CREB. This leads to the induction of a variety of genes, several of which have been shown to overcome myelin-mediated inhibition in their own right. In this review, we will highlight the pro-regenerative effects of arginase I, interleukin-6, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and metallothionein-I/II, and discuss their potential for therapeutic use in spinal cord injury.

  16. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  17. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 overexpression with progressive growth of colorectal neoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; Fang Wang; Wei-Qi Wang; Qian Gao; Wan-Li Wei; Yun Yang; Guo-Ying Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the function of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with tumor lymph node metastasis.METHODS: NDRG1 was detected at its protein level by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and image analysis (IA), and NDRG1 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH)in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections with a total of 190 specimens including 38 normal colorectal mucosae, 31 colorectal adenomas, 45 non-metastatic colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), 38 metastatic primary CRC and subsequently regional lymph nodes respectively. At the same time, the correlations of NDRG1 with sex, age of patients and histological types of colorectal carcinomas were observed.RESULTS: NDRG1 proteins were gradually increased in colorectal carcinogenesis (P<0.05 or P<0.01). There was a significant difference in the expression of NDRG1 between non-metastatic and metastatic CRCs (P<0.05), and the correlation was positive (P<0.01, rs=0.329). However, there was no obvious difference in the expression of NDRG1 between the primary sites of CRCs and that in the metastatic sites of corresponding regional lymph nodes, nor was there an apparent difference in sex, age, and histological types.The expression of NDRG1 mRNA was generally in concordance with that of NDRG1 protein.CONCLUSION: NDRG1 gene may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. In addition, NDRG1 may be a putative tumor metastasis promoter gene and is regarded as one of the molecular biological markers that can forecast early metastasis of CRCs. NDRG1 gene in the metastatic sites of regional lymph nodes may preserve its expression characteristics in the primary sites of CRCs to some extent.The expression of NDRG1 is not affected by sex, age and histological types. The role of NDRG1 in tumor metastatic process can be demonstrated byin vivo and in vitro.

  18. Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by ccp1, a FGF2 downstream gene

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    Inman Gareth J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coiled-coil domain containing 115 (Ccdc115 or coiled coil protein-1 (ccp1 was previously identified as a downstream gene of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2 highly expressed in embryonic and adult brain. However, its function has not been characterised to date. Here we hypothesized that ccp1 may be a downstream effecter of FGF2, promoting cell proliferation and protecting from apoptosis. Methods Forced ccp1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF and neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line, as well as down-regulation of ccp1 expression by siRNA in NIH3T3, was used to characterize the role of ccp1. Results Ccp1 over-expression increased cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of ccp1 expression reduced it. Ccp1 was able to increase cell proliferation in the absence of serum. Furthermore, ccp1 reduced apoptosis upon withdrawal of serum in SK-N-SH. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK or ERK Kinase (MEK inhibitor, U0126, only partially inhibited the ccp1-dependent BrdU incorporation, indicating that other signaling pathway may be involved in ccp1-induced cell proliferation. Induction of Sprouty (SPRY upon FGF2 treatment was accelerated in ccp1 over-expressing cells. Conclusions All together, the results showed that ccp1 regulates cell number by promoting proliferation and suppressing cell death. FGF2 was shown to enhance the effects of ccp1, however, it is likely that other mitogenic factors present in the serum can also enhance the effects. Whether these effects are mediated by FGF2 influencing the ccp1 function or by increasing the ccp1 expression level is still unclear. At least some of the proliferative regulation by ccp1 is mediated by MAPK, however other signaling pathways are likely to be involved.

  19. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  20. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  1. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankunda T Kariisa

    Full Text Available In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  2. OsCOL10, a CONSTANS-Like Gene, Functions as a Flowering Time Repressor Downstream of Ghd7 in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Junjie; Jin, Mingna; Wang, Jiachang; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Zheng, Xiaoming; Chen, Liping; Wang, Min; Zhu, Shanshan; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xuanming; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Flowering time, or heading date, is a critical agronomic trait that determines the cropping season and regional adaptability, and ultimately grain yield in rice. A number of genes involved in photoperiodic flowering have been cloned and their roles in modulating expression of the flowering genes have been characterized to a certain extent. However, much less is known about the pathway in transmitting the day length response signal(s) to induce transition to reproductive growth. Here, we report a constitutive flowering repressor OsCOL10, which encodes a member of the CONSTANS-like (COL) family. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCOL10 (driven by a strong promoter or by fusing it to the activation domain of VP64) showed delayed flowering time under both short and long days.OsCOL10 is affected by the circadian clock and is preferentially expressed in leaf mesophyll cells; it is localized to the nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Further studies show that OsCOL10 represses the expression of theFT-like genes RFT1 and Hd3a through Ehd1. Transcripts of OsCOL10 are more abundant in plants carrying a functional Ghd7 allele or overexpressing Ghd7 than in Ghd7-deficient plants, thus placing OsCOL10 downstream of Ghd7.Taking these findings together, we conclude that OsCOL10 functions as a flowering time repressor that links Ghd7 and Ehd1 in rice.

  3. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  4. Blocking Signaling at the Level of GLI Regulates Downstream Gene Expression and Inhibits Proliferation of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Mehdi Hayat; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway is active in a variety of human malignancies and is known to contribute to the growth and survival of human osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of GLI transcription factors in multiple canine osteosarcoma cell lines and analyzed the effects of inhibiting GLI with GANT61, a GLI-specific inhibitor. Compared with normal canine osteoblasts, real-time PCR showed that GLI1 and GLI2 were highly expressed in two out of three cell lines and correlated with downstream target gene expression of PTCH1and PAX6. Treatment of canine osteosarcoma cells with GANT61 resulted in decreased expression of GLI1, GLI2, PTCH1, and PAX6. Furthermore, GANT61 inhibited proliferation and colony formation in all three canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The finding that GLI signaling activity is present and active in canine osteosarcoma cells suggests that spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in dogs might serve as a good model for future preclinical testing of GLI inhibitors. PMID:24810746

  5. Blocking signaling at the level of GLI regulates downstream gene expression and inhibits proliferation of canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hayat Shahi

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway is active in a variety of human malignancies and is known to contribute to the growth and survival of human osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of GLI transcription factors in multiple canine osteosarcoma cell lines and analyzed the effects of inhibiting GLI with GANT61, a GLI-specific inhibitor. Compared with normal canine osteoblasts, real-time PCR showed that GLI1 and GLI2 were highly expressed in two out of three cell lines and correlated with downstream target gene expression of PTCH1and PAX6. Treatment of canine osteosarcoma cells with GANT61 resulted in decreased expression of GLI1, GLI2, PTCH1, and PAX6. Furthermore, GANT61 inhibited proliferation and colony formation in all three canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The finding that GLI signaling activity is present and active in canine osteosarcoma cells suggests that spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in dogs might serve as a good model for future preclinical testing of GLI inhibitors.

  6. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  7. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Mills, Robert B. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Environmental and Technical Services Division, Portland, OR)

    1998-06-01

    All juvenile fish numbers, sample, collection, and index were down almost 50% from the previous year at John Day Dam (JDA). At Bonneville Dam, sample numbers increased while collection and index numbers stayed about the same. The following report presents results from the 1997 smolt monitoring at John Day and Bonneville dams and represents the fourteenth annual report under this project. The report also contains summaries of data for all years of the program at John Day and Bonneville dams in Appendices C and D.

  8. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1998 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Environmental and Technical Services Division, Portland, OR)

    1999-03-01

    Project 84-014 has been part of the annual integrated and coordinated Columbia River Basin Smolt Monitoring Program since 1984, and currently addresses measure 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. This report presents results from the 1998 smolt monitoring at John Day and Bonneville dams and represents the fifteenth annual report under this project.

  9. Variations of mitochondrial D-loop region plus downstream gene 12S rRNA-tRNAphe and gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Bo Han; Fan Li; Yu-Jie Zhao; Jia-Ming Ma; Dong-Ying Wu; Yu-Kui Zhang; Yan Xin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the instabilities, polymorphisms and other variations of mitochondrial D-loop region and downstream gene 12S rRNA-tRNAPhe in gastric cancers, and to study their relationship with gastric cancer.METHODS: Three adjacent regions (D-loop, tRNAphe and 12S rRNA) were detected for instabilities, polymorphisms and other variations via PCR amplification followed by direct DNA sequencing in 22 matched gastric cancerous tissues and para-cancerous normal tissues.RESULTS: PolyC or (CA)n instabilities were detected in 13/22(59.1%) gastric cancers and 9/22(40.9 %) in the control (P>0.05). There existed 2/12(16.7%) and 6/10(60%)alterations of 12S rR NA-tRNAphe in well differentiated gastric cancers and poorly differentiated ones, respectively(P0.05).Some new variations were found, among which np 318 and np 321 C-T transitions in D-loop region were two of the five bases for H-strand replication primer. Np 523 AC-deletion and np 527 C-T transition occurred at mtTF1 binding site (mtTFBS), which were associated with the transcription of downstream mitochondrial genome. Seven samples showed the np 16 182 polyC instabilities, five of which simultaneously showed np 16 189 T-C transitions.CONCLUSION: There is no statistic significance of instabilities and polymorphisms in mitochondrial D-loop region between gastric cancerous and para-cancerous normal tissues, which suggests that the instability might relate to heredity or be dependent on aging. There is asignificant correlation between differentiation degree of gastric cancer and variant frequencies of 12S rRNA-tRNAphe. The poorly differentiated gastric cancers are more prone to 12S rRNAtRNAphe variations, or gastric cancers with 12S rRNA-tRNAphe variations are more likely to be poorly differentiated, np 16189 T-C transition may be one of the important reasons for polyC instability in gastric cancer.

  10. Transcription of the Escherichia coli dcw cluster: evidence for distal upstream transcripts being involved in the expression of the downstream ftsZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, A; Palacios, P; Vicente, M

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains VIP596 and VIP597 have been constructed to compare the amount of transcription of the ftsZ gene derived from proximal promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region with that originating in the upstream regions of the dcw cluster. Both strains have in common a beta-galactosidase reporter fusion located at the ddlB locus, but differ in that VIP597 has a transcription terminator Omega interposon located downstream from lacZ. In addition, these strains have the ddlB, ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ genes under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter P(tac), allowing to control artificially ftsZ expression for normal cell division to take place. When beta-galactosidase activity was measured in VIP596 and VIP597 and compared to the levels measured in strain VIP407, in which the lacZ reporter fusion is located in the ftsZ gene, they were found to account for nearly 66% of the total transcription entering into ftsZ. This result indicates that the reduction in ftsZ transcription observed when the promoters in the ddlB-ftsA region are disconnected from the upstream sequences of the dcw cluster (as observed by Flärdh et al., Mol. Microbiol. 30 (1998) 305-316) in strain VIP490) is the direct consequence of the interruption in the transcription originated upstream and not due to the effect of such sequences on the promoters proximal to ftsZ.

  11. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1990 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, Lynette A.

    1991-03-01

    The seaward migration of salmonid smolts was monitored by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) at three sites on the Columbia River system in 1990. This project is a part of the continuing Smolt Monitoring Program to monitor Columbia Basin salmonid stocks coordinated by the Fish Passage Center (FPC) for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Indian Tribes. It's purpose is to provide timely data to the Fish Passage Managers for in season flow and spill management for fish passage and post-season analysis for travel time, relative magnitude and timing and the smolt migration. This program is carried out under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program and is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Sampling sites were John Day and Bonneville Dams under the Smolt Monitoring program, and the Dallas Dam under the Fish Spill Memorandum of Agreement'' for 1990. All pertinent fish capture, condition and brand data, as well as dam operations and river flow data were reported daily to FPC. These data were incorporated into the FPC Fish Passage Data Information System (FPDIS). 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1992 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, Lynnette A.; Martinson, Rick D.; Absolon, Randall F. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Environmental and Technical Services Division, Portland, OR)

    1993-05-01

    The seaward migration of salmonid smolts was monitored by the National marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) at two sites on the Columbia River in 1992. The NMFS Smolt Monitoring Project is part of a larger Smolt Monitoring Program to index Columbia Basin juvenile salmonied stocks. It is coordinated by the Fish Passage Center (FPC) for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Tribes. Its purpose is to facilitate fish passage through reservoirs and at dams by providing FPC with timely smolt migration data used for flow and spill management. Data is also used for travel time, migration timing and relative run size magnitude analysis. This program is carried out under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program and is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Sampling sites were John Day and Bonneville Dams under the 1992 Smolt Monitoring Program. All pertinent fish capture, condition, brand recovery, and flow data, were reported daily to FPC. These data were incorporated into the FPC`s Fish Passage Data System (FPDS).

  13. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M. (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR)

    2005-02-02

    yearling Chinook and unclipped steelhead runs took longer to pass Bonneville than any previous year, at 44 and 45 days, respectively. For subyearling Chinook, the middle 80% of the fish passed during the last three weeks of June and the first week of July, taking 35 days to pass the project, the same as last year. Descaling for all species was slightly higher than the average of the last five years. Compared to last year, descaling varied by species, increasing for yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye and lower for subyearling Chinook and steelhead. Since sampling began in the juvenile monitoring facility, descaling has been quite consistent, staying below 3.6% for yearling and subyearling Chinook, unclipped steelhead and coho, and above 4.7% for clipped steelhead and sockeye. Mortality was slightly higher than last year and the historical average for yearling and subyearling Chinook and steelhead. Coho and sockeye mortality was lower than last year and the historical average. Mortality for all species was below 1%. Powerhouse 2 operational priority and research results showing higher survival of fish passing through the PH1 turbines rather than through the bypass system resulted in a complete disuse of the PH1 bypass system. Consequently, we removed the historic PH1 data from this report and refer readers to any prior report for information regarding first powerhouse fish sampling.

  14. Characterization of divIVA and other genes located in the chromosomal region downstream of the dcw cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Daniela; Pischedda, Carla; Caldara, Fabrizio; Whalen, Michael B; Anderluzzi, Daniela; Domenici, Enrico; Massidda, Orietta

    2003-10-01

    We analyzed the chromosome region of Streptococcus pneumoniae located downstream of the division and cell wall (dcw) cluster that contains the homolog of the Bacillus subtilis cell division gene divIVA and some genes of unknown function. Inactivation of divIVA in S. pneumoniae resulted in severe growth inhibition and defects in cell shape, nucleoid segregation, and cell division. Inactivation of the ylm genes resulted in some morphological and/or division abnormalities, depending on the inactivated gene. Transcriptional analysis revealed a relationship between these genes and the ftsA and ftsZ cell division genes, also indicating that the connection between the dcw cluster and the divIVA region is more extensive than just chromosomal position and gene organization.

  15. Regulation of Expression of the adhE Gene, Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase in Escherichia coli: Transcription from a Downstream Promoter and Regulation by Fnr and RpoS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli, located at min 27 on the chromosome, encodes the bifunctional NAD-linked oxidoreductase responsible for the conversion of acetyl-coenzyme A to ethanol during fermentative growth. The expression of adhE is dependent on both transcriptional and posttranscriptional controls and is about 10-fold higher during anaerobic than during aerobic growth. Two putative transcriptional start sites have been reported: one at position −292 and the other at −188 from the translational start codon ATG. In this study we show, by using several different transcriptional and translational fusions to the lacZ gene, that both putative transcriptional start sites can be functional and each site can be redox regulated. Although both start sites are NarL repressible in the presence of nitrate, Fnr activates only the −188 start site and Fis is required for the transcription of only the −292 start site. In addition, it was discovered that RpoS activates adhE transcription at both start sites. Under all experimental conditions tested, however, only the upstream start site is active. Available evidence indicates that under those conditions, the upstream promoter region acts as a silencer of the downstream transcriptional start site. Translation of the mRNA starting at −292, but not the one starting at −188, requires RNase III. The results support the previously postulated ribosomal binding site (RBS) occlusion model, according to which RNase III cleavage is required to release the RBS from a stem-loop structure in the long transcript. PMID:10601216

  16. Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1990-09-01

    We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

  17. TaWRKY70 transcription factor in wheat QTL-2DL regulates downstream metabolite biosynthetic genes to resist Fusarium graminearum infection spread within spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Udaykumar; Yogendra, Kalenahalli N.; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.

    2017-01-01

    A semi-comprehensive metabolomics was used to identify the candidate metabolites and genes to decipher mechanisms of resistance in wheat near-isogenic lines (NILs) containing QTL-2DL against Fusarium graminearum (Fg). Metabolites, with high fold-change in abundance, belonging to hydroxycinnamic acid amides (HCAAs): such as coumaroylagmatine, coumaroylputrescine and Fatty acids: phosphatidic acids (PAs) were identified as resistance related induced (RRI) metabolites in rachis of resistant NIL (NIL-R), inoculated with Fg. A WRKY like transcription factor (TF) was identified within the QTL-2DL region, along with three resistance genes that biosynthesized RRI metabolites. Sequencing and in-silico analysis of WRKY confirmed it to be wheat TaWRKY70. Quantitative real time-PCR studies showed a higher expression of TaWRKY70 in NIL-R as compared to NIL-S after Fg inoculation. Further, the functional validation of TaWRKY70 based on virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) in NIL-R, not only confirmed an increased fungal biomass but also decreased expressions of downstream resistance genes: TaACT, TaDGK and TaGLI1, along with decreased abundances of RRI metabolites biosynthesized by them. Among more than 200 FHB resistance QTL identified in wheat, this is the first QTL from which a TF was identified, and its downstream target genes as well as the FHB resistance functions were deciphered. PMID:28198421

  18. Metamorphic labral axis patterning in the beetle Tribolium castaneum requires multiple upstream, but few downstream, genes in the appendage patterning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R; Gaudio, Matthew S; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-03-01

    The arthropod labrum is an anterior appendage-like structure that forms the dorsal side of the preoral cavity. Conflicting interpretations of fossil, nervous system, and developmental data have led to a proliferation of scenarios for labral evolution. The best supported hypothesis is that the labrum is a novel structure that shares development with appendages as a result of co-option. Here, we use RNA interference in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to compare metamorphic patterning of the labrum to previously published data on ventral appendage patterning. As expected under the co-option hypothesis, depletion of several genes resulted in similar defects in the labrum and ventral appendages. These include proximal deletions and proximal-to-distal transformations resulting from depletion of the leg gap genes homothorax and extradenticle, large-scale deletions resulting from depletion of the leg gap gene Distal-less, and smaller distal deletions resulting from knockdown of the EGF ligand Keren. However, depletion of dachshund and many of the genes that function downstream of the leg gap genes in the ventral appendages had either subtle or no effects on labral axis patterning. This pattern of partial similarity suggests that upstream genes act through different downstream targets in the labrum. We also discovered that many appendage axis patterning genes have roles in patterning the epipharyngeal sensillum array, suggesting that they have become integrated into a novel regulatory network. These genes include Notch, Delta, and decapentaplegic, and the transcription factors abrupt, bric à brac, homothorax, extradenticle and the paralogs apterous a and apterous b.

  19. Four Arabidopsis AREB/ABF transcription factors function predominantly in gene expression downstream of SnRK2 kinases in abscisic acid signalling in response to osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takuya; Fujita, Yasunari; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mogami, Junro; Todaka, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Under osmotic stress conditions such as drought and high salinity, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1/ABF2, AREB2/ABF4 and ABF3, which are activated by SNF1-related kinase 2s (SnRK2s) such as SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3 (SRK2D/E/I). However, since the three AREB/ABFs are crucial, but not exclusive, for the SnRK2-mediated gene expression, transcriptional pathways governed by SRK2D/E/I are not fully understood. Here, we show that a bZIP transcription factor, ABF1, is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression in Arabidopsis. Despite lower expression levels of ABF1 than those of the three AREB/ABFs, the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 mutant plants displayed increased sensitivity to drought and decreased sensitivity to ABA in primary root growth compared with the areb1 areb2 abf3 mutant. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that expression of downstream genes of SRK2D/E/I, which include many genes functioning in osmotic stress responses and tolerance such as transcription factors and LEA proteins, was mostly impaired in the quadruple mutant. Thus, these results indicate that the four AREB/ABFs are the predominant transcription factors downstream of SRK2D/E/I in ABA signalling in response to osmotic stress during vegetative growth.

  20. The Osr1 and Osr2 genes act in the pronephric anlage downstream of retinoic acid signaling and upstream of Wnt2b to maintain pectoral fin development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Ana; Mercader, Nadia; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate odd-skipped related genes (Osr) have an essential function during the formation of the intermediate mesoderm (IM) and the kidney structures derived from it. Here, we show that these genes are also crucial for limb bud formation in the adjacent lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Reduction of zebrafish Osr function impairs fin development by the failure of tbx5a maintenance in the developing pectoral fin bud. Osr morphant embryos show reduced wnt2b expression, and increasing Wnt signaling in Osr morphant embryos partially rescues tbx5a expression. Thus, Osr genes control limb bud development in a non-cell-autonomous manner, probably through the activation of Wnt2b. Finally, we demonstrate that Osr genes are downstream targets of retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Therefore, Osr genes act as a relay within the genetic cascade of fin bud formation: by controlling the expression of the signaling molecule Wnt2ba in the IM they play an essential function transmitting the RA signaling originated in the somites to the LPM.

  1. Genes that act downstream of sensory neurons to influence longevity, dauer formation, and pathogen responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M Gaglia

    Full Text Available The sensory systems of multicellular organisms are designed to provide information about the environment and thus elicit appropriate changes in physiology and behavior. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sensory neurons affect the decision to arrest during development in a diapause state, the dauer larva, and modulate the lifespan of the animals in adulthood. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified transcripts whose levels are altered by mutations in the intraflagellar transport protein daf-10, which result in impaired development and function of many sensory neurons in C. elegans. In agreement with existing genetic data, the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO was affected by daf-10 mutations. In addition, we found altered expression of transcriptional targets of the DAF-12/nuclear hormone receptor in the daf-10 mutants and showed that this pathway influences specifically the dauer formation phenotype of these animals. Unexpectedly, pathogen-responsive genes were repressed in daf-10 mutant animals, and these sensory mutants exhibited altered susceptibility to and behavioral avoidance of bacterial pathogens. Moreover, we found that a solute transporter gene mct-1/2, which was induced by daf-10 mutations, was necessary and sufficient for longevity. Thus, sensory input seems to influence an extensive transcriptional network that modulates basic biological processes in C. elegans. This situation is reminiscent of the complex regulation of physiology by the mammalian hypothalamus, which also receives innervations from sensory systems, most notably the visual and olfactory systems.

  2. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  3. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  4. Mathematical modeling of light-mediated HPA axis activity and downstream implications on the entrainment of peripheral clock genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steven E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-15

    In this work we propose a semimechanistic model that describes the photic signal transduction to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that ultimately regulates the synchronization of peripheral clock genes (PCGs). Our HPA axis model predicts that photic stimulation induces a type-1 phase response curve to cortisol's profile with increased cortisol sensitivity to light exposure in its rising phase, as well as the shortening of cortisol's period as constant light increases (Aschoff's first rule). Furthermore, our model provides insight into cortisol's phase and amplitude dependence on photoperiods and reveals that cortisol maintains highest amplitude variability when it is entrained by a balanced schedule of light and dark periods. Importantly, by incorporating the links between HPA axis and PCGs we were able to investigate how cortisol secretion impacts the entrainment of a population of peripheral cells and show that disrupted light schedules, leading to blunted cortisol secretion, fail to synchronize a population of PCGs which further signifies the loss of circadian rhythmicity in the periphery of the body.

  5. The chromatin "landscape" of a murine adult β-globin gene is unaffected by deletion of either the gene promoter or a downstream enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cadiz-Rivera

    Full Text Available In mammals, the complex tissue- and developmental-specific expression of genes within the β-globin cluster is known to be subject to control by the gene promoters, by a locus control region (LCR located upstream of the cluster, and by sequence elements located across the intergenic regions. Despite extensive investigation, however, the complement of sequences that is required for normal regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression within the cluster is not fully defined. To further elucidate regulation of the adult β-globin genes, we investigate the effects of two deletions engineered within the endogenous murine β-globin locus. First, we find that deletion of the β2-globin gene promoter, while eliminating β2-globin gene expression, results in no additional effects on chromatin structure or gene expression within the cluster. Notably, our observations are not consistent with competition among the β-globin genes for LCR activity. Second, we characterize a novel enhancer located 3' of the β2-globin gene, but find that deletion of this sequence has no effect whatsoever on gene expression or chromatin structure. This observation highlights the difficulty in assigning function to enhancer sequences identified by the chromatin "landscape" or even by functional assays.

  6. The Chromatin “Landscape” of a Murine Adult β-Globin Gene Is Unaffected by Deletion of Either the Gene Promoter or a Downstream Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; Fromm, George; de Vries, Christina; Fields, Jennifer; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Fiering, Steven; Bulger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the complex tissue- and developmental-specific expression of genes within the β-globin cluster is known to be subject to control by the gene promoters, by a locus control region (LCR) located upstream of the cluster, and by sequence elements located across the intergenic regions. Despite extensive investigation, however, the complement of sequences that is required for normal regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression within the cluster is not fully defined. To further elucidate regulation of the adult β-globin genes, we investigate the effects of two deletions engineered within the endogenous murine β-globin locus. First, we find that deletion of the β2-globin gene promoter, while eliminating β2-globin gene expression, results in no additional effects on chromatin structure or gene expression within the cluster. Notably, our observations are not consistent with competition among the β-globin genes for LCR activity. Second, we characterize a novel enhancer located 3′ of the β2-globin gene, but find that deletion of this sequence has no effect whatsoever on gene expression or chromatin structure. This observation highlights the difficulty in assigning function to enhancer sequences identified by the chromatin “landscape” or even by functional assays. PMID:24817273

  7. The chromatin "landscape" of a murine adult β-globin gene is unaffected by deletion of either the gene promoter or a downstream enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; Fromm, George; de Vries, Christina; Fields, Jennifer; McGrath, Kathleen E; Fiering, Steven; Bulger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the complex tissue- and developmental-specific expression of genes within the β-globin cluster is known to be subject to control by the gene promoters, by a locus control region (LCR) located upstream of the cluster, and by sequence elements located across the intergenic regions. Despite extensive investigation, however, the complement of sequences that is required for normal regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression within the cluster is not fully defined. To further elucidate regulation of the adult β-globin genes, we investigate the effects of two deletions engineered within the endogenous murine β-globin locus. First, we find that deletion of the β2-globin gene promoter, while eliminating β2-globin gene expression, results in no additional effects on chromatin structure or gene expression within the cluster. Notably, our observations are not consistent with competition among the β-globin genes for LCR activity. Second, we characterize a novel enhancer located 3' of the β2-globin gene, but find that deletion of this sequence has no effect whatsoever on gene expression or chromatin structure. This observation highlights the difficulty in assigning function to enhancer sequences identified by the chromatin "landscape" or even by functional assays.

  8. Analysis of the expression of miRNAs and downstream target genes in gastric cancer tissue and exploration of its relationship with clinicopathologic stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study and analyze the expression of miRNAs and downstream target genes in gastric cancer tissue and its relationship with clinicopathologic stage.Methods:Patients diagnosed with gastric cancer in our hospital from April 2012 to Decempber 2014 were selected for study, and gastric cancer tissue and paracancer tissue were collected to detect the expression of miRNAs as well as the contents of proteins encoded by drug resistance-related genes, proliferation-related genes and EMT-related genes.Results: miR-21, miR-106a, miR-192, miR-194, miR-210 and miR-215 expression in gastric cancer tissue was significantly up-regulated, miR-30a, miR-125, miR-149, miR-194, miR-205 and miR-365 expression was significantly down-regulated, and the higher the TNM stage of tumor, the more significant the change of the expression of above miRNAs; the trend of miR106 and miR-30a were the most significant, the former was up-regulated by 4.38 times and the latter was down-regulated by 0.23 times; P-gP, GST-π, CACNA2D1, RPL23, Hsp27, ZNF139, Mcmp4, OPCML, N-cadherin and Vimentin contents in gastric cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in paracancer tissue, and E-cadherin content was significantly lower than that in paracancer tissue; miR106 expression level was positively correlated with P-gP, GST-π, CACNA2D1, RPL23, Hsp27, ZNF139, Mcmp4, OPCML, N-cadherin and Vimentin contents and negatively correlated with E-cadherin content; miR-30a expression level was negatively correlated with P-gP, GST-π, CACNA2D1, RPL23, Hsp27, ZNF139, Mcmp4, OPCML, N-cadherin and Vimentin contents and positively correlated with E-cadherin content.Conclusion: miR106 expression significantly increases and miR-30a expression significantly decreases in gastric cancer tissue, and miR106 and miR-30a can regulate the expression of drug resistance genes, proliferation genes and EMT genes.

  9. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  10. Feasibility Study for Evaluating Cumulative Exposure of Downstream Migrant Juvenile Salmonids to Total Dissolved Gas. Final Report 1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C.Scott; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Robert L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-11-01

    A feasibility study was initiated to determine if downstream migrant salmonids could be monitored to determine potential relationships between total dissolved gas (TDG) exposure and signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT). The primary objectives were to: (1) establish logistical requirements for in-river monitoring of TDG exposure, including net pen design, deployment, and navigation constraints; (2) resolve uncertainties associated with effects of the net pen on fish behavior; (3) test the accuracy and precision of in-river monitoring equipment used to measure fish distribution and water quality; and (4) determine the application of hydrologic/flow models to predictions of TDG exposure. In-river measurements included water velocity, boat position, and selected water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, depth, conductivity). Fish distribution within the net pen was monitored using scanning sonar, and a split-beam echo sounder was used to evaluate vertical distribution of fish m in the river adjacent to the net pen. Three test drifts were conducted from late July through late August. The studies demonstrated that it was feasible to assemble and deploy a large net pen for mobile monitoring of TDG exposure. Accurate monitoring of vertical and lateral distribution of smolts was performed, and diel differences in behavior were documented. Further, the fish sounded in response to researcher activity on the perimeter platform. Thus, in-transit monitoring for GBT or mortality would affect fish depth distribution and exposure to TDG. Principal recommendations for future studies are directed at improving maneuverability of the net pen in adverse weather conditions and applying new acoustics technology to simultaneously collect fish distribution data from within and outside of the pen. 6 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part I of II, 2001-2002 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H. (Washington State University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineers, Albrook Hydraulics Laboratory)

    2002-12-01

    Turbulence in gravel bed rivers plays a critical role in most stream processes including contaminant and nutrient transport, aquatic habitat selection, and natural channel design. While most hydraulic designs and fluid models are based on bulk velocity, migrating juvenile salmon experience and react to the temporally varied turbulent fluctuations. Without properly understanding and accounting for the continuous turbulent motions proper fishway design and guidance are impossible. Matching temporally varied flow to fish reactions is the key to guiding juvenile salmonids to safe passageways. While the ideal solution to fish guidance design would be to use specific fluid action-fish reaction mechanisms, such concrete cause and effect relations have not been established. One way to approach the problem of guidance is to hypothesize that in an environment lacking obvious bulk flow cues (like the reservoir environment), turbulent flow conditions similar to those experienced by juvenile salmonids in natural migration corridors will be attractive to juvenile salmonids. Proof of this hypothesis requires three steps: (1) gathering data on turbulence characteristics in natural migration corridors, (2) reproduction of the turbulence parameters in a controlled environment, and (3) testing the reproduced turbulence on actively migrating juvenile salmonids for increased passage efficiencies. The results from the third step have not been finalized, therefore this report will focus on understanding turbulent processes in gravel bed rivers and reproduction of turbulence in controlled environments for use in fish passage technologies. The purposes of this report are to (1) present data collected in natural gravel bed rivers, (2) present a simple method for reproduction of appropriate turbulence levels in a controlled environment, (3) compare these results to those from one prototype surface collector (PSC), and (4) discuss the implications on fish passage design.

  12. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle.

  13. Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR (USA))

    1989-09-01

    We report on our progress from April 1988 through March 1989 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. Highlights of results of our work in the Dalles and Bonneville reservoirs are: using setlines, we caught 1,586 sturgeon in The Dalles Reservoir and 484 sturgeon in Bonneville Reservoir in 1988. Fork length of fish caught ranged from 34 cm to 274 cm. Of the fish caught we marked 1,248 in The Dalles Reservoir and 341 in Bonneville Reservoir. Of the fish marked in 1988, we recaptured 82 in The Dalles Reservoir and none in Bonneville Reservoir. We recaptured 89 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 35 fish marked in 1988 and 16 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 2 sturgeon marked in 1988 in Bonneville Reservoir. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  14. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression with clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients of different race/ethnicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minori Koshiji; Thérèse Commes; David Piquemal; Curtis C Harris; Kam-Meng Tchou-Wong; Kensuke Kumamoto; Keiichirou Morimura; Yasufumi Utsumi; Michiko Aizawa; Masami Hoshino; Shinji Ohki; Seiichi Takenoshita; Max Costa

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the role of N-myc downstreamregulated gene 1 (NDRG1) expression in prognosis and survival of colorectal cancer patients with different ethnic backgrounds.METHODS: Because NDRG1 is a downstream target of p53 and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), we examined NDRG1 expression together with p53 and HIF1α by immunohistochemistry. A total of 157 colorectal cancer specimens including 80 from Japanese patients and 77 from US patients were examined. The correlation between protein expression with clinicopathological features and survival after surgery was analyzed.RESULTS: NDRG1 protein was significantly increased in colorectal tumor compared with normal epithelium in both Japanese and US patient groups. Expression of NDRG1 protein was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, depth of invasion,histopathological type, and Dukes'stage in Japanese colorectal cancer patients. NDRG1 expression was correlated to histopathological type, Dukes'stage and HIF-1α expression in US-Caucasian patients but not in US-African American patients. Interestingly, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that NDRG1 expression correlated significantly with poorer survival in US-African American patients but not in other patient groups.However, in p53-positive US cases, NDRG1 positivity correlated significantly with better survival. In addition,NDRG1 expression also correlated significantly with improved survival in US patients with stages Ⅲ and Ⅳtumors without chemotherapy. In Japanese patients with stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ tumors, strong NDRG1 staining in p53-positive tumors correlated significantly with improved survival but negatively in patients without chemotherapy.CONCLUSION: NDRG1 expression was correlated with various clinicopathological features and clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer depending on the race/ethnicity of the patients. NDRG1 may serve as a biological basis for the disparity of clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer

  15. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhart Charles G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63% and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%, but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes.

  16. Early growth response 4 is involved in cell proliferation of small cell lung cancer through transcriptional activation of its downstream genes.

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    Taisuke Matsuo

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is aggressive, with rapid growth and frequent bone metastasis; however, its detailed molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the critical role of early growth factor 4 (EGR4, a DNA-binding, zinc-finger transcription factor, in cell proliferation of SCLC. EGR4 overexpression in HEK293T cells conferred significant upregulation of specific splice variants of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP gene, resulting in enhancement of the secretion of PTHrP protein, a known mediator of osteolytic bone metastasis. More importantly, depletion of EGR4 expression by siRNA significantly suppressed growth of the SCLC cell lines, SBC-5, SBC-3 and NCI-H1048. On the other hand, introduction of EGR4 into NIH3T3 cells significantly enhanced cell growth. We identified four EGR4 target genes, SAMD5, RAB15, SYNPO and DLX5, which were the most significantly downregulated genes upon depletion of EGR4 expression in all of the SCLC cells examined, and demonstrated the direct recruitment of EGR4 to their promoters by ChIP and luciferase reporter analysis. Notably, knockdown of the expression of these genes by siRNA remarkably suppressed the growth of all the SCLC cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that EGR4 likely regulates the bone metastasis and proliferation of SCLC cells via transcriptional regulation of several target genes, and may therefore be a promising target for the development of anticancer drugs for SCLC patients.

  17. RNAi and Homologous Over-Expression Based Functional Approaches Reveal Triterpenoid Synthase Gene-Cycloartenol Synthase Is Involved in Downstream Withanolide Biosynthesis in Withania somnifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrati Mishra

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera Dunal, is one of the most commonly used medicinal plant in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine traditionally owing to its therapeutic potential, because of major chemical constituents, withanolides. Withanolide biosynthesis requires the activities of several enzymes in vivo. Cycloartenol synthase (CAS is an important enzyme in the withanolide biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing cyclization of 2, 3 oxidosqualene into cycloartenol. In the present study, we have cloned full-length WsCAS from Withania somnifera by homology-based PCR method. For gene function investigation, we constructed three RNAi gene-silencing constructs in backbone of RNAi vector pGSA and a full-length over-expression construct. These constructs were transformed in Agrobacterium strain GV3101 for plant transformation in W. somnifera. Molecular and metabolite analysis was performed in putative Withania transformants. The PCR and Southern blot results showed the genomic integration of these RNAi and overexpression construct(s in Withania genome. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of WsCAS gene was considerably downregulated in stable transgenic silenced Withania lines compared with the non-transformed control and HPLC analysis showed that withanolide content was greatly reduced in silenced lines. Transgenic plants over expressing CAS gene displayed enhanced level of CAS transcript and withanolide content compared to non-transformed controls. This work is the first full proof report of functional validation of any metabolic pathway gene in W. somnifera at whole plant level as per our knowledge and it will be further useful to understand the regulatory role of different genes involved in the biosynthesis of withanolides.

  18. RNAi and Homologous Over-Expression Based Functional Approaches Reveal Triterpenoid Synthase Gene-Cycloartenol Synthase Is Involved in Downstream Withanolide Biosynthesis in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Smrati; Bansal, Shilpi; Mishra, Bhawana; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera Dunal, is one of the most commonly used medicinal plant in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine traditionally owing to its therapeutic potential, because of major chemical constituents, withanolides. Withanolide biosynthesis requires the activities of several enzymes in vivo. Cycloartenol synthase (CAS) is an important enzyme in the withanolide biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing cyclization of 2, 3 oxidosqualene into cycloartenol. In the present study, we have cloned full-length WsCAS from Withania somnifera by homology-based PCR method. For gene function investigation, we constructed three RNAi gene-silencing constructs in backbone of RNAi vector pGSA and a full-length over-expression construct. These constructs were transformed in Agrobacterium strain GV3101 for plant transformation in W. somnifera. Molecular and metabolite analysis was performed in putative Withania transformants. The PCR and Southern blot results showed the genomic integration of these RNAi and overexpression construct(s) in Withania genome. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of WsCAS gene was considerably downregulated in stable transgenic silenced Withania lines compared with the non-transformed control and HPLC analysis showed that withanolide content was greatly reduced in silenced lines. Transgenic plants over expressing CAS gene displayed enhanced level of CAS transcript and withanolide content compared to non-transformed controls. This work is the first full proof report of functional validation of any metabolic pathway gene in W. somnifera at whole plant level as per our knowledge and it will be further useful to understand the regulatory role of different genes involved in the biosynthesis of withanolides.

  19. The statin class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors demonstrate differential activation of the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR and FXR, as well as their downstream target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Katharine; Sanat, Faizah; Thumser, Alfred E; Coleman, Tanya; Plant, Nick

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, the statins are central agents in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and the associated conditions of cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although statin therapy is generally considered safe, a number of known adverse effects do occur, most commonly treatment-associated muscular pain. In vitro evidence also supports the potential for drug-drug interactions involving this class of agents, and to examine this a ligand-binding assay was used to determine the ability of six clinically used statins for their ability to directly activate the nuclear receptors pregnane X-receptor (PXR), farnesoid X-receptor (FXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), demonstrating a relative activation of PXR>FXR>CAR. Using reporter gene constructs, we demonstrated that this order of activation is mirrored at the transcriptional activation level, with PXR-mediated gene activation being pre-eminent. Finally, we described a novel regulatory loop, whereby activation of FXR by statins increases PXR reporter gene expression, potentially enhancing PXR-mediated responses. Delineating the molecular interactions of statins with nuclear receptors is an important step in understanding the full biological consequences of statin exposure. This demonstration of their ability to directly activate nuclear receptors, leading to nuclear receptor cross-talk, has important potential implications for their use within a polypharmacy paradigm.

  20. CNOOC Advancing into Downstream of Petroleum Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    @@ "China National Offshore Oil Corporation is starting to expand its business into the downstream sector after making achievements continuously in exploration and development," Wang Yan, president of the corporation,told reporter in an interview, adding that the downstream sector is the third development stage for China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC).

  1. Reporter Gene Imaging in Therapy and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritha Ray, Abhijit De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive molecular imaging using reporter genes is a relatively recent field in biomedical imaging that holds great promises for disease diagnosis and therapy. As modern medicine is moving towards personalized medicine, targeted biomolecule based therapies is gaining popularity that requires careful and systematic validation. Reporter genes have emerged as important generalizable tools to overcome the shortcomings of direct evaluation of individual biomolecules and are being applied in various fields such as cell therapy, stem cell therapy, immune therapy, viral gene delivery through optical, radionuclide, magnetic resonance imaging techniques. New approaches to image protein-protein interaction, protein phosphorylation, protein folding that are crucial parameters for theranostic study using reporter genes are being developed. All these new technologies and relevant preclinical and clinical researches will determine the success of early detection and personalized therapy in the future.

  2. Ancestral regulatory circuits governing ectoderm patterning downstream of Nodal and BMP2/4 revealed by gene regulatory network analysis in an echinoderm.

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    Alexandra Saudemont

    Full Text Available Echinoderms, which are phylogenetically related to vertebrates and produce large numbers of transparent embryos that can be experimentally manipulated, offer many advantages for the analysis of the gene regulatory networks (GRN regulating germ layer formation. During development of the sea urchin embryo, the ectoderm is the source of signals that pattern all three germ layers along the dorsal-ventral axis. How this signaling center controls patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo is not understood. Here, we report a large-scale analysis of the GRN deployed in response to the activity of this signaling center in the embryos of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, in which studies with high spatial resolution are possible. By using a combination of in situ hybridization screening, overexpression of mRNA, recombinant ligand treatments, and morpholino-based loss-of-function studies, we identified a cohort of transcription factors and signaling molecules expressed in the ventral ectoderm, dorsal ectoderm, and interposed neurogenic ("ciliary band" region in response to the known key signaling molecules Nodal and BMP2/4 and defined the epistatic relationships between the most important genes. The resultant GRN showed a number of striking features. First, Nodal was found to be essential for the expression of all ventral and dorsal marker genes, and BMP2/4 for all dorsal genes. Second, goosecoid was identified as a central player in a regulatory sub-circuit controlling mouth formation, while tbx2/3 emerged as a critical factor for differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm. Finally, and unexpectedly, a neurogenic ectoderm regulatory circuit characterized by expression of "ciliary band" genes was triggered in the absence of TGF beta signaling. We propose a novel model for ectoderm regionalization, in which neural ectoderm is the default fate in the absence of TGF beta signaling, and suggest that the stomodeal and neural subcircuits that we

  3. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1990-1991 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1991-09-01

    We report on our effort from April 1990 to March 1991 to describe the life history and population dynamics of white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in.John Day Reservoir. We set 1188 set lines and 26 gill nets. We caught 623 white sturgeon with set lines and 236 with gill nets. Catch per unit effort was much higher in areas near the tailrace than in downstream sites. Our setlines were size selective. We recaptured 3 fish released in John Day Reservoir in 1989 and 28 fish released in 1990. Sport and commercial fishermen recovered 62 tags from fish we tagged in Bonneville, The Dalles and John Day reservoirs, 1987-1990. We observed extensive movements of marked sturgeon within the reservoirs. We completed aging of available samples from all three reservoirs from 1987-1990. We aged fish as old as 46 years. Bone marks were observed on 74 of 78 fish previously injected with oxytetracycline and annulus formation was generally complete after June. We estimated parameters in a length-weight equation. About 1.5% of the female white sturgeon we examined to date had early or late vitellogenic eggs and would be expected to spawn the following year.

  4. Identification of Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog downstream target genes with statistical confidence by applying a novel algorithm to time course microarray and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation data

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    Xin Li

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target genes of a transcription factor (TF Pou5f1 (Oct3/4 or Oct4, which is essential for pluripotency maintenance and self-renewal of embryonic stem (ES cells, have previously been identified based on their response to Pou5f1 manipulation and occurrence of Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-binding sites in promoters. However, many responding genes with binding sites may not be direct targets because response may be mediated by other genes and ChIP-binding site may not be functional in terms of transcription regulation. Results To reduce the number of false positives, we propose to separate responding genes into groups according to direction, magnitude, and time of response, and to apply the false discovery rate (FDR criterion to each group individually. Using this novel algorithm with stringent statistical criteria (FDR Pou5f1 suppression and published ChIP data, we identified 420 tentative target genes (TTGs for Pou5f1. The majority of TTGs (372 were down-regulated after Pou5f1 suppression, indicating that the Pou5f1 functions as an activator of gene expression when it binds to promoters. Interestingly, many activated genes are potent suppressors of transcription, which include polycomb genes, zinc finger TFs, chromatin remodeling factors, and suppressors of signaling. Similar analysis showed that Sox2 and Nanog also function mostly as transcription activators in cooperation with Pou5f1. Conclusion We have identified the most reliable sets of direct target genes for key pluripotency genes – Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog, and found that they predominantly function as activators of downstream gene expression. Thus, most genes related to cell differentiation are suppressed indirectly.

  5. Identification of Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog downstream target genes with statistical confidence by applying a novel algorithm to time course microarray and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A; Masui, Shinji; Sharova, Lioudmila V; Piao, Yulan; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Matoba, Ryo; Xin, Li; Niwa, Hitoshi; Ko, Minoru SH

    2008-01-01

    Background Target genes of a transcription factor (TF) Pou5f1 (Oct3/4 or Oct4), which is essential for pluripotency maintenance and self-renewal of embryonic stem (ES) cells, have previously been identified based on their response to Pou5f1 manipulation and occurrence of Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-binding sites in promoters. However, many responding genes with binding sites may not be direct targets because response may be mediated by other genes and ChIP-binding site may not be functional in terms of transcription regulation. Results To reduce the number of false positives, we propose to separate responding genes into groups according to direction, magnitude, and time of response, and to apply the false discovery rate (FDR) criterion to each group individually. Using this novel algorithm with stringent statistical criteria (FDR < 0.2) to a compendium of published and new microarray data (3, 6, 12, and 24 hr after Pou5f1 suppression) and published ChIP data, we identified 420 tentative target genes (TTGs) for Pou5f1. The majority of TTGs (372) were down-regulated after Pou5f1 suppression, indicating that the Pou5f1 functions as an activator of gene expression when it binds to promoters. Interestingly, many activated genes are potent suppressors of transcription, which include polycomb genes, zinc finger TFs, chromatin remodeling factors, and suppressors of signaling. Similar analysis showed that Sox2 and Nanog also function mostly as transcription activators in cooperation with Pou5f1. Conclusion We have identified the most reliable sets of direct target genes for key pluripotency genes – Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog, and found that they predominantly function as activators of downstream gene expression. Thus, most genes related to cell differentiation are suppressed indirectly. PMID:18522731

  6. A Single Base Substitution Adjacent to the Stop Codon in the downstream of the SMP3 gene Affects its Post-trancriptional process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donny Widianto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The smp3-1 mutant allele confers increased holding stability of heterologous plasmid, pSR1, and a temperature-sensitive growth defect which is remediable by the addition of 1 M sorbitol as the osmotic stabilizer. The smp3-1 allele contains two base substitutions; one is in the open reading frame and changed the 490th CAT (encoding Histidine to TAT (tyrosine, and the other one is an A for G substitution, at 2 bp downstream from termination codon. These base substitutions were separated each other by recombination at a BstNI site located between these two substitutions. The base substitution in the 3'' untranslated region was found to be lethal and the defect was unremediable by the osmotic stabilizer, while that in the open reading frame has no appreciable effect to the cell. Thus, both the base substitutions join together confer the smp3-1 mutant phenotype. The smp3-1 mutant cells cultivated at 37 OC in nutrient medium containing 1 M sorbitol showed similar smp3 transcription as in the wild type. These facts suggest that smp3-1 mutation has a defect in its post-transcriptional process.

  7. Identification of hoxb1b downstream genes: hoxb1b as a regulatory factor controlling transcriptional networks and cell movement during zebrafish gastrulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, W.M.; Durston, A.J.; Spaink, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hox proteins are homeobox containing transcription factors that play important roles in patterning the presumptive central nervous system and the axial mesoderm in the early vertebrate embryo. Hox genes are first expressed during gastrula stages and recent studies suggest that their function goes be

  8. The regulation of Jmjd3 upon the expression of NF-κB downstream inflammatory genes in LPS activated vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaoqing; Chen, Xia; Xiu, Min; He, Feng; Xing, Juanjuan; Min, Dinghong; Guo, Fei

    2017-02-09

    Inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules have been implicated in a variety of diseases including atherosclerosis. As both the mediator-releasing and targeted cells, vascular endothelial cells play key role in pathological processes. NF-κB signaling regulates a cluster of inflammatory factors in LPS-activated vascular endothelial cells but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the epigenetic regulation of LPS upon the expression of inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules. We found that LPS treatment promoted jmjd3 expression, enhanced Jmjd3 nuclear accumulation in human vascular endothelial cells. In addition, LPS enhanced the demethylation of H3K27me3, a specific substrate of Jmjd3. LPS treatment recruited Jmjd3 and NF-κB to the promoter region of target genes, suggesting Jmjd3 synergizes with NF-κB to activate the expression of target genes. We further found that Jmjd3 attenuated the methylation status in promoter region of target genes, culminating in target gene expression. Our findings unveil epigenetic regulations of LPS upon NF-κB pathway and identify Jmjd3 as a critical modulator of NF-κB pathway and potential therapeutic target for NF-κB related diseases including atherosclerosis.

  9. Up-regulation of the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene, a downstream target of the beta-catenin/T-cell factor complex, in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Furukawa, Y; Tsunoda, T; Tanaka, T; Ogawa, M; Nakamura, Y

    2001-11-01

    To clarify the molecular mechanisms of human carcinogenesis associated with abnormal Wnt/wingless signaling, we searched for genes the expression of which was significantly altered by introduction of wild-type AXIN1 into LoVo colon cancer cells. By means of a cDNA microarray, we compared expression profiles of LoVo cells infected with either adenoviruses expressing wild-type AXIN1 (Ad-Axin) or those expressing a control gene (Ad-LacZ). Among the genes showing altered expression, the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene was down-regulated in response to Ad-Axin. The promoter activity of ENC1 was elevated approximately 3-fold by transfection of an activated form of beta-catenin together with wild-type T-cell factor (Tcf)4 in HeLa cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that expression of ENC1 was increased in more than two-thirds of 24 primary colon cancer tissues that we examined compared with corresponding noncancerous mucosae. Introduction of exogenous ENC1 increased the growth rate of HCT116 colon cancer cells in serum-depleted medium. In other experiments, overexpression of ENC1 in HT-29 colon cancer cells suppressed the usual increase of two differentiation markers, in response to treatment with sodium butyrate, a differentiation-inducible agent. These data suggest that ENC1 is regulated by the beta-catenin/Tcf pathway and that its altered expression may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis by suppressing differentiation of colonic cells.

  10. microRNA-340-5p Functions Downstream of Cardiotrophin-1 to Regulate Cardiac Eccentric Hypertrophy and Heart Failure via Target Gene Dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoya; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Zhang, Xitao; An, Xiangguang; Yan, Jun; Xin, Yue; Su, Pixiong

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy inevitably leads to the unfavorable outcomes of heart failure (HF) or even sudden death. microRNAs are key regulation factors participating in many pathophysiological processes. Recently, we observed upregulation of microRNA-340-5p (miR-340) in failing human hearts because of dilated cardiomyopathy, but the functional consequence of miR-340 remains to be clarified.We transfected neonatal cardiomyocytes with miR-340 and found fetal gene expression including Nppa, Nppb and Myh7. We also observed eccentric hypertrophy development upon treatment which was analogous to the phenotype after cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) stimulation. As a potent inducer of cardiac eccentric hypertrophy, treatment by IL-6 family members CT-1 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) led to the elevation of miR-340. Knockdown of miR-340 using antagomir attenuated fetal gene expression and hypertrophy formation, which means miR-340 could convey the hypertrophic signal of CT-1. To demonstrate the initial factor of miR-340 activation, we constructed a volume overloaded abdominal aorta-inferior vena cava fistula rat HF model. miR-340 and CT-1 were found to be up-regulated in the left ventricle. Dystrophin (DMD), a putative target gene of miR-340 which is eccentric hypertrophy-susceptible, was decreased in this HF model upon Western blotting and immunohistochemistry tests. Luciferase assay constructed in two seed sequence of DMD gene 3'UTR showed decreased luciferase activities, and miR-340 transfected cells resulted in the degradation of DMD.miR-340 is a pro-eccentric hypertrophy miRNA, and its expression is dependent on volume overload and cytokine CT-1 activation. Cardiomyocyte structure protein DMD is a target of miR-340.

  11. N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1 promotes metastasis of human scirrhous gastric cancer cells through epithelial mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ureshino

    Full Text Available Our recent study demonstrated that higher expression of N-myc downregulated gene 1 (NDRG1 is closely correlated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In this study, we asked whether NDRG1 has pivotal roles in malignant progression including metastasis of gastric cancer cells. By gene expression microarray analysis expression of NDRG1 showed the higher increase among a total of 3691 up-regulated genes in a highly metastatic gastric cancer cell line (58As1 than their parental low metastatic counterpart (HSC-58. The highly metastatic cell lines showed decreased expression of E-cadherin, together with enhanced expression of vimentin and Snail. This decreased expression of E-cadherin was restored by Snail knockdown in highly metastatic cell lines. We next established stable NDRG1 knockdown cell lines (As1/Sic50 and As1/Sic54 from the highly metastatic cell line, and both of these cell lines showed enhanced expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression of vimentin and Snail. And also, E-cadherin promoter-driven luciferase activity was found to be increased by NDRG1 knockdown in the highly metastatic cell line. NDRG1 knockdown in gastric cancer cell showed suppressed invasion of cancer cells into surround tissues, suppressed metastasis to the peritoneum and decreased ascites accumulation in mice with significantly improved survival rates. This is the first study to demonstrate that NDRG1 plays its pivotal role in the malignant progression of gastric cancer through epithelial mesenchymal transition.

  12. Differential action of 13-HPODE on PPARalpha downstream genes in rat Fao and human HepG2 hepatoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Bettina; Eder, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    In rats, oxidized fats activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), leading to reduced triglyceride concentrations in liver, plasma and very low density lipoproteins. Oxidation products of linoleic acid constitute an important portion of oxidized dietary fats. This study was conducted to check whether the primary lipid peroxidation product of linoleic acid, 13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE), might be involved in the PPARalpha-activating effect of oxidized fats. Therefore, we examined the effect of 13-HPODE on the expression of PPARalpha target genes in the rat Fao and the human HepG2 hepatoma cell lines. In Fao cells, 13-HPODE increased the mRNA concentration of the PPARalpha target genes acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO), cytochrome P450 4A1 and carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). Furthermore, the concentration of cellular and secreted triglycerides was reduced in Fao cells treated with 13-HPODE. Because PPARalpha mRNA was not influenced, we conclude that these effects are due to an activation of PPARalpha by 13-HPODE. In contrast, HepG2 cells seemed to be resistant to PPARalpha activation by 13-HPODE because no remarkable induction of the PPARalpha target genes ACO, CPT1A, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and delta9-desaturase was observed. Consequently, cellular and secreted triglyceride levels were not changed after incubation of HepG2 cells with 13-HPODE. In conclusion, this study shows that 13-HPODE activates PPARalpha in rat Fao but not in human HepG2 hepatoma cells.

  13. Positron emission tomography reporter genes and reporter probes: gene and cell therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Campbell, Dean O; Radu, Caius G; Czernin, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes (IRGs) and PET reporter probes (PRPs) are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Reporter Genes and Reporter Probes: Gene and Cell Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar S. Yaghoubi, Dean O. Campbell, Caius G. Radu, Johannes Czernin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging reporter genes (IRGs and PET reporter probes (PRPs are amongst the most valuable tools for gene and cell therapy. PET IRGs/PRPs can be used to non-invasively monitor all aspects of the kinetics of therapeutic transgenes and cells in all types of living mammals. This technology is generalizable and can allow long-term kinetics monitoring. In gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body imaging of therapeutic transgene expression, monitoring variations in the magnitude of transgene expression over time. In cell or cellular gene therapy, PET IRGs/PRPs can be used for whole-body monitoring of therapeutic cell locations, quantity at all locations, survival and proliferation over time and also possibly changes in characteristics or function over time. In this review, we have classified PET IRGs/PRPs into two groups based on the source from which they were derived: human or non-human. This classification addresses the important concern of potential immunogenicity in humans, which is important for expansion of PET IRG imaging in clinical trials. We have then discussed the application of this technology in gene/cell therapy and described its use in these fields, including a summary of using PET IRGs/PRPs in gene and cell therapy clinical trials. This review concludes with a discussion of the future direction of PET IRGs/PRPs and recommends cell and gene therapists collaborate with molecular imaging experts early in their investigations to choose a PET IRG/PRP system suitable for progression into clinical trials.

  15. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS, which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. Methods DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. Results DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20 of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification and 4.7% (4/86 of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification. KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild

  16. TRIM68 negatively regulates IFN-β production by degrading TRK fused gene, a novel driver of IFN-β downstream of anti-viral detection systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Wynne

    Full Text Available In recent years members of the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM family of E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to both positively and negatively regulate viral defence and as such are emerging as compelling targets for modulating the anti-viral immune response. In this study we identify TRIM68, a close homologue of TRIM21, as a novel regulator of Toll-like receptor (TLR- and RIG-I-like receptor (RLR-driven type I IFN production. Proteomic analysis of TRIM68-containing complexes identified TRK-fused gene (TFG as a potential TRIM68 target. Overexpression of TRIM68 and TFG confirmed their ability to associate, with TLR3 stimulation appearing to enhance the interaction. TFG is a known activator of NF-κB via its ability to interact with inhibitor of NF-κB kinase subunit gamma (IKK-γ and TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK. Our data identifies a novel role for TFG as a positive regulator of type I IFN production and suggests that TRIM68 targets TFG for lysosomal degradation, thus turning off TFG-mediated IFN-β production. Knockdown of TRIM68 in primary human monocytes resulted in enhanced levels of type I IFN and TFG following poly(I:C treatment. Thus TRIM68 targets TFG, a novel regulator of IFN production, and in doing so turns off and limits type I IFN production in response to anti-viral detection systems.

  17. CREB Negatively Regulates IGF2R Gene Expression and Downstream Pathways to Inhibit Hypoxia-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyoblast Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kung Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During hypoxia, gene expression is altered by various transcription factors. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF2 is known to be induced by hypoxia, which binds to IGF2 receptor IGF2R that acts like a G protein-coupled receptor, might cause pathological hypertrophy or activation of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB is central to second messenger-regulated transcription and plays a critical role in the cardiomyocyte survival pathway. In this study, we found that IGF2R level was enhanced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia in a time-dependent manner but was down-regulated by CREB expression. The over-expression of CREB in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts suppressed the induction of hypoxia-induced IGF2R expression levels and reduced cell apoptosis. Gel shift assay results further indicated that CREB binds to the promoter sequence of IGF2R. With a luciferase assay method, we further observed that CREB represses IGF2R promoter activity. These results suggest that CREB plays an important role in the inhibition of IGF2R expression by binding to the IGF2R promoter and further suppresses H9c2 cardiomyoblast cell apoptosis induced by IGF2R signaling under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  19. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy; Imagerie par gene rapporteur: un atout pour la therapie genique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Avicenne, Service Central de Medecine Nucleaire et Biophysique, UPRES 2360, 93 - Bobigny (France); Tamgac, G. [Univetsite d' Uludag, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Bursa (Turkey)

    2002-06-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  20. Movements and Distribution of Northern Squawfish Downstream of Lower Snake River Dams Relative to the Migration of Juvenile Salmonids, 1992-1993 Completion Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaak, D.J.; Bjornn, T.C. (University of Idaho, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Moscow, ID)

    1996-03-01

    Northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis movements were monitored downstream of two lower Snake River dams during the juvenile salmonid migrations of 1992 and 1993. During a high flow year in 1993, the abundance of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam peaked in July, after the majority of juveniles had moved past Lower Granite Dam, and peak abundance was inversely related to river discharge. Few squawfish moved into the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam in 1993 because of the extended period of spill. Distributions of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam varied between and within years and shifted in response to changing prey densities, flow patterns, water temperature, and diel cycles, but fish consistently used low velocity habitats. Data from Ice Harbor Dam is less extensive, but squawfish distributions there appeared to be affected by changing flow patterns and fish used low velocity habitats. The changes in distribution and abundance of squawfish in tailrace areas are evidence that predation on seaward migrating salmonids depends on the timing of migration and size and timing of runoff. Juvenile salmonids migrating in the spring and early summer will probably be less affected by squawfish predation in tailrace areas than salmon that migrate later in the summer.

  1. Golgi Phosphoprotein 3 Inhibits the Apoptosis of Human Glioma Cells in Part by Downregulating N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Li, Mengyou; Tian, Xiuli; Li, QingZhe; Lu, Qingyang; Yan, Jinqiang; Jia, Qingbin; Zhang, Lianqun; Li, Xueyuan; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Background Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) has been reported to be involved in the development of several human cancers. Our previous study showed that GOLPH3 expression in glioma tissues was related to the severity of the malignancy of the cancer. However, the mechanism by which GOLPH3 affects cell apoptosis is largely unknown. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism of GOLPH3 in cell apoptosis. Material/Methods To analyze the biological role of GOLPH3 in glioma cells, we used GOLPH3 small interference RNA in apoptosis of glioma cells. The apoptosis of glioma cells was detected by flow cytometry. The expression level of GOLPH3 and NDRG1 protein was determined by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, to evaluate their association with glioma. Tumor tissues were collected from patients with glioma. Normal cerebral tissues were acquired from cerebral trauma patients undergoing internal decompression surgery. Results We confirm that the decrease of GOLPH3 that promotes the apoptosis of glioma cells may be regulated by the activation of NDRG1 and cleaved capcase 3. There was a inverse association between GOLPH3 and NDRG1 in glioma samples. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GOLPH3 and NDRG1 both play an important role in glioma etiology. Either GOLPH3 or NDRG1 might be a potential candidate for malignant glioma therapy. PMID:27698340

  2. Summary report of responses of key resources to the 2000 Low Steady Summer Flow experiment, along the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Barbara E.

    2011-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 2000, a series of steady discharges of water from Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River were used to evaluate the effects of aquatic habitat stability and water temperatures on native fish growth and survival, with a special focus on the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha), downstream from the dam in Grand Canyon. The steady releases were bracketed by peak powerplant releases in late-May and early-September. The duration and volume of releases from the dam varied between spring and summer. The intent of the experimental hydrograph was to mimic predam river discharge patterns by including a high, steady discharge in the spring and a low, steady discharge in the summer. The hydrologic experiment was called the Low Steady Summer Flow (LSSF) experiment because steady discharges of 226 m3/s dominated the hydrograph for 4 months from June through September 2000. The experimental hydrograph was developed in response to one of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Recommended and Prudent Alternatives (RPA) in its Biological Opinion of the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam Final Environmental Impact Statement. The RPA focused on the hypothesis that seasonally adjusted steady flows were dam operations that might benefit humpback chub more than the Record of Decision operations, known as Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) operations. Condensed timelines between planning and implementation (2 months) of the experiment and the time required for logistics, purchasing, and contracting resulted in limited data collection during the high-release part of the experiment that occurred in spring. The LSSF experiment is the longest planned hydrograph that departed from the MLFF operations since Record of Decision operations began in 1996. As part of the experiment, several studies focused on the responses of physical properties related to environments that young-of-year (YOY) native fish might occupy (for example, measuring mainstem and shoreline water

  3. 人胰腺癌细胞STAT3下游耐药相关基因的初步筛选%Preliminary screening of drug resistance-related genes downstream of STAT3 in human pancreatic cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨豪俊; 黄陈; 裘正军; 江弢; 曹俊

    2011-01-01

    目的 利用小分子干扰RNA( siRNA)和基因芯片技术初步筛选人胰腺癌细胞信号转导及转入激活因子3( STAT3)下游耐药相关基因,为探索STAT3调控耐药机制提供依据.方法 利用基因芯片技术比较人胰腺癌细胞SW1990与siRNA沉默STAT3后SW1990细胞中基因表达的差异,初步筛选STAT3下游耐药相关基因.结果 按差异显著性标准从47 000条基因(代表38 500个明晰的基因)中筛选出具有表达差异的基因共有982条(2.55%),其中上调表达2倍的基因有592条,下调表达2倍的基因有390条.与耐药相关基因有:显著上调的拓扑异构酶AⅡα( TOPOⅡα)、肿瘤坏死因子凋亡诱导相关配体(TRAIL);显著下调的富半胱氨酸61( CYR61),Ras肿瘤基因家族成员(RAP1 A),bcl-2相关抗凋亡基因(BAG1),囊性纤维化跨膜转导调节因子(CFTR).结论 胰腺癌耐药是一个多基因、多通路相互作用的结果.应用siRNA技术沉默STAT3基因后,有6条耐药相关基因发生改变.为进一步研究STAT3与胰腺癌耐药的关系提供新的线索,也为胰腺癌的治疗提供新的思路.%Objective To preliminarily screen out the drug resistance-related genes downstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 ( STAT3 ) in human pancreatic cancer cell by small interfering RNA ( siRNA) and gene chip technique, with the purpose of providing a basis for studying the mechanism of STAT3-associated drug resistance. Methods The differentially expressed genes between the human pancreatic SW1990 cells of wild-type STAT3 gene and STAT3 gene silenced by siRNA were compared after using gene chip technique to preliminarily screen out the drug resistance-related genes downstream of STAT3. Results Nine hundred and eighty-two (2. 55% ) differentially expressed genes were screened from the 47000 genes represented on the microarray according to the criterion of significant difference, of which, 592 genes were up-regulated by 2-fold and 390 genes

  4. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide

  5. Turbulence investigation and reproduction for assisting downstream migrating juvenile salmonids, Part II of II: Effects of induced turbulence on behavior of juvenile salmon, 2001-2005 final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Farley , M.; Hansen, G.; Morse , J.; Rondorf, D.

    2005-01-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide

  6. Three Dimensional Analysis of the Final Design of Pier Extensions and West Guide Wall to Mitigate Local Scour Risk at the BNSF Railroad Bridge Downstream of the Prado Dam Supplemental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sinha, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kerenyi, K. [Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center, McLean, VA (United States); Sharp, Jeremy [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MI (United States), Coastal and Hydraulics Lab

    2016-06-01

    This report is a supplement to a previous report [ref] covering optimization of wedge shaped pier extensions to streamline large bluff body piers as a local scour countermeasure for the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe (BNSF) Railroad Bridge over the Santa Ana River downstream of Prado Dam in Riverside County, CA. The optimized design was tested in a 1/30 scale physical model at U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) in Vicksburg, MS, and the optimized design was used as the base for the construction design. Constructability issues having to do with both materials and site conditions including access underneath the BNSF bridge yielded a construction design that required making the pier extensions wider and either moving the western curve of the west guide wall upstream or changing its geometry.

  7. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2009-04-03

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to

  8. RU486 (mifepristone) ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and reverses the down-regulation of astrocytic N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Z-F; Wang, W; Niu, L; Kou, Z-Z; Zhu, C; Wang, W; Zhao, X-H; Luo, D-S; Zhang, T; Zhang, F-X; Liu, X-Z; Wu, S-X; Li, Y-Q

    2011-09-08

    Diabetic cognitive dysfunction (DCD), usually accompanied with chronically elevated glucocorticoids and hippocampal astrocytic alterations, is one of the most serious complications in patients with type-1 diabetes. However, the role for chronically elevated glucocorticoids and hippocampal astrocytic activations in DCD remains to be elucidated, and it is not clear whether astrocytic N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2, involved in cell differentiation and development) participated in DCD. In the present study, three months after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1 diabetes onset, rats showed cognitive impairments in Morris water maze test as well as elevated corticosterone level. Diabetic rats also presented down-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a key indicator of astrocytic reactivity) and NDRG2 in hippocampus revealed by immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR and Western blot. Moreover, the diabetic cognitive impairments were ameliorated by 9-day glucocorticoids receptor (GR) blockade with RU486, and the down-regulation of hippocampal NDRG2 and GFAP in diabetic animals was also attenuated by 9-day GR blockade. These results suggest that glucocorticoids-GR system is crucial for DCD, and that astrocytic reactivity and NDRG2 are involved in these processes. Thus, inhibiting GR activation in the hippocampus may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating DCD.

  9. The conserved barH-like homeobox-2 gene barhl2 acts downstream of orthodentricle-2 and together with iroquois-3 in establishment of the caudal forebrain signaling center induced by Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraver-Geslin, Hugo A; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Durand, Béatrice C

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the gene regulatory network that governs formation of the Zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), a signaling center that secretes Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) to control the growth and regionalization of the caudal forebrain. Using loss- and gain-of-function, explants and grafting experiments in amphibians, we demonstrate that barhl2 acts downstream of otx2 and together with the iroquois (irx)-3 gene in establishment of the ZLI compartment initiated by Shh influence. We find that the presumptive (pre)-ZLI domain expresses barhl2, otx2 and irx3, whereas the thalamus territory caudally bordering the pre-ZLI expresses barhl2, otx2 and irx1/2 and early on irx3. We demonstrate that Barhl2 activity is required for determination of the ZLI and thalamus fates and that within the p2 alar plate the ratio of Irx3 to Irx1/2 contributes to ZLI specification and size determination. We show that when continuously exposed to Shh, neuroepithelial cells coexpressing barhl2, otx2 and irx3 acquire two characteristics of the ZLI compartment-the competence to express shh and the ability to segregate from anterior neural plate cells. In contrast, neuroepithelial cells expressing barhl2, otx2 and irx1/2, are not competent to express shh. Noteworthy in explants, under Shh influence, ZLI-like cells segregate from thalamic-like cells. Our study establishes that Barhl2 activity plays a key role in p2 alar plate patterning, specifically ZLI formation, and provides new insights on establishment of the signaling center of the caudal forebrain.

  10. Cloning-free regulated monitoring of reporter and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirkaya Omer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of the promoters, their regulatory elements, and their variations in the human genome remain unknown. Reporter gene technology for transcriptional activity is a widely used tool for the study of promoter structure, gene regulation, and signaling pathways. Construction of transcriptional reporter vectors, including use of cis-acting sequences, requires cloning and time-demanding manipulations, particularly with introduced mutations. Results In this report, we describe a cloning-free strategy to generate transcriptionally-controllable linear reporter constructs. This approach was applied in common transcriptional models of inflammatory response and the interferon system. In addition, it was used to delineate minimal transcriptional activity of selected ribosomal protein promoters. The approach was tested for conversion of genes into TetO-inducible/repressible expression cassettes. Conclusion The simple introduction and tuning of any transcriptional control in the linear DNA product renders promoter activation and regulated gene studies simple and versatile.

  11. Continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-08-01

    Continuous manufacturing has been applied in many different industries but has been pursued reluctantly in biotechnology where the batchwise process is still the standard. A shift to continuous operation can improve productivity of a process and substantially reduce the footprint. Continuous operation also allows robust purification of labile biomolecules. A full set of unit operations is available to design continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals. Chromatography, the central unit operation, is most advanced in respect to continuous operation. Here, the problem of 'batch' definition has been solved. This has also paved the way for implementation of continuous downstream processing from a regulatory viewpoint. Economic pressure, flexibility, and parametric release considerations will be the driving force to implement continuous manufacturing strategies in future.

  12. Effect of SNPs in protein kinase Czgene on gene expression in the reporter gene detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo Liu; Hong-Xia Sun; Yong-Wei Zhang; Yun-Feng Li; Jin Zuo; Yan Meng; Fu-De Fang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the effects of the SNPs (rs411021,rs436045, rs427811, rs385039 and rs809912) on gene expression and further identify the susceptibility genes of type 2 diabetes.METHODS: Ten allele fragments (49 bp each) were synthesized according to the 5 SNPs mentioned above.These fragments were cloned into luciferase reporter gene vector and then transfected into HepG2 cells. The activity of the luciferase was assayed. Effects of the SNPs on RNA splicing were analyzed by bioinformatics.RESULTS: rs427811T allele and rs809912G allele enhanced the activity of the reporter gene expression. None of the 5 SNPs affected RNA splicing.CONCLUSION: SNPs in protein kinase Cz (PKCZ) gene probably play a role in the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes by affecting the expression level of the relevant genes.

  13. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  14. Notch信号在增生性瘢痕表皮中的表达%Expression of Notch receptors, ligands and downstream target genes in epidermis of hypertrophic scar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏炜; 潘宝华; 刘宾; 张曦; 马福成; 王映梅; 杨晓婷; 刘丹; 郭树忠

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of Notch receptors, ligands and downstream target genes in hypertrophic scar and normal skin, and to investigate its role in the development of hypertrophic scar. Methods By immunohistochemistry, the expression of epidermal differentiation markers-β1 integrin, keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 19 (K19), as well as Notch 1-4 and Jagged1 were examined in hypertrophic scars and normal skins. The expression of Notch downstream genes- P21 and P63 was analyzed with real-time quantitative PCR and immtmohistechemistry staining. Results Histological analysis revealed a significant epidermal thickening in the hypertrophic scars, with excessive cell layers above the basal layer. Compared to the normal epidermis, the expression of β1 integrin, K19 and K14 decreased in hypertrophic scars (P<0.05). Positive expression rate of Notch1 and Jagged1 in keratinocytes was significantly higher in hypertrophic scar than in normal skin (P<0.05), while there was no difference in Notch2 and 3 positive expression rate. Furthermore, the expression of P21 was significantly up-regulated, while the expression of P63 was down-regulated in keratinocytes of hypertrophic scar (P<0.05). Conclusions Notch signal may play an important role in hypertrophic scar pathogenesis. Over-defferentiation of Keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar may be related to the overexpression of Notch1 and Jagged1, up-regalation of P21 gene and down-regulation of P63 gene.%目的 研究Notch信号相关分子在增生性瘢痕表皮中的表达情况,探讨其是否参与增生性瘢痕的形成. 方法 收集年龄、性别、部位互为对照的增生性瘢痕和健康皮肤组织各8例.行免疫组织化学检测:①表皮分化标志物,包括整合素β1、角蛋白14(K14)和19(K19);②Notch受体1~4以及配体Jagged1.行Real-time PCR和免疫组织化学检测Notch下游基因P21和P63的表达以及定位. 结果 组织学检测发现增生性瘢痕表皮较健康表皮明显增厚,

  15. Increase of Expression Levels of Reporter Gene in Transgenic Tobaccos by Matrix Attachment Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix attachment region (MAR) located downstream of Plastocyanin gene was isolated from the genome of pea. To study the effect of MARs on foreign gene expression in transgenic plants, T-DNA vector was constructed in which MARs flanked bothβ-glucuronidase(GUS) gene and selectable marker neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT-II) gene. The plant expression vectors were transferred into leaf discs via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure. The result of GUS measurement showed that pea MAR could increase transgene expression level. The mean expression levels of GUS gene expression in population containing MARs could be increased twofold when compared with that of population without MARs.

  16. Expression and distribution of N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 in pancreatic diseases%胰腺疾病组织N-myc下游调节基因2的表达与分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺菲菲; 焦凯; 刘新平; 沈岚

    2013-01-01

    The pancreatic tissues from patients with islet cell hyperplasia,insulinoma,and pancreatic adenocarcinoma,as well as normal pancreatic tissues were embedded with paraffin,serial sections were cut and mounted on glass slides.Immunohistochemical staining was carried out with N-myc down-stream regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) monoclonal antibody by means of ABC method,and Western blotting was carried out to detect the expression and distribution of Ndrg2.The results showed that Ndrg2 positive immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of islet cell,being similar to the localization of insulin positive immunoreactivity.The number and volume of pancreatic islets were increased in the patients with islet cell hyperplasia,and Ndrg2 expression was also increased.Western blotting results showed that the expression of Ndrg2 in the pancreas of patients with islet cell hyperplasia was increased compared with normal group.The above results suggest that Ndrg2 may play an important role in performing physiological function of islet cells.%分离胰岛细胞增生症患者、胰岛素瘤患者、胰尾高中分化腺癌患者和正常人胰腺组织,制成石蜡切片,用抗N-myc下游调节基因2(Ndrg2)单克隆抗体进行免疫组织化学染色(ABC法),用Western印迹法检测Ndrg2的表达与分布情况.结果显示,Ndrg2阳性反应物主要分布在胰岛细胞的胞浆,与胰岛素的阳性反应物分布与定位相似;胰岛细胞增生症患者胰岛数量增加,体积增大,且该疾病患者胰腺中Ndrg2表达增加;Western印迹实验结果显示胰岛细胞增生症患者胰腺组织中Ndrg2蛋白的表达量较正常组增高.提示Ndrg2基因可能在胰岛细胞中发挥重要的生理功能.

  17. Operational optimization in the downstream; Otimizacao operacional no downstream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberman, Luis; Cunha, Filipe Silveira Ramos da [Petroleo Ipiranga, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    On the present competitive down stream's market, there is a great necessity of optimization aiming to guarantee the best price and quality of our clients. Our goal is to attend these expectations while we guarantee an efficient operation. The greatest question is how far we are from the ideal model. This way, a lot of projects have been executed during the last years aiming the operational optimization of all our activities. We divide the projects in 4 areas: Logistic (new modals distribution), Transport (transport optimization - quality and more deliveries with less trucks), Client Support (Internet Ipiranga and Support Center), Distribution Terminals Productivity (automation and environment). This work intend to present our ideal, perfect and complete Downstream Operation model. We will talk about how close we are of this ideal model and we will present the projects that we had already developed and implanted on the automation of the terminals and the logistics area. (author)

  18. Repetitive Imaging of Reporter Gene Expression in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Richard

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomographic imaging is emerging as a powerful technology to monitor reporter transgene expression in the lungs and other organs. However, little information is available about its usefulness for studying gene expression over time. Therefore, we infected 20 rats with a replication-deficient adenovirus containing a fusion gene encoding for a mutant Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and an enhanced green fluorescent protein. Five additional rats were infected with a control virus. Pulmonary gene transfer was performed via intratracheal administration of vector using a surfactant-based method. Imaging was performed 4–6 hr, and 4, 7, and 10 days after gene transfer, using 9-(4-[18F]-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutylguanine, an imaging substrate for the mutant kinase. Lung tracer uptake assessed with imaging was moderately but significantly increased 4–6 hr after gene transfer, was maximal after 4 days, and was no longer detectable by 10 days. The temporal pattern of transgene expression measured ex vivo with in vitro assays of thymidine kinase activity and green fluorescent protein was similar to imaging. In conclusion, positron emission tomography is a reliable new tool to evaluate the onset and duration of reporter gene expression noninvasively in the lungs of intact animals.

  19. The human norepinephrine transporter in combination with C-11-m-hydroxyephedrine as a reporter gene/reporter probe for PET of gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buursma, A.R.; Beerens, Antoine; de Vries, E.F J; van Waarde, Aaren; Rots, Marianne; Hospers, G.A.P.; Vaalburg, W.; Haisma, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Although the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene has been frequently applied as a reporter gene for monitoring gene transfection in animals, it has some intrinsic limitations for use in humans. In our search for a reporter gene that lacks these limitations, we have evaluated the feasibility o

  20. SPECT imaging of cardiac reporter gene expression in living rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying; LAN Xiaoli; ZHANG Liang; WU Tao; JIANG Rifeng; ZHANG Yongxue

    2009-01-01

    This work is to demonstrate feasibility of imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine ki-nase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene in rabbits myocardium by using the reporter probe 131I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D- arabi-nofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (131I-FIAU) and SPECT. Rabbits of the study group received intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk and control group received aseptic saline injection. Two sets of experiments were performed on the study group. Rabbits of the 1st set were injected with 131I-FIAU 600 μCi at Day 2 after intramyocardial transfection of Ad5-tk in 1×109, 5×108, 1×108, 5×107 and 1×107 pfu, and heart SPECT imaging was done at different hours. Rabbits of the 2nd were transferred various titers of Ad5-tk (1×109, 5×108, 1×108, 5×107, 1×107 pfu) to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. Two days later, 131I-FIAU was injected and heart SPECT imaging was performed at 6, 24 and 48 h, before killing them for gamma counting of the hearts. Reverse tran-scription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to verify the transferred HSV1-tk gene expression. Semi-quantitative analysis derived of region of interest (ROI) of SPECT images and RT-PCR images was performed and the relationship of SPECT images with ex vivo gamma counting and mRNA level were evaluated. SPECT images conformed 131I-FIAU accumulation in rabbits injected with Ad5-tk in the anterolateral wall. The optimal images qual-ity was obtained at 24~48 h for different viral titers. The highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium was seen at 6 h, and then declined with time. The threshold was 5×107 pfu of virus titer. The result could be set better in 1~5×108 pfu by SPECT analysis and gamma counting. ROI-derived semi-quantitative study on SPECT images correlated well with ex vivo gamma counting and mRNA levels from RT-PCR analysis. The HSV1-tk/131I-FIAU reporter gene/reporter probe system is feasible for cardiac SPECT reporter gene imaging

  1. Downstream targets of WRKY33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Klaus; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-11-01

    Innate immunity signaling pathways in both animals and plants are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. In a recent publication we show that MPK4 and its substrate MKS1 interact with WRKY33 in vivo, and that WRKY33 is released from complexes with MPK4 upon infection. Transcriptome analysis of a wrky33 loss-of-function mutant identified a subset of defense-related genes as putative targets of WRKY33. These genes include PAD3 and CYP71A13, which encode cytochrome P450 monoxygenases required for synthesis of the antimicrobial phytoalexin camalexin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that WRKY33 bound the promoter of PAD3 when plants were inoculated with pathogens. Here we further discuss the involvement of two other targets of WRKY33, NUDT6 and ROF2 in defense responses against invading pathogens.

  2. Downstream targets of WRKY33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Klaus; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Mundy, John;

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity signaling pathways in both animals and plants are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. In a recent publication we show that MPK4 and its substrate MKS1 interact with WRKY33 in vivo, and that WRKY33 is released from complexes with MPK4 upon infection....... Transcriptome analysis of a wrky33 loss-of-function mutant identified a subset of defense-related genes as putative targets of WRKY33. These genes include PAD3 and CYP71A13, which encode cytochrome P450 monoxygenases required for synthesis of the antimicrobial phytoalexin camalexin. Chromatin...... immunoprecipitation confirmed that WRKY33 bound the promoter of PAD3 when plants were inoculated with pathogens. Here we further discuss the involvement of two other targets of WRKY33, NUDT6 and ROF2 in defense responses against invading pathogens....

  3. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  4. hNIS-IRES-eGFP Dual Reporter Gene Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiantu Che

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The human and rodent sodium iodide symporters (NIS have recently been cloned and are being investigated as potential therapeutic and reporter genes. We have extended this effort by constructing an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-linked human NIS (hNIS-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP hybrid reporter gene for both nuclear and optical imaging. A self-inactivating retroviral vector, termed pQCNIG, containing hNIS-IRES-eGFP dual reporter gene, driven by a constitutive CMV promoter, was constructed and used to generate RG2-pQCNIG cells and RG2-pQCNIG tumors. 131I-iodide and 99mTcO4-pertechnetate accumulation studies plus fluorescence microscopy and intensity assays were performed in vitro, and gamma camera imaging studies in RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumor-bearing athymic rats were performed. RG2-pQCNIG cells expressed high levels of hNIS protein and showed high intensity of eGFP fluorescence compared with RG2 wild-type cells. RG2-pQCNIG cells accumulated Na131I and 99mTcO4– to a 50:1 and a 170:1 tissue/medium ratio at 10 min, compared with 0.8:1.2 tissue/medium ratio in wild-type RG2 cells. A significant correlation between radiotracer accumulation and eGFP fluorescence intensity was demonstrated. RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumors were readily differentiated by in vivo gamma camera imaging; radiotracer uptake increased in RG2-pQCNIG but declined in RG2 tumors over the 50-min imaging period. Stomach and thyroid were the major organs of radionuclide accumulation. The IRES-linked hNIS-eGFP dual reporter gene is functional and stable in transduced RG2-pQCNIG cells. Optical and nuclear imaging of tumors produced from these cell lines provides the opportunity to monitor tumor growth and response to therapy. These studies indicate the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter imaging and translation into patient studies using radioisotopes that are currently available for human use for both SPECT and PET imaging.

  5. A novel 30 bp deletion in the FOXL2 gene in a phenotypically normal woman with primary amenorrhoea: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Ksenija; Harris, Sarah E; Smale, Wendy J; Shelling, Andrew N

    2004-12-01

    In a Slovene patient with primary amenorrhoea without an association with blepharophimosis/ptosis/epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES), a novel 30 bp deletion was identified in the FOXL2 gene. We report the clinical features of this woman who has spontaneously conceived and delivered two live healthy babies. The novel deletion was predicted to remove 10 out of 14 alanines (A221_A230del), from the polyalanine tract downstream of the winged helix/forkhead domain of the FOXL2 protein. The patient's parents and sister were shown not to carry this deletion. Despite seeing an anovulatory secretory pattern of FSH, follicles developed spontaneously. Persistent and consistent monitoring have practical implications for genetic and fertility counselling in the era when women with premature ovarian failure usually seek ovum donation. The role of FOXL2 in the development of infertility is still unclear, but several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a central role in follicle development.

  6. Intestinal lactase as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for in vivo gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Siamak; Eckley, Lorna; Sawyer, Greta J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dong, Xuebin; Freund, Jean-Noel; Fabre, John W

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal lactase has potential as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for long-term gene expression studies in vivo, using chromogenic, luminescent, and fluorogenic substrates developed for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. In normal rat tissues, reactivity with a chromogenic fucopyranoside (X-Fuc, the preferred substrate of lactase) was present only at the lumenal surface of small intestine epithelial cells. Full-length lactase (domains I-IV), mature lactase (domains III and IV), and a cytosolic form of mature lactase (domains III and IV, without the signal sequence or transmembrane region) were evaluated. Transfection of HuH-7 cells in vitro, and hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver in vivo, resulted in excellent gene expression. The full-length and mature (homodimeric, membrane-bound) forms reacted strongly with X-Fuc but not with the corresponding galactopyranoside (X-Gal). However, the presumptively monomeric cytosolic lactase unexpectedly reacted equally well with both substrates. The fluorogenic substrate fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside was cleaved by cytosolic lactase, but not by full-length or mature lactase. Full-length lactase, when expressed ectopically in hepatocytes in vivo, localized exclusively to the bile canalicular membrane. Intestinal lactase is highly homologous in mice, rats, and humans and has considerable potential for evaluating long-term gene expression in experimental animals and the clinic.

  7. Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1996-08-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

  8. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  9. A HOMOLOGOUS GENE-REPORTER SYSTEM FOR THE BASIDIOMYCETE SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE BASED ON INTERNALLY DELETED HOMOLOGOUS GENES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; HARMSEN, MC; WESSELS, JGH

    Problems encountered in our attempts to achieve expression of heterologous genes, driven by ascomycetous regulatory sequences, in homobasidiomycetes led us to develop a gene-reporter system based on the expression of homologous genes in Schizophyllum commune. Internal deletions were made in the

  10. Supply Chain Modeling: Downstream Risk Assessment Methodology (DRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    Supply Chain Modeling: Downstream Risk Assessment Methodology (DRAM) Dr. Sean Barnett December 5, 2013 Institute for Defense Analyses Alexandria, Virginia DMSMS Conference 2013 These Slides are Unclassified and Not Proprietary Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the

  11. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Castellanos

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq to further elucidate the

  12. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Raquel; Xie, Qing; Zheng, Deyou; Cvekl, Ales; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome). TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S) do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to further elucidate the molecular

  13. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Shiaochin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. Results We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1 subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2 insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3 link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. Conclusion The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  14. Evolution of echinoderms may not have required modification of the ancestral deuterostome HOX gene cluster: first report of PG4 and PG5 Hox orthologues in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne; Martinez, Pedro; Chen, Wei-Chung; Thorndyke, Michael; Byrne, Maria

    2003-11-01

    Is the extreme derivation of the echinoderm body plan reflected in a derived echinoderm Hox genotype? Building on previous work, we exploited the sequence conservation of the homeobox to isolate putative orthologues of several Hox genes from two asteroid echinoderms. The 5-peptide motif (LPNTK) diagnostic of PG4 Hox genes was identified immediately downstream of one of the partial homeodomains from Patiriella exigua. This constitutes the first unequivocal report of a PG4 Hox gene orthologue from an echinoderm. Subsequent screenings identified genes of both PG4 and PG4/5 in Asterias rubens. Although in echinoids only a single gene (PG4/5) occupies these two contiguous cluster positions, we conclude that the ancestral echinoderm must have had the complete deuterostome suite of medial Hox genes, including orthologues of both PG4 and PG4/5 (=PG5). The reported absence of PG4 in the HOX cluster of echinoids is therefore a derived state, and the ancestral echinoderm probably had a HOX cluster not dissimilar to that of other deuterostomes. Modification of the ancestral deuterostome Hox genotype may not have been required for evolution of the highly derived echinoderm body plan.

  15. A negative element in the downstream region of the Rice tungro bacilliform virus promoter is orientation- and position-independent and is active with heterologous promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Arunima; Sharma, Shweta; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2010-10-01

    The promoter of an Indian isolate of the pararetrovirus Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV-WB) contains a negative element downstream of the transcription start site (TSS), between nucleotide residues +58 and +195 (Mathur and Dasgupta, 2007). To further characterize the element, we show, by using transient gus reporter gene assays in the cells of onion peel, rice calli and Arabidopsis leaves, that it down-regulates heterologous promoters CaMV35S and Maize ubiquitin. Quantitative measurements of transient GUS activity indicated more than 90% inhibition of reporter gene expression by the negative element. We also show, by reversing the orientation of the element downstream and by placing it in a position upstream to a constitutively expressing RTBV promoter, that the negative element is orientation- and position-independent, pointing towards its activity at the transcriptional and not post-transcriptional level.

  16. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  17. Identifying master regulators of cancer and their downstream targets by integrating genomic and epigenomic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Olivier; Plevritis, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Vast amounts of molecular data characterizing the genome, epigenome and transcriptome are becoming available for a variety of cancers. The current challenge is to integrate these diverse layers of molecular biology information to create a more comprehensive view of key biological processes underlying cancer. We developed a biocomputational algorithm that integrates copy number, DNA methylation, and gene expression data to study master regulators of cancer and identify their targets. Our algorithm starts by generating a list of candidate driver genes based on the rationale that genes that are driven by multiple genomic events in a subset of samples are unlikely to be randomly deregulated. We then select the master regulators from the candidate driver and identify their targets by inferring the underlying regulatory network of gene expression. We applied our biocomputational algorithm to identify master regulators and their targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and serous ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that the expression of candidate drivers is more likely to be influenced by copy number variations than DNA methylation. Next, we selected the master regulators and identified their downstream targets using module networks analysis. As a proof-of-concept, we show that the GBM and ovarian cancer module networks recapitulate known processes in these cancers. In addition, we identify master regulators that have not been previously reported and suggest their likely role. In summary, focusing on genes whose expression can be explained by their genomic and epigenomic aberrations is a promising strategy to identify master regulators of cancer.

  18. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Final report: Report period, 15 April 1993--15 April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    This Report concludes the DOE Human Genome Program project, ``Identification of Genes in Anonymous DNA Sequence.`` The central goals of this project have been (1) understanding the problem of identifying genes in anonymous sequences, and (2) development of tools, primarily the automated identification system gm, for identifying genes. The activities supported under the previous award are summarized here to provide a single complete report on the activities supported as part of the project from its inception to its completion.

  19. Preliminary Report of Molecular Detection of Retinoblastoma Gene Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    To develop gene diagnosis for retinoblastoma predisposition, it is necessary to disclose the retinoblastoma gene mutations or deletions in detail. Genomic DNA from tumor and peripheral white blood cells in 33 patients with retinoblastoma was detected with 3.8kb probe derived from 3' end of retinoblastoma gene cDNA. The gene abnormalities, including deletion, partial deletion and rearrangement, were found in 18 patients. Further research will be aimed at microdeletions or mutations for those patients wti...

  20. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  1. Scleroglucan: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Survase

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides produced by a variety of microorganisms find multifarious industrial applications in foods, pharmaceutical and other industries as emulsifiers, stabilizers, binders, gelling agents, lubricants, and thickening agents. One such exopolysaccharide is scleroglucan, produced by pure culture fermentation from filamentous fungi of genus Sclerotium. The review discusses the properties, fermentative production, downstream processing and applications of scleroglucan.

  2. Downstream bioprocess characterisation within microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Marco; Krühne, Ulrich; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturising bioprocess unit operation steps is a well-established approach to find novel routes for process intensification and improved process economics. While a number of microbioreactors have been presented over the last 15 years, miniaturised downstream unit operations (mDUO) are less deve...

  3. The Prdm13 histone methyltransferase encoding gene is a Ptf1a-Rbpj downstream target that suppresses glutamatergic and promotes GABAergic neuronal fate in the dorsal neural tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanotel, Julie; Bessodes, Nathalie; Thélie, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activator Ptf1a determines inhibitory GABAergic over excitatory glutamatergic neuronal cell fate in progenitors of the vertebrate dorsal spinal cord, cerebellum and retina. In an in situ hybridization expression survey of PR domain containing gene...... and glutamatergic neuronal fate in the dorsal and caudal part of the vertebrate neural tube....... and a reduction of the GABAergic neuronal marker Pax2. It also leads to an upregulation of Prdm13 transcription, suggesting an autonegative regulation. Conversely, in animal caps, Prdm13 blocks the ability of the bHLH factor Neurog2 to activate Tlx3. Additional gain of function experiments in the chick neural...... tube confirm that Prdm13 suppresses Tlx3(+)/glutamatergic and induces Pax2(+)/GABAergic neuronal fate. Thus, Prdm13 is a novel crucial component of the Ptf1a regulatory pathway that, by modulating the transcriptional activity of bHLH factors such as Neurog2, controls the balance between GABAergic...

  4. MITIGATION OF SEDIMENTATION HAZARDS DOWNSTREAM FROM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ellen WOHL; Sara RATHBURN

    2003-01-01

    Many reservoirs currently in operation trap most or all of the sediment entering the reservoir,creating sediment-depleted conditions downstream. This may cause channel adjustment in the form of bank erosion, bed erosion, substrate coarsening, and channel planform change. Channel adjustment may also result from episodic sediment releases during reservoir operation, or from sediment evacuation following dam removal. Channel adjustment to increased sediment influx depends on the magnitude, frequency, duration and grain-size distribution of the sediment releases, and on the downstream channel characteristics. Channel adjustment may occur as a change in substrate sizedistribution, filling of pools, general bed aggradation, lateral instability, change in channel planform,and/or floodplain aggradation. The increased sediment availability may alter aquatic and riparian habitat, reduce water quality, distribute adsorbed contaminants along the river corridor, and provide germination sites for exotic vegetation. Mitigation of these sedimentation hazards requires: (1)mapping grain-size distribution within the reservoir and estimating the grain-size distributions of sediment that will be mobilized through time; (2) mapping shear stress and sediment transport capacity as a function of discharge on the basis of channel units for the length of the river likely to be affected; (3) mapping potential depositional zones, and aquatic habitat and "acceptable losses," along the downstream channel, and comparing these volumes to the total sediment volume stored in the reservoir as a means of estimating total transport capacity required to mobilize reservoir sediment delivered to the channel; (4) designing discharge and sediment release regime (magnitude, frequency,duration) to minimize adverse downstream impacts; and (5) developing plans to remove, treat, contain,or track contaminants, and to restrict establishment of exotic vegetation. The North Fork Poudre River in Colorado is used to

  5. The secretion, synthesis, and metabolism of cortisol and its downstream genes in the H-P-I axis of rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) are disrupted by acute waterborne cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Bi-Wen; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Jin, Li; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The H (hypothalamic)-P (pituitary)-I (interrenal) axis plays a critical role in the fish stress response and is regulated by several factors. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in the world, but its effects on the H-P-I axis of teleosts are largely unknown. Using rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) as an experimental animal, we found that Cd only disrupted the secretion and synthesis of cortisol. Neither hormones at the H or P level nor the expressions of their receptor genes (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRHR) and melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R)) were affected. Steroidogenic acute regulator (StAR), CYP11A1 and CYP11B1, which encode the key enzymes in the cortisol synthesis pathway, were significantly up-regulated in the kidney (including the head kidney). The level of 11β-HSD2, which is required for the conversion of cortisol to cortisone, was increased in the kidney, intestine, brain, and hepatopancreas, whereas the expression of 11β-HSD1, which encodes the reverse conversion enzyme, was increased in the gill, kidney and almost unchanged in other tissues. The enzyme activity concentration of 11β-HSD2 was increased in the kidney as well. The level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased in the intestine, gill and muscle, and the key GR regulator FK506 binding protein5 (FKBP5) was up-regulated in the GR-decreased tissues, whereas the level of nuclear receptor co-repressor 1 (NCoR1), another GR regulator remained almost unchanged. Thus, GR, FKBP5 and 11β-HSD2 may be involved in Cd-induced cortisol disruption.

  6. The Prdm13 histone methyltransferase encoding gene is a Ptf1a-Rbpj downstream target that suppresses glutamatergic and promotes GABAergic neuronal fate in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanotel, Julie; Bessodes, Nathalie; Thélie, Aurore; Hedderich, Marie; Parain, Karine; Van Driessche, Benoit; Brandão, Karina De Oliveira; Kricha, Sadia; Jorgensen, Mette C; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Serup, Palle; Van Lint, Carine; Perron, Muriel; Pieler, Tomas; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2014-02-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activator Ptf1a determines inhibitory GABAergic over excitatory glutamatergic neuronal cell fate in progenitors of the vertebrate dorsal spinal cord, cerebellum and retina. In an in situ hybridization expression survey of PR domain containing genes encoding putative chromatin-remodeling zinc finger transcription factors in Xenopus embryos, we identified Prdm13 as a histone methyltransferase belonging to the Ptf1a synexpression group. Gain and loss of Ptf1a function analyses in both frog and mice indicates that Prdm13 is positively regulated by Ptf1a and likely constitutes a direct transcriptional target. We also showed that this regulation requires the formation of the Ptf1a-Rbp-j complex. Prdm13 knockdown in Xenopus embryos and in Ptf1a overexpressing ectodermal explants lead to an upregulation of Tlx3/Hox11L2, which specifies a glutamatergic lineage and a reduction of the GABAergic neuronal marker Pax2. It also leads to an upregulation of Prdm13 transcription, suggesting an autonegative regulation. Conversely, in animal caps, Prdm13 blocks the ability of the bHLH factor Neurog2 to activate Tlx3. Additional gain of function experiments in the chick neural tube confirm that Prdm13 suppresses Tlx3(+)/glutamatergic and induces Pax2(+)/GABAergic neuronal fate. Thus, Prdm13 is a novel crucial component of the Ptf1a regulatory pathway that, by modulating the transcriptional activity of bHLH factors such as Neurog2, controls the balance between GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal fate in the dorsal and caudal part of the vertebrate neural tube.

  7. Carbonic Anhydrases Function in Anther Cell Differentiation Downstream of the Receptor-Like Kinase EMS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Li, Zhiyong; Biener, Gabriel; Xiong, Erhui; Malik, Shikha; Eaton, Nathan; Zhao, Catherine Z; Raicu, Valerica; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhao, Dazhong

    2017-06-01

    Plants extensively employ leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs), the largest family of RLKs, to control a wide range of growth and developmental processes as well as defense responses. To date, only a few direct downstream effectors for LRR-RLKs have been identified. We previously showed that the LRR-RLK EMS1 (EXCESS MICROSPOROCYTES1) and its ligand TPD1 (TAPETUM DETERMINANT1) are required for the differentiation of somatic tapetal cells and reproductive microsporocytes during early anther development in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we report the identification of β-carbonic anhydrases (βCAs) as the direct downstream targets of EMS1. EMS1 biochemically interacts with βCA proteins. Loss of function of βCA genes caused defective tapetal cell differentiation, while overexpression of βCA1 led to the formation of extra tapetal cells. EMS1 phosphorylates βCA1 at four sites, resulting in increased βCA1 activity. Furthermore, phosphorylation-blocking mutations impaired the function of βCA1 in tapetal cell differentiation; however, a phosphorylation mimic mutation promoted the formation of tapetal cells. βCAs are also involved in pH regulation in tapetal cells. Our findings highlight the role of βCA in controlling cell differentiation and provide insights into the posttranslational modification of carbonic anhydrases via receptor-like kinase-mediated phosphorylation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility of sodium/iodide symporter gene as a new imaging reporter gene: comparison with HSV1-tk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, 110-744, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea); Department of Tumor Biology, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Joo Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, 110-744, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Chul Woo [Department of Pathology, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Myung Chul [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, 110-744, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea)

    2004-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes, such as HSV1-tk and D{sub 2} receptor genes, make it possible to visualise gene expression non-invasively and repetitively in vivo. However, these systems require the synthesis of complicated substrates and the availability of expensive PET equipment. Expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene can be easily monitored with radioiodines and technetium-99m using a gamma camera. To evaluate the possibility of using NIS as an imaging reporter gene, we compared its characteristics with those of the conventional HSV1-tk gene. The CM cell line was made by transfecting the HSV1-tk gene into CT-26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line). The CTN and CMN cell lines were then made by transfecting the NIS gene into CT-26 and CM. We measured the uptake of iodine-125 iodovinyldeoxyuridine ([{sup 125}I]IVDU) and {sup 125}I to evaluate the expression of the HSV1-tk and NIS genes, respectively. Each cell line was injected into four flank sites in Balb/c mice. The biodistribution study was performed after intravenously injecting [{sup 125}I]IVDU and {sup 131}I, and {sup 131}I scintigraphy was performed for the evaluation of NIS expression. In vitro studies indicated that CTN and CMN had 40- to 79-fold and 150- to 256-fold higher uptake of {sup 125}I than CT-26 and CM, respectively. Furthermore, CM and CMN showed 57- to 69-fold higher uptake of [{sup 125}I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. NIS gene expression and {sup 125}I accumulation were found to be directly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.923), as were HSV1-tk gene expression and [{sup 125}I]IVDU accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.956). Calculated signal per unit NIS and HSV1-tk mRNA expression was 23,240{+-}3,755 cpm and 34,039{+-}5,346 cpm, respectively. In vivo study indicated that CTN and CMN had 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher uptake of {sup 131}I than CT-26 and CM, and 1.8- and 3.5-fold higher uptake of [{sup 125}I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. Scintigraphy using {sup 131}I easily visualised CTN and

  9. India's Downstream Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This study provides a holistic examination of pricing and investment dynamics in India's downstream petroleum sector. It analyses the current pricing practices, highlights the tremendous fiscal cost of current pricing and regulatory arrangements, and examines the sectoral investment dynamics. It also looks at potential paths towards market-based reform along which the Indian government may move, while at the same time protecting energy market access for India's large poor population.

  10. Fish reproductive guilds downstream of dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, L P; Alves, D C; Gomes, L C

    2014-11-01

    Fish reproductive guilds were used to evaluate the responses of species with different reproductive strategies during two different periods of post-dam construction. The data used for the comparisons were collected in the upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil), downstream of the Porto Primavera dam, 2 and 10 years after impoundment. The abundance (catch per unit effort, CPUE), species richness, evenness and structure of communities, all within reproductive guilds, were used to test the hypothesis that these metrics vary spatially and temporally. The influence of damming on species structure and the diversity of fish reproductive guilds varied spatiotemporally, and species with opportunistic reproductive strategies tended to be less affected. Conversely, long-distance migratory species responded more markedly to spatiotemporal variations, indicating that the ecosystem dynamics exert greater effects on populations of these species. Thus, the effects of a dam, even if attenuated, may extend over several years, especially downstream. This finding emphasizes the importance of maintaining large undammed tributaries downstream of reservoirs.

  11. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  12. Regulatory network of inflammation downstream of proteinase-activated receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease-activated receptors (PAR are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered in response to inflammation. PARs are a unique class of G protein-coupled that carry their own ligands, which remain cryptic until unmasked by proteolytic cleavage. Although the canonical signal transduction pathway downstream of PAR activation and coupling with various G proteins is known and leads to the rapid transcription of genes involved in inflammation, the effect of PAR activation on the downstream transcriptome is unknown. We have shown that intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P (SP, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1- and to a lesser extent by PAR2-deficiency. Results Here, cDNA array experiments determined inflammatory genes whose expression is dependent on PAR1 activation. For this purpose, we compared the alteration in gene expression in wild type and PAR1-/- mice induced by classical pro-inflammatory stimuli (LPS, SP, and antigen. 75 transcripts were considered to be dependent on PAR-1 activation and further annotated in silico by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA and gene ontology (GO. Selected transcripts were target validated by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR. Among PAR1-dependent transcripts, the following have been implicated in the inflammatory process: b2m, ccl7, cd200, cd63, cdbpd, cfl1, dusp1, fkbp1a, fth1, hspb1, marcksl1, mmp2, myo5a, nfkbia, pax1, plaur, ppia, ptpn1, ptprcap, s100a10, sim2, and tnfaip2. However, a balanced response to signals of injury requires a transient cellular activation of a panel of genes together with inhibitory systems that temper the overwhelming inflammation. In this context, the activation of genes such as dusp1 and

  13. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  14. Upstream plasticity and downstream robustness in evolution of molecular networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksen Kasper

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication followed by the functional divergence of the resulting pair of paralogous proteins is a major force shaping molecular networks in living organisms. Recent species-wide data for protein-protein interactions and transcriptional regulations allow us to assess the effect of gene duplication on robustness and plasticity of these molecular networks. Results We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulation of duplicated genes in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae diverges fast so that on average they lose 3% of common transcription factors for every 1% divergence of their amino acid sequences. The set of protein-protein interaction partners of their protein products changes at a slower rate exhibiting a broad plateau for amino acid sequence similarity above 70%. The stability of functional roles of duplicated genes at such relatively low sequence similarity is further corroborated by their ability to substitute for each other in single gene knockout experiments in yeast and RNAi experiments in a nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. We also quantified the divergence rate of physical interaction neighborhoods of paralogous proteins in a bacterium Helicobacter pylori and a fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, in the absence of system-wide data on transcription factors' binding in these organisms we could not compare this rate to that of transcriptional regulation of duplicated genes. Conclusions For all molecular networks studied in this work we found that even the most distantly related paralogous proteins with amino acid sequence identities around 20% on average have more similar positions within a network than a randomly selected pair of proteins. For yeast we also found that the upstream regulation of genes evolves more rapidly than downstream functions of their protein products. This is in accordance with a view which puts regulatory changes as one of the main driving forces of the evolution. In this

  15. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam: Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, David L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1999-02-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1997 through March 1998 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS; Report D), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of the work from April 1997 through March 1998 listed.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease gene discovery. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-09

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the human gene(s) responsible for the disorder known as IBD. The work was planned in two phases. The desired products resulting from Phase 1 were BAC clone(s) containing the genetic marker(s) identified by gene/Networks, Inc. as potentially linked to IBD, plasmid subclones of those BAC(s), and new genetic markers developed from these plasmid subclones. The newly developed markers would be genotyped by gene/Networks, Inc. to ascertain evidence for linkage or non-linkage of IBD to this region. If non-linkage was indicated, the project would move to investigation of other candidate chromosomal regions. Where linkage was indicated, the project would move to Phase 2, in which a physical map of the candidate region(s) would be developed. The products of this phase would be contig(s) of BAC clones in the region exhibiting linkage to IBD, as well as plasmic subclones of the BACs and further genetic marker development. There would also be continued genotyping with new polymorphic markers during this phase. It was anticipated that clones identified and developed during these two phases would provide the physical resources for eventual disease gene discovery.

  17. Calpains are downstream effectors of bax-dependent excitotoxic apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orsi, Beatrice; Bonner, Helena; Tuffy, Liam P; Düssmann, Heiko; Woods, Ina; Courtney, Michael J; Ward, Manus W; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2012-02-01

    Excitotoxicity resulting from excessive Ca(2+) influx through glutamate receptors contributes to neuronal injury after stroke, trauma, and seizures. Increased cytosolic Ca(2+) levels activate a family of calcium-dependent proteases with papain-like activity, the calpains. Here we investigated the role of calpain activation during NMDA-induced excitotoxic injury in embryonic (E16-E18) murine cortical neurons that (1) underwent excitotoxic necrosis, characterized by immediate deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, a persistent depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)), and insensitivity to bax-gene deletion, (2) underwent excitotoxic apoptosis, characterized by recovery of NMDA-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) increases, sensitivity to bax gene deletion, and delayed Δψ(m) depolarization and Ca(2+) deregulation, or (3) that were tolerant to excitotoxic injury. Interestingly, treatment with the calpain inhibitor calpeptin, overexpression of the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin, or gene silencing of calpain protected neurons against excitotoxic apoptosis but did not influence excitotoxic necrosis. Calpeptin failed to exert a protective effect in bax-deficient neurons but protected bid-deficient neurons similarly to wild-type cells. To identify when calpains became activated during excitotoxic apoptosis, we monitored calpain activation dynamics by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy using a calpain-sensitive Förster resonance energy transfer probe. We observed a delayed calpain activation that occurred downstream of mitochondrial engagement and directly preceded neuronal death. In contrast, we could not detect significant calpain activity during excitotoxic necrosis or in neurons that were tolerant to excitotoxic injury. Oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced injury in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures confirmed that calpains were specifically activated during bax-dependent apoptosis and in this setting function as downstream cell-death executioners.

  18. microRNA-181b promotes migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells by targeting N-myc downstream regulated gene 2%miR-181b通过靶向调控N-myc下游调节基因2影响骨肉瘤细胞的迁移和侵袭

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵建立; 李志忠; 王亮; 焦根龙; 周志刚; 孙国栋

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of miR-181b on the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. Methods Three cultured osteosarcoma cell lines and MG-63 cells transfected with miR-181b inhibitor were examined for miR-181b expression using qRT-PCR analysis. The cell migration and invasion of the transfected cells were assessed with Transwell assay. The targets of miR-181b were predicted using a miRNA target prediction software and the results were verified with luciferase reporter assay. The target protein expression in osteosarcoma cells lines was determined by Western blotting, and the cell migration and invasion changes following inhibition of miR-181b or its target protein were assessed using Transwell assay. Results All the 3 osteosarcoma cells lines showed significantly up-regulated miR-181b expression. Inhibition of miR-181b expression obviously suppressed the migration and invasion of MG-63 cells. Based on luciferase reporter assay, N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) was identified as the direct target gene of miR-181b, and inhibition of NDRG2 expression significantly reversed the effect of miR-181b on cell migration and invasion in MG-63 cells. Conclusion miR-181b is over-expressed in osteosarcoma cells, and inhibition of miR-181b, which directly targets NDRG2, can suppress the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells.%目的:探讨miR-181b对骨肉瘤细胞迁移和侵袭的影响。方法培养骨肉瘤细胞,实时荧光定量PCR检测miR-181b在骨肉瘤细胞中的表达。抑制miR-181b的表达,Transwell检测对骨肉瘤迁移和侵袭的影响;生物信息学分析miR-181b靶基因并采用荧光素酶报告基因分析miR-181b和靶基因在骨肉瘤中是否直接作用,同时采用Western Blotting检测靶基因在骨肉瘤细胞中的表达以及Transwell检测靶基因对骨肉瘤迁移和侵袭的影响。结果实时荧光定量PCR结果表明miR-181b在骨肉瘤细胞中高表达。抑制miR-181b的表达

  19. Effects of Mitigation Measures on Productivity of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, and Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1992-1993 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beamesdorfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1993-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 1992-March 1993 in research on white sturgeon in the lower Columbia River. The study began in July 1986 and progress through 1992 was summarized in a comprehensive report in 2 volumes (Beamesderfer and Nigro 1993a, 1993b). This report details activities during the first year of Phase II of this sturgeon research. In Phase I, we assessed the status and habitat requirements of the white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. Phase II will examine the effects on white sturgeon productivity of mitigative measures recommended in Phase I. The status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations upstream from McNary Dam will also be examined in Phase II. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Marine Fisheries Service. Work during the past year has focused on: (1) analysis of results of limited sampling conducted in 1992, (2) submission of Phase I results to the peer-review literature to ensure widespread dissemination, clarity of presentation, and credibility of findings, and (3) preparations for additional field work in 1993. In report sections A to D, each agency reports 1992 results if applicable and the current status of manuscripts. Results of field work conducted in 1993 will be reported in the 1994 annual report.

  20. Innovation in Downstream Fashion Retail Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2012-01-01

    , technology and service providers, ownership structures and local level supply chain facilities. This paper analyses theoretical and empirical views of innovation in international retail networks using the fashion industry as a case because this industry better than other industries maintain branded stores......-depth studies of the biggest Danish fashion brand owners and their respective retail networks. The study shows how brand owners can emphasise change by shifting from a passive and narrow observation of its downstream retail network to an active and broad observation, or at least develop a conscious approach...

  1. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolstenholme, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The authors have completed sequencing the segments (totalling 19 kb, both complementary strands) of the maize mtDNA molecule that encode the entire NADH dehydrogenase subunit (nadl) gene. They have identified nucleotides in mature transcripts of the nadl gene that are edited and have generated clones of cDNAs of entire mature (fully spliced) nadl transcripts. They have examined the relative rates of splicing in transcripts of the four nadl gene group II introns and begun examining nadl intron cDNAs to determine the extent and distribution of RNA edits in introns, in order to evaluate the possibility that intron excision and exon splicing might be editing independent.

  2. Upstream and Downstream Influence in STBLI Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Pino; Priebe, Stephan; Helm, Clara

    2016-11-01

    Priebe and Martín (JFM, 2012) show that the low-frequency unsteadiness in shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLI) is governed by an inviscid instability. Priebe, Tu, Martín and Rowley (JFM, 2016) show that the instability is an inviscid centrifugal one, i.e Görtlerlike vortices. Previous works had given differing conclusions as to whether the low-frequency unsteadiness in STBLI is caused by an upstream or downstream mechanism. In this paper, we reconcile these opposite views and show that upstream and downstream correlations co-exist in the context of the nature of Görtler vortices. We find that the instability is similar to that in separated subsonic and laminar flows. Since the turbulence is modulated but passive to the global mode, the turbulent separated flows are amenable to linear global analysis. As such, the characteristic length and time scales, and the receptivity of the global mode might be determined, and low-order models that represent the low-frequency dynamics in STBLI might be developed. The centrifugal instability persists even under hypersonic conditions. This work is funded by the AFOSR Grant Number AF9550-15-1-0284 with Dr. Ivett Leyva.

  3. Analysis of Gene Targeting & Nonhomologous End-joining. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, J. E.

    2002-11-30

    Overall, we identified a number of new proteins that participate in nonhomologous end-joining and also in telomere addition to the ends of broken chromosomes. We showed that NHEJ is severely reduced in cells expressing both yeast mating-type genes and then went on to identify the NEJ1 gene that was under this control. We showed the epistasis relations among a set of mutations that impair telomere addition and we showed that there are in fact two pathways to repair broken chromosomes in the absence of telomerase. We characterized the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in response to a single broken chromosome and characterized especially the adaptation of cells arrested by an unrepaired DSB. We demonstrated that the DNA damage response is nuclear-limited. We showed adaptation defects for Tid1and Srs2 proteins and showed that Srs2 was also recovery-defective, even when DNA was repaired.

  4. Mercury exposure in terrestrial birds far downstream of an historical point source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Allyson K., E-mail: allyson.jackson@briloon.org [Biodiversity Research Institute, 19 Flaggy Meadow Road, Gorham, ME 04038 (United States); Institute for Integrative Bird Behavior Studies, Department of Biology, College of William and Mary, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Evers, David C.; Folsom, Sarah B. [Biodiversity Research Institute, 19 Flaggy Meadow Road, Gorham, ME 04038 (United States); Condon, Anne M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6669 Short Lane, Gloucester, VA 23061 (United States); Diener, John; Goodrick, Lizzie F. [Biodiversity Research Institute, 19 Flaggy Meadow Road, Gorham, ME 04038 (United States); McGann, Andrew J. [Institute for Integrative Bird Behavior Studies, Department of Biology, College of William and Mary, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Schmerfeld, John [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 6669 Short Lane, Gloucester, VA 23061 (United States); Cristol, Daniel A. [Institute for Integrative Bird Behavior Studies, Department of Biology, College of William and Mary, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a persistent environmental contaminant found in many freshwater and marine ecosystems. Historical Hg contamination in rivers can impact the surrounding terrestrial ecosystem, but there is little known about how far downstream this contamination persists. In 2009, we sampled terrestrial forest songbirds at five floodplain sites up to 137 km downstream of an historical source of Hg along the South and South Fork Shenandoah Rivers (Virginia, USA). We found that blood total Hg concentrations remained elevated over the entire sampling area and there was little evidence of decline with distance. While it is well known that Hg is a pervasive and long-lasting aquatic contaminant, it has only been recently recognized that it also biomagnifies effectively in floodplain forest food webs. This study extends the area of concern for terrestrial habitats near contaminated rivers for more than 100 km downstream from a waterborne Hg point source. - Highlights: > We report blood mercury levels for terrestrial songbirds downstream of contamination. > Blood mercury levels remain elevated above reference for at least 137 km downstream. > Trends vary based on foraging guild and migration strategy. > Mercury affects terrestrial biota farther downstream than previously documented. - Blood mercury levels of forest songbirds remain elevated above reference levels for at least 137 km downstream of historical point source.

  5. Evaluation of different promoters driving the GFP reporter gene in seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii

    OpenAIRE

    Muh. Alias L. Rajamuddin; Alimuddin A; Utut Widyastuti; Irvan Faizal

    2016-01-01

    Promoter regulates expression level of foreign gene in transgenic organism. This study was performed to select asuitable promoter as the fi rst step towards production of valuable trait-enhanced seaweed by transgenic technology. Greenfl uorescent protein (GFP) gene was used as a reporter to determine the activity of promoter in seaweed Kappaphycusalvarezii. GFP gene constructs driven by cytomegalovirus (pCMV-GFP), caulifl ower mosaic virus (pCaMV-GFP),medaka β-actin (pmBA-GFP) and Japanese fl...

  6. Far-red fluorescence gene reporter tomography for determination of placement and viability of cell-based gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay D; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Hall, Mary A; Lazard, Zawaunyka W; Davis, Alan R; Simpson, Lashan; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Non-invasive injectable cellular therapeutic strategies based on sustained delivery of physiological levels of BMP-2 for spinal fusion are emerging as promising alternatives, which could provide sufficient fusion without the associated surgical risks. However, these injectable therapies are dependent on bone formation occurring only at the specific target region. In this study, we developed and deployed fluorescence gene reporter tomography (FGRT) to provide information on in vivo cell localization and viability. This information is sought to confirm the ideal placement of the materials with respect to the area where early bone reaction is required, ultimately providing three dimensional data about the future fusion. However, because almost all conventional fluorescence gene reporters require visible excitation wavelengths, current in vivo imaging of fluorescent proteins is limited by high tissue absorption and confounding autofluorescence. We previously administered fibroblasts engineered to produce BMP-2, but is difficult to determine 3-D information of placement prior to bone formation. Herein we used the far-red fluorescence gene reporter, IFP1.4 to report the position and viability of fibroblasts and developed 3-D tomography to provide placement information. A custom small animal, far-red fluorescence tomography system integrated into a commercial CT scanner was used to assess IFP1.4 fluorescence and to demark 3-D placement of encapsulated fibroblasts with respect to the vertebrae and early bone formation as assessed from CT. The results from three experiments showed that the placement of the materials within the spine could be detected. This work shows that in vivo fluorescence gene reporter tomography of cell-based gene therapy is feasible and could help guide cell-based therapies in preclinical models.

  7. Pim-1 kinase inhibits the activation of reporter gene expression in Elk-1 and c-Fos reporting systems but not the endogenous gene expression: an artifact of the reporter gene assay by transient co-transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the molecular mechanism and signal transduction of pim-1, an oncogene encoding a serine-threonine kinase. This is a true oncogene which prolongs survival and inhibits apoptosis of hematopoietic cells. In order to determine whether the effects of Pim-1 occur by regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, we used a transcriptional reporter assay by transient co-transfection as a screening method. In this study, we found that Pim-1 inhibited the Elk-1 and NFkappaB transcriptional activities induced by activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in reporter gene assays. However, Western blots showed that the induction of Elk-1-regulated expression of endogenous c-Fos was not affected by Pim-1. The phosphorylation and activation of neither Erk1/2 nor Elk-1 was influenced by Pim-1. Also, in the gel shift assay, the pattern of endogenous NFkappaB binding to its probe was not changed in any manner by Pim-1. These data indicate that Pim-1 does not regulate the activation of Erk1/2, Elk-1 or NFkappaB. These contrasting results suggest a pitfall of the transient co-transfection reporter assay in analyzing the regulation of transcription factors outside of the chromosome context. It ensures that results from reporter gene expression assay should be verified by study of endogenous gene expression.

  8. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  9. Feeding by whiteflies suppresses downstream jasmonic acid signaling by eliciting salicylic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng-Jun; Li, Wei-Di; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jin-Ming; Xu, Fang-Cheng; Lu, Yao-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Phloem-feeding whiteflies in the species complex Bemisia tabaci cause extensive crop damage worldwide. One of the reasons for their "success" is their ability to suppress the effectual jasmonic acid (JA) defenses of the host plant. However, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying whitefly suppression of JA-regulated defenses. Here, we showed that the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes (EDS1 and PR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana was significantly enhanced during feeding by whitefly nymphs. Whereas upstream JA-responsive genes (LOX2 and OPR3) also were induced, the downstream JA-responsive gene (VSP1) was repressed, i.e., whiteflies only suppressed downstream JA signaling. Gene-expression analyses with various Arabidopsis mutants, including NahG, npr-1, ein2-1, and dde2-2, revealed that SA signaling plays a key role in the suppression of downstream JA defenses by whitefly feeding. Assays confirmed that SA activation enhanced whitefly performance by suppressing downstream JA defenses.

  10. AND STEP-SHAPED DOWNSTREAM SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal'zannikov Mihail Ivanovich

    2012-10-01

    The article also presents the results of the hydraulic research of the pilot model of the proposed structure. The research has proven that the suppression of any excessive kinetic energy of the discharged water flows falling onto the step-shaped and curving section or the step-shaped section the shape of which is similar to the one made of geosynthetic shells is more efficient that the suppression provided by the smooth section by 50 % to 60 %, and the above suppression is almost equal to the one provided by the well-known step-shaped section. This conclusion can serve as the proof of the high rate of energy suppression demonstrated by the earth-filled dam designed at Samara University of Architecture and Civil Engineering. The dam in question has geosynthetic shells that connect the downstream section to the body of the dam.

  11. Downstream Thermal Evolution of Vortex Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barea, A.; Herrada, M. A.; Pérez-Saborid, M.; Barrero, A.

    1999-11-01

    The downstream evolution of the total temperature field in a quasi-incompressible axisymmetric vortex core has been computed. Starting at an initial station (z=0) with velocity profiles of the Burgers type and given temperature distributions, the numerical results of the evolution show that, according to experimental results, the total temperature in the near-axis region decreases substantially due to the work done by pressure and viscous forces together with the effect of both convection and conduction of heat. Depending on the values of the parameters characterizing the initial profiles and on the value of the Prandtl number, the vortex either breaks down or eventually reaches a self-similar regime. The results obtained shed light on the basic physics involved in the thermal separation phenomenon which appears inside Ranque-Hilsch vortex tubes.

  12. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  13. Development of a Competent and Trouble Free DNA Isolation Protocol for Downstream Genetic Analyses in Glycine Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amjad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA from plants is preliminary step in molecular biology. Fast and cost effective genomic DNA isolation from Glycine species for downstream application is a major bottleneck. Here we report a high throughput and trouble free method for genomic DNA extraction from leaf and seeds of Glycine species with high quality and quantity. Protocol reports the optimization by employing different concentrations of CTAB and PVP in extraction buffer. Efficiency of optimized protocol was compared with frequently used DNA extraction methods. Wide adoptability and utility of this protocol was confirmed by DNA extraction from leaves as well as seeds of G. max, G. soja, G. tomentella and G. latifolia. Extracted DNA was successfully subjected to PCR amplification of five microsatellite markers and four putative glycosyltransferase genes. DNA extraction protocol is reproducible, trouble free, rapid and can be adopted for plant molecular biology applications.

  14. A novel binary T-vector with the GFP reporter gene for promoter characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ye Jiang

    Full Text Available Several strategies have been developed to clone PCR fragments into desired vectors. However, most of commercially available T-vectors are not binary vectors and cannot be directly used for Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. In this study, a novel binary T-vector was constructed by integrating two AhdI restriction sites into the backbone vector pCAMBIA 1300. The T-vector also contains a GFP reporter gene and thus, can be used to analyze promoter activity by monitoring the reporter gene. On the other hand, identification and characterization of various promoters not only benefit the functional annotation of their genes but also provide alternative candidates to be used to drive interesting genes for plant genetic improvement by transgenesis. More than 1,000 putative pollen-specific rice genes have been identified in a genome-wide level. Among them, 67 highly expressed genes were further characterized. One of the pollen-specific genes LOC_Os10g35930 was further surveyed in its expression patterns with more details by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Finally, its promoter activity was further investigated by analyzing transgenic rice plants carrying the promoter::GFP cassette, which was constructed from the newly developed T-vector. The reporter GFP gene expression in these transgenic plants showed that the promoter was active only in mature but not in germinated pollens.

  15. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  16. Non-invasive imaging using reporter genes altering cellular water permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Wu, Di; Davis, Hunter C.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2016-12-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gene expression in live, optically opaque animals is important for multiple applications, including monitoring of genetic circuits and tracking of cell-based therapeutics. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable such monitoring with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, existing MRI reporter genes based on metalloproteins or chemical exchange probes are limited by their reliance on metals or relatively low sensitivity. Here we introduce a new class of MRI reporters based on the human water channel aquaporin 1. We show that aquaporin overexpression produces contrast in diffusion-weighted MRI by increasing tissue water diffusivity without affecting viability. Low aquaporin levels or mixed populations comprising as few as 10% aquaporin-expressing cells are sufficient to produce MRI contrast. We characterize this new contrast mechanism through experiments and simulations, and demonstrate its utility in vivo by imaging gene expression in tumours. Our results establish an alternative class of sensitive, metal-free reporter genes for non-invasive imaging.

  17. Transcription factor network downstream of protease activated receptors (PARs modulating mouse bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All four PARs are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered during inflammation. In order to search for therapeutic targets other than the receptors themselves, we set forth to determine TFs downstream of PAR activation in the C57BL/6 urinary bladders. Methods For this purpose, we used a protein/DNA combo array containing 345 different TF consensus sequences. Next, the TF selected was validated by EMSA and IHC. As mast cells seem to play a fundamental role in bladder inflammation, we determined whether c-kit receptor deficient (Kitw/Kitw-v mice have an abrogated response to PAR stimulation. Finally, TFEB antibody was used for CHIP/Q-PCR assay and revealed up-regulation of genes known to be downstream of TFEB. Results TFEB, a member of the MiTF family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper, was the only TF commonly up-regulated by all PAR-APs. IHC results confirm a correlation between inflammation and TFEB expression in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, Kitw/Kitw-v mice did not exhibit inflammation in response to PAR activation. EMSA results confirmed the increased TFEB binding activity in C57BL/6 but not in Kitw/Kitw-v mice. Conclusion This is the first report describing the increased expression of TFEB in bladder inflammation in response to PAR activation. As TFEB belongs to a family of TFs essential for mast cell survival, our findings suggest that this molecule may influence the participation of mast cells in PAR-mediated inflammation and that targeting TFEB/MiTF activity may be a novel approach for the treatment of bladder inflammatory disorders.

  18. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Takeyoshi [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Asahi, Toru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Sawamura, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.sawamura@gmail.com [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  19. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  20. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from the McNary Dam, 1994-1995 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiningen, Kirk T. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR (US)

    1996-03-01

    The author reports on progress from April 1994 through March 1995 of research on white sturgeon in the lower Columbia River. The study began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state and tribal fisheries entities to determine the (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Columbia River. This report describes activities conducted during the third year of this contract's second phase. Information was collected, analyzed, and evaluated on sub-adult and adult life histories, population dynamics, quantity and quality of habitat, and production enhancement strategies. The report is divided into sections that evaluate success of developing and implementing a management plan for white sturgeon; evaluate growth, mortality, and contributions to fisheries of juvenile white sturgeon transplanted from areas downstream; describe the life history and population dynamics of sub-adult a nd adult white sturgeon; define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing of white sturgeon and quantify the extent of habitat available; describe reproductive and early life history characteristics of white sturgeon; and quantify physical habitat used by spawning and rearing white sturgeon in the free-flowing portion of the Columbia River.

  1. First report of the blaVIM gene in environmental isolates of Buttiauxella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-04-01

    Several works have demonstrated the presence of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in clinical bacteria. However, in environmental isolates, few works have reported on these enzymes. In this study, we report for the first time two environmental isolates of Buttiauxella sp. recovered from chrysanthemum plantations in Brazil containing blaVIM gene and producing MBLs.

  2. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Alejandra Castillo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a beta-1,3-beta-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc., and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc. applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high EPS concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined.

  3. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Natalia A.; Valdez, Alejandra L.; Fariña, Julia I.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined. PMID:26528259

  4. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Julia V; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A J; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K; Lloyd, K C Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown.

  5. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression.

  6. Report of a chimeric origin of transposable elements in a bovine-coding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L M; Amaral, M E J; Silva, I T; Silva, W A; Riggs, P K; Carareto, C M

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in mammalian genomes, part of their evolutionary significance remains to be discovered. Today there is a substantial amount of evidence showing that TEs are involved in the generation of new exons in different species. In the present study, we searched 22,805 genes and reported the occurrence of TE-cassettes in coding sequences of 542 cow genes using the RepeatMasker program. Despite the significant number (542) of genes with TE insertions in exons only 14 (2.6%) of them were translated into protein, which we characterized as chimeric genes. From these chimeric genes, only the FAST kinase domains 3 (FASTKD3) gene, present on chromosome BTA 20, is a functional gene and showed evidence of the exaptation event. The genome sequence analysis showed that the last exon coding sequence of bovine FASTKD3 is approximately 85% similar to the ART2A retrotransposon sequence. In addition, comparison among FASTKD3 proteins shows that the last exon is very divergent from those of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes and Canis familiares. We suggest that the gene structure of bovine FASTKD3 gene could have originated by several ectopic recombinations between TE copies. Additionally, the absence of TE sequences in all other species analyzed suggests that the TE insertion is clade-specific, mainly in the ruminant lineage.

  7. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    ). But evidence of specific siRNA inhibition in living fish is still needed. Using the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), messenger RNA (mRNA) can be targeted resulting in degradation of targeted transcript or translational repression. Reporter genes such as luciferase and green fluorescence protein (GFP) can......RNA interference is a mechanism for silencing specific genes. It has been applied in cell culture to inhibit expression of genes involved in disease including viral genes as recently shown for the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus or VHSV (Bohle et al., 2011...... be used to observe the knock down effect by siRNAs designed to target these reporters. One aim of this project is to verify the specific knock down effect of siRNAs in cell culture and in living fish and to establish easy-read out models for testing the effect especially in vivo. Cell culture from human...

  8. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    ). But evidence of specific siRNA inhibition in living fish is still needed. Using the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), messenger RNA (mRNA) can be targeted resulting in degradation of targeted transcript or translational repression. Reporter genes such as luciferase and green fluorescence protein (GFP) can......RNA interference is a mechanism for silencing specific genes. It has been applied in cell culture to inhibit expression of genes involved in disease including viral genes as recently shown for the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus or VHSV (Bohle et al., 2011...... be used to observe the knock down effect by siRNAs designed to target these reporters. One aim of this project is to verify the specific knock down effect of siRNAs in cell culture and in living fish and to establish easy-read out models for testing the effect especially in vivo. Cell culture from human...

  9. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    cotransfected with the human androgen receptor expression vector and the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV)(2)-luciferase vector using the new nonliposomal transfection reagent FuGene, Stimulation of the cells for 24 h with the synthetic androgen receptor agonist, R1881 (10 nM), resulted in a 30- to 60-fold...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were......-on laboratory time. This assay is a powerful tool for the efficient and accurate determination and quantification of the effects of antiandrogens on reporter gene transcription, To extend the application of FuGene, the reagent was shown to be superior compared to Lipofectin for transfecting MCF7 human breast...

  10. Genetics and molecular biology of methanogen genes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konisky, J.

    1997-10-07

    Adenylate kinase has been isolated from four related methanogenic members of the Archaea. For each the optimum temperature for enzyme activity was similar to the temperature for optimal microbial growth and was approximately 30 C for Methanococcus voltage, 70 C for Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, 80 C for Methanococcus igneus and 80--90 C for Methanococcus jannaschii. The enzymes were sensitive to the adenylate kinase inhibitor, Ap{sub 5}A [P{sup 1}, P{sup 5}-di(adenosine-5{prime}) pentaphosphate], a property that was exploited to purify the enzymes by CIBACRON Blue affinity chromatography. The enzymes had an estimated molecular weight (approximately 23--25 kDa) in the range common for adenylate kinases. Each of the enzymes had a region of amino acid sequence close to its N-terminus that was similar to the canonical P-loop sequence reported for all adenylate kinases. However, the methanogen sequences lacked a lysine residue that has previously been found to be invariant in adenylate kinases including an enzyme isolated from the Archeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. If verified as a nucleotide binding domain, the methanogen sequence would represent a novel nucleotide binding motif. There was no correlation between amino acid abundance and the optimal temperature for enzyme activity.

  11. DOWNSTREAM ECOCIDE FROM UPSTREAM WATER PIRACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah Muhammad Adel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Upstream India and downstream Bangladesh share more than 50 international rivers. India has set up water diversion constructions in more than 50% of these rivers, the largest one being on the Bangladesh’s northwest upon the Ganges River, puts Bangladesh’s Gangetic ecosystem at stake. In some border rivers, India has set up groins on her side of river banks. Also, Indian side pumps Bangladesh river water stealthily from border-rivers. Further, India is constructing another dam and reservoir upstream on the Barak River on the northeast of Bangladesh. Furthermore, India has chalked out a grand plan for river networking. Exploration has been made to assess the degree of the ecosystem degradation both inland and on the coast due to all water diversion constructions around the border, except for the Tipaimukh Dam in which case estimation of projected ecosystem degradation has been mentioned. Finally, Indian grand plan of river networking plan has been briefly touched upon. Site visitations, observations, surveys, measurements and interviews of professionals were made in the project country. Relevant literatures on this issue were reviewed in electronic and print databases. Related published articles in electronic and print media were systematically searched following the key words for the case. Finally, both electronic and print news media have been closely followed to know the latest developments on this issue. The reduced flow of the Ganges in Bangladesh has caused scarcity of fresh water, species endangerment and extinction, obstruction to livestock raising, loss of livelihoods, people’s displacement, changes in crop production, reduction in navigable routes, extreme weather, increased flood occurrences, scarcity of potable water, groundwater contamination, reduction in coastal sediment deposition, deterioration of the Ganges water quality and inland intrusion of saline water front. Water diversion constructions in other rivers have

  12. Identification of BABY BOOM downstream targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarinho, P.A.; Fukuoka, H.; Xing, M.; Arkel, van J.; Immink, G.H.; Joosen, R.V.L.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Lammers, M.; Herdies, L.; Boer, de B.; Geest, van der A.H.M.; Boutilier, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    A glucocorticoid-regulated BBM protein (35S:BBM-GR) was used in combination with microarray analysis to identify genes directly activated by BBM. We employed the system described by (Lloyd et al., 1994) in which dexamethasone (DEX) and cycloheximide (CHX) are applied together to respectively, induce

  13. Effect of mutations in a simian virus 40 PolyA signal enhancer on green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H G; Wang, X F; Jing, X Y; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Lv, Z J

    2011-08-26

    Our previous studies have shown that tandem Alu repeats inhibit green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression when inserted downstream of the GFP gene in the pEGFP-C1 vector. We found that the 22R sequence (5'-GTGAAAAAAATGCTTTATTTGT-3') from the antisense PolyA (240 bp polyadenylation signal) of simian virus 40, eliminated repression of GFP gene expression when inserted between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats. The 22R sequence contains an imperfect palindrome; based on RNA structure software prediction, it forms an unstable stem-loop structure, including a loop, a first stem, a bulge, and a second stem. Analysis of mutations of the loop length of the 22R sequence showed that the three-nucleotide loop (wild-type, 22R) induced much stronger GFP expression than did other loop lengths. Two mutations, 4TMI (A7→T, A17→T) and 5AMI (A6→T, T18→A), which caused the base type changes in the bulge and in the second stem in the 22R sequence, induced stronger GFP gene expression than 22R itself. Mutation of the bulge base (A17→T), leading to complete complementation of the stem, caused weaker GFP gene expression. Sequences without a palindrome (7pieA, 5'-GTGAAAAAAATG CAAAAAAAGT-3', 7pieT, 5'-GTGTTTTTTTTGCTTTTTTTGT-3') did not activate GFP gene expression. We conclude that an imperfect palindrome affects and can increase GFP gene expression.

  14. Elucidation of a downstream boundary of the 3' IgH regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manis, John P; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Birshtein, Barbara K; Alt, Frederick W

    2003-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region gene (C(H)) in B cells from IgM to IgG, IgA, or IgE, without modifying the variable region gene segment. This process requires transcription through switch (S) regions located upstream of the C(H) genes targeted for CSR, a process that relies on the activity of an uncharacterized regulatory region at the 3' end of the C(H) locus (3' IgH RR) that has been implicated via the effects of pgk-neo cassettes inserted into the locus. The 30kb region just downstream of the most 3' C(H) gene (Ca) contains four known enhancer elements including HS3a, HS1,2, HS3b, and HS4. Replacement of either of the proximal two enhancer elements (HS3a or HS1,2) with a pgk-neo gene cassette disrupted germline transcription of and CSR to most C(H) genes. However, replacement of either of the enhancers with a loxP sequence had no effect on CSR indicating that these elements are not critical for CSR. Insertion of a pgk-neo cassette at various sites within the C(H) locus inhibited CSR to upstream, but not downstream C(H) genes, supporting the notion that the pgk-neo cassette insertion into the locus short-circuits the ability of the 3' RR to facilitate CSR of dependent C(H) genes upstream of the insertion. These analyses also indicated that the key elements of the 3' IgH RR were downstream from HS1,2. In this study, we have sought to localize the 3' IgH RR by defining its 3' boundary. For this purpose, a pgk-neo gene cassette was targeted 2kb downstream of the HS4 element in ES cells that had normal ability to undergo CSR. We then employed Rag-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to generate chimeric mice that harbored B cells homozygous for this mutation. Such chimeras exhibited normal reconstitution of the splenic compartment and had normal serum immunoglobulin levels. Upon in vitro activation, transcription from the pgk-neo cassette was induced in B cells, however, CSR to all measured IgH isotypes

  15. New imaging probes to track cell fate: reporter genes in stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgielewicz, Piotr; Harmsen, Stefan; Wei, Elizabeth; Bachmann, Michael H; Ting, Richard; Aras, Omer

    2017-07-03

    Cell fate is a concept used to describe the differentiation and development of a cell in its organismal context over time. It is important in the field of regenerative medicine, where stem cell therapy holds much promise but is limited by our ability to assess its efficacy, which is mainly due to the inability to monitor what happens to the cells upon engraftment to the damaged tissue. Currently, several imaging modalities can be used to track cells in the clinical setting; however, they do not satisfy many of the criteria necessary to accurately assess several aspects of cell fate. In recent years, reporter genes have become a popular option for tracking transplanted cells, via various imaging modalities in small mammalian animal models. This review article examines the reporter gene strategies used in imaging modalities such as MRI, SPECT/PET, Optoacoustic and Bioluminescence Imaging. Strengths and limitations of the use of reporter genes in each modality are discussed.

  16. Bmx tyrosine kinase has a redundant function downstream of angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors in arterial endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajantie, I; Ekman, N; Iljin, K; Arighi, E; Gunji, Y; Kaukonen, J; Palotie, A; Dewerchin, M; Carmeliet, P; Alitalo, K

    2001-07-01

    The Bmx gene, a member of the Tec tyrosine kinase gene family, is known to be expressed in subsets of hematopoietic and endothelial cells. In this study, mice were generated in which the first coding exon of the Bmx gene was replaced with the lacZ reporter gene by a knock-in strategy. The homozygous mice lacking Bmx activity were fertile and had a normal life span without an obvious phenotype. Staining of their tissues using beta-galactosidase substrate to assess the sites of Bmx expression revealed strong signals in the endothelial cells of large arteries and in the endocardium starting between days 10.5 and 12.5 of embryogenesis and continuing in adult mice, while the venular endothelium showed a weak signal only in the superior and inferior venae cavae. Of the five known endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases tested, activated Tie-2 induced tyrosyl phosphorylation of the Bmx protein and both Tie-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) stimulated Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. Thus, the Bmx tyrosine kinase has a redundant role in arterial endothelial signal transduction downstream of the Tie-2 and VEGFR-1 growth factor receptors.

  17. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  18. A systemic lupus erythematosus gene expression array in disease diagnosis and classification: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Y-T; Peoples, C; Kafri, R; Kyttaris, V C; Sunahori, K; Kis-Toth, K; Fitzgerald, L; Ergin, S; Finnell, M; Tsokos, G C

    2011-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease diagnosed on the presence of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings. At the pathogenetic level, multiple factors using diverse biochemical and molecular pathways have been recognized. Succinct recognition and classification of clinical disease subsets, as well as the availability of disease biomarkers, remains largely unsolved. Based on information produced by the present authors' and other laboratories, a lupus gene expression array consisting of 30 genes, previously claimed to contribute to aberrant function of T cells, was developed. An additional eight genes were included as controls. Peripheral blood was obtained from 10 patients (19 samples) with SLE and six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as 19 healthy controls. T cell mRNA was subjected to reverse transcription and PCR, and the gene expression levels were measured. Conventional statistical analysis was performed along with principal component analysis (PCA) to capture the contribution of all genes to disease diagnosis and clinical parameters. The lupus gene expression array faithfully informed on the expression levels of genes. The recorded changes in expression reflect those reported in the literature by using a relatively small (5 ml) amount of peripheral blood. PCA of gene expression levels placed SLE samples apart from normal and RA samples regardless of disease activity. Individual principal components tended to define specific disease manifestations such as arthritis and proteinuria. Thus, a lupus gene expression array based on genes previously claimed to contribute to immune pathogenesis of SLE may define the disease, and principal components of the expression of 30 genes may define patients with specific disease manifestations.

  19. Reporter gene imaging of immune responses to cancer: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to cancer are dynamic processes which take place through the concerted activity of innate and adaptive cell populations. In order to fully understand the efficacy of immune therapies for cancer, it is critical to understand how the treatment modulates the function of each cell type involved in the anti-tumor immune response. Molecular imaging is a versatile method for longitudinal studies of cellular localization and function. The development of reporter genes for tracking cell movement and function was a powerful addition to the immunologist's toolbox. This review will highlight the advances and challenges in the use of reporter gene imaging to track immune cell localization and function in cancer.

  20. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  1. Effects of MicroRNA-153 on the Expression of Its Target Gene Downstream Signaling Molecule GSK-3β and on the Cellular Anti-Injury Ability%MicroRNA-153对靶基因下游信号分子GSK-3β表达水平及细胞抗损伤能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁春联; 朱华; 黄澜; 许艳峰; 邓巍; 马春梅; 刘颖; 秦川

    2011-01-01

    Objective Mir-153 can negatively regulate the expression of APP and APLP2 protein, the crucial Alzheimer' s disease related genes, and consequently lower the level of their intracellular degradation fragment (intracellular domains, ICDs). Considering the transcriptional activity and pro-apoptotic role of ICDs, the aim of this study was to explore the effect of mir-153 on the expression of GSK-3β, the downstream signaling molecule of the two target genes, and on the ability of cells against damage stress to further identify the role of mir-153 in Alzheimer' s disease.Methods A stably transfected cell line over-expressing mir-153 was developed and mir-153 transgenic mice were generated. Western blot was used to detect the expression of phosphorylated GSK-3β, Tau and their total protein in the cells and mice. The mir-153 stably transfected cells were treated with Aβ42peptide and H202. respectively, to determine the changes of cell viability by MTS and analyze the cell apoptosis by flow cytometry. Results The expression of phosphorylated GSK-3β and it's total protein were decreased and the phosphorylation of Tau was reduced in the mir-153 stably transfected cells. The expression of phosphorylated GSK-3β and it' s total protein were down-regulated and the level of phosphorylated Tau and its total protein were not significantly changed in the brain of mir-153 transgenic mice. Under the treatment of Aβ42 peptide and H2O2, the viability of mir-153 stably transfected cells were clearly decreased and the apoptosis level of the cells was increased. Conclusion Mir-153 can negatively regulate the expression of GSK-3β, the downstream signaling molecule of its target genes. Over-expressed mir-153 lowers the cellular anti-injury ability.%目的 mir-153可负调控阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer'S disease,AD)主要致病基因APP及APLP2的蛋白表达,降低其胞内降解片段(intracellular domains,ICDs)的生成.因ICDs具有转录活化及促凋亡

  2. Optimization of reporter gene assay: several factors influencing detection of promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li-xiang; WENG Mo; ZHANG Zong-yu; TONG Tan-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Promoter analysis is currently applied to detect the expression of the targeted gene in studies of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. As a reporter gene, luciferase plays an important role and has been used widely in the promoter assay.Methods Human embryonic lung fibroblast cells (2BS), HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells were transfected with various genes embedded by lipofectamine. This study determined various factors that affect promoter activity determination,such as the selection of the reporter genes and internal references, the dose and the type of the vectors carrying the transcription factors, the host cells and the instruments.Results The sensitivity of the luciferase assay was much higher than that of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Moreover, promoter activity is increased in a dose-related manner only in certain ranges outside of which the results may be reversed and the promoter activity is related to the expression vector which is carrying the cDNA.Otherwise, the length of the promoter, internal references and the host cell can also influence the promoter activity.Conclusions To detect the promoter activity accurately, a few factors including dose, vector, length and host cell which influence reporter gene assay aforementioned should be considered.

  3. NAN fusions: a synthetic sialidase reporter gene as a sensitive and versatile partner for GUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J; Kavanagh, T A

    2002-11-01

    GUS continues to be the reporter of choice for many gene fusion applications, due to the unparalleled sensitivity of the encoded enzyme and the ease with which it can be quantified in cell-free extracts and visualized histochemically in cells and tissues. A compatible and functionally equivalent reporter gene would facilitate dual promoter studies and internal standardization of expression analyses in the same plant. A search for a candidate enzyme activity not found in plants, which might form the basis of a novel GUS-compatible reporter system, led us to investigate nanH, a Clostridium perfringens gene which encodes the so-called 'small' cytoplasmic sialidase. Expression of the native, AT-rich nanH gene in transgenic plants did not, however, result in detectable sialidase activity. For this reason, a codon-optimized derivative, NAN, was synthesized which possesses a GC content similar to that found in highly expressed plant genes. NAN enzyme activity was expressed at high levels in both stably and transiently transformed cells, possessed kinetic and stability properties similar to those of GUS, and showed optimal activity in GUS buffer. Moreover, NAN and GUS activity could be visualized simultaneously in polyacrylamide gels using the corresponding methylumbelliferone-based substrates, and in whole seedlings and tissue sections using the histochemical substrates 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl alpha-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (X-NeuNAc) and 5-bromo-6-chloro-3-indolyl beta-d-glucuronide (X-GlucM), respectively.

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis in a Family of TNFRSF11A (RANK Gene Mutation Detection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Karkucak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive osteoporosis (ARO is a severe disease causing death usually at infancy or childhood. RANKL coded by TNFSF11 gene and RANK coded by TNFRSF11A gene are important proteins for osteoclast maturation and it is indicated that mutation on these genes plays an important role for ARO development. It is reported in this article that c.508 A→G homozygote mutation (pArg170Gly is observed in TNFRSF11A gene of 2 children of consanguineous couple. Mutation analysis performed on CVS material during the next pregnancy revealed heterozygous mutation in the fetus. The pregnancy was continued to term and a healthy boy was delivered. Prenatal mutation analysis is important for diseases with known mutations to relieve parental anxiety and provide genetic counselling for the family.

  5. Focused ultrasound enhanced molecular imaging and gene therapy for multifusion reporter gene in glioma-bearing rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Ting; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chien, Yi-Chun; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Tsai, Min-Lan

    2015-11-03

    The ability to monitor the responses of and inhibit the growth of brain tumors during gene therapy has been severely limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A previous study has demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive in vivo imaging with 123I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodo-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (123I-FIAU) for monitoring herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) cancer gene expression in an experimental animal model. Here, we tested the enhancement of SPECT with 123I-FIAU and ganciclovir (GCV) treatment in brain tumors after BBB disruption induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles. We established an orthotopic F98 glioma-bearing rat model with trifusion reporter genes. The results of this study showed that the rat model of HSV1-tk-expressing glioma cells could be successfully detected by SPECT imaging after FUS-induced BBB disruption on day 10 after implantation. Compared to the control group, animals receiving the GCV with or without sonication exhibited a significant antitumor activity (P therapy in brain diseases.

  6. Downstream Evolution of Longitudinal Embedded Vortices with Helical Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2009-01-01

    In the present work the downstream development of device induced vortices with helical symmetry embedded in wall bounded flow on a bump is studied with the aid of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The downstream evolution of characteristic parameters of helical vortices is studied...

  7. 3' Noncoding Region Construction of GHR Gene-luciferase Report Vector and Valuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Jing; Men Jing; Wang Chun-mei; Gao Xue-jun; Li Qing-zhang

    2012-01-01

    To analyze miR-139 target sites in 3' UTR of GHR gene in dairy cow mammary gland, a GHR 3' UTR- luciferase reporter vector was constructed and the effect of miRNA on its activity was evaluated in dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells (DCMECs). The miR-139 targeting GHR 3' UTR was predicted by Target Scan 5.1 software, 3' UTR fragment of GHR was amplified by PCR from RNA of DCMECs. PCR products were cloned into Spe Ⅰ/Hind Ⅱ modified pMIR-Report vector. The luciferase reporter vector and miRNA eukaryotic expression vector were transferred into DCMECs using lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. The dualluciferase reporter assay system was used to quantitiate the reporter activity. The results showed that a 107 bp 3' UTR fragment of GHR gene was successfully cloned into the pMIR-Report vector, which authenticated by Spe Ⅰ/Hind Ⅲ digestion and DNA sequencing. The luciferase activity of reporter construction treated with miR-139 decreased 20.87% compared with the control group. It was concluded that the GHR3' UTR-luciferase reporter vector had been successfully constructed. The luciferase activity of the reporter could be suppressed by miR- 139.

  8. Oxygen Sensitivity of Reporter Genes: Implications for Preclinical Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Cecic

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Reporter gene techniques have been applied toward studying the physiologic phenomena associated with tumor hypoxia, a negative prognostic indicator. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential adverse effects of hypoxic conditions on the effectiveness of four commonly used reporter genes: Renilla luciferase, monomeric red fluorescent protein, thymidine kinase, and lacZ. Tumor-forming A375 cells expressing a trifusion reporter consisting of Renilla luciferase, monomeric red fluorescent protein, and thymidine kinase were subjected to decreasing oxygen tensions and assayed for reporter expression and activity. A375 cells expressing β-galactosidase were similarly exposed to hypoxia, with activity of the reporter monitored by cleavage of the fluorescent substrate 7-hydroxy-9H-(1, 3-dichloro-9, 9-dimethylacridin-2-one-β-galactoside (DDAOG. Generation of signal in in vivo tumor models expressing bioluminescent or β-galactosidase reporters were also examined over the course of hypoxic stresses, either by tumor clamping or the antivascular agent 5, 6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA. Our findings indicate that bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter activity are decreased under hypoxia despite minimal variations in protein production, whereas β-galactosidase reporter activity per unit protein was unchanged. These results demonstrate that combining β-galactosidase with the DDAOG optical probe may be a robust reporter system for the in vivo study of tumor hypoxia.

  9. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  10. A small scale cell culture system to analyze mechanobiology using reporter gene constructs and polyurethane dishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seefried, Lothar; Mueller-Deubert, Sigrid; Wentzer, Thomas Schwarz

    2010-01-01

    of mechanotransduction and its crosstalk with biochemically induced signal transduction, AP1 and SP1 luciferase reporter gene constructs were cloned and transfected into various cell lines and primary cells. A newly developed bioreactor and small-scale 24-well polyurethane dishes were used to apply cyclic stretching...

  11. Multiple insulin degrading enzyme variants alter in vitro reporter gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Belbin

    Full Text Available The insulin degrading enzyme (IDE variant, v311 (rs6583817, is associated with increased post-mortem cerebellar IDE mRNA, decreased plasma β-amyloid (Aβ, decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD and increased reporter gene expression, suggesting that it is a functional variant driving increased IDE expression. To identify other functional IDE variants, we have tested v685, rs11187061 (associated with decreased cerebellar IDE mRNA and variants on H6, the haplotype tagged by v311 (v10; rs4646958, v315; rs7895832, v687; rs17107734 and v154; rs4646957, for altered in vitro reporter gene expression. The reporter gene expression levels associated with the second most common haplotype (H2 successfully replicated the post-mortem findings in hepatocytoma (0.89 fold-change, p = 0.04 but not neuroblastoma cells. Successful in vitro replication was achieved for H6 in neuroblastoma cells when the sequence was cloned 5' to the promoter (1.18 fold-change, p = 0.006 and 3' to the reporter gene (1.29 fold change, p = 0.003, an effect contributed to by four variants (v10, v315, v154 and v311. Since IDE mediates Aβ degradation, variants that regulate IDE expression could represent good therapeutic targets for AD.

  12. WUS and STM-based reporter genes for studying meristem development in poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development of a reporter system for monitoring meristem initiation in poplar using promoters of poplar homologs to the meristem-active regulatory genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM). When ~3 kb of the 5’ flanking regions of close homologs were used to drive expression o...

  13. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  14. Impact of copy number of distinct SV40PolyA segments on expression of a GFP reporter gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The presence of Alu repeats downregulates the expression of the green fluorescent protein(GFP) gene.We found that SV40PolyA(PolyA,240 bp),in either orientation,eliminated the inhibition of GFP gene expression induced by Alu repeats when it was placed between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats.In this study,4 different segments(each 60 bp) were amplified from antisense PolyA(PolyAas) by PCR,and inserted upstream of Alu14 in pAlu14 plasmid(14 Alu repeats inserted downstream of the GFP gene in vector pEGFP-C1 in a head-tail tandem manner).Segments 1F1R(the first 60 bp segment at the 5’ end of PolyAas) and 4F4R(the fourth 60 bp segment from the 5’ end of PolyAas) did not activate GFP gene expression,whereas 2F2R and 3F3R(the middle two segments) did(as detected by Northern blot analysis and fluorescent microscopy).Different copy numbers of 2F2R and 3F3R segments,in a head and tail tandem manner,were inserted downstream of the GFP gene in pAlu14.p2F2R*4-Alu28,p3F3R*4-Alu18 and p3F3R*4-Alu28 were used as length controls to verify that the decrease in the expression of GFP was not due to the increased length of the inserted segment in the expression vectors.We found that 2 and 4 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R activated the GFP gene more strongly than one copy of them.However,more than 8 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R reduced the activation of the GFP gene.We concluded that SV40PolyAas contained at least two gene-activating elements(2F2R and 3F3R) and 2-4 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R were optimal for the expression of the GFP gene.

  15. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. N-MYC下游调节基因-2蛋白在前列腺肿瘤组织中的表达%Analysis of the N-MYC down-stream regulate gene-2 protein expression in prostatic carcinoma tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟强; 毕玉彪; 于新路; 曹丽佳; 孙明; 于垂恭

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To study the expression of N-MYC down-stream regulated gene-2 (NDRG2), a new candidate tumor suppressor, in prostate cancer, and to investigate its clinical and pathological implications. [Methods] Formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 42 cases of prostatic carcinoma(PCa) and 9 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were analyzed retrospectively with immunohistochemistry ( S-P method). [Results] The NDRG2 gene was highly expressed in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, but not in carcinomatous ones. Positive expression of NDRG2 proteins was detected in 14 of the 17 (82.35%) benign tumor samples and accounted for 32.69% in prostatic carcinoma ones. Furthermore, positive expression of NDRG2 in prostatic carcinoma samples decreased significantly with the increasing of the gleason score (r = -0.5197) .However, positive expression of NDRG2 was not correlated with TN M tumor stages or the concentration of prostate-specific antigen (P SA)in blood serum(P > 0.05).[Conclusior] The NDRG2 expression level was lower in PCA than in BPH. NDRG2 may play an essential role in prostate carcinogenesis and in the progress of PCA.%[目的]N-MYC下游调节基因-2(NDRG2)在前列腺癌及前列腺增生中的表达与临床病理特征和生物学行为的关系[方法]前列腺肿瘤标本51例,其中前列腺增生标本9例,前列腺癌标本42例,均为存档石蜡切片,应用免疫组织化学(S-P法)研究NDRG2表达.[结果]NDRG2在前列腺增生组织表达为82.35%,在前列腺癌组织为32.69%,两者差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).NDRG2表达水平同Gleason评分呈负相关(r=-0.5197),在不同临床TNM分期间、在血清PSA浓度≤20 ng/ml与PSA浓度>20ng/ml组间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).[结论]NDRG2表达在前列腺癌组织低于前列腺增生组织,且表达与Gleason评分呈负相关.表明NDRG2有可能参与了前列腺癌的发生及发展过程.

  17. Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM), a target for anti-thrombotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-03-01

    Circulating platelets participate in the process of numerous diseases including thrombosis, inflammation, and cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the underlying mechanisms mediating platelet activation under disease conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that despite the lack of a nucleus, platelets possess molecules that are involved in gene transcription in nucleated cells. This review will summarize downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, and highlight recent findings suggesting its novel non-transcriptional role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  18. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  19. Vagaries of fluorochrome reporter gene expression in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Schallenberg

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cell lineage commitment and expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be induced at the CD4(+CD8(+ double-positive (DP and CD4(+CD8(? single-positive stages of thymic development, as well as in postthymic CD4(+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues. The availability of transgenic mice with Foxp3-dependent fluorochrome reporter gene expression has greatly facilitated studies on the intra- and extrathymic generation of murine Foxp3(+ Treg cells. Here, we performed a comparative analysis of thymic Treg cell development and peripheral compartments of mature Treg cells in various transgenic strains with gene targeted and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-driven Foxp3-fluorochrome expression. These studies revealed a relative deficiency of Foxp3(+ DP thymocytes selectively in mice with targeted insertion of the fluorochrome reporter gene coding sequence into the endogenous Foxp3 gene. While Foxp3 BAC-driven fluorochrome expression in ex vivo CD4(+ T cells was found to faithfully reflect Foxp3 protein expression, we provide evidence that Foxp3 BAC transgenesis can result in sizable populations of Foxp3(+ Treg cells that lack fluorochrome reporter expression. This could be attributed to both timely delayed up-regulation of BAC expression in developing Treg cells and the accumulation of peripheral Foxp3(+ Treg cells with continuous transcriptional inactivity of the Foxp3 BAC transgene.

  20. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  1. Recurrent anencephaly: a case report and examination of the VANGL1 and FOXN1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, Consolato; Gekas, Jean; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2013-07-01

    We report a new and rare case of recurrent anencephaly in a family with no other apparent abnormalities. The karyotypes of the family and all affected subjects were normal. Thorough mutational analyses of VANGL1 of chromosome 1p13.1 and FOXN1 of chromosome 17q11-q12, genes that are associated with phenotypes of the anencephaly spectrum, unfortunately did not disclose any DNA variations in an affected fetus of this family. The etiology of recurrent anencephaly in this family is therefore due to mutations in genes yet to be discovered, perhaps of the planar cell polarity pathway, or to possible environmental gestational factors during development.

  2. Molecular characterization of a maize regulatory gene. Progress report, July 1989--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessler, S.

    1990-12-31

    This progress report contains information concerning the characterization of the Maize regulatory gene. The findings of this research program have immediate significance. Firstly, it provides support for the notion that R proteins, produced by the regulatory gene, are functionally equivalent. Secondly, the success of these experiments provides a simple transient assay for either natural or constructed R protein mutations. The relative ease of this assay coupled with overnight results are important prerequisites to the proposed experiments involving a structure-function analysis of the R protein.

  3. Quantification of Atlantic salmon type-I interferon using an Mx1 promoter reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Audny; Collet, Bertrand; Sandaker, Elin; Secombes, Christopher J; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2004-02-01

    We here describe an assay for the detection of interferon-like activity in Atlantic salmon based on the transient transfection of chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 cells) with a rainbow trout Mx1 promoter linked to a luciferase reporter. A beta-galactosidase gene under the control of a constitutively expressed beta-actin promoter was used as a transfection standard, and luciferase and beta gal expression were measured by a commercially available kit. Interferon containing supernatants from poly I:C- or CpG-stimulated leucocytes added to transfected CHSE-cells induced high luciferase expression (>60-fold induction compared to supernatants from non-stimulated cells). There was no response to supernatants from LPS- and ConA/PMA-stimulated leucocytes, demonstrating the specificity for type I interferon-like activity. Duplicate samples analysed using a cell protection assay for detection of antiviral activity correlated well with levels obtained by the Mx1 promoter reporter gene assay (R2=0.97), confirming the reporter assay as a reliable substitute for the standard antiviral assay. The Mx reporter gene assay also has advantages in terms of sensitivity, high dynamic range and reliability over the conventional cell protection assay.

  4. An assessment of recently published gene expression data analyses: reporting experimental design and statistical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuaje Francisco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of large-scale gene expression data is a fundamental approach to functional genomics and the identification of potential drug targets. Results derived from such studies cannot be trusted unless they are adequately designed and reported. The purpose of this study is to assess current practices on the reporting of experimental design and statistical analyses in gene expression-based studies. Methods We reviewed hundreds of MEDLINE-indexed papers involving gene expression data analysis, which were published between 2003 and 2005. These papers were examined on the basis of their reporting of several factors, such as sample size, statistical power and software availability. Results Among the examined papers, we concentrated on 293 papers consisting of applications and new methodologies. These papers did not report approaches to sample size and statistical power estimation. Explicit statements on data transformation and descriptions of the normalisation techniques applied prior to data analyses (e.g. classification were not reported in 57 (37.5% and 104 (68.4% of the methodology papers respectively. With regard to papers presenting biomedical-relevant applications, 41(29.1 % of these papers did not report on data normalisation and 83 (58.9% did not describe the normalisation technique applied. Clustering-based analysis, the t-test and ANOVA represent the most widely applied techniques in microarray data analysis. But remarkably, only 5 (3.5% of the application papers included statements or references to assumption about variance homogeneity for the application of the t-test and ANOVA. There is still a need to promote the reporting of software packages applied or their availability. Conclusion Recently-published gene expression data analysis studies may lack key information required for properly assessing their design quality and potential impact. There is a need for more rigorous reporting of important experimental

  5. Case report of novel CACNA1A gene mutation causing episodic ataxia type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alan Isaacs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Episodic ataxia type 2 (OMIM 108500 is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by paroxysms of ataxia, vertigo, nausea, and other neurologic symptoms. More than 50 mutations of the CACNA1A gene have been discovered in families with episodic ataxia type 2, although 30%–50% of all patients with typical episodic ataxia type 2 phenotype have no detectable mutation of the CACNA1A gene. Case: A 46-year-old Caucasian man, with a long history of bouts of imbalance, vertigo, and nausea, presented to our hospital with 2 weeks of ataxia and headache. Subsequent evaluation revealed a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene: c.1364 G > A Arg455Gln. Acetazolamide was initiated with symptomatic improvement. Conclusion: This case report expands the list of known CACNA1A mutations associated with episodic ataxia type 2.

  6. Case report of novel CACNA1A gene mutation causing episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, David Alan; Bradshaw, Michael J; Brown, Kelly; Hedera, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (OMIM 108500) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by paroxysms of ataxia, vertigo, nausea, and other neurologic symptoms. More than 50 mutations of the CACNA1A gene have been discovered in families with episodic ataxia type 2, although 30%-50% of all patients with typical episodic ataxia type 2 phenotype have no detectable mutation of the CACNA1A gene. A 46-year-old Caucasian man, with a long history of bouts of imbalance, vertigo, and nausea, presented to our hospital with 2 weeks of ataxia and headache. Subsequent evaluation revealed a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene: c.1364 G > A Arg455Gln. Acetazolamide was initiated with symptomatic improvement. This case report expands the list of known CACNA1A mutations associated with episodic ataxia type 2.

  7. Construction and application of a promoter-trapping vector with methyl parathion hydrolase gene mpd as the reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Zhong-Hui; Li, Shun-Peng

    2004-07-01

    A facilitative and efficient promoter-trapping vector, pUC-mpd, was constructed with the promoterless methyl parathion hydrolase gene as the reporter. This reporter gene is easily used to clone promoters with different promoting strength on selective plates. Promoter regions of the ytkA and ywoF genes with strong promoting and signal peptide functions were cloned from the Bacillus subtilis 168 genomic promoter library with this vector.

  8. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  9. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF DEGRADATION AND FLUVIAL PROCESS DOWNSTREAM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To research into the problem of degradation and fluvial process downstream reservoirs and its influence on flood control and navigation, a 1-D mathematical model of degradation and fluvial process downstream the reservoir was established in this paper. The non-equilibrium transport of non-uniform suspended load, the non-uniform bedload transport and bed material sorting were considered in the model. Some techniques were suggested for some problems in calculation, such as the effective suspended load carrying capacity of the different reaches of bed materials, the coefficient of suspended load carrying capacity, the recovering coefficient of carrying capacity, the mixed layer thickness, the bedload transport width, bifurcation and confluence of main and branch channel, and the distribution of deposition and erosion along the cross section, etc. The model was tested by the data of degradation downstream the Danjiangkou reservoir on the Hanjiang River and the data of degradation downstream the Gezhouba Project on the Yangtze River.

  10. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFa antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NF¿B regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NF¿B. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFa-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  11. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFα antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NFκB regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NFκB. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFα-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  12. A small scale cell culture system to analyze mechanobiology using reporter gene constructs and polyurethane dishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seefried, Lothar; Mueller-Deubert, Sigrid; Wentzer, Thomas Schwarz

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical forces are translated into biochemical signals and contribute to cell differentiation and phenotype maintenance. Mesenchymal stem cells and their tissue-specific offspring, as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, cells of cardiovascular tissues and lung cells are sensitive to mechanical loading...... but molecules and mechanisms involved have to be unraveled. It is well established that cellular mechanotransduction is mediated e.g. by activation of the transcription factor SP1 and by kinase signaling cascades resulting in the activation of the AP1 complex. To investigate cellular mechanisms involved...... in mechanotransduction and to analyze substances, which modulate cellular mechanosensitivity reporter gene constructs, which can be transfected into cells of interest might be helpful. Suitable small-scale bioreactor systems and mechanosensitive reporter gene constructs are lacking. To analyze the molecular mechanisms...

  13. Reporter gene imaging of targeted T cell immunotherapy in recurrent glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keu, Khun Visith; Witney, Timothy H; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Kurien, Anita; Magnusson, Rachel; Williams, John; Habte, Frezghi; Wagner, Jamie R; Forman, Stephen; Brown, Christine; Allen-Auerbach, Martin; Czernin, Johannes; Tang, Winson; Jensen, Michael C; Badie, Behnam; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2017-01-18

    High-grade gliomas are aggressive cancers that often become rapidly fatal. Immunotherapy using CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), engineered to express both herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) zetakine chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), is a treatment strategy with considerable potential. To optimize this and related immunotherapies, it would be helpful to monitor CTL viability and trafficking to glioma cells. We show that noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 9-[4-[(18)F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([(18)F]FHBG) can track HSV1-tk reporter gene expression present in CAR-engineered CTLs. [(18)F]FHBG imaging was safe and enabled the longitudinal imaging of T cells stably transfected with a PET reporter gene in patients. Further optimization of this imaging approach for monitoring in vivo cell trafficking should greatly benefit various cell-based therapies for cancer.

  14. Novel Mutations in the CLCN1 Gene of Myotonia Congenita: 2 Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakraj, Amanda Amrita; Miller, Geoffrey; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Khokhar, Babar; Nowak, Richard J.; DiCapua, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Myotonia Congenita is an inherited myotonia that is due to a mutation in the skeletal muscle chloride channel CLCN1. These mutations lead to reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance, causing delayed muscle relaxation that is evident as clinical and electrical myotonia. Methods: We report the clinical presentations of two individuals with Myotonia Congenita (MC). Results: Patient 1 has been diagnosed with the recessive form of MC, known as the Becker variant, and Patient 2 has been diagnosed with the dominant form of MC, known as the Thomsen variant. In both patients, the diagnosis was made based on the clinical presentation, EMG and CLCN1 gene sequencing. Patient 1 also had a muscle biopsy. Conclusions: Genetic testing in both patients reveals previously unidentified mutations in the CLCN1 gene specific to Myotonia Congenita. We report the salient clinical features of each patient and discuss the effects and common types of CLCN1 mutations and review the literature. PMID:23483815

  15. Evaluation of a GFP Report Gene Construct for Environmental Arsenic Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, F.F.; Barnes, J.M.; Bruhn, D.F.

    2002-03-28

    Detection of arsenic and other heavy metal contaminants in the environment is critical to ensuring safe drinking water and effective cleanup of historic activities that have led to widespread contamination of soil and groundwater. Biosensors have the potential to significantly reduce the costs associated with site characterization and long term environmental monitoring. By exploiting the highly selective and sensitive natural mechanisms by which bacteria and other living organisms respond to heavy metals, and fusing transcriptionally active components of these mechanisms to reporter genes, such as B-galactosidase, bacterial luciferase (lux), or green fluorescent protein (GFP) from marine jellyfish, it is possible to produce inexpensive, yet effective biosensors. This article describes the response to submicrogram quantities of arsenite and arsenate of a whole cell arsenic biosensor utilizing a GFP reporter gene.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF RIVER BED CHANGE DOWNSTREAM OF XIAOLANGDI RESERVOIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model of river bed change downstream of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir was developed based on the most recent achievement of sediment theory in the Yellow River. The model was verified by the comparison of computed results and measured data from 1986 to 1996. Numerical prediction of the erosion and deposition downstream of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir in its first operation year was carried out, and a series of suggestions were given for reservoir operation mode in its early operation period.

  17. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shen

    2012-05-01

    Maximizing the optical network unit’s (ONU) sleep time is an effective approach for achieving maximum energy conservation in green Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs). While overlapping downstream and upstream ONU transmissions can maximize the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality of service (QoS) performance of the network, especially for downstream traffic in case the overlapping is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green EPONs under the limited service discipline and the upstream-based overlapped time window. Specifically, we first derive the expected mean packet delay, and then present a closed-form expression of the ONU sleep time, setting identical upstream/downstream transmission cycle times based on a maximum downstream traffic delay re-quirement. With the proposed system model, we present a novel downstream bandwidth allocation scheme for energy conservation in green EPONs. Simulation results verify the proposed model and highlight the advantages of our scheme over conventional approaches.

  18. Rational Design of a Triple Reporter Gene for Multimodality Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ju Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality imaging using noncytotoxic triple fusion (TF reporter genes is an important application for cell-based tracking, drug screening, and therapy. The firefly luciferase (fl, monomeric red fluorescence protein (mrfp, and truncated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase SR39 mutant (ttksr39 were fused together to create TF reporter gene constructs with different order. The enzymatic activities of TF protein in vitro and in vivo were determined by luciferase reporter assay, H-FEAU cellular uptake experiment, bioluminescence imaging, and micropositron emission tomography (microPET. The TF construct expressed in H1299 cells possesses luciferase activity and red fluorescence. The tTKSR39 activity is preserved in TF protein and mediates high levels of H-FEAU accumulation and significant cell death from ganciclovir (GCV prodrug activation. In living animals, the luciferase and tTKSR39 activities of TF protein have also been successfully validated by multimodality imaging systems. The red fluorescence signal is relatively weak for in vivo imaging but may expedite FACS-based selection of TF reporter expressing cells. We have developed an optimized triple fusion reporter construct DsRedm-fl-ttksr39 for more effective and sensitive in vivo animal imaging using fluorescence, bioluminescence, and PET imaging modalities, which may facilitate different fields of biomedical research and applications.

  19. Glucocerebrosidase 2 gene deletion rescues type 1 Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Pramod K.; LIU, Jun; Sun, Li; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Yuen, Tony; Yang, Ruhua; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Kate; Li, Jianhua; Keutzer, Joan; Stachnik, Agnes; Mennone, Albert; Boyer, James L; Jain, Dhanpat; Brady, Roscoe O

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by inherited mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene. This disease results in a marked accumulation of glycosphingolipid substrates, causing visceromegaly, cytopenia, and osteopenia. Here, we have rescued this clinical phenotype in GD1 mice by genetically deleting Gba2, a gene encoding a downstream extralysosomal enzyme, GBA2. We also report that sphingosine production in GD1 patients may contribute to the low-...

  20. Use of the Aspergillus oryzae actin gene promoter in a novel reporter system for exploring antifungal compounds and their target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Junichiro; Yoshimi, Akira; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Fujii-Watanabe, Yoshimi; Oda, Ken; Koike, Hideaki; Tamano, Koichi; Ishii, Tomoko; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Abe, Keietsu

    2010-08-01

    Demand for novel antifungal drugs for medical and agricultural uses has been increasing because of the diversity of pathogenic fungi and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Genomic resources for various living species, including pathogenic fungi, can be utilized to develop novel and effective antifungal compounds. We used Aspergillus oryzae as a model to construct a reporter system for exploring novel antifungal compounds and their target genes. The comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that the actin-encoding actB gene was transcriptionally highly induced by benomyl treatment. We therefore used the actB gene to construct a novel reporter system for monitoring responses to cytoskeletal stress in A. oryzae by introducing the actB promoter::EGFP fusion gene. Distinct fluorescence was observed in the reporter strain with minimum background noise in response to not only benomyl but also compounds inhibiting lipid metabolism that is closely related to cell membrane integrity. The fluorescent responses indicated that the reporter strain can be used to screen for lead compounds affecting fungal microtubule and cell membrane integrity, both of which are attractive antifungal targets. Furthermore, the reporter strain was shown to be technically applicable for identifying novel target genes of antifungal drugs triggering perturbation of fungal microtubules or membrane integrity.

  1. Arabidopsis NAC1 transduces auxin signal downstream of TIR1 to promote lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q; Frugis, G; Colgan, D; Chua, N H

    2000-12-01

    Auxin plays a key role in lateral root formation, but the signaling pathway for this process is poorly understood. We show here that NAC1, a new member of the NAC family, is induced by auxin and mediates auxin signaling to promote lateral root development. NAC1 is a transcription activator consisting of an N-terminal conserved NAC-domain that binds to DNA and a C-terminal activation domain. This factor activates the expression of two downstream auxin-responsive genes, DBP and AIR3. Transgenic plants expressing sense or antisense NAC1 cDNA show an increase or reduction of lateral roots, respectively. Finally, TIR1-induced lateral root development is blocked by expression of antisense NAC1 cDNA, and NAC1 overexpression can restore lateral root formation in the auxin-response mutant tir1, indicating that NAC1 acts downstream of TIR1.

  2. Defective Connective Tissue Remodeling in Smad3 Mice Leads to Accelerated Aneurysmal Growth Through Disturbed Downstream TGF-β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. van der Pluijm, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Smad3 deficiency leads to imbalanced activation of downstream genes, no activation of MMPs in VSMCs, and immune responses resulting in rapid aortic wall dilatation and rupture. Our findings uncover new possibilities for treatment of SMAD3 patients; instead of targeting TGF-β signaling, immune suppression may be more beneficial.

  3. p300 and p53 levels determine activation of HIF-1 downstream targets in invasive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugel, M.M.; Shvarts, D.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies, we noted that overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)–1a in breast cancer, especially the diffuse form, does not always lead to functional activation of its downstream genes. Transcriptional activity of HIF-1 may be repressed by p53 through competition for transcription

  4. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rein P Stulp; Yvonne J Vos; Bart Mol; Arend Karrenbeld; Monique de Raad; Huub JC van der Mijle; Rolf H Sijmons

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast majority of these HNPCC-associated mutations have been proven,or assumed, given the family history of cancer, to be transmitted through several generations. To the best of our knowledge, only a single case of a de novo germline MMR gene mutation (in MSH2) has been reported till now. Here, we report a patient with a de novo mutation in MLH1. We identified a MLH1 Q701X truncating mutation in the blood lymphocytes of a male who had been diagnosed with rectal cancer at the age of 35. His family history of cancer was negative for the first- and second-degree relatives. The mutation could not be detected in the patient's parents and sibling and paternity was confirmed with a set of highly polymorphic markers. Non-penetrance and small family size is the common explanation of verified negative family histories of cancer in patients with a germline MMR gene mutation. However, in addition to some cases explained by non-paternity, de novo germline mutations should be considered as a possible explanation as well. As guidelines that stress not to restrict MMR gene mutation testing to patients with a positive family history are more widely introduced, more cases of de novo MMR gene germline mutations may be revealed.

  5. Development of a facile method for high throughput screening with reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, A S; Andrews, J L; Littleton, T R; Ignar, D M

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a facile methodology for high throughput screening with stable mammalian cell reporter gene assays. We have adapted a 96-well adherent cell method to an assay in which cells propagated in suspension are dispensed into 96- or 384-well plates containing test compounds in 100% DMSO. The validation of a stable CHO cell line that expresses 6xCRE-luciferase for use as a reporter gene host cell line is described. The reporter gene, when expressed in this particular CHO cell line, appears to respond specifically to modulation of cAMP levels, thus the cell line is appropriate for screening and pharmacological analysis of Galpha(s)- and Galpha(i)-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors. The development of the new suspension cell assay in both 96- and 384-well formats was performed using a derivative of the CHO host reporter cell line that was stably transfected with human melanocortin-1 receptor. The response of this cell line to NDP-alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and forskolin was nearly identical between the adherent and suspension methods. The new method offers improvements in cost, throughput, cell culture effort, compound stability, accuracy of compound delivery, and hands-on time. The 384-well assay can be performed at high capacity in any laboratory without the use of expensive automation systems such that a single person can screen 100 plates per day with 3.5-4 h hands-on time. Although the system has been validated using Galpha(s)-coupled receptor-mediated activation of a cAMP response element, the method can be applied to other types of targets and/or transcriptional response elements.

  6. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible Pars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  7. A reporter gene assay to assess the molecular mechanisms of xenobiotic-dependent induction of the human CYP3A4 gene in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, M S; Williams, J M; Tarbit, M; Goldfarb, P S; Gray, T J; Gibson, G G

    1999-03-01

    1. A plasmid containing 1 kb of the CYP3A4 regulatory (promoter) region coupled to a reporter gene for secretary placental alkaline phosphatase (SPAP) was transfected into HepG2 cells. Transfected cells were dosed with several known inducers of CYP3A4 and the levels of SPAP were measured. The effect of co-transfecting a plasmid encoding the human glucocorticoid receptor on reporter gene activity was also examined. 2. Dexamethasone induced CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner and induction was approximately doubled in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor. Dexamethasone-dependent induction was blocked by RU-486 (a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist), in the presence of the co-transfected glucocorticoid receptor. 3. Induction of CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression and enhancement of the induction by the glucocorticoid receptor was also observed with pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), rifampicin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenylbutazone and phenobarbitone, all known in vivo inducers of CYP3A4 in man. 4. Metyrapone and sulfinpyrazone induced CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression, but induction was not enhanced by the glucocorticoid receptor. 5. Clotrimazole, erythromycin and triacetyloleandomycin (TAO) did not induce CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression, consistent with the observation that these inducers act through post-transcriptional mechanisms. 6. These results highlight differences in the molecular mechanisms of induction of CYP3A4 by the xenobiotics studied and indicate that the glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the induction of the CYP3A4 gene by some, but not all, CYP3A4 inducers. 7. We propose that the approach described here provides a useful in vitro approach for the identification of transcriptional regulators of the CYP3A4 gene.

  8. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  9. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  10. Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation together with anticardiolipin antibody during pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Couto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: High plasmatic homocysteine levels have been associated with arterial and venous thrombosis. The C677T methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene mutation is one of the known causes for high homocysteine levels in plasma. Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA is also associated with thrombosis and, along with other clinical complications such as recurrent abortion and stillbirth, is part of the antiphospholipid syndrome. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A 19-year-old woman with two gestations and one parity (G2P1 had exhibited deep venous thrombosis in her previous puerperal period. Investigation of thrombophilic factors revealed ACA-IgM and heterozygous C677T mutation in the MTHFR gene. Lupus anticoagulant, protein C, protein S and antithrombin III deficiencies, and Leiden factor V and the G20210A mutation in the prothrombin gene, were not detected. The patient received 55,000 IU of subcutaneous heparin daily, from the 15th to the 36th week of pregnancy, when vaginal delivery took place. There were no clinical complications during the puerperal period and she was discharged three days after delivery, while still using oral anticoagulants.

  11. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and chorioallantoic membrane. Our results suggest that melA is a useful photoacoustic reporter gene for visualizing bacteria, and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  12. The first report of the vanC₁ gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Yue; Chen, Zhongju; Zhu, Xuhui; Tian, Lei; Sun, Ziyong

    2014-09-01

    The vanC₁ gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC₁gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC₁ and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC₁ gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC₁gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC₁gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC₁gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC₁gene from different species.

  13. Deletion of a single-copy DAAM1 gene in congenital heart defect: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Bihui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing incidence of congenital heart defects (CHDs in recent years, genotype-phenotype correlation and array-based methods have contributed to the genome-wide analysis and understanding of genetic variations in the CHD population. Here, we report a copy number deletion of chromosomal 14q23.1 in a female fetus with complex congenital heart defects. This is the first description of DAAM1 gene deletion associated with congenital heart anomalies. Case Presentation Compared with the control population, one CHD fetus showed a unique copy number deletion of 14q23.1, a region that harbored DAAM1 and KIAA0666 genes. Conclusions Results suggest that the copy number deletion on chromosome 14q23.1 may be critical for cardiogenesis. However, the exact relationship and mechanism of how DAAM1 and KIAA0666 deletion contributes to the onset of CHD is yet to be determined.

  14. Production of structured lipids: acyl migration during enzymatic interesterification and downstream processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing

    1997-01-01

    -2 position or sn-1,3 positions of glycerol backbone. These kinds of lipids are reported to be promising for both enteral and parenteral nutrition. However, acyl migration occurs in the reaction stage and downstream purification process. This side-reaction causes by-products which are harmful...... to the required products. In this paper, the reasons of acyl migration and factors affecting the acyl migration were reviewed and discussed. The possible solutions were also evaluated....

  15. First report of multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species casseliflavus and gallinarum of swine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Dai, Lei; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and genetic environment of the multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species of swine origin. Twenty-five cfr-carrying Enterococcus isolates were collected from swine in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shandong, China. The isolates consist of 24 Enterococcus casseliflavus and one Enterococcus gallinarum isolate, and exhibited six SmaI PFGE patterns. The cfr gene was located on plasmids in all isolates except E. casseliflavus En83, in which cfr was located on the chromosomal DNA. The cfr gene environments in most of these isolates contain DNA sequences similar to pEF-01, which was first found in Enterococcus. However, inverse PCR analysis suggested that the cfr-carrying circular forms might be different from pEF-01. The circular forms in Eg51 and its transconjugant, and En23, En10, and En94 are similar to the circular form in pEF-01, except for the truncated IS1216, which is replaced by a transposase of the IS256 family in En24. The cfr circular form could not be detected in either En77 or En83, and the same cfr-carrying segments of ∼ 10 kb had only 3500bp of sequence similar to pEF-01. This is the first report of cfr gene in E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum. The potential dissemination of the multidrug resistance gene amongst different bacterial species, especially in enterococci of human and animal origins, is concerning and should be closely monitored.

  16. Gene Deletion by Fluorescence-Reported Allelic Exchange Mutagenesis in Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad E. Mueller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although progress in Chlamydia genetics has been rapid, genomic modification has previously been limited to point mutations and group II intron insertions which truncate protein products. The bacterium has thus far been intractable to gene deletion or more-complex genomic integrations such as allelic exchange. Herein, we present a novel suicide vector dependent on inducible expression of a chlamydial gene that renders Chlamydia trachomatis fully genetically tractable and permits rapid reverse genetics by fluorescence-reported allelic exchange mutagenesis (FRAEM. We describe the first available system of targeting chlamydial genes for deletion or allelic exchange as well as curing plasmids from C. trachomatis serovar L2. Furthermore, this approach permits the monitoring of mutagenesis by fluorescence microscopy without disturbing bacterial growth, a significant asset when manipulating obligate intracellular organisms. As proof of principle, trpA was successfully deleted and replaced with a sequence encoding both green fluorescent protein (GFP and β-lactamase. The trpA-deficient strain was unable to grow in indole-containing medium, and this phenotype was reversed by complementation with trpA expressed in trans. To assess reproducibility at alternate sites, FRAEM was repeated for genes encoding type III secretion effectors CTL0063, CTL0064, and CTL0065. In all four cases, stable mutants were recovered one passage after the observation of transformants, and allelic exchange was limited to the specific target gene, as confirmed by whole-genome sequencing. Deleted sequences were not detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR from isogenic mutant populations. We demonstrate that utilization of the chlamydial suicide vector with FRAEM renders C. trachomatis highly amenable to versatile and efficient genetic manipulation.

  17. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Walker, Robin K; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2012-11-27

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca(2+) elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca(2+) channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca(2+)-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca(2+) stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca(2+). Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca(2+) elevation, H(2)O(2) generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen.

  18. Experimental investigation of unsteady fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F.; Olsen, T. L.

    1986-07-01

    In the present study of the unsteady pressure field produced on fan rotor blades by interaction with downstream struts, a single stage, low speed axial-flow fan was instrumented with blade-mounted high frequency pressure transducers. In addition, stationary pressure problems were used to map out the flowfield. Fluctuating pressure measurements are presented for blade midspan and 85-percent span on both the suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor blades at several positions of the downstream struts, and for two different flow coefficients. The strut is found to produce an effect on the unsteady pressure field on the rotor blades; this effect exceeds that due to the stator at design rotor-stator-strut spacing, but it rapidly declines as the struts are moved downstream.

  19. Study of Scour Downstream Different Shapes of Culverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahem Adel Al Hafed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research a laboratory study was carried out to investigate the scour phenomenon in sandy soil beds downstream different shapes of culverts, Four   shapes of culverts such as circular, ellipse, rectangular and square were used. So, a best hydraulic section was used in rectangular and ellipse shapes. The study includes the measurement and comparison of maximum scour depth and length of scour hole downstream these different shapes of culverts. Also, the distribution of soil parts was studied. It was used five discharges for each one of culvert.              Laboratory results of this study showed that the minimum depth of scour in the same discharge occurred downstream ellipse culvert and then rectangular culvert and then square culvert and the last circular culvert.  

  20. User-centered design of multi-gene sequencing panel reports for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Elizabeth; Banchero, Meghan; Beitelshees, Amber L; Cimino, James J; Fiol, Guilherme Del; Gurses, Ayse P; Hoffman, Mark A; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Kelemen, Mark; Pincus, Harold Alan; Shuldiner, Alan R; Williams, Marc S; Pollin, Toni I; Overby, Casey Lynnette

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a high-fidelity prototype for delivering multi-gene sequencing panel (GS) reports to clinicians that simulates the user experience of a final application. The delivery and use of GS reports can occur within complex and high-paced healthcare environments. We employ a user-centered software design approach in a focus group setting in order to facilitate gathering rich contextual information from a diverse group of stakeholders potentially impacted by the delivery of GS reports relevant to two precision medicine programs at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Responses from focus group sessions were transcribed, coded and analyzed by two team members. Notification mechanisms and information resources preferred by participants from our first phase of focus groups were incorporated into scenarios and the design of a software prototype for delivering GS reports. The goal of our second phase of focus group, to gain input on the prototype software design, was accomplished through conducting task walkthroughs with GS reporting scenarios. Preferences for notification, content and consultation from genetics specialists appeared to depend upon familiarity with scenarios for ordering and delivering GS reports. Despite familiarity with some aspects of the scenarios we proposed, many of our participants agreed that they would likely seek consultation from a genetics specialist after viewing the test reports. In addition, participants offered design and content recommendations. Findings illustrated a need to support customized notification approaches, user-specific information, and access to genetics specialists with GS reports. These design principles can be incorporated into software applications that deliver GS reports. Our user-centered approach to conduct this assessment and the specific input we received from clinicians may also be relevant to others working on similar projects.

  1. The development and application of a multiple gene co-silencing system using endogenous URA3 as a reporter gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashuai Mu

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most important medicinal mushrooms; however, molecular genetics research on this species has been limited due to a lack of reliable reverse genetic tools. In this study, the endogenous orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase gene (URA3 was cloned as a silencing reporter, and four gene-silencing methods using hairpin, sense, antisense, and dual promoter constructs, were introduced into G. lucidum through a simple electroporation procedure. A comparison and evaluation of silencing efficiency demonstrated that all of the four methods differentially suppressed the expression of URA3. Our data unequivocally indicate that the dual promoter silencing vector yields the highest rate of URA3 silencing compared with other vectors (up to 81.9%. To highlight the advantages of the dual promoter system, we constructed a co-silencing system based on the dual promoter method and succeeded in co-silencing URA3 and laccase in G. lucidum. The reduction of the mRNA levels of the two genes were correlated. Thus, the screening efficiency for RNAi knockdown of multiple genes may be improved by the co-silencing of an endogenous reporter gene. The molecular tools developed in this study should facilitate the isolation of genes and the characterization of the functions of multiple genes in this pharmaceutically important species, and these tools should be highly useful for the study of other basidiomycetes.

  2. Downstream Processability of Crystal Habit-Modified Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pudasaini, Nawin; Upadhyay, Pratik Pankaj; Parker, Christian Richard

    2017-01-01

    Efficient downstream processing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) can depend strongly on their particulate properties, such as size and shape distributions. Especially in drug products with high API content, needle-like crystal habit of an API may show compromised flowability and tablet......Efficient downstream processing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) can depend strongly on their particulate properties, such as size and shape distributions. Especially in drug products with high API content, needle-like crystal habit of an API may show compromised flowability...

  3. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  4. Viral vectors for gene transfer: current status of gene therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy for the correction of inherited or acquired disease has gained increasing importance in recent years. Successful treatment of children suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was achieved using retrovirus vectors for gene transfer. Encouraging improvements of vision were reported in a genetic eye disorder (LCA) leading to early childhood blindness. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used for gene transfer in these trials. This chapter gives an overview of the design and delivery of viral vectors for the transport of a therapeutic gene into a target cell or tissue. The construction and production of retrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors are covered. The focus is on production methods suitable for biopharmaceutical upscaling and for downstream processing. Quality control measures and biological safety considerations for the use of vectors in clinical trials are discussed.

  5. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Zeinstra, L.M.; Schuitemaker, F.; Lanser, P.H.; Bogerd, J.; Brouwer, A.; Vethaak, A.D.; Voogt, de P.; Murk, A.J.; Burg, van der B.

    2002-01-01

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably trans

  6. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  7. Genetic analysis of the regulation of TCH gene expression, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braam, Janet

    2008-10-28

    The Arabidopsis TCH genes, originally isolated as a consequence of their upregulation in response to the mechanical stimulus of touch, are also upregulated by a variety of seemingly disparate environmental and hormonal stimuli. To gain insight into the complexities of TCH gene regulation, a number of approaches were taken. Regulatory elements responsible for regulation were identified and characteristics of the regulation were evaluated. Reporter genes were used to monitor expression localization and dynamics. Microarray analyses of genome-wide expression behavior indicated that touch-inducible gene expression is more widespread than generally appreciated. Identification of all touch-regulated genes shed light on the types of cellular processes that may be altered in response to mechanical stress perturbations. Expression of the TCH2 gene, also called CML24, encoding a calmodulin (CaM)-like (CML) protein, was evaluated. CML24 shares over 40% amino acid sequence identity with CaM, has 4 EF hands and undergoes a Ca2+-dependent change in migration rate through denaturing gel electrophoresis, indicating that CML24 binds Ca2+ and, as a consequence, undergoes conformational changes. CML24 expression occurs in all major organs and is induced from 2- to 15-fold in plants subjected to touch, darkness, heat, cold, hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The putative CML24 regulatory region confers reporter expression at sites of predicted mechanical stress, in regions undergoing growth, in vascular tissues and various floral organs and in stomata, trichomes and hydathodes. CML24 underexpressing transgenics are resistant to ABA inhibition of germination and seedling growth, defective in long-day induction of flowering, and have enhanced tolerance to CoCl2, molybdic acid, ZnSO4 and MgCl2. These data present evidence that CML24 encodes a potential Ca2+ sensor that may function to enable responses to ABA, day length and presence of various salts. Further

  8. Coregulation of lux genes and riboflavin genes in bioluminescent bacteria of Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nack-Do; Lee, Chan Yong

    2004-09-01

    Investigation of the expression of the riboflavin (rib) genes, which are found immediately downstream of luxG in the lux operon in Photobacterium phosphoreum, provides more information relevant to the evolution of bioluminescence, as well as to the regulation of supply of flavin substrate for bacterial bioluminescence reactions. In order to answer the question of whether or not the transcriptions of lux and rib genes are integrated, a transcriptional termination assay was performed with P. phosphoreum DNA, containing the possible stem-loop structures, located in the intergenic region of luxF and luxE (OmegaA), of luxG and ribE (OmegaB), and downstream of ribA (OmegaC). The expression of the CAT (Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase) reporter gene was remarkably decreased upon the insertion of the stem-loop structure (OmegaC) into the strong lux promoter and the reporter gene. However, the insertion of the structure (OmegaB) into the intergenic region of the lux and the rib genes caused no significant change in expression from the CAT gene. In addition, the single stranded DNA in the same region was protected by the P. phosphoreum mRNA from the S1 nuclease protection assay. These results suggest that lux genes and rib genes are part of the same operon in P. phosphoreum.

  9. A robust dual reporter system to visualize and quantify gene expression mediated by transcription activator-like effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uhde-Stone Claudia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs are a class of naturally occurring transcription effectors that recognize specific DNA sequences and modulate gene expression. The modularity of TALEs DNA binding domain enables sequence-specific perturbation and offers broad applications in genetic and epigenetic studies. Although the efficient construction of TALEs has been established, robust functional tools to assess their functions remain lacking. Results We established a dual reporter system that was specifically designed for real-time monitoring and quantifying gene expression mediated by TALEs. We validated both sensitivity and specificity of this dual-reporter system in mammalian cells, and demonstrated that this dual reporter system is robust and potentially amenable to high throughput (HTP applications. Conclusion We have designed, constructed and validated a novel dual reporter system for assessing TALE mediated gene regulations. This system offers a robust and easy-to- use tool for real-time monitoring and quantifying gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-15

    This report details the progress of the three tasks of this project. The tasks are: (1) develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

  11. p53 Promoter-based Reporter Gene in vitro Assays for Quick Assessment of Agents with Genotoxic Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaixing LI; Ke SHI; Ruiwen CHEN; Yan HE; Dan WU; Shuhan SUN

    2007-01-01

    The p53 promoter-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase reporter gene assays have been established for detecting DNA damage induced by genotoxic agents.To evaluate the system,NIH3T3 cells transfected with either pHP53-GFP or pMP53-GFP construct were treated with mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Expression of the GFP reporter gene was significantly and specifically induced in the cells exposed to mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Then we treated NIH3T3 cells harboring pHP53-Luc or pMP53-Luc vector with mitomycin,5-fluorouracil or cisplatin at various concentrations.Similarly,exposure of the cells to these agents with genotoxic potentials resulted in a dose-dependent induction in luciferase reporter gene expression.Thus,these in vitro reporter gene assays could provide an ideal system for quick assessment or screening of agents with genotoxic potential.

  12. Exploration of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecule expression in cervical cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Chong Yuan; QiongYang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecules in cervical cancer tissue.Methods:Cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected to detect the expression of FoxM1, proliferation-related genes (CDK6 and CDK8) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC); Hela cells were cultured and transfected with FoxM1 siRNA, and then expression of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC were detected.Results:mRNA contents of FoxM1, CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue; mRNA content of FoxM1 was positively correlated with mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC; mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC of FoxM1-siRNA group were significantly lower than those of negative control-siRNA group.Conclusion:FoxM1 expression abnormally increases in cervical cancer tissue, and its downstream target genes include CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC.

  13. Using mechanistic Bayesian networks to identify downstream targets of the sonic hedgehog pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Abhik; Tenzen, Toyoaki; McMahon, Andrew P; Woolf, Peter J

    2009-12-18

    The topology of a biological pathway provides clues as to how a pathway operates, but rationally using this topology information with observed gene expression data remains a challenge. We introduce a new general-purpose analytic method called Mechanistic Bayesian Networks (MBNs) that allows for the integration of gene expression data and known constraints within a signal or regulatory pathway to predict new downstream pathway targets. The MBN framework is implemented in an open-source Bayesian network learning package, the Python Environment for Bayesian Learning (PEBL). We demonstrate how MBNs can be used by modeling the early steps of the sonic hedgehog pathway using gene expression data from different developmental stages and genetic backgrounds in mouse. Using the MBN approach we are able to automatically identify many of the known downstream targets of the hedgehog pathway such as Gas1 and Gli1, along with a short list of likely targets such as Mig12. The MBN approach shown here can easily be extended to other pathways and data types to yield a more mechanistic framework for learning genetic regulatory models.

  14. Using mechanistic Bayesian networks to identify downstream targets of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Andrew P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The topology of a biological pathway provides clues as to how a pathway operates, but rationally using this topology information with observed gene expression data remains a challenge. Results We introduce a new general-purpose analytic method called Mechanistic Bayesian Networks (MBNs that allows for the integration of gene expression data and known constraints within a signal or regulatory pathway to predict new downstream pathway targets. The MBN framework is implemented in an open-source Bayesian network learning package, the Python Environment for Bayesian Learning (PEBL. We demonstrate how MBNs can be used by modeling the early steps of the sonic hedgehog pathway using gene expression data from different developmental stages and genetic backgrounds in mouse. Using the MBN approach we are able to automatically identify many of the known downstream targets of the hedgehog pathway such as Gas1 and Gli1, along with a short list of likely targets such as Mig12. Conclusions The MBN approach shown here can easily be extended to other pathways and data types to yield a more mechanistic framework for learning genetic regulatory models.

  15. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated with the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are non-pathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders.

  16. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  17. Sporadic Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Report of Further Mutations of CCM Genes in 40 Italian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia D’Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities, affecting the central nervous system. CCMs can occur sporadically or as a familial autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression attributable to mutations in three different genes: CCM1 (K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1, CCM2 (MGC4607, and CCM3 (PDCD10. CCMs occur as a single or multiple malformations that can lead to seizures, focal neurological deficits, hemorrhagic stroke, and headache. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, both sporadic and familial, we have identified several mutations in CCM genes, three of which in three distinct sporadic patients. In this study, representing further molecular screening of the three CCM genes, in a south Italian cohort of CCM patients enrolled by us in the last three years, we report the identification of other four new mutations in 40 sporadic patients with either single or multiple CCM.

  18. Sporadic Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Report of Further Mutations of CCM Genes in 40 Italian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Alafaci, Concetta; Scimone, Concetta; Ruggeri, Alessia; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Tomasello, Francesco; Sidoti, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities, affecting the central nervous system. CCMs can occur sporadically or as a familial autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression attributable to mutations in three different genes: CCM1 (K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1)), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10). CCMs occur as a single or multiple malformations that can lead to seizures, focal neurological deficits, hemorrhagic stroke, and headache. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, both sporadic and familial, we have identified several mutations in CCM genes, three of which in three distinct sporadic patients. In this study, representing further molecular screening of the three CCM genes, in a south Italian cohort of CCM patients enrolled by us in the last three years, we report the identification of other four new mutations in 40 sporadic patients with either single or multiple CCM. PMID:24058906

  19. Brief Report: Aggression and Stereotypic Behavior in Males with Fragile X Syndrome-- Moderating Secondary Genes in a "Single Gene" Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessl, David; Tassone, Flora; Cordeiro, Lisa; Koldewyn, Kami; McCormick, Carolyn; Green, Cherie; Wegelin, Jacob; Yuhas, Jennifer; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2008-01-01

    Although fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single gene disorder with a well-described phenotype, it is not known why some individuals develop more significant maladaptive behaviors such as aggression or autistic symptoms. Here, we studied two candidate genes known to affect mood and aggression, the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine…

  20. Brief Report: Aggression and Stereotypic Behavior in Males with Fragile X Syndrome-- Moderating Secondary Genes in a "Single Gene" Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessl, David; Tassone, Flora; Cordeiro, Lisa; Koldewyn, Kami; McCormick, Carolyn; Green, Cherie; Wegelin, Jacob; Yuhas, Jennifer; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2008-01-01

    Although fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single gene disorder with a well-described phenotype, it is not known why some individuals develop more significant maladaptive behaviors such as aggression or autistic symptoms. Here, we studied two candidate genes known to affect mood and aggression, the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine…

  1. Analysis of the downstream region of nodD3 P1 promoter by deletion and complementation tests in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈迪; 刘彦杰; 朱家璧; 沈善炯; 俞冠翘

    2003-01-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nodD3 gene is transcriptionally controlled by two promoters, P1 and P2. Under P1, there is a 660 bp sequence including a small open reading frame, ORF2, followed by the nodD3 coding region. Genetic analysis using the different deletions on the 3′ends of P1 downstream sequence showed that the downstream sequence +1-+125nt is essential for P1 expression. Complementation, mutations and nodulation tests demonstrated that the ORF2 auto-represses P1 expression, while the P1 downstream sequence +1-+125nt counteracts it.

  2. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  3. Evaluation of different promoters driving the GFP reporter gene in seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Alias L. Rajamuddin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Promoter regulates expression level of foreign gene in transgenic organism. This study was performed to select asuitable promoter as the fi rst step towards production of valuable trait-enhanced seaweed by transgenic technology. Greenfl uorescent protein (GFP gene was used as a reporter to determine the activity of promoter in seaweed Kappaphycusalvarezii. GFP gene constructs driven by cytomegalovirus (pCMV-GFP, caulifl ower mosaic virus (pCaMV-GFP,medaka β-actin (pmBA-GFP and Japanese fl ounder keratin (pJfKer-GFP promoters were introduced by electroporationmethod. Electroporation was performed using a gene pulser (BIORAD with voltage of 300 V, pulse length of 0.5 ms,pulse numbers of 4, and pulse interval of 0.1 s. Promoter activity was determined by analyzing GFP gene expressionlevel using a fl uorescent microscope. The results showed that CMV regulated highest number of fi lament callus(34.10%±1.49 expressing GFP at medium to strong fl uorescence levels. CaMV promoter had relatively similar activitywith CMV, but lower number of fi lament callus expressing GFP (10.48%±0.25. mBA promoter drove GFP expressionat medium level and similar number of fi lament callus (8.85%±2.31 expressing GFP with CaMV, while JfKer promoterhad lowest activity by means in number of fi lament callus expressing GFP (4.79%±0.26 and GFP expression level. PCRanalysis for transgenic confi rmation showed a DNA band of PCR product from pCMV-GFP and pCaMV-GFP expressingfi lament callus in the same size (about 0.6 kb with positive control of plasmid. Thus, CMV and CaMV promoters wasan appropriate promoter and foreign gene could be transferred to fi lament callus by electroporation method. Combiningthis achievement with developing a culture method of fi lament callus to be thallus, stable transgenic breeding in K.alvarezii can be feasible.

  4. Gene polymorphisms in association with self-reported stroke in US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Z Fan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Amy Z Fan1, Jing Fang1, Ajay Yesupriya2, Man-huei Chang2, Greta Kilmer1, Meaghan House3, Donald Hayes1, Renée M Ned2, Nicole F Dowling2, Ali H Mokdad1 1National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Office of Public Health Genomics, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: Epidemiologic studies suggest that several gene variants increase the risk of stroke, and population-based studies help provide further evidence. We identified polymorphisms associated with the prevalence of self-reported stroke in US populations using a representative sample.Methods: Our sample comprised US adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination (NHANES III DNA bank. We examined nine candidate gene variants within ACE, F2, F5, ITGA2, MTHFR, and NOS3 for associations with self-reported stroke. We used multivariate regression and Cox proportional hazards models to test the association between these variants and history of stroke.Results: In regression models, the rs4646994 variant of ACE (I/I and I/D genotypes was associated with higher prevalence adjusted prevalence odds ratio [APOR] = 2.66 [1.28, 5.55] and 2.23 [1.30, 3.85], respectively compared with the D/D genotype. The heterozygous genotype of MTHFR rs1801131 (A/C was associated with lower prevalence of stroke (APOR = 0.48 [0.25, 0.92] compared with A/A and C/C genotypes. For rs2070744 of NOS3, both the C/T genotype (APOR = 1.91 [1.12, 3.27] and C/C genotype (APOR = 3.31 [1.66, 6.60] were associated with higher prevalence of stroke compared with the T/T genotype.Conclusion: Our findings suggest an association between the prevalence of self-reported stroke and polymorphisms in ACE, MTHFR, and NOS3 in a population-based sample. Keywords: stroke, gene, polymorphisms, NHANES III, gene

  5. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-vessel disease, small-vessel disease, and cardioembolic stroke. By systematic review we identified previous candidate gene and GWAS associations with stroke and previous GWAS associations with related cardiovascular phenotypes (myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and carotid intima-media thickness). Fifty associations were identified. For all ischemic stroke, heritability was 37.9%. Heritability varied markedly by stroke subtype being 40.3% for large-vessel disease and 32.6% for cardioembolic but lower for small-vessel disease (16.1%). No previously reported candidate gene was significant after rigorous correction for multiple testing. In contrast, 3 loci from related cardiovascular GWAS studies were significant: PHACTR1 in large-vessel disease (P=2.63e(-6)), PITX2 in cardioembolic stroke (P=4.78e(-8)), and ZFHX3 in cardioembolic stroke (P=5.50e(-7)). There is substantial heritability for ischemic stroke, but this varies for different stroke subtypes. Previous candidate gene associations contribute little to this heritability, but GWAS studies in related cardiovascular phenotypes are identifying robust associations. The heritability data, and data from GWAS, suggest detecting additional associations will depend on careful stroke subtyping.

  6. Flow diagnostics downstream of a tribladed rotor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Rahmanov, V. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of vortex wake structures and measurements of instantaneous 3D velocity fields downstream of a triblade turbine model. Two operation modes of flow around the rotor with different tip speed ratios were tested. Initially the wake structures were visualized and...

  7. Extreme wave phenomena in down-stream running modulated waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati, A.; Karjanto, N.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    Modulational, Benjamin-Feir, instability is studied for the down-stream evolution of surface gravity waves. An explicit solution, the soliton on finite background, of the NLS equation in physical space is used to study various phenomena in detail. It is shown that for sufficiently long modulation

  8. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. II: Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the model presented in the companion paper, Wright and Parker (2005) is applied to a generic river reach typical of a large, sand-bed river flowing into the ocean in order to investigate the mechanisms controlling longitudinal profile development and downstream fining. Three mechanisms which drive downstream fining are studied: a delta prograding into standing water, sea-level rise, and tectonic subsidence. Various rates of sea-level rise (typical of the late Holocene) and tectonic subsidence are modeled in order to quantify their effects on the degree of profile concavity and downstream fining. Also, several other physical mechanisms which may affect fining are studied, including the relative importance of the suspended versus bed load, the effect of the loss of sediment overbank, and the influence of the delta bottom slope. Finally, sensitivity analysis is used to show that the grain-size distribution at the interface between the active layer and substrate has a significant effect on downstream fining. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  9. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppresion - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents of "broad" scope (where the claimed scope is typically broader than that strictly justified by the invention) enable their owners to "block" or "hold-up" downstream innovation.[1] They claim to have illustrated this thesis in such important cas...

  10. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents have enabled their owners to 'block' or 'hold-up' downstream innovation in cases as important as the car, radio, aircraft and electric lighting (Merges and Nelson 1990, ; Merges and Nelson 1994). Merges and Nelson use their work to question the...

  11. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents have enabled their owners to 'block' or 'hold-up' downstream innovation in cases as important as the car, radio, aircraft and electric lighting (Merges and Nelson 1990, ; Merges and Nelson 1994). Merges and Nelson use their work to question...

  12. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-López, B.; Mendiola, J.A.; Fontecha, J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.; Cifuentes, A.; Herrero, M.; Ibáñez, E.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green

  13. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-López, B.; Mendiola, J.A.; Fontecha, J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.; Cifuentes, A.; Herrero, M.; Ibáñez, E.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green chemist

  14. DNS and RANS Simulation of Dispersion Downstream of an Obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    DNS AND RANS SIMULATION OF DISPERSION DOWNSTREAM OF AN OBSTACLE Riccardo Rossi*, Gianluca Iaccarino** * Laboratorio di Termofluidodinamica...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Laboratorio di Termofluidodinamica Computazionale, Seconda Facolt‘a di Ingegneria di Forl‘ý Universit‘a di Bologna

  15. Downstream processing of monoclonal antibodies--application of platform approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Abhinav A; Hubbard, Brian; Tressel, Tim; Guhan, Sam; Low, Duncan

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents an overview of large-scale downstream processing of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fusion proteins (mAbs). This therapeutic modality has become increasingly important with the recent approval of several drugs from this product class for a range of critical illnesses. Taking advantage of the biochemical similarities in this product class, several templated purification schemes have emerged in the literature. In our experience, significant biochemical differences and the variety of challenges to downstream purification make the use of a completely generic downstream process impractical. Here, we describe the key elements of a flexible, generic downstream process platform for mAbs that we have adopted at Amgen. This platform consists of a well-defined sequence of unit operations with most operating parameters being pre-defined and a small subset of parameters requiring development effort. The platform hinges on the successful use of Protein A chromatography as a highly selective capture step for the process. Key elements of each type of unit operation are discussed along with data from 14 mAbs that have undergone process development. Aspects that can be readily templated as well as those that require focused development effort are identified for each unit operation. A brief description of process characterization and validation activities for these molecules is also provided. Finally, future directions in mAb processing are summarized.

  16. Extreme wave phenomena in down-stream running modulated waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati,; Karjanto, N.; Groesen, van E.

    2006-01-01

    Modulational, Benjamin-Feir, instability is studied for the down-stream evolution of surface gravity waves. An explicit solution, the soliton on finite background, of the NLS equation in physical space is used to study various phenomena in detail. It is shown that for sufficiently long modulation le

  17. Interactive Learning-driven Innovation in Upstream-Downstream Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro; Ueki, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a simple framework of the innovations that result from interfirm learning through exchanges of engineers in upstream-downstream relations within a production chain. To examine the framework, we empirically investigate the impact of mutual knowledge exchanges on product and pro...

  18. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim was to...

  19. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-li; Huang, Xiao-jun; Luan, Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-di; Tang, Hui-dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identified in the hypokalemic periodic paralysis patient and the paramyotonia congenita family respectively. Both mutations were not detected in healthy controls. Compared with reported cases, patients with mutation R675Q usually do not present hypokalemic periodic paralysis but hyperkalemic or normokalemic periodic paralysis. The mutation V445M was first reported in Chinese patients with nondystrophic myotonias. In addition, we carried out literature review by summarizing clinical features of the 2 mutations and establish the genotype-phenotype correlations to provide guidance for diagnosis.

  20. Enterococcus gallinarum carrying the vanA gene cluster: first report in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, I L B C; Barth, A L; Pilger, K; Seligman, B G S; Machado, A R L; Darini, A L C

    2004-11-01

    In 2000, Enterococcus faecalis resistant to vancomycin was first reported at a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The resistance spread to other hospitals and surveillance programs were established by hospital infection committees to prevent the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In February 2002, an isolate initially identified at the genus level as Enterococcus was obtained by surveillance culture (rectal swab) from a patient admitted to a hospital for treatment of septic arthritis in the shoulder. The isolate proved to be resistant to vancomycin by the disc diffusion method and confirmed by an E-test resulting in a minimal inhibitory concentration of > or = 256 microg/ml. This isolate was sent to a reference laboratory (Laboratorio Especial de Bacteriologia e Epidemiologia Molecular, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, USP) for further study and proved to be an E. gallinarum by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers for the species. Due to the phenotype of unusually high vancomycin resistance, the isolate presumably had the resistance genes (vanA and vanB) and this was confirmed by PCR, which indicated the presence of the vanA gene. A 10.8-kb Tn1546-related transposon was also identified by long-PCR. Interspecies transfer of the vancomycin-resistance gene from the donor E. gallinarum was performed in a successful conjugation experiment in vitro, using E. faecium GE-1 and E. faecalis JH22 as receptors. This is the first report of the detection of a vanA determinant naturally acquired by E. gallinarum in Brazil, indicating the importance of characterizing VRE by both phenotype and genotype methods.

  1. Enterococcus gallinarum carrying the vanA gene cluster: first report in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L.B.C. Camargo

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2000, Enterococcus faecalis resistant to vancomycin was first reported at a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The resistance spread to other hospitals and surveillance programs were established by hospital infection committees to prevent the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In February 2002, an isolate initially identified at the genus level as Enterococcus was obtained by surveillance culture (rectal swab from a patient admitted to a hospital for treatment of septic arthritis in the shoulder. The isolate proved to be resistant to vancomycin by the disc diffusion method and confirmed by an E-test resulting in a minimal inhibitory concentration of > or = 256 µg/ml. This isolate was sent to a reference laboratory (Laboratório Especial de Bacteriologia e Epidemiologia Molecular, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, USP for further study and proved to be an E. gallinarum by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific primers for the species. Due to the phenotype of unusually high vancomycin resistance, the isolate presumably had the resistance genes (vanA and vanB and this was confirmed by PCR, which indicated the presence of the vanA gene. A 10.8-kb Tn1546-related transposon was also identified by long-PCR. Interspecies transfer of the vancomycin-resistance gene from the donor E. gallinarum was performed in a successful conjugation experiment in vitro, using E. faecium GE-1 and E. faecalis JH22 as receptors. This is the first report of the detection of a vanA determinant naturally acquired by E. gallinarum in Brazil, indicating the importance of characterizing VRE by both phenotype and genotype methods.

  2. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  3. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars in the rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Ielpi, Alessandro; Aldinucci, Mauro; Fustic, Milovan

    2016-04-01

    Classical models developed for ancient fluvial point bars are based on the assumption that meander bends invariably increase their radius as meander-bend apices migrate in a direction transverse to the channel-belt axis (i.e., meander bend expansion). However, many modern meandering rivers are also characterized by down-valley migration of the bend apex, a mechanism that takes place without a significant change in meander radius and wavelength. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars (DMFPB) are the dominant architectural element of these types of meander belts. Yet they are poorly known from ancient fluvial-channel belts, since their disambiguation from expansional point bars often requires fully-3D perspectives. This study aims to review DMFPB deposits spanning in age from Devonian to Holocene, and to discuss their main architectural and sedimentological features from published outcrop, borehole and 3D-seismic datasets. Fluvial successions hosting DMFPB mainly accumulated in low accommodation conditions, where channel belts were affected by different degrees of morphological (e.g., valleys) or tectonic (e.g., axial drainage of shortening basins) confinement. In confined settings, bends migrate downstream along the erosion-resistant valley flanks and little or no floodplain deposits are preserved. Progressive floor aggradation (e.g., valley filling) allow meander belts with DMFPB to decrease their degree of confinement. In less confined settings, meander bends migrate downstream mainly after impinging against older, erosion-resistant channel fill mud. By contrast, tectonic confinement is commonly associated with uplifted alluvial plains that prevented meander-bend expansion, in turn triggering downstream translation. At the scale of individual point bars, translational morphodynamics promote the preservation of downstream-bar deposits, whereas the coarser-grained upstream and central beds are less frequently preserved. However, enhanced preservation of upstream

  4. A Mutagenesis Assay for Reporter Gene Screening Using Partially Degenerate Oligonucleotides of the Tandems NNT and NNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifen Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all proteins are tolerable to mutations. Whether a specific protein can be a mutable target is of importance in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. This study reported a novel mutagenesis assay using tandem NNT and NNC oligonucleotides to test the mutability of a candidate gene. These two tandem oligonucleotides avoid the risk of forming nonsense mutations and render flexibility of truncating or expanding the insertion size. As a reporter gene, ZeoR (zeocin resistance gene was confirmed to have a high tolerance for mutagenesis by this new assay.

  5. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  6. A novel virtual hub approach for multisource downstream service integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtali, Mattia; Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    A large development of downstream services is expected to be stimulated starting from earth observations (EO) datasets acquired by Copernicus satellites. An important challenge connected with the availability of downstream services is the possibility for their integration in order to create innovative applications with added values for users of different categories level. At the moment, the world of geo-information (GI) is extremely heterogeneous in terms of standards and formats used, thus preventing a facilitated access and integration of downstream services. Indeed, different users and data providers have also different requirements in terms of communication protocols and technology advancement. In recent years, many important programs and initiatives have tried to address this issue even on trans-regional and international level (e.g. INSPIRE Directive, GEOSS, Eye on Earth and SEIS). However, a lack of interoperability between systems and services still exists. In order to facilitate the interaction between different downstream services, a new architectural approach (developed within the European project ENERGIC OD) is proposed in this paper. The brokering-oriented architecture introduces a new mediation layer (the Virtual Hub) which works as an intermediary to bridge the gaps linked to interoperability issues. This intermediation layer de-couples the server and the client allowing a facilitated access to multiple downstream services and also Open Data provided by national and local SDIs. In particular, in this paper an application is presented integrating four services on the topic of agriculture: (i) the service given by Space4Agri (providing services based on MODIS and Landsat data); (ii) Gicarus Lab (providing sample services based on Landsat datasets) and (iii) FRESHMON (providing sample services for water quality) and services from a several regional SDIs.

  7. Downstream migrating antidunes or in-phase waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez González, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Late back in the beginning of the 20th century, Gilbert observed bedforms that migrated in opposite direction to flow. Since this feature was remarkable and inverse to the behavior of dunes (most often observed in rivers and flumes), he called the new species antidunes. Subsequent researchers identified other characteristic attributes of the new species, and it was later commonly accepted that a defining characteristic of antidunes was that undulations of bed and water profiles were roughly in-phase. Due to its generality, such definition has given place to some ambiguities, particularly when dealing with bedforms close to the critical-supercritical transition, as occurs with bedforms with bed and water profiles roughly in-phase but migrating downstream. Such bedforms are described by different researchers, but they are not always classified as antidunes. Some sedimentologists argue that given the depositional pattern of such streamwise migrating forms is different to that of upstream-migrating antidunes, the more generic term "in-phase waves" should be applied to consider them as a different class. The lack of a stability field for 2D downstream-migrating antidunes in the classical theoretical study of Kennedy in the early sixties, has also contributed to some confusion. According to such theoretical diagram, downstream-migrating antidunes could only exist being 3D, but empirical evidences -even from Kennedy- contradict this outcome. In this work, such results and other morphodynamic features of downstream-migrating antidunes will be discussed, in light of experimental data and a simple hydraulic analysis of the direction of movement of antidunes. An open question will be left to debate about the appropriateness of classifying downstream-migrating in-phase waves as antidunes, and it will be emphasized that finding consensus between different disciplines involved with the study of bedforms will be advantageous.

  8. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D; Campbell, Robert E; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9×dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ∼20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and chorioallantoic membrane. Our results suggest that melA is a useful photoacoustic reporter gene

  9. Product-induced gene expression, a product-responsive reporter assay used to screen metagenomic libraries for enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-11-01

    A reporter assay-based screening method for enzymes, which we named product-induced gene expression (PIGEX), was developed and used to screen a metagenomic library for amidases. A benzoate-responsive transcriptional activator, BenR, was placed upstream of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein and used as a sensor. Escherichia coli sensor cells carrying the benR-gfp gene cassette fluoresced in response to benzoate concentrations as low as 10 μM but were completely unresponsive to the substrate benzamide. An E. coli metagenomic library consisting of 96,000 clones was grown in 96-well format in LB medium containing benzamide. The library cells were then cocultivated with sensor cells. Eleven amidase genes were recovered from 143 fluorescent wells; eight of these genes were homologous to known bacterial amidase genes while three were novel genes. In addition to their activity toward benzamide, the enzymes were active toward various substrates, including d- and l-amino acid amides, and displayed enantioselectivity. Thus, we demonstrated that PIGEX is an effective approach for screening novel enzymes based on product detection.

  10. Dual-level regulation of ACC synthase activity by MPK3/MPK6 cascade and its downstream WRKY transcription factor during ethylene induction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojing; Meng, Xiangzong; Wang, Ruigang; Mao, Guohong; Han, Ling; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun

    2012-06-01

    Plants under pathogen attack produce high levels of ethylene, which plays important roles in plant immunity. Previously, we reported the involvement of ACS2 and ACS6, two Type I ACS isoforms, in Botrytis cinerea-induced ethylene biosynthesis and their regulation at the protein stability level by MPK3 and MPK6, two Arabidopsis pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The residual ethylene induction in the acs2/acs6 double mutant suggests the involvement of additional ACS isoforms. It is also known that a subset of ACS genes, including ACS6, is transcriptionally induced in plants under stress or pathogen attack. However, the importance of ACS gene activation and the regulatory mechanism(s) are not clear. In this report, we demonstrate using genetic analysis that ACS7 and ACS11, two Type III ACS isoforms, and ACS8, a Type II ACS isoform, also contribute to the B. cinerea-induced ethylene production. In addition to post-translational regulation, transcriptional activation of the ACS genes also plays a critical role in sustaining high levels of ethylene induction. Interestingly, MPK3 and MPK6 not only control the stability of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins via direct protein phosphorylation but also regulate the expression of ACS2 and ACS6 genes. WRKY33, another MPK3/MPK6 substrate, is involved in the MPK3/MPK6-induced ACS2/ACS6 gene expression based on genetic analyses. Furthermore, chromatin-immunoprecipitation assay reveals the direct binding of WRKY33 to the W-boxes in the promoters of ACS2 and ACS6 genes in vivo, suggesting that WRKY33 is directly involved in the activation of ACS2 and ACS6 expression downstream of MPK3/MPK6 cascade in response to pathogen invasion. Regulation of ACS activity by MPK3/MPK6 at both transcriptional and protein stability levels plays a key role in determining the kinetics and magnitude of ethylene induction.

  11. MR molecular imaging of tumours using ferritin heavy chain reporter gene expression mediated by the hTERT promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of ChengDu Medical College, Department of Radiology, ChengDu (China); Gong, Ming-fu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Wang, Guang-xian; Su, Tong-sheng; Wen, Li; Zhang, Dong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter and the modified ferritin heavy chain (Fth) reporter gene, reporter gene expression for MRI was examined in telomerase positive and negative tumour cells and xenografts. Activity of the reporter gene expression vector Lenti-hTERT-Fth1-3FLAG-Puro was compared to constitutive CMV-driven expression and to the untransfected parental control in five tumour cell lines: A549, SKOV3, 293T, U2OS and HPDLF. In vitro, transfected cells were evaluated for FLAG-tagged protein expression, iron accumulation and transverse relaxation. In vivo, tumours transduced by lentiviral vector injection were imaged using T2*WI. Changes in tumour signal intensity were validated by histology. Only telomerase positive tumour cells expressed FLAG-tagged Fth and displayed an increase in R2* above the parental control, with a corresponding change in T2*WI. In addition, only telomerase positive tumours, transduced by injection of the reporter gene expression construct, exhibited a change in signal intensity on T2*WI. Tumour histology verified the expression of FLAG-tagged Fth and iron accumulation in telomerase positive tissue. Reporter gene expression for MRI, using the Fth reporter and the hTERT promoter, may be a useful strategy for the non-invasive diagnosis of many types of cancer. (orig.)

  12. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  13. Human IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Benjamin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing a suitable level of exogenous gene expression in mammalian cells in general, and embryonic stem (ES cells in particular, is an important aspect of understanding pathways of cell differentiation, signal transduction and cell physiology. Despite its importance, this process remains challenging because of the poor correlation between the presence of introduced exogenous DNA and its transcription. Consequently, many transfected cells must be screened to identify those with an appropriate level of expression. To improve the screening process, we investigated the utility of the human interleukin 12 (IL-12 p40 cDNA as a reporter gene for studies of mammalian gene expression and for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells. Results A series of expression plasmids were used to study the utility of IL-12 p40 as an accurate reporter of gene activity. These studies included a characterization of the IL-12 p40 expression system in terms of: (i a time course of IL-12 p40 accumulation in the medium of transfected cells; (ii the dose-response relationship between the input DNA and IL-12 p40 mRNA levels and IL-12 p40 protein secretion; (iii the utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for analyzing the activity of cis-acting genetic elements; (iv expression of the IL-12 p40 reporter protein driven by an IRES element in a bicistronic mRNA; (v utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene in a high-throughput screening strategy to identify successful transformed mouse embryonic stem cells; (vi demonstration of pluripotency of IL-12 p40 expressing ES cells in vitro and in vivo; and (vii germline transmission of the IL-12 p40 reporter gene. Conclusion IL-12 p40 showed several advantages as a reporter gene in terms of sensitivity and ease of the detection procedure. The IL-12 p40 assay was rapid and simple, in as much as the reporter protein secreted from the transfected cells was accurately measured by ELISA using

  14. A novel lamin A/C gene mutation causing spinal muscular atrophy phenotype with cardiac involvement: report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Kawamata, Jun; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-02-20

    Mutations of the lamin A/C gene have been associated with several diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, referred to as laminopathies. Only one report of spinal muscular atrophy and cardiomyopathy phenotype with lamin A/C gene mutations has been published. The concept that lamin A/C gene mutations cause spinal muscular atrophy has not been established. We report a man aged 65 years who presented with amyotrophy of lower limbs, arrhythmia and cardiac hypofunction. He showed gait disturbance since childhood, and his family showed similar symptoms. Neurological and electrophysiological findings suggested spinal muscular atrophy type 3. Gene analysis of lamin A/C gene showed a novel nonsense mutation p.Q353X (c.1057C > T). Further investigations revealed that he and his family members had cardiac diseases including atrioventricular block. We report the first Japanese case of spinal muscular atrophy phenotype associated with lamin A/C mutation. When a patient presents a spinal muscular atrophy phenotype and unexplained cardiac disease, especially when the family history is positive, gene analysis of lamin A/C gene should be considered.

  15. eQTL networks unveil enriched mRNA master integrators downstream of complex disease-associated SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiquan; Pouladi, Nima; Achour, Ikbel; Gardeux, Vincent; Li, Jianrong; Li, Qike; Zhang, Hao Helen; Martinez, Fernando D; Garcia, Joe G N 'Skip'; Lussier, Yves A

    2015-12-01

    The causal and interplay mechanisms of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex diseases (complex disease SNPs) investigated in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) at the transcriptional level (mRNA) are poorly understood despite recent advancements such as discoveries reported in the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTex). Protein interaction network analyses have successfully improved our understanding of both single gene diseases (Mendelian diseases) and complex diseases. Whether the mRNAs downstream of complex disease genes are central or peripheral in the genetic information flow relating DNA to mRNA remains unclear and may be disease-specific. Using expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) that provide DNA to mRNA associations and network centrality metrics, we hypothesize that we can unveil the systems properties of information flow between SNPs and the transcriptomes of complex diseases. We compare different conditions such as naïve SNP assignments and stringent linkage disequilibrium (LD) free assignments for transcripts to remove confounders from LD. Additionally, we compare the results from eQTL networks between lymphoblastoid cell lines and liver tissue. Empirical permutation resampling (p<0.001) and theoretic Mann-Whitney U test (p<10(-30)) statistics indicate that mRNAs corresponding to complex disease SNPs via eQTL associations are likely to be regulated by a larger number of SNPs than expected. We name this novel property mRNA hubness in eQTL networks, and further term mRNAs with high hubness as master integrators. mRNA master integrators receive and coordinate the perturbation signals from large numbers of polymorphisms and respond to the personal genetic architecture integratively. This genetic signal integration contrasts with the mechanism underlying some Mendelian diseases, where a genetic polymorphism affecting a single protein hub produces a divergent signal that affects a large

  16. First report on interferon related developmental regulator-1 from Macrobrachium rosenbergii: bioinformatic analysis and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2012-05-01

    This study reports the first full length gene of interferon related developmental regulator-1 (designated as MrIRDR-1), identified from the transcriptome of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The complete gene sequence of the MrIRDR-1 is 2459 base pair long with an open reading frame of 1308 base pairs and encoding a predicted protein of 436 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 48 kDa. The MrIRDR-1 protein contains a long interferon related developmental regulator super family domain between 30 and 330. The mRNA expressions of MrIRDR-1 in healthy and the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) infected M. rosenbergii were examined using qRT-PCR. The MrIRDR-1 is highly expressed in hepatopancreas along with all other tissues (walking leg, gills, muscle, haemocyte, pleopods, brain, stomach, intestine and eye stalk). After IHHNV infection, the expression is highly upregulated in hepatopancreas. This result indicates an important role of MrIRDR-1 in prawn defense system.

  17. Prenatal Diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX Mosaicism with Presence of SRY Gene. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alí Díaz-Véliz Jiménez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common karyotype of the Turner syndrome is 45,X, although it may occur as mosaic 45,X/46,XX. In the Provincial Medical Genetics Center, a 42-year-old pregnant woman underwent an amniocentesis which led to the detection of mosaic Turner Syndrome (45,X/46,XX. A male was diagnosed through ultrasound and a sample of amniotic fluid was sent to the National Medical Genetics Center to confirm it. A study of the SRY gene was completed and the result was positive. The patient decided to terminate the pregnancy. The pathology report showed a fetal corpse of 25, 3 weeks of gestation, with penis and morphologically normal scrotal sacs, presenting alterations by cysts and hypoplasia of the prostate and seminal vesicles as well as testicular absence. In the literature, cases of XX males are considered uncommon while those combining a mosaic 45, X/46, XX with a SRY gene are less addressed; and therein lies the importance of this case. This article presents the results of a prenatal diagnosis of this rare chromosomal aberration.

  18. Upstream-downstream cooperation approach in Guanting Reservoir watershed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi-feng; ZHANG Wen-guo

    2005-01-01

    A case study is introduced and discussed concerning water dispute of misuse and pollution between up- and down-stream parts.The relations between water usage and local industrial structures are analyzed. Results show it is important to change industrial structures of the target region along with controlling water pollution by technical and engineering methods. Three manners of upstream-downstream cooperation are presented and discussed based on the actual conditions of Guangting Reservoir watershed, Two typical scenarios are supposed and studied along with the local plan on water resources development. The best solution for this cooperation presents a good way to help the upstream developing in a new pattern of eco-economy.

  19. Dead zone area at the downstream flow of barrages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow separation is a natural phenomenon encountered at some cases downstream of barrages. The main flow is divided into current and dead zone flows. The percentage area of dead zone flow must be taken into consideration downstream of barrages, due to its negative effect on flow characteristics. Experimental studies were conducted in the Hydraulic Research Institute (HRI, on a physical regulator model with five vents. Theoretically the separation zone is described as a part of an ellipse which is practically verified by plotting velocity vectors. The results show that the percentage area of dead zone to the area through length of separation depends mainly on the expansion ratio [channel width to width of opened vents], with maximum value of 81% for operated side gates. A statistical analysis was derived, to predict the percentage area of dead zone flow to the area through length of separation.

  20. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppresion - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents of "broad" scope (where the claimed scope is typically broader than that strictly justified by the invention) enable their owners to "block" or "hold-up" downstream innovation.[1] They claim to have illustrated this thesis in such important cases...... of development as aircraft, the car, radio and electric lighting. Merges and Nelson quite logically use their work to question the value of Kitch's prospect theory of patents,[2] a theory that emphasises that the social value of patents is that they enable the coordination of technological development....... This article re-examines Merges and Nelson's illustrative historical-empirical evidence and finds their thesis of downstream innovation suppression to be unwarranted by their empirical evidence.[3] Instead, Merges and Nelson have selected a number of important historical cases in which the administration...

  1. Downstream plasma parameters in laminar shocks from ion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedalin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ion dynamics in oblique shocks is governed by the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of the shock front. In laminar shocks, these fields are time-independent and depend only on the coordinate along the shock normal. The shock ramp is narrow and the ion motion across the shock is manifestly non-adiabatic. The ion distribution just behind the ramp is significantly non-gyrotropic. Gyrotropy is achieved well behind the ramp mainly due to the gyrophase mixing. The asymptotic values of the ion density and temperature are determined by the eventual collisionless relaxation of the gyrating ion distribution. Given a distribution at the downstream edge of the ramp, the moments of the distribution after gyrophase mixing are derived using proper spatial averaging. The obtained expressions can be used for independent determination of the downstream plasma state and implementation in Rankine-Hugoniot relations.

  2. Short report: polymorphisms in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Lombok, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Suryanatha, Aan; Suarsana, Nyoman; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2004-07-01

    The polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) and P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) genes, which are associated with chloroquine resistance, were examined in 48 P. falciparum isolates from uncomplicated malaria patients from the West Lombok District in Indonesia. The point mutation N86Y in pfmdr1 was present in 35.4% of the isolates and mutation K76T in pfcrt was found in all but one of the samples studied. Identified pfcrt haplotypes were mainly identical to the Papua New Guinea type S(agt)VMNT (42 of 48, 87.5%), and a few isolates had the Southeast Asia type CVIET (5 of 48, 10.4%). Moreover, one P. falciparum isolate harbored the K76N mutation, giving rise to the haplotype CVMNN, which was not previously reported in field isolates. Our findings suggest that chloroquine resistance in this area might have the same origin as in Papua New Guinea.

  3. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yelin [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Binquan [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Zhou, Yanfeng, E-mail: zyfhdj@yahoo.com [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  4. Involvement of the BDNF gene in loneliness in adolescence: a report of opposite gene effects in boys and girls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Verhagen

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that loneliness has a heritable component and that genes within the serotonin-, dopamine-, and oxytocin systems are related to loneliness in adolescence. In the present study, the relation between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and loneliness in adolescent boys and girls was examined in a longitudinal study spanning five annual waves (N = 305. Latent growth curve modeling (LGCM was used to examine the baseline level and the change in loneliness over time. The main finding was that the BDNF gene was not related to loneliness in the total sample. A BDNF by sex interaction was found, in that Met carrying girls had the highest levels of loneliness at baseline, whereas in boys the ValVal genotype was related to higher levels of loneliness. Our results underline the importance of sex-stratified analyses when examining effects of the BDNF genotype and the necessity of conducting gene studies to intermediate phenotypes of loneliness.

  5. Unsteady Interaction Between a Transonic Turbine Stage and Downstream Components

    OpenAIRE

    Davis Roger; Yao Jixian; Clark John; Stetson Gary; Alonso Juan; Jameson Antony; Haldeman Charles; Dunn Michael

    2004-01-01

    Results from a numerical simulation of the unsteady flow through one quarter of the circumference of a transonic high-pressure turbine stage, transition duct, and low-pressure turbine first vane are presented and compared with experimental data. Analysis of the unsteady pressure field resulting from the simulation shows the effects of not only the rotor/stator interaction of the high-pressure turbine stage but also new details of the interaction between the blade and the downstream transition...

  6. Innovation Incentive of Downstream Firms in Stackelberg Duopoly Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hongzhen; Yan Qingyou; Huang Wenjie

    2006-01-01

    The licensing strategies and innovation incentives of downstream firms in a Stackelberg duopoly model were analyzed under three respective assumptions that upstream industry is monopoly, duopoly, or perfect competition. It is found that the Stackelberg firm may license his drastic innovation by a fixed royalty rate which is lower than innovation size. The incentives of drastic innovation of Stackelberg firm facing input suppliers with market power decrease considerably even under royalty licensing,compared with facing perfectly competitive input market.

  7. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  8. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozco Javier I

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion.

  9. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of selected phthalates using reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ouxi; Du, Guizhen; Sun, Hong; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Ling; Wang, Xinru

    2009-12-01

    Phthalates are widely used in the plastic industry and food packaging, imparting softness and flexibility to normally rigid plastic medical devices and children's toys. Even though phthalates display low general toxicity, there is increasing concern on the effects of endocrine system induced by some of phthalate compounds. The hormone activity of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assays. The results showed that DBP, MBP and DEHP, not only exhibited potent antiandrogenic activity, with IC(50) value of 1.05x10(-6), 1.22x10(-7)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, but also showed the androgenic activity with EC(50) value of 6.17x10(-6), 1.13x10(-5)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M. We also found that all the three related chemicals possessed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist activity with IC(50) of 1.31x10(-5), 2.77x10(-6)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, and none showed TR agonist activity. These results indicate that TR might be the targets of industrial chemicals. In the ER mediate reporter gene assay, three chemicals showed no agonistic activity except for DBP, which appeared weakly estrogenic at the concentration of 1.0x10(-4)M. Together, the findings demonstrate that the three phthalates could simultaneously disrupt the function of two or more hormonal receptors. Therefore, these phthalates should be considered in risk assessments for human health.

  10. Development of the 5-HT2CR-Tango System Combined with an EGFP Reporter Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Aoki, Miku; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor implicated in emotion, feeding, reward, and cognition. 5-HT2CRs are pharmacological targets for mental disorders and metabolic and reward system abnormalities, as alterations in 5-HT2CR expression, RNA editing, and SNPs are involved in these disturbances. To date, 5-HT2CR activity has mainly been measured by quantifying inositol phosphate production and intracellular Ca(2+) release, but these assays are not suitable for in vivo analysis. Here, we developed a 5-HT2CR-Tango assay system, a novel analysis tool of 5-HT2CR activity based on the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-arrestin interaction. With desensitization of activated 5-HT2CR by arrestin, this system converts the 5-HT2CR-arrestin interaction into EGFP reporter gene signal via the LexA transcriptional activation system. For validation of our system, we measured activity of two 5-HT2CR RNA-editing isoforms (INI and VGV) in HEK293 cells transfected with EGFP reporter gene. The INI isoform displayed both higher basal- and 5-HT-stimulated activities than the VGV isoform. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of 5-HT2CR antagonist SB242084 was also detected by 5-HT2CR-Tango system. This novel tool is useful for in vitro high-throughput targeted 5-HT2CR drug screening and can be applied to future in vivo brain function studies associated with 5-HT2CRs in transgenic animal models.

  11. Bed profile downstream compound sharp crested V-notch weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmoud Ibrahim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Triangular weirs are commonly used to measure discharge in open channel flow. They represent an inexpensive, reliable methodology to monitor water allocation. A compound sharp-crested weir consisting of two triangular parts with different notch angles was used. The lower triangular part of the weir handles the normal range of discharges while the upper part measures the higher peak flows. This paper evaluates experimentally the local scour downstream compound sharp crested V-notch weir. Forty-eight (48 experimental runs were conducted. Three models of weirs with different geometries (combination of notch angles, four upstream water levels, three water levels at the tailgate, and two bed materials were used. Multiple regression equations based on energy principal and dimensional analysis theory were deduced to estimate the local scour downstream of the weir models. The developed equations were compared with the experimental data. The comparison between the local scour downstream classical V-notch weir and a compound sharp-crested weir consisting of two triangular parts with different notch angles was found to be unnoticed. The study recommended using the compound V-notch weir to pass high discharges instead of the classical V-notch weir.

  12. A novel mutation in the ADA gene causing severe combined immunodeficiency in an Arab patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellani Ali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction About 20% of the cases of human severe combined immunodeficiency are the result of the child being homozygous for defective genes encoding the enzyme adenosine deaminase. To our knowledge, the mutation pattern in Arab patients with severe combined immunodeficiency has never been reported previously. Case presentation A 14-month-old Arab boy had clinical features typical of severe combined immunodeficiency. His clinical picture and flow cytometric analysis raised the diagnosis of adenosine deaminase deficiency and prompted us to screen the adenosine deaminase gene for mutation(s. We detected a novel mutation in exon 9 of the adenosine deaminase gene (p.Arg282>Gln, which we believe is the cause of the severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype observed in our patient. Conclusion This is the first report of adenosine deaminase mutation in an Arab patient with severe combined immunodeficiency due to a novel pathogenic mutation in the adenosine deaminase gene.

  13. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. No effect of high fat diet-induced obesity on spontaneous reporter gene mutations in gpt delta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Shinji; Ishii, Yuji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Kijima, Aki; Kodama, Yukio; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A large number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for several human cancers. Several animal studies using rodents with diet-induced or genetic obesity have also demonstrated that obesity can promote tumor development. However, the effects of obesity on the early stages of carcinogenesis, and especially on the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations, remain unclear. To investigate the effects of obesity on the rate of spontaneous gene mutations, we performed reporter gene mutation assays in liver, kidney, and colon, organs in which obesity appears to be associated with cancer development on the basis of epidemiological or animal studies, in mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Six-week-old male and female C57BL/6 gpt delta mice were fed HFD or standard diet (STD) for 13 or 26 weeks. At the end of the experiments, reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon were performed. Final body weights and serum leptin levels of male and female mice fed HFD for 13 or 26 weeks were significantly increased compared with corresponding STD-fed groups. Reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon revealed that there were no significant differences in gpt or Spi- mutant frequencies between STD- and HFD-fed mice in either the 13-week or 26-week groups. These results indicate that HFD treatment and consequent obesity does not appear to influence the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations.

  15. Reliable gene expression analysis by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR: reporting and minimizing the uncertainty in data accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remans, Tony; Keunen, Els; Bex, Geert Jan; Smeets, Karen; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has been widely adopted to measure differences in mRNA levels; however, biological and technical variation strongly affects the accuracy of the reported differences. RT-qPCR specialists have warned that, unless researchers minimize this variability, they may report inaccurate differences and draw incorrect biological conclusions. The Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines describe procedures for conducting and reporting RT-qPCR experiments. The MIQE guidelines enable others to judge the reliability of reported results; however, a recent literature survey found low adherence to these guidelines. Additionally, even experiments that use appropriate procedures remain subject to individual variation that statistical methods cannot correct. For example, since ideal reference genes do not exist, the widely used method of normalizing RT-qPCR data to reference genes generates background noise that affects the accuracy of measured changes in mRNA levels. However, current RT-qPCR data reporting styles ignore this source of variation. In this commentary, we direct researchers to appropriate procedures, outline a method to present the remaining uncertainty in data accuracy, and propose an intuitive way to select reference genes to minimize uncertainty. Reporting the uncertainty in data accuracy also serves for quality assessment, enabling researchers and peer reviewers to confidently evaluate the reliability of gene expression data. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.-H. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University Medical School and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Deng, W.-P. [Institute of Biomedical Material, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, F.-D. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology Taichung 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d49220009@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [{sup 131}I] FIAU and [{sup 3}H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by

  17. A comparative analysis of green fluorescent protein and -glucuronidase protein-encoding genes as a reporter system for studying the temporal expression profiles of promoters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kavita; Pradeep Kumar Burma

    2008-09-01

    The assessment of activity of promoters has been greatly facilitated by the use of reporter genes. However, the activity as assessed by reporter gene is a reflection of not only promoter strength, but also that of the stability of the mRNA and the protein encoded by the reporter gene. While a stable reporter gene product is an advantage in analysing activities of weak promoters, it becomes a major limitation for understanding temporal expression patterns of a promoter, as the reporter product persists even after the activity of the promoter ceases. In the present study we undertook a comparative analysis of two reporter genes, -glucuronidase (gus) and green fluorescent protein (sgfp), for studying the temporal expression pattern of tapetum-specific promoters A9 (Arabidopsis thaliana) and TA29 (Nicotiana tabacum). The activity of A9 and TA29 promoters as assessed by transcript profiles of the reporter genes (gus or sgfp) remained the same irrespective of the reporter gene used. However, while the deduced promoter activity using gus was extended temporally beyond the actual activity of the promoter, sgfp as recorded through its fluorescence correlated better with the transcription profile. Our results thus demonstrate that sgfp is a better reporter gene compared to gus for assessment of temporal activity of promoters. Although several earlier reports have commented on the possible errors in deducing temporal activities of promoters using GUS as a reporter protein, we experimentally demonstrate the advantage of using reporter genes such as gfp for analysis of temporal expression patterns.

  18. Construction and preliminary evaluation of an Aspergillus flavus reporter gene construct as a potential tool for screening aflatoxin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L; Brown-Jenco, Carmen S; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Payne, Gary A

    2003-10-01

    Effective preharvest strategies to eliminate aflatoxin accumulation in crops are not presently available. The molecular biology of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been extensively studied, and genetic and molecular tools such as reporter gene systems for the measurement of fungal growth have been developed. A reporter construct containing the Aspergillus flavus beta-tubulin gene promoter fused to Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) has been shown to be a reliable tool for the indirect measurement of fungal growth in maize kernels. Since cost-saving alternative methods for the direct measurement of aflatoxin levels are needed to facilitate more widespread field and laboratory screening of maize lines, a new reporter gene construct involving the promoter region of the omtA gene of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway was constructed and tested. Expression of GUS activity by this construct (omtA::GUS) was correlated with aflatoxin accumulation in culture. In the fungal transformant GAP26-1, which harbors this construct, aflatoxin production and GUS expression on sucrose-containing medium showed the same temporal pattern of toxin induction. Furthermore, GUS expression by GAP26-1 was shown to be associated with aflatoxin accumulation in maize kernels inoculated with this strain. Our results suggest that this and other reporter gene pathway promoter constructs may provide superior alternatives to direct aflatoxin quantification with respect to time, labor, and materials for the screening of maize lines for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation.

  19. 'Obesity Gene' Doesn't Affect Ability to Lose Weight: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161090.html 'Obesity Gene' Doesn't Affect Ability to Lose Weight: ... 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having the so-called "obesity gene" doesn't affect people's ability to shed ...

  20. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor.

  1. Heavy Solar Wind Ion Dynamics at and Downstream from the Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Virginia M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a contract under the NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program for the analysis and interpretation of the scientific data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) spacecraft and the Fast Plasma Experiment on the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft. These combined data sets will be used in a comprehensive study of the heavy solar wind ion dynamics at and downstream from the Earth's bow shock. The report summarizes activities during the above period and outlines expected activities during the forthcoming quarter.

  2. The transformation of rivers’ temperature regime downstream of reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirvel Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of the transformation of rivers’ temperature conditions influenced by artificial reservoirs. A quantitative estimation of average water temperatures over ten days, and maximum and average annual water temperatures of regulated rivers downstream of reservoirs was made on the basis of the data analysis of a complete period of instrumental observations of the Republican Hydrometeorological Centre of the Republic of Belarus. It is established that the character and the parameters of the transformation of temperature conditions of the regulated rivers along with morphometric features of the reservoirs are determined by the meteorological conditions of the year and the operating conditions of the water-engineering system. The length of the cooling period effect varies from 20 days downstream of small reservoirs to 50-70 days downstream of small and average size reservoirs. The warming effect is less significant by temperature, but lasts longer and is appreciable around 200-240 days in a year. An increase in the average annual water temperature up to 0.5°C and a decrease in maximum temperature down to 1.1°C are observed in the tail-water of average size storage pools. Small size storage pools demonstrate an annual increase in annual water temperature up to 0.3°C and a decrease in maximum temperature down to 0.3°C. Small size water pools show an increase both in annual water temperature up to 0.5°C and maximum water temperature up to 0.3°C. Typical changes in temperature conditions of rivers are observed for a distance of 130 kilometres below the dam of average size water pools, along 70 kilometres in small water pools and along 30 kilometres in tiny ones.

  3. A toolkit and robust pipeline for the generation of fosmid-based reporter genes in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Tursun

    Full Text Available Engineering fluorescent proteins into large genomic clones, contained within BACs or fosmid vectors, is a tool to visualize and study spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in transgenic animals. Because these reporters cover large genomic regions, they most likely capture all cis-regulatory information and can therefore be expected to recapitulate all aspects of endogenous gene expression. Inserting tags at the target gene locus contained within genomic clones by homologous recombination ("recombineering" represents the most straightforward method to generate these reporters. In this methodology paper, we describe a simple and robust pipeline for recombineering of fosmids, which we apply to generate reporter constructs in the nematode C. elegans, whose genome is almost entirely covered in an available fosmid library. We have generated a toolkit that allows for insertion of fluorescent proteins (GFP, YFP, CFP, VENUS, mCherry and affinity tags at specific target sites within fosmid clones in a virtually seamless manner. Our new pipeline is less complex and, in our hands, works more robustly than previously described recombineering strategies to generate reporter fusions for C. elegans expression studies. Furthermore, our toolkit provides a novel recombineering cassette which inserts a SL2-spliced intercistronic region between the gene of interest and the fluorescent protein, thus creating a reporter controlled by all 5' and 3' cis-acting regulatory elements of the examined gene without the direct translational fusion between the two. With this configuration, the onset of expression and tissue specificity of secreted, sub-cellular compartmentalized or short-lived gene products can be easily detected. We describe other applications of fosmid recombineering as well. The simplicity, speed and robustness of the recombineering pipeline described here should prompt the routine use of this strategy for expression studies in C. elegans.

  4. Enhanced mixing downstream of a pile in an estuarine flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, H. U.; Mohrholz, V.; Knoll, M.; Prandke, H.

    2008-11-01

    We studied the impact on stratification and mixing of a bridge pile in a stratified shear flow at the Western Bridge of the Great Belt Fixed Link, Denmark, in January and April 2006. Stratification was measured with high horizontal resolution by towed CTD chains and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was measured by a free-falling MSS 90 microstructure profiler equipped with shear probes. Background stratification and current were measured by standard CTD and a bottom-mounted ADCP, respectively. The spatial and temporal variability of the flow field close behind a single pile was measured by an ADCP mounted on a small catamaran tethered to this pile. A shear background flow of varying strength was observed with an inflow of up to 80 cm s - 1 in the surface layer and an outflow of 10 cm s - 1 in the bottom layer. The brackish surface layer was separated from the saline Kattegat water in the bottom layer by an intermediate layer resulting in a Brunt-Väisälä frequency of up to 100 cycles per hour (cph). The maximum Reynolds number ( Re) and internal Froude number ( Fr) were 4.6 × 10 6 and 1.3, respectively. Eddies occurred downstream of a pile with a characteristic diameter of the pile and a frequency corresponding to a von Kármán vortex street when near-surface Fr > 0.7. Enhanced mixing was observed in the von Kármán vortex streets, which caused an increase in salinity by a few psu in the surface mixed layer of the eddy up to 400 m downstream of the piles. Differential advection by cross-channel circulation smeared out laterally from the wakes' salinity anomalies and turbulence. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy in the intermediate layer increased by an order of magnitude downstream of the piles as a function of Fr when Fr > 0.7. This enhanced mixing reduced the mean potential energy anomaly downstream by some 10 Jm - 3 in the upper 15 m depth and caused an upstream-directed baroclinic pressure gradient of the same order as the barotropic

  5. Hydroeconomic optimization of reservoir management under downstream water quality constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xingguo;

    2015-01-01

    low increase to 16.4. billion. CNY/year. Dilution plays an important role and increases the share of surface water allocations to users situated furthest downstream in the system. The modeling framework generates decision rules that result in the economically efficient strategy for complying with both...... a variant of stochastic dynamic programming known as the water value method. Nonlinearity arising from the water quality constraints is handled with an effective hybrid method combining genetic algorithms and linear programming. Untreated pollutant loads are represented by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD...

  6. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xianfeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-12-10

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases, and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks.

  7. Mutagenicity test system based on a reporter gene assay for short-term detection of mutagens (MutaGen assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Claudia; Arndt, Christian; Reifferscheid, Georg

    2003-02-05

    The construction of a bacterial mutation assay system detecting reversions of base substitutions and frameshifts in tetracycline (tet) and ampicillin resistance genes located on low copy plasmids is described. Frameshift mutations were introduced into repetitive GC-sequences and G-repeats known to be mutagenic hot-spots. Base pair substitutions were inserted in or around the active site of the ampicillinase gene thus generating reversibility of the ampicilline sensitivity. The plasmids carry genes to enable sensitive, fast and specific detection of mutagens in bacteria. MucAB was cloned into the test plasmid to enhance error-prone DNA-repair. The conventional reversion principle has been combined with the luminometric measurement of an inducible reporter gene. The revertants are detected after induction of the beta-galactosidase-producing lacZ-gene either controlled by its natural lac-promotor or by the more stringently repressed (anhydrotetracyclin inducible) tetA promotor. The tester strains containing the tetA/lacZ reporter gene construct can grow in full medium over the complete assay. This test procedure enables screening for mutations within one working day. Incubation for 16 h reveals high sensitivity.

  8. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Background: The considerable capacity of filamentous fungi for the secretion of proteins is the basis for multi-billion dollar industries producing enzymes and proteins with therapeutic value. The stepwise pathway from translation to secretion is therefore well studied, and genes playing major...... roles in the process have been identified through transcriptomics. The assignment of function to these genes has been enabled in combination with gene deletion studies. In this work, 14 genes known to play a role in protein secretion in filamentous fungi were overexpressed in Aspergillus nidulans...... results indicate that increased expression may be a way for the cell to slow down secretion in order to cope with the increased protein load. By constructing a secretion reporter strain, the study demonstrates a robust way to study the secretion pathway in filamentous fungi....

  9. Asynchronous Bilateral Renal Infarction and Thrombophilia With Associated Gene Mutations in a 43-Year-Old Man: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu-Jie; Liu, Li-Jun; Chen, Min; Zhou, Fu-De

    2016-04-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed late because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation, which may result in irreversible damage to the renal parenchyma or increase the risk of other embolic events affecting additional organs. Multiple causal mechanisms and cases of idiopathic RI have been reported, but the causal factors are not clear in most cases.Here, we report the case of a patient with heterochronic bilateral RI caused by thrombophilia. Although he had several risk factors for hypercoagulation disorders, two gene mutations-MTHFR 677 C>T and PLG 1858G>A-were identified by genome sequencing of the entire exome. The findings suggest the possibility of a synergistic relationship between the two gene mutations.Thus, screening for gene mutations may provide additional clues for clarifying the cause of RI and thrombophilia.

  10. Vortex structures downstream a lobed nozzle/mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Hu; Toshio Kobayashi

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the evolutions of unsteady vortex structures downstream a lobed mixer/nozzle. A novel dual-plane stereoscopic PIV system was used to measure all 3-components of vorticity distributions to revealed both the large-scale streamwise vortices produced by the lobed mixer/nozzle and the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex structures generated due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities simultaneously and quantitatively for the first time. The instantaneous and the ensemble-averaged vorticity distributions displayed quite different aspects about the evolutions of the unsteady vortex structures. While the ensemble-averaged vorticity distributions indicated the overall effect of the special geometry of the lobed nozzle/mixer on the enhanced mixing process, the instantaneous vorticity distributions elucidated many details about how the enhanced mixing process was conducted. In addition to quantitatively confirming conjectures of previous studies, further insight about the formation, evolution and interaction characteristics of the unsteady vortex structures downstream of the lobed mixer/nozzle were also uncovered quantitatively in the present study.

  11. Downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins produced in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, Johannes Felix; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    All biological platforms for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins produce an initially turbid extract that must be clarified to avoid fouling sensitive media such as chromatography resins. Clarification is more challenging if the feed stream contains large amounts of dispersed particles, because these rapidly clog the filter media typically used to remove suspended solids. Charged polymers (flocculants) can increase the apparent size of the dispersed particles by aggregation, facilitating the separation of solids and liquids, and thus reducing process costs. However, many different factors can affect the behavior of flocculants, including the pH and conductivity of the medium, the size and charge distribution of the particulates, and the charge density and molecular mass of the polymer. Importantly, these properties can also affect the recovery of the target protein and the overall safety profile of the process. We therefore used a design of experiments approach to establish reliable predictive models that characterize the impact of flocculants during the downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We highlight strategies for the selection of flocculants during process optimization. These strategies will contribute to the quality by design aspects of process development and facilitate the development of safe and efficient downstream processes for plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:24637706

  12. Natural Origin Lycopene and Its "Green" Downstream Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Emmanouil H; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Karabelas, Anastasios J

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene is an abundant natural carotenoid pigment with several biological functions (well-known for its antioxidant properties) which is under intensive investigation in recent years. Lycopene chemistry, its natural distribution, bioavailability, biological significance, and toxicological effects are briefly outlined in the first part of this review. The second, major part, deals with various modern downstream processing techniques, which are assessed in order to identify promising approaches for the recovery of lycopene and of similar lipophilic compounds. Natural lycopene is synthesized in plants and by microorganisms, with main representatives of these two categories (for industrial production) tomato and its by-products and the fungus Blakeslea trispora, respectively. Currently, there is a great deal of effort to develop efficient downstream processing for large scale production of natural-origin lycopene, with trends strongly indicating the necessity for "green" and mild extraction conditions. In this review, emphasis is placed on final product safety and ecofriendly processing, which are expected to totally dominate in the field of natural-origin lycopene extraction and purification.

  13. PIV measurements and flow characteristics downstream of mangrove root models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Curet, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Mangrove forests attracted attentions as a solution to protect coastal areas exposed to sea-level rising, frequent storms, and tsunamis. Mangrove forests found in tide-dominated flow regions are characterized by their massive and complex root systems, which play a prominent role in the structure of tidal flow currents. To understand the role of mangrove roots in flow structure, we modeled mangrove roots with rigid and flexible arrays of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In this work, we investigate the fluid dynamics downstream of the models using a 2-D time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization. We carried out experiments for four different Reynolds number based on cylinder diameters ranges from 2200 to 12000. We present time-averaged and time-resolved flow parameters including velocity distribution, vorticity, streamline, Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy. The results show that the flow structure has different vortex shedding downstream of the cylinders due to interactions of shear layers separating from cylinders surface. The spectral analysis of the measured velocity data is also performed to obtain Strouhal number of the unsteady flow in the cylinder wake.

  14. Ion Effects in the DARHT-II Downstream Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Ekdahl, Carl; Genoni, Thomas C; Hughes, Thomas P; Schulze, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces an 18-MeV, 2-kA, 2-μs electron beam pulse. After the accelerator, the pulse is delivered to the final focus on an x-ray producing target via a beam transport section called the Downstream Transport. Ions produced due to beam ionization of residual gases in the Downstream Transport can affect the beam dynamics. Ions generated by the head of the pulse will cause modification of space-charge forces at the tail of the pulse so that the beam head and tail will have different beam envelopes. They may also induce ion-hose instability at the tail of the pulse. If these effects are significant, the focusing requirements of beam head and tail at the final focus will become very different. The focusing of the complete beam pulse will be time dependent and difficult to achieve, leading to less efficient x-ray production. In this paper, we will describe the results of our calculations of these ion effects at different residual-gas pressure levels. Our goal is to determine the ma...

  15. 九龙江下游水源水中新发病原微生物和抗生素抗性基因的定量PCR检测%Real-time PCR Detection and Quantification of Emerging Waterborne Pathogens (EWPs) and Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) in the Downstream Area of Jiulon~ River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 林惠荣; 张舒婷; 于鑫

    2012-01-01

    The emerging waterborne pathogens(EWPs) and antibiotic resistance genes(ARGs) are important for drinking water safety.The detection and quantification of 7 EWPs and 4 ARGs were carried out in Jiulong River,which is the main water source of southwestern Fujian Province.The water samples were collected from four sites of the Jiulong River downstream area and a drinking water treatment plant nearby.DNA was extracted and quantified by real-time(SYBR Green) PCR methods after the samples were filtered through 0.22 μm membranes.The results showed that the amount of Salmonella enterica(Salmonella spp.),Legionella pneumophila(L.pneumophila) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P.aeruginosa) could reach up to 103,104and 105 copies·mL-1,respectively.The concentration of organic matter in water may affect the copy numbers significantly.The water plant could effectively remove most EWPs and ARGs except Salmonella spp..Therefore,more efforts should be made on water pollution source control,water treatment technology and point-of-use system to make sure the safety of drinking water.%新发水传病原微生物和抗生素抗性基因对于饮用水的生物安全性有重要意义.以7种典型的水传病原微生物和4种抗生素抗性基因作为检测指标,对闽西南地区的重要水源九龙江下游水源水进行了检测.从九龙江下游4个采样点和附近某水厂进出水采集水样,用0.22μm的滤膜过滤后,进行DNA提取及荧光定量PCR检测.结果表明,九龙江下游水源水中Salmonella enterica(Salmonella spp.)、Legionella pneumophila(L.pneumophila)和Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P.aeruginosa)等个别指标可达到103、104、105copies.mL-1的水平.有机物浓度可能对病原微生物和抗生素抗性基因的水平有较大影响.水厂常规工艺对于大多数病原微生物和抗生素抗性基因可以实现有效去除,但对Salmonella spp.的去除效果不理想.因此为保证饮用水安全,需要在

  16. Pathogenic classification of LPL gene variants reported to be associated with LPL deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Rute; Artieda, Marta; Tejedor, Diego

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency is a serious lipid disorder of severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG) with chylomicronemia. A large number of variants in the LPL gene have been reported but their influence on LPL activity and SHTG has not been completely analyzed. Gaining insight...

  17. Use of the fluorescent timer DsRED-E5 as reporter to monitor dynamics of gene activity in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabella, R.; Franken, C.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins, such as green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein (DsRED), have become frequently used reporters in plant biology. However, their potential to monitor dynamic gene regulation is limited by their high stability. The recently made DsRED-E5 variant overcame this

  18. Lenz-Majewski syndrome: Report of a case with novel mutation in PTDSS1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Parag M; Vasudevan, Lakshmi; Bansal, Vandana; Menon, Shyla R; Gawde, Harshavardhan M; D'Souza, Aruna; Babu, Shiny; Kondurkar, Shweta; Adhia, Rashmi; Das, Dhanjit Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is an extremely rare syndrome characterized by osteosclerosis, intellectual disability, characteristic facies and distinct craniofacial, dental, cutaneous and distal - limb anomalies. Recently, mutations in PTDSS1 gene have been identified as causative in six unrelated individuals. We report the seventh mutation proven case of LMS and provide a concise review of all known patients till date.

  19. Establishing the lysine-rich protein CEST reporter gene as a CEST MR imaging detector for oncolytic virotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Farrar (Christian T.); J.S. Buhrman (Jason); G. Liu (Guanshu); A. Kleijn (Anne); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); M.T. McMahon (Michael T.); A.A. Gilad (Assaf A.); G. Fulci (Giulia)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To (a) evaluate whether the lysine-rich protein (LRP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reporter gene can be engineered into G47Δ, a herpes simplex-derived oncolytic virus that is currently being tested in clinical trials, without disrupting its therapeutic effectiveness and (b) e

  20. Lineage switch in relapse of acute leukemia with rearrangement of MLL gene (KMT2A. literature review and case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Zerkalenkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lineage switch is a rare phenomenon in which a transition from lymphoid to myeloid was observed in relapse of acute leukemia, or vice versa. This paper presents the four clinical case reports of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL gene rearrangement (KMT2A with myeloid phenotype in relapse.

  1. Stable reporter cell lines for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor y (PPARy)-mediated modulation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Man, H.Y.; Kloet, S.K.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Keijer, J.; Rietjens, I.; Burg, van der B.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ¿ (PPAR¿) by ligands is associated with beneficial health effects, including anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects. The aim of the current study was to develop luciferase reporter gene assays to enable fast and low-cost measurement

  2. Use of the fluorescent timer DsRED-E5 as reporter to monitor dynamics of gene activity in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabella, R.; Franken, C.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins, such as green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein (DsRED), have become frequently used reporters in plant biology. However, their potential to monitor dynamic gene regulation is limited by their high stability. The recently made DsRED-E5 variant overcame this proble

  3. Using of green fluorescent reporter gene (GFP) to monitor the fate of Fusarium moniliforme mycoparasitized by Trichoderma viride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ting-heng; WANG Wei-xia; WANG Chang-chun; YANG Rui-qin; CAI Xin-zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fusarium moniliforme Sheld. is a rice pathogenic fungus and causes the disease called Bakanae,which has increasingly damaged rice production in the recent years. Trichoderma spp. has been one of the most widely used biological control agent of plant disease. By geneticaly labelling F. moniliforme with the GFP reporter gene, we have studied the antagonistic action of Trichoderma viride against this pathogenic fungus.

  4. LuxCDE-luxAB-based promoter reporter system to monitor the Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozcal, Elif; Dagdeviren, Melih; Uzel, Atac

    2017-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the in vitro and in vivo regulation of the virulence factor genes of bacterial pathogens. In this study, we describe the construction of a versatile reporter system for Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 (YeO3) based on the luxCDABE operon. In strain YeO3-luxCDE we integrated the luciferase substrate biosynthetic genes, luxCDE, into the genome of the bacterium so that the substrate is constitutively produced. The luxAB genes that encode the luciferase enzyme were cloned into a suicide vector to allow cloning of any promoter-containing fragment upstream the genes. When the obtained suicide-construct is mobilized into YeO3-luxCDE bacteria, it integrates into the recipient genome via homologous recombination between the cloned promoter fragment and the genomic promoter sequence and thereby generates a single-copy and stable promoter reporter. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen (O-ag) and outer core hexasaccharide (OC) of YeO3 are virulence factors necessary to colonization of the intestine and establishment of infection. To monitor the activities of the OC and O-ag gene cluster promoters we constructed the reporter strains YeO3-Poc::luxAB and YeO3-Pop1::luxAB, respectively. In vitro, at 37°C both promoter activities were highest during logarithmic growth and decreased when the bacteria entered stationary growth phase. At 22°C the OC gene cluster promoter activity increased during the late logarithmic phase. Both promoters were more active in late stationary phase. To monitor the promoter activities in vivo, mice were infected intragastrically and the reporter activities monitored by the IVIS technology. The mouse experiments revealed that both LPS promoters were well expressed in vivo and could be detected by IVIS, mainly from the intestinal region of orally infected mice. PMID:28235077

  5. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Zeinstra, Laura M; Schuitemaker, Femke; Lanser, Peter H; Bogerd, Jan; Brouwer, Abraham; Vethaak, A Dick; De Voogt, Pim; Murk, Albertinka J; Van der Burg, Bart

    2002-10-15

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably transfected with an ER-mediated luciferase gene construct. In the in vivo assay, transgenic zebrafish are used in which the same luciferase construct has been stably introduced. In both assays, luciferase reporter gene activity can be easily quantified following short-term exposure to chemicals activating endogenous estrogen receptors. The objective of this study was to compare responses by known (xeno)estrogenic compounds in both assays. Exposure to the (xeno)estrogens estradiol (E2), estrone, ethynylestradiol (EE2), o,p'-DDT, nonylphenol (NP), and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) revealed that EE2 was the most potent (xeno)estrogen tested and was 100 times more potent than E2 in the transgenic zebrafish assay, whereas in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, EE2 and E2 were equipotent Although the xenoestrogens o,p'-DDT and NP were full estrogen agonists in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, only o,p'-DDT demonstrated weak dose-related estrogenic activity in vivo. To determine if differences in reporter gene activity may be explained by differential affinity of (xeno)estrogens to human and zebrafish ERs, full-length sequences of the zebrafish ER subtypes alpha, beta, and gamma were cloned, and transactivation by (xeno)estrogens was compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Using transiently transfected recombinant ER and reporter gene constructs, EE2 also showed relatively potent activation of zebrafish ERalpha and ERbeta compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Zebrafish ERbeta and ERgamma showed higher transactivation by (xeno)estrogens relative to E2 than human ERbeta.

  6. Pine Gene Discovery Project - Final Report - 08/31/1997 - 02/28/2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whetten, R. W.; Sederoff, R. R.; Kinlaw, C.; Retzel, E.

    2001-04-30

    Integration of pines into the large scope of plant biology research depends on study of pines in parallel with study of annual plants, and on availability of research materials from pine to plant biologists interested in comparing pine with annual plant systems. The objectives of the Pine Gene Discovery Project were to obtain 10,000 partial DNA sequences of genes expressed in loblolly pine, to determine which of those pine genes were similar to known genes from other organisms, and to make the DNA sequences and isolated pine genes available to plant researchers to stimulate integration of pines into the wider scope of plant biology research. Those objectives have been completed, and the results are available to the public. Requests for pine genes have been received from a number of laboratories that would otherwise not have included pine in their research, indicating that progress is being made toward the goal of integrating pine research into the larger molecular biology research community.

  7. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  8. Construction of a multiplex promoter reporter platform to monitor Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene expression and the identification of usnic acid as a potent suppressor of psm gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng GAO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  9. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  10. How phosphoinositide 3-phosphate controls growth downstream of amino acids and autophagy downstream of amino acid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Manifava, Maria; Schoenfelder, Priya; Rotondo, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    The simple phosphoinositide PtdIns3P has been shown to control cell growth downstream of amino acid signalling and autophagy downstream of amino acid withdrawal. These opposing effects depend in part on the existence of distinct complexes of Vps34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34), the kinase responsible for the majority of PtdIns3P synthesis in cells: one complex is activated after amino acid withdrawal to induce autophagy and another regulates mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) activation when amino acids are present. However, lipid-dependent signalling almost always exhibits a spatial dimension, related to the site of formation of the lipid signal. In the case of PtdIns3P-regulated autophagy induction, recent data suggest that PtdIns3P accumulates in a membrane compartment dynamically connected to the endoplasmic reticulum that constitutes a platform for the formation of some autophagosomes. For PtdIns3P-regulated mTORC1 activity, a spatial context is not yet known: several possibilities can be envisaged based on the known effects of PtdIns3P on the endocytic system and on recent data suggesting that activation of mTORC1 depends on its localization on lysosomes.

  11. Large Wood Storage Does Not Decrease Downstream Through a Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, M.; Pasternack, G. B.; Senter, A. E.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    The storage of large wood in streams at the watershed scale has long been characterized as decreasing downstream due to a transport limitation in headwater streams, and a supply limitation in larger rivers. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis through a field study in the Upper Yuba River watershed in Northern California, USA. While most studies surveyed within the wetted channel at selected reaches of different sizes, this study measured overbank deposits of large wood in addition to those in-channel to reflect the total storage within the active river corridor, and used a stratified random sampling scheme to see if relations held at the watershed scale. The watershed is large (2,874 km2), mountainous, mostly forested, and has been dramatically altered by human activities primarily related to gold mining. One hundred fourteen field sites of varied drainage area sizes were visited, inventoried for large wood (length > 1 m, diameter > 10 cm) storage within the active river corridor, and the volume storage per river length was calculated. Inclusion of floodplains in field surveys illuminates the fact that the distribution of large wood changes within the active river corridor, while the total storage does not decrease downstream. Among many watershed-scale control variables, such as drainage area, stream order, and upslope distance, the local amount of shrub cover and bankfull channel width were the only significant predictors of large wood storage in a multiple linear regression model, both with positive coefficients. A critical literature review was also conducted to investigate the evidence for the common conceptual model. Findings were that (1) the observed downstream trend of large wood storage is largely a function of the methods employed by each study, (2) the use of storage per channel area has confounded the commonly held conceptual model, due to its correlation with channel width, and (3) there is little evidence to support the hypothesis

  12. Behavior of a metabolic cycling population at the single cell level as visualized by fluorescent gene expression reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Laxman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During continuous growth in specific chemostat cultures, budding yeast undergo robust oscillations in oxygen consumption that are accompanied by highly periodic changes in transcript abundance of a majority of genes, in a phenomenon called the Yeast Metabolic Cycle (YMC. This study uses fluorescent reporters of genes specific to different YMC phases in order to visualize this phenomenon and understand the temporal regulation of gene expression at the level of individual cells within the cycling population. METHODOLOGY: Fluorescent gene expression reporters for different phases of the YMC were constructed and stably integrated into the yeast genome. Subsequently, these reporter-expressing yeast were used to visualize YMC dynamics at the individual cell level in cultures grown in a chemostat or in a microfluidics platform under varying glucose concentrations, using fluorescence microscopy and quantitative Western blots. CONCLUSIONS: The behavior of single cells within a metabolic cycling population was visualized using phase-specific fluorescent reporters. The reporters largely recapitulated genome-specified mRNA expression profiles. A significant fraction of the cell population appeared to exhibit basal expression of the reporters, supporting the hypothesis that there are at least two distinct subpopulations of cells within the cycling population. Although approximately half of the cycling population initiated cell division in each permissive window of the YMC, metabolic synchrony of the population was maintained. Using a microfluidics platform we observed that low glucose concentrations appear to be necessary for metabolic cycling. Lastly, we propose that there is a temporal window in the oxidative growth phase of the YMC where the cycling population segregates into at least two subpopulations, one which will enter the cell cycle and one which does not.

  13. Compound heterozygosity of SHOX-encompassing and downstream PAR1 deletions results in Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Barros, Angel; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Ross, Judith L; Zinn, Andrew R; Heath, Karen E

    2007-05-01

    We present the clinical and molecular characteristics of a multi-generation family in which the proband presented with clinical features of Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) whilst different family members had a diagnosis of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and/or pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). In the LMD proband two different deletions were identified in the pseudoautosomal 1 region (PAR1) of the X and Y chromosomes: a SHOX-encompassing deletion inherited from his father and a downstream PAR1 deletion, which did not include SHOX, inherited from his mother. The individuals with PSACH features presented the previously described G719D mutation in the C-terminal globular domain of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene (COMP). The LMD proband described here represents the first LMD case due to compound heterozygosity for deletions of the two different PAR1 regions, SHOX-encompassing and downstream from SHOX, that have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis of LWD and LMD.

  14. Neuro-fuzzy GMDH based particle swarm optimization for prediction of scour depth at downstream of grade control structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Najafzadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, neuro-fuzzy based-group method of data handling (NF-GMDH as an adaptive learning network was utilized to predict the maximum scour depth at the downstream of grade-control structures. The NF-GMDH network was developed using particle swarm optimization (PSO. Effective parameters on the scour depth include sediment size, geometry of weir, and flow characteristics in the upstream and downstream of structure. Training and testing of performances were carried out using non-dimensional variables. Datasets were divided into three series of dataset (DS. The testing results of performances were compared with the gene-expression programming (GEP, evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR model, and conventional techniques. The NF-GMDH-PSO network produced lower error of the scour depth prediction than those obtained using the other models. Also, the effective input parameter on the maximum scour depth was determined through a sensitivity analysis.

  15. Downstream molecular pathways of FLT3 in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia: biology and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Shinichiro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase. Mutations of FLT3 comprise one of the most frequently identified types of genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia. One-third of acute myeloid leukemia patients have mutations of this gene, and the majority of these mutations involve an internal tandem duplication in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3, leading to constitutive activation of downstream signaling pathways and aberrant cell growth. This review summarizes the current understanding of the effects of the downstream molecular signaling pathways after FLT3 activation, with a particular focus on the effects on transcription factors. Moreover, this review describes novel FLT3-targeted therapies, as well as efficient combination therapies for FLT3-mutated leukemia cells.

  16. CD147 and downstream ADAMTSs promote the tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Chen, Yihan; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Ochoa, Augusto C; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Toole, Bryan P; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-26

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several human cancers, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients and lack effective therapeutic options. We have previously shown that KSHV or viral protein LANA up-regulates the glycoprotein CD147, thereby inducing primary endothelial cell invasiveness. In the current study, we identify the global network controlled by CD147 in KSHV-infected endothelial cells using Illumina microarray analysis. Among downstream genes, two specific metalloproteases, ADAMTS1 and 9, are strongly expressed in AIDS-KS tissues and contribute to KSHV-infected endothelial cell invasiveness through up-regulation of IL-6 and VEGF. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that targeting CD147 and downstream ADAMTSs significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, targeting CD147 and associated proteins may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against these KSHV-related malignancies.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, T. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Alt, F.W. (Columbia Univ., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA). Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  18. Exosome proteomics reveals transcriptional regulator proteins with potential to mediate downstream pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Timothy H; Madsen, Helen J; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Lencioni, Alex M; Graner, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    Exosomes are virus-sized, membrane-enclosed vesicles with origins in the cellular endosomal system, but are released extracellularly. As a population, these tiny vesicles carry relatively enormous amounts of information in their protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the vesicles can have profound impacts on recipient cells. This review employs publically-available data combined with gene ontology applications to propose a novel concept, that exosomes transport transcriptional and translational machinery that may have direct impacts on gene expression in recipient cells. Here, we examine the previously published proteomic contents of medulloblastoma-derived exosomes, focusing on transcriptional regulators; we found that there are numerous proteins that may have potential roles in transcriptional and translational regulation with putative influence on downstream, cancer-related pathways. We expanded this search to all of the proteins in the Vesiclepedia database; using gene ontology approaches, we see that these regulatory factors are implicated in many of the processes involved in cancer initiation and progression. This information suggests that some of the effects of exosomes on recipient cells may be due to the delivery of protein factors that can directly and fundamentally change the transcriptional landscape of the cells. Within a tumor environment, this has potential to tilt the advantage towards the cancer.

  19. Trends in Upstream and Downstream Process Development for Antibody Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Gronemeyer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A steady increase of product titers and the corresponding change in impurity composition represent a challenge for development and optimization of antibody production processes. Additionally, increasing demands on product quality result in higher complexity of processes and analytics, thereby increasing the costs for product work-up. Concentration and composition of impurities are critical for efficient process development. These impurities can show significant variations, which primarily depend on culture conditions. They have a major impact on the work-up strategy and costs. The resulting “bottleneck” in downstream processing requires new optimization, technology and development approaches. These include the optimization and adaptation of existing unit operations respective to the new separation task, the assessment of alternative separation technologies and the search for new methods in process development. This review presents an overview of existing methods for process optimization and integration and indicates new approaches for future developments.

  20. 'Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Fact or Fiction?'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    1977), a theory that is a version of the classic justification for the award of the exclusive right - that it should protect the incentive to develop property. Merges and Nelson insist that their thesis should be supported by empirical evidence and they turn to historical accounts as an important form...... of that empirical evidence. They present alleged historical examples of downstream innovation suppression in such important technologies as: Edison's carbon filament light bulb; the automobile; radio; aircraft; the transistor; the computer. This paper presents a contrary interpretation of the role of patents......), when adequate historical context is included in the analysis, the more common problem is revealed to be that the patents at issue were not administered, for example by courts or the US Patent Office, to maintain their prospect function i.e, their ability to enable the coordination of development...

  1. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations.

  2. Efficient industry configurations in downstream gas markets. An empirical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarin, Ariel A. [IAE Escuela de Direccion y Negocios, Universidad Austral, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-03-15

    This paper examines the production technology of the downstream gas industry in order to provide some useful insights into its efficient structure by looking at the optimal size of firms and the productive efficiency reasons for and against their vertical integration. The analysis is based on a restricted cost function model estimated using firm level data for Argentina and Great Britain. The findings provide evidence for the presence of vertical diseconomies between stages. Results indicate that a single transmitter is able to produce the industry's output at lower costs for large market sizes and that several regional firms are able to operate without sacrificing scale economies if gas distribution is integrated with supply. The findings also indicate that a gas retailer experiences constant returns to scale when it supplies a large customer base. Liberalisation could thus result in oligopolistic industry configurations. (Author)

  3. Allogeneic cell therapy bioprocess economics and optimization: downstream processing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Simaria, Ana S; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Gupta, Siddharth; Warren, Kim; Farid, Suzanne S

    2015-01-01

    To develop a decisional tool to identify the most cost effective process flowsheets for allogeneic cell therapies across a range of production scales. A bioprocess economics and optimization tool was built to assess competing cell expansion and downstream processing (DSP) technologies. Tangential flow filtration was generally more cost-effective for the lower cells/lot achieved in planar technologies and fluidized bed centrifugation became the only feasible option for handling large bioreactor outputs. DSP bottlenecks were observed at large commercial lot sizes requiring multiple large bioreactors. The DSP contribution to the cost of goods/dose ranged between 20-55%, and 50-80% for planar and bioreactor flowsheets, respectively. This analysis can facilitate early decision-making during process development.

  4. Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam: Implications for Downstream Riparian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Block, P. J.; Hammond, M.; King, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ethiopia has begun seriously developing their significant hydropower potential by launching construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile River to facilitate local and regional growth. Although this has required substantial planning on Ethiopia's part, no policy dictating the reservoir filling rate strategy has been publicly issued. This filling stage will have clear implications on downstream flows in Sudan and Egypt, complicated by evaporative losses, climate variability, and climate change. In this study, various filling policies and future climate states are simultaneously explored to infer potential streamflow reductions at Lake Nasser, providing regional decision-makers with a set of plausible, justifiable, and comparable outcomes. Schematic of the model framework Box plots of 2017-2032 percent change in annual average streamflow at Lake Nasser for each filling policy constructed from the 100 time-series and weighted precipitation changes. All values are relative to the no dam policy and no changes to future precipitation.

  5. Scale-Up of Protein Purification: Downstream Processing Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, John Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Separation science continues to occupy the central position in the overall strategy for the downstream processing and purification of therapeutic protein products for human use. Increasing product titers from mammalian cell culture and new emerging classes of biopharmaceuticals has presented a challenge to the industry to identify ways of improving the robustness and economics of chromatography processes. In commercial manufacturing, there is always a need to increase the scale of the chromatography operations which are typically developed and optimized in small-scale laboratory experiments. This review discusses the key factors in the chromatography process that need to be considered as the scale of the purification step is increased in order to maintain the purity and integrity of the product purified at smaller scale.

  6. Report on emerging technologies for translational bioinformatics: a symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldron Levi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 million formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue samples archived each year in the United States alone, archival tissues remain a vast and under-utilized resource in the genomic study of cancer. Technologies have recently been introduced for whole-transcriptome amplification and microarray analysis of degraded mRNA fragments from FFPE samples, and studies of these platforms have only recently begun to enter the published literature. Results The Emerging Technologies for Translational Bioinformatics symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues featured presentations of two large-scale FFPE expression profiling studies (each involving over 1,000 samples, overviews of several smaller studies, and representatives from three leading companies in the field (Illumina, Affymetrix, and NuGEN. The meeting highlighted challenges in the analysis of expression data from archival tissues and strategies being developed to overcome them. In particular, speakers reported higher rates of clinical sample failure (from 10% to 70% than are typical for fresh-frozen tissues, as well as more frequent probe failure for individual samples. The symposium program is available at http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ffpe. Conclusions Multiple solutions now exist for whole-genome expression profiling of FFPE tissues, including both microarray- and sequencing-based platforms. Several studies have reported their successful application, but substantial challenges and risks still exist. Symposium speakers presented novel methodology for analysis of FFPE expression data and suggestions for improving data recovery and quality assessment in pre-analytical stages. Research presentations emphasized the need for careful study design, including the use of pilot studies, replication, and randomization of samples among batches, as well as careful attention to data quality control. Regardless of any limitations in quantitave transcriptomics for

  7. A Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi Kalia, Andre; Frei, Michaela; Lege, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    SAR Interferometry is a powerful technique able to detect and monitor various surface displacements caused by e.g. gravitative mass movement, subrosion, groundwater extraction, fluid injection, natural gas extraction. These processes can e.g. cause damage to buildings, infrastructure, affect ecosystems, agriculture and the economic use of the geological underground by influencing the hydro(geo)logical setting. Advanced techniques of interferometric processing (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, PSI) allow highly precise displacement measurements (mm precision) by analyzing stacks of SAR imagery. The PSI mapping coverage can be increased to entire nations by using several adjacent satellite tracks. In order to assist the operational use of this technique a German-wide, officially approved, PSI dataset is under development. The intention of this presentation is to show i) the concept of the Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany and ii) a pilot study to exemplarily demonstrate the workflow and potential products from the Copernicus downstream service. The pilot study is focusing on the built up of an officially approved wide-area PSI dataset. The study area covers an area of more than 30.000 km² and is located in the Northwest German Basin. Several natural processes (e.g. compaction of marine sediments, peat loss) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. natural gas extraction, rock salt mining) are causing surface displacements in the study area. The PSI analysis is based on six ERS-1/-2 data stacks covering the timespan from 1992 until 2001. Each data stack consists of 49 to 73 ERS-1/-2 SAR images. A comparison of the PSI results with thematic data (e.g. volume and location of extracted natural gas) strongly indicates that a part of the detected land subsidence is caused by natural gas extraction. Furthermore, land subsidence caused by e.g. fluid injection and rock salt mining were successfully detected by the PSI analysis.

  8. Downstream evolution of unconfined vortices: mechanical and thermal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Saborid, M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gómez-Barea, A.; Barrero, A.

    2002-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the downstream evolution (mechanical and thermal) of vortex-jet cores whose velocity and temperature fields far from the axis match a family of inviscid and non-conducting vortices. The far-velocity field is rotational, except for a particular case which corresponds to the well-known Long's vortex. The evolution of the vortex core depends on both the conditions at a certain upstream station, characterized by the dimensionless value of the velocity at the axis, and a dimensionless swirling parameter L defined as the ratio of the values of the azimuthal and axial velocities outside the vortex core. This numerical study, based on the quasi-cylindrical approximation (QC) of the Navier Stokes equations, determines the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, eventually reaching an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria, Fernández de la Mora & Barrero 1995; Herrada, Pérez-Saborid & Barrero 1999), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). In particular, the critical value L = Lb(a) beyond which vortex breakdown occurs downstream is a function of a dimensionless parameter a characterizing the axial momentum of the vortex jet at an initial upstream station. It is found numerically that for very large values of a this vortex breakdown criterion tends to an asymptote which is precisely the value L = L* predicted by the self-similar analysis, and beyond which a self-similar structure of the vortex core does not exist. In addition, the computation of the total temperature field provides useful information on the physical mechanisms responsible for the thermal separation phenomenon observed in Ranque Hilsch tubes and other swirling jet devices. In particular, the mechanical work of viscous forces which gives rise to an intense loss of kinetic energy during the initial stages of the evolution has been identified as the physical mechanism responsible for thermal

  9. Detection of miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and preliminary analysis of its downstream target molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Shen; Jian-Wu Gao; Yan-Yu Li; Peng Teng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and analyze its downstream target molecules.Methods:Patients with different FIGO stages of cervical cancer and healthy subjects were selected, cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected, and contents of miRNA-21 and apoptotic genes were detected; cervical cancer SiHa cells were cultured, miRNA-21 mimics and inhibitors were transfected, and then apoptotic gene contents were detected.Results:miRNA-21 contents in different stages of cervical cancer tissue were all higher than those in normal cervical tissue, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were lower than those in normal tissue, and mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were negatively correlated with miRNA-21 contents; after miRNA-21 mimics were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly decreased, and after miRNA-21 inhibitors were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly increased.Conclusion:miRNA-21 contents in cervical cancer tissue significantly increase; downstream target genes of this miRNA may be apoptotic genes p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19.

  10. Unintentional miRNA ablation is a risk factor in gene knockout studies: a short report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Osokine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most powerful techniques for studying the function of a gene is to disrupt the expression of that gene using genetic engineering strategies such as targeted recombination or viral integration of gene trap cassettes. The tremendous utility of these tools was recognized this year with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Capecchi, Evans, and Smithies for their pioneering work in targeted recombination mutagenesis in mammals. Another noteworthy discovery made nearly a decade ago was the identification of a novel class of non-coding genes called microRNAs. MicroRNAs are among the largest known classes of regulatory elements with more than 1000 predicted to exist in the mouse genome. Over 50% of known microRNAs are located within introns of coding genes. Given that currently about half of the genes in mouse have been knocked out, we investigated the possibility that intronic microRNAs may have been coincidentally deleted or disrupted in some of these mouse models. We searched published murine knockout studies and gene trap embryonic stem cell line databases for cases where a microRNA was located within or near the manipulated genomic loci, finding almost 200 cases where microRNA expression may have been disrupted along with another gene. Our results draw attention to the need for careful planning in future knockout studies to minimize the unintentional disruption of microRNAs. These data also raise the possibility that many knockout studies may need to be reexamined to determine if loss of a microRNA contributes to the phenotypic consequences attributed to loss of a protein-encoding gene.

  11. HYPOSENSITIVE TO LIGHT,an Alpha/Beta Fold Protein,Acts Downstream of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 to Regulate Seedling De-Etiolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Sun; Min Ni

    2011-01-01

    Ambient light has profound effects on early seedling de-etiolation through red and far-red light-absorbing phytochromes and blue and UV-A light-absorbing cryptochromes.Subsequent integration of various light signal transduction pathways leads to changes in gene expression and morphogenic responses.Here,we report the isolation of a new Arabidopsis light-signaling component,HYPOSENSITIVE TO LIGHT or HTL.Both htl-1 and htl-2 alleles displayed a long hypocotyl phenotype under red,far-red,and blue light,whereas overexpression of HTL caused a short hypocotyl phenotype under similar light conditions.The mutants also showed other photomorphogenic defects such as elongated petioles,retarded cotyledon and leaf expansion,reduced accumulation of chlorophyll and anthocyanin pigments,and attenuated expression of light-responsive CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN 3 and CHALCONE SYNTHASE genes.HTL belongs to an alpha/beta fold protein family and is localized strongly in the nucleus and weakly in the cytosol.The expression of HTL was strongly induced by light of various wavelengths and this light induction was impaired in elongated hypocotyl 5.HY5directly bound to both a C/G-box and a G-box in the HTL promoter but with a greater affinity toward the C/G-box.HTL.therefore,represents a new signaling step downstream of HY5 in phy-and cry-mediated de-etiolation responses.

  12. In vitro reporter gene assays for assessment of PPAR- and Nrf2-mediated health effects of tomato and its bioactive constituents

    OpenAIRE

    Gijsbers, L.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of food products with health-promoting properties, such as for example margarines with plant sterols, fruit juice enriched with calcium and cereals with (soluble) fibre, has increased rapidly during the last years. The present thesis provides proof-of-principle that reporter gene assays are effective tools to investigate the effects of functional foods and food compounds on gene expression pathways. In order to test fruits and vegetables for selected functions in reporter gene...

  13. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  14. Bardet-Biedl syndrome in Denmark-report of 13 novel sequence variations in six genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund; Grønskov, Karen; Philp, Alisdair R

    2010-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, obesity, learning disabilities, renal involvement, and male hypogenitalism. BBS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations of 14 genes, accounting for approximately 70% of cases. Triall...

  15. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, T.W.

    1999-04-01

    Part 1 of this research focuses on patterns of gene expression of ADPG-pyrophosphorylase in native and transgenic potato plants. To elucidate the mechanism controlling AGP expression during plant development, the expression of the potato tuber AGP small subunit (sAGP) gene was analyzed in transgenic potato plants using a promoter-{beta}-glucuronidase expression system. Part II evaluated the structure-function relationships of AGP.

  16. Development of functional genomic tools in trematodes: RNA interference and luciferase reporter gene activity in Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    Full Text Available The growing availability of sequence information from diverse parasites through genomic and transcriptomic projects offer new opportunities for the identification of key mediators in the parasite-host interaction. Functional genomics approaches and methods for the manipulation of genes are essential tools for deciphering the roles of genes and to identify new intervention targets in parasites. Exciting advances in functional genomics for parasitic helminths are starting to occur, with transgene expression and RNA interference (RNAi reported in several species of nematodes, but the area is still in its infancy in flatworms, with reports in just three species. While advancing in model organisms, there is a need to rapidly extend these technologies to other parasites responsible for several chronic diseases of humans and cattle. In order to extend these approaches to less well studied parasitic worms, we developed a test method for the presence of a viable RNAi pathway by silencing the exogenous reporter gene, firefly luciferase (fLUC. We established the method in the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and then confirmed its utility in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. We transformed newly excysted juveniles of F. hepatica by electroporation with mRNA of fLUC and three hours later were able to detect luciferase enzyme activity, concentrated mainly in the digestive ceca. Subsequently, we tested the presence of an active RNAi pathway in F. hepatica by knocking down the exogenous luciferase activity by introduction into the transformed parasites of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA specific for fLUC. In addition, we tested the RNAi pathway targeting an endogenous F. hepatica gene encoding leucine aminopeptidase (FhLAP, and observed a significant reduction in specific mRNA levels. In summary, these studies demonstrated the utility of RNAi targeting reporter fLUC as a reporter gene assay to establish the presence of an intact RNAi pathway in helminth

  17. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae. Progress report, March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. {beta}-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for {beta}-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  18. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudaladava Volha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2 were validated by real-time RT-PCR.

  19. MMP14 as a novel downstream target of VEGFR2 in migratory glioma-tropic neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita G. Alexiades

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC-based carriers have been presented as promising therapeutic tools for the treatment of infiltrative brain tumors due to their intrinsic tumor homing property. They have demonstrated the ability to migrate towards distant tumor microsatellites and effectively deliver the therapeutic payload, thus significantly improving survival in experimental animal models for brain tumor. Despite such optimistic results, the efficacy of NSC-based anti-cancer therapy has been limited due to the restricted tumor homing ability of NSCs. To examine this issue, we investigated the mechanisms of tumor-tropic migration of an FDA-approved NSC line, HB1.F3.CD, by performing a gene expression analysis. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA and membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14 as molecules whose expression are significantly elevated in migratory NSCs. We observed increased expression of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2 in the focal adhesion complexes of migratory NSCs, with downstream activation of VEGFR2-dependent kinases such as p-PLCγ, p-FAK, and p-Akt, a signaling cascade reported to be required for cellular migration. In an in vivo orthotopic glioma xenograft model, analysis of the migratory trail showed that NSCs maintained expression of VEGFR2 and preferentially migrated within the perivascular space. Knockdown of VEGFR2 via shRNAs led to significant downregulation of MMP14 expression, which resulted in inhibited tumor-tropic migration. Overall, our results suggest, the involvement of VEGFR2-regulated MMP14 in the tumor-tropic migratory behavior of NSCs. Our data warrant investigation of MMP14 as a target for enhancing the migratory properties of NSC carriers and optimizing the delivery of therapeutic payloads to disseminated tumor burdens.

  20. Functional analysis of bifidobacterial promoters in Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli using the α-galactosidase gene as a reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Tamai, Saki; Hirayama, Yosuke; Onodera, Ai; Koguchi, Hiroka; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukiya, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    Heterologous gene expression in bifidobacteria requires weak, strong, and inducible promoters depending on the objectives of different expression studies. Weak promoters in Escherichia coli can also be desirable for stable heterologous gene cloning. Here, we developed a reporter system using the Bifidobacterium longum α-galactosidase gene and investigated the activity and inducibility of seven bifidobacterial promoters in B. longum and their activities in E. coli. These studies revealed diverse promoter activities. Three promoters were highly active in B. longum, but only slightly active in E. coli. Among these, two phosphoketolase gene (xfp) promoters exhibited strong activity in B. longum cells grown on glucose. In contrast, the promoter activity of the fructose transporter operon (fruEKFG) was strongly induced by carbohydrates other than glucose, including fructose, xylose, and ribose. These promoters will allow strong or highly inducible expression in bifidobacteria and stable gene cloning in E. coli. In contrast to the functions of these promoters, the promoter of sucrose-utilization operon cscBA showed very high activity in E. coli but low activity in B. longum. Other three promoters were functional in both B. longum and E. coli. In particular, two sucrose phosphorylase gene (scrP) promoters showed inducible activity by sucrose and raffinose in B. longum, indicating their applicability for regulated expression studies. The diverse promoter functions revealed in this study will contribute to enabling the regulated expression of heterologous genes in bifidobacteria research.

  1. The Effects of Pre-Exposure to DEET on the Downstream Blood-Feeding Behaviors of Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    toluamide (DEET) is the most 29 widely used insect repellent on the market and an excellent example of a chemical that has been 30 used to modify...distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 2 Abstract 26 Mosquito behavior is heavily influenced by the chemical molecules in the environment. 27...have been reported . In 32 this study, we investigated the effect of pre-exposure to DEET on the downstream blood-feeding 33 behavior of Ae. aegypti

  2. A unique downstream estrogen responsive unit mediates estrogen induction of proteinase inhibitor-9, a cellular inhibitor of IL-1beta- converting enzyme (caspase 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, S A; Krieg, A J; Shapiro, D J

    2001-11-01

    Recently, proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9) was identified as the first endogenous inhibitor of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme). The regulation of PI-9 expression, therefore, has great importance in the control of inflammatory processes. We reported that PI-9 mRNA and protein are rapidly and directly induced by estrogen in human liver cells. Using transient transfections to assay PI-9 promoter truncations and mutations, we demonstrate that this strong estrogen induction is mediated by a unique downstream estrogen responsive unit (ERU) approximately 200 nucleotides downstream of the transcription start site. Using primers flanking the ERU in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate estrogen-dependent binding of ER to the cellular PI-9 promoter. The ERU consists of an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) palindrome immediately adjacent to a direct repeat containing two consensus ERE half-sites separated by 13 nucleotides (DR13). In transient transfections, all four of the ERE half-sites in the imperfect ERE and in the DR13 were important for estrogen inducibility. Transfected chicken ovalbumin upstream transcription factor I and II down-regulated estrogen-mediated expression from the ERU. EMSAs using purified recombinant human ERalpha demonstrate high-affinity binding of two ER complexes to the ERU. Further EMSAs showed that one ER dimer binds to an isolated DR13, supporting the view that one ER dimer binds to the imperfect ERE and one ER dimer binds to DR13. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting showed that purified ER protected all four of the half-sites in the ERU. Our finding that a direct repeat can function with an imperfect ERE palindrome to confer estrogen inducibility on a native gene extends the repertoire of DNA sequences able to function as EREs.

  3. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Imrich, K. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilderman, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  4. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornsey Mark A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8 and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase, goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive, enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A and Paneth cells (lysozyme. Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up

  5. Leucine aminopeptidase regulates defense and wound signaling in tomato downstream of jasmonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jonathan H; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Aromdee, Dale N; Pautot, Véronique; Holzer, Frances M; Walling, Linda L

    2009-04-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase A (LapA) is a late wound-response gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). To elucidate the role of LapA, transgenic plants that overexpressed or abolished LapA gene expression were used. The early wound-response gene RNA levels were similar in wild-type and Lap-silenced (LapA-SI), -antisense (LapA-AS), and -overexpressing (LapA-OX) plants. By contrast, late wound-response gene RNA levels and protection against Manduca sexta damage were influenced by LapA RNA and protein levels. While LapA-OX plants had elevated levels of LapA RNAs and protein, ectopic expression of LapA was not sufficient to induce Pin (Ser proteinase inhibitor) or PPO (polyphenol oxidase) transcripts in nonwounded leaves. M. sexta larvae damaged less foliage and displayed delays in growth and development when feeding on LapA-OX plants. By contrast, LapA-SI and LapA-AS lines had lower levels of Pin and PPO RNAs than wild-type controls. Furthermore, larvae consumed more foliage and attained larger masses when feeding on LapA-SI plants. Jasmonic acid (JA) did not complement the wound-signaling phenotype of LapA-SI plants. Based on root elongation in the presence of JA, JA perception appeared to be intact in LapA-SI lines. Collectively, these data suggested that LAP-A has a role in modulating essential defenses against herbivores by promoting late wound responses and acting downstream of JA biosynthesis and perception.

  6. Leucine Aminopeptidase Regulates Defense and Wound Signaling in Tomato Downstream of Jasmonic Acid[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jonathan H.; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Aromdee, Dale N.; Pautot, Véronique; Holzer, Frances M.; Walling, Linda L.

    2009-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase A (LapA) is a late wound-response gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). To elucidate the role of LapA, transgenic plants that overexpressed or abolished LapA gene expression were used. The early wound-response gene RNA levels were similar in wild-type and Lap-silenced (LapA-SI), -antisense (LapA-AS), and -overexpressing (LapA-OX) plants. By contrast, late wound-response gene RNA levels and protection against Manduca sexta damage were influenced by LapA RNA and protein levels. While LapA-OX plants had elevated levels of LapA RNAs and protein, ectopic expression of LapA was not sufficient to induce Pin (Ser proteinase inhibitor) or PPO (polyphenol oxidase) transcripts in nonwounded leaves. M. sexta larvae damaged less foliage and displayed delays in growth and development when feeding on LapA-OX plants. By contrast, LapA-SI and LapA-AS lines had lower levels of Pin and PPO RNAs than wild-type controls. Furthermore, larvae consumed more foliage and attained larger masses when feeding on LapA-SI plants. Jasmonic acid (JA) did not complement the wound-signaling phenotype of LapA-SI plants. Based on root elongation in the presence of JA, JA perception appeared to be intact in LapA-SI lines. Collectively, these data suggested that LAP-A has a role in modulating essential defenses against herbivores by promoting late wound responses and acting downstream of JA biosynthesis and perception. PMID:19376935

  7. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  8. Hydroeconomic optimization of reservoir management under downstream water quality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xingguo; Holm, Peter E.; Trapp, Stefan; Rosbjerg, Dan; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A hydroeconomic optimization approach is used to guide water management in a Chinese river basin with the objectives of meeting water quantity and water quality constraints, in line with the China 2011 No. 1 Policy Document and 2015 Ten-point Water Plan. The proposed modeling framework couples water quantity and water quality management and minimizes the total costs over a planning period assuming stochastic future runoff. The outcome includes cost-optimal reservoir releases, groundwater pumping, water allocation, wastewater treatments and water curtailments. The optimization model uses a variant of stochastic dynamic programming known as the water value method. Nonlinearity arising from the water quality constraints is handled with an effective hybrid method combining genetic algorithms and linear programming. Untreated pollutant loads are represented by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and the resulting minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is computed with the Streeter-Phelps equation and constrained to match Chinese water quality targets. The baseline water scarcity and operational costs are estimated to 15.6 billion CNY/year. Compliance to water quality grade III causes a relatively low increase to 16.4 billion CNY/year. Dilution plays an important role and increases the share of surface water allocations to users situated furthest downstream in the system. The modeling framework generates decision rules that result in the economically efficient strategy for complying with both water quantity and water quality constraints.

  9. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  10. Downstream effects of a hydroelectric reservoir on aquatic plant assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernez, Ivan; Haury, Jacques; Ferreira, Maria Teresa

    2002-03-16

    Macrophytes were studied downstream of the Rophémel hydroelectric dam on the River Rance (Côtes d'Armor Department, western France) to assess the effects of hydroelectric functioning on river macrophyte communities. We studied ten representative sections of the hydro-peaking channel on five occasions in 1995 and 1996, on a 15-km stretch of river. Floristic surveys were carried out on sections 50 m in length, and genera of macroalgae, species of bryophyta, hydrophytes, and emergent rhizophytes were identified. For the aquatic bryophytes and spermatophytes section of our study, we compared our results with 19th century floristic surveys, before the dam was built. During the vegetative growth period, the hydro-peaking frequency was low. The plant richness was highest near the dam. The macrophyte communities were highly modified according to the distance to the dam. The frequency and magnitude of hydro-peaking was related to the aquatic macrophyte richness in an Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis position. However, the results of the eco-historical comparison with 19th century floristic surveys point to the original nature of the flora found at the site. Some floral patterns, seen during both periods and at an interval of 133 years, were indicative of the ubiquity of the aquatic flora and of the plants" adaptability. This demonstrates the importance of taking river basin history into account in such biological surveys.

  11. Downstream Effects of a Hydroelectric Reservoir on Aquatic Plant Assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bernez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophytes were studied downstream of the Rophémel hydroelectric dam on the River Rance (Côtes d’Armor Department, western France to assess the effects of hydroelectric functioning on river macrophyte communities. We studied ten representative sections of the hydro-peaking channel on five occasions in 1995 and 1996, on a 15-km stretch of river. Floristic surveys were carried out on sections 50 m in length, and genera of macroalgae, species of bryophyta, hydrophytes, and emergent rhizophytes were identified. For the aquatic bryophytes and spermatophytes section of our study, we compared our results with 19th century floristic surveys, before the dam was built. During the vegetative growth period, the hydro-peaking frequency was low. The plant richness was highest near the dam. The macrophyte communities were highly modified according to the distance to the dam. The frequency and magnitude of hydro-peaking was related to the aquatic macrophyte richness in an Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis position. However, the results of the eco-historical comparison with 19th century floristic surveys point to the original nature of the flora found at the site. Some floral patterns, seen during both periods and at an interval of 133 years, were indicative of the ubiquity of the aquatic flora and of the plants’ adaptability. This demonstrates the importance of taking river basin history into account in such biological surveys.

  12. Downstream process development in biotechnological itaconic acid manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Antonio Irineudo; de Carvalho, Júlio Cesar; Medina, Jesus David Coral; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Itaconic acid is a promising chemical that has a wide range of applications and can be obtained in large scale using fermentation processes. One of the most important uses of this biomonomer is the environmentally sustainable production of biopolymers. Separation of itaconic acid from the fermented broth has a considerable impact in the total production cost. Therefore, optimization and high efficiency downstream processes are technological challenges to make biorefineries sustainable and economically viable. This review describes the current state of the art in recovery and purification for itaconic acid production via bioprocesses. Previous studies on the separation of itaconic acid relying on operations such as crystallization, precipitation, extraction, electrodialysis, diafiltration, pertraction, and adsorption. Although crystallization is a typical method of itaconic acid separation from fermented broth, other methods such as membrane separation and reactive extraction are promising as a recovery steps coupled to the fermentation, potentially enhancing the overall process yield. Another approach is adsorption in fixed bed columns, which efficiently separates itaconic acid. Despite recent advances in separation and recovery methods, there is still space for improvement in IA recovery and purification.

  13. Flume experiments on scour downstream of wood stream restoration structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Kurdistani, Sahameddin Mahmoudi

    2017-02-01

    River restoration aims to improve physical natural form and processes of a river. Techniques to control the riverbed, stabilize channel alignment, protect stream banks, and rebuild the natural habitat are an important part of river restoration projects. Rivers can be stabilized and habitat restored through techniques such as rebuilding meanders and pool-riffle sequences and managing large wood. Structures that limit channel width to accelerate the normal flows through the constricted section are referred to as stream deflectors. Single-wing, double-wing and triangular deflectors are the most commonly used types of this measure. Log-frame deflectors consist of a triangular log frame filled with rock. Deflector constructions singly or in series in low gradient meandering streams, divert base flows toward the center of the channel and, under certain conditions, increase the depth and velocity of flow thereby creating scour pools and enhancing fish habitat. Scour characteristics and morphologies downstream of log-frame deflectors have been analyzed at the hydraulic laboratory of the University of Pisa. All experiments have been carried out in clear water conditions. The results showed that the tailwater depth plays an important role on scour characteristics. In addition, it was experimentally proven that using log-frame deflectors instead of log-deflectors result in a better river bank protection. In this case, for all the tested hydraulic conditions, the scour hole never occurred close to the channel bank. Useful empirical relationships have been proposed in order to evaluate the main features of the scour geometry.

  14. Gellan Gum: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar B. Bajaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharides are water-soluble polymers secreted by microorganisms during fermentation. The biopolymer gellan gum is a relatively recent addition to the family of microbial polysaccharides that is gaining much importance in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its novel properties. It is commercially produced by C. P. Kelco in Japan and the USA. Further research and development in biopolymer technology is expected to expand its use. This article presents a critical review of the available information on the gellan gum synthesized by Sphingomonas paucimobilis with special emphasis on its fermentative production and downstream processing. Rheological behaviour of fermentation broth during fermentative production of gellan gum and problems associated with mass transfer have been addressed. Information on the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gum, enzymes and precursors involved in gellan gum production and application of metabolic engineering for enhancement of yield of gellan gum has been specified. Characteristics of gellan gum with respect to its structure, physicochemical properties, rheology of its solutions and gel formation behaviour are discussed. An attempt has also been made to review the current and potential applications of gellan gum in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  15. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [{sup 131}I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: lxl730724@hotmail.com; Yin Xiaohua; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China) and Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2009-02-15

    Aim: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with {sup 131}I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with {sup 131}I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82{+-}2.05% and 94.85{+-}1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [{sup 131}I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55{+-}0.37% and 2.09{+-}0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene

  16. Comparative analyses of downstream signal transduction targets modulated after activation of the AT1 receptor by two β-arrestin-biased agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Geisa A; Duarte, Diego A; Parreiras-E-Silva, Lucas T; Teixeira, Felipe R; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Oliveira, Eduardo B; Bouvier, Michel; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in essentially all physiological processes in mammals. The classical GPCR signal transduction mechanism occurs by coupling to G protein, but it has recently been demonstrated that interaction with β-arrestins leads to activation of pathways that are independent of the G protein pathway. Also, it has been reported that some ligands can preferentially activate one of these signaling pathways; being therefore called biased agonists for G protein or β-arrestin pathways. The angiotensin II (AngII) AT1 receptor is a prototype GPCR in the study of biased agonism due to the existence of well-known β-arrestin-biased agonists, such as [Sar(1), Ile(4), Ile(8)]-AngII (SII), and [Sar(1), D-Ala(8)]-AngII (TRV027). The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the two above mentioned β-arrestin-biased agonists on downstream phosphorylation events and gene expression profiles. Our data reveal that activation of AT1 receptor by each ligand led to a diversity of activation profiles that is far broader than that expected from a simple dichotomy between "G protein-dependent" and "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling. We observed clusters of activation profiles common to AngII, SII, and TRV027, as well as downstream effector activation that are unique to AngII, SII, or TRV027. Analyses of β-arrestin conformational changes after AT1 receptor stimulation with SII or TRV027 suggests that the observed differences could account, at least partially, for the diversity of modulated targets observed. Our data reveal that, although the categorization "G protein-dependent" vs. "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling can be of pharmacological relevance, broader analyses of signaling pathways and downstream targets are necessary to generate an accurate activation profile for a given ligand. This may bring relevant information for drug development, as it may allow more refined comparison of drugs with similar mechanism of action and effects, but with

  17. Comparative analyses of downstream signal transduction targets modulated after activation of the AT1 receptor by two β-arrestin biased agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisa A Santos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in essentially all physiological processes in mammals. The classical GPCR signal transduction mechanism occurs by coupling to G protein, but it has recently been demonstrated that interaction with β-arrestins leads to activation of pathways that are independent of the G protein pathway. Also, it has been reported that some ligands can preferentially activate one of these signaling pathways; being therefore called biased agonists for G protein or β-arrestin pathways. The angiotensin II (AngII AT1 receptor is a prototype GPCR in the study of biased agonism due to the existence of well-known β-arrestin biased agonists, such as [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]-AngII (SII, and [Sar1,D-Ala8]-AngII (TRV027. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the two above mentioned β-arrestin biased agonists on downstream phosphorylation events and gene expression profiles. Our data reveal that activation of AT1 receptor by each ligand led to a diversity of activation profiles that is far broader than that expected from a simple dichotomy between G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. We observed clusters of activation profiles common to AngII, SII and TRV027, as well as downstream effector activation that are unique to AngII, SII, or TRV027. Analyses of β-arrestin conformational changes after AT1 receptor stimulation with SII or TRV027 suggests that the observed differences could account, at least partially, for the diversity of modulated targets observed. Our data reveal that, although the categorization G protein-dependent vs. β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be of pharmacological relevance, broader analyses of signaling pathways and downstream targets are necessary to generate an accurate activation profile for a given ligand. This may bring relevant information for drug development, as it may allow more refined comparison of drugs with similar mechanism of action and effects, but with

  18. Dual-level regulation of ACC synthase activity by MPK3/MPK6 cascade and its downstream WRKY transcription factor during ethylene induction in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojing Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants under pathogen attack produce high levels of ethylene, which plays important roles in plant immunity. Previously, we reported the involvement of ACS2 and ACS6, two Type I ACS isoforms, in Botrytis cinerea-induced ethylene biosynthesis and their regulation at the protein stability level by MPK3 and MPK6, two Arabidopsis pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. The residual ethylene induction in the acs2/acs6 double mutant suggests the involvement of additional ACS isoforms. It is also known that a subset of ACS genes, including ACS6, is transcriptionally induced in plants under stress or pathogen attack. However, the importance of ACS gene activation and the regulatory mechanism(s are not clear. In this report, we demonstrate using genetic analysis that ACS7 and ACS11, two Type III ACS isoforms, and ACS8, a Type II ACS isoform, also contribute to the B. cinerea-induced ethylene production. In addition to post-translational regulation, transcriptional activation of the ACS genes also plays a critical role in sustaining high levels of ethylene induction. Interestingly, MPK3 and MPK6 not only control the stability of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins via direct protein phosphorylation but also regulate the expression of ACS2 and ACS6 genes. WRKY33, another MPK3/MPK6 substrate, is involved in the MPK3/MPK6-induced ACS2/ACS6 gene expression based on genetic analyses. Furthermore, chromatin-immunoprecipitation assay reveals the direct binding of WRKY33 to the W-boxes in the promoters of ACS2 and ACS6 genes in vivo, suggesting that WRKY33 is directly involved in the activation of ACS2 and ACS6 expression downstream of MPK3/MPK6 cascade in response to pathogen invasion. Regulation of ACS activity by MPK3/MPK6 at both transcriptional and protein stability levels plays a key role in determining the kinetics and magnitude of ethylene induction.

  19. Salvador-warts-hippo signaling promotes Drosophila posterior follicle cell maturation downstream of notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesello, Cédric; Tapon, Nicolas

    2007-11-06

    The Salvador Warts Hippo (SWH) network limits tissue size in Drosophila and vertebrates [1]. Decreased SWH pathway activity gives rise to excess proliferation and reduced apoptosis. The core of the SWH network is composed of two serine/threonine kinases Hippo (Hpo) and Warts (Wts), the scaffold proteins Salvador (Sav) and Mats, and the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki) [1]. Two band 4.1 related proteins, Merlin (Mer) and Expanded (Ex), have been proposed to act upstream of Hpo, which in turn activates Wts ([1] for review). Wts phosphorylates and inhibits Yki, repressing the expression of Yki target genes [2-4]. Recently, several planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been implicated in the SWH network in growth control [5-8]. Here, we show that, during oogenesis, the core components of the SWH network are required in posterior follicle cells (PFCs) competent to receive the Gurken (Grk)/TGFalpha signal emitted by the oocyte to control body axis formation. Our results suggest that the SWH network controls the expression of Hindsight, the downstream effector of Notch, required for follicle cell mitotic cycle-endocycle switch. The PCP members of the SWH network are not involved in this process, indicating that signaling upstream of Hpo varies according to developmental context.

  20. Downstream targets of GATA3 in the vestibular sensory organs of the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, David M; Veile, Rose; Speck, Judith; Warchol, Mark; Lovett, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Haploinsufficiency for the transcription factor GATA3 leads to hearing loss in humans. It is expressed throughout the auditory sensory epithelium (SE). In the vestibular organs, GATA3 is limited to the striola reversal zone of the utricle. Stereocilia orientation shifts 180 degrees at this region, which contains morphologically distinct type-I hair cells. The striola is conserved in all amniotes, its function is unknown, and GATA3 is the only known marker of the reversal zone. To identify downstream targets of GATA3 that might point to striolar function, we measured gene expression differences between striolar and extra-striolar SE. These were compared with profiles after GATA3 RNAi and GATA3 over-expression. We identified four genes (BMP2, FKHL18, LMO4, and MBNL2) that consistently varied with GATA3. Two of these (LMO4 and MBNL2) were shown to be direct targets of GATA3 by ChIP. Our results suggest that GATA3 impacts WNT signaling in this region of the sensory macula.

  1. The Impact of the Preprocessing Methods in Downstream Analysis of Agilent Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana BĂLĂCESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, gene expression microarrays have been used extensively in biomedical research. However, these high-throughput experiments are affected by technical variation and biases introduced at different levels, such as mRNA processing, labeling, hybridization, scanning and/or imaging. Therefore, data preprocessing is important to minimize these systematic errors in order to identify actual biological changes. The aim of this study was to compare all possible combinations of two normalization, four summarization, and two background correction options, using two different foreground estimates. The results shows that the background correction of the raw median signal and summarization methods used here have no impact in downstream analysis. In contrast, the choice of the normalization method influences the results; the quantile normalization leading to a better biological sensitivity of the data. When Agilent processed signal was considered, regardless of the summarization and normalization options, there were consistently identified more differentially expressed genes (DEG than when raw median signal was used. Nevertheless, the greater number of DEG didn’t result in an improvement of the biological relevance.

  2. The essential and downstream common proteins of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A protein-protein interaction network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yimin; Kuo, Su-Wei; Chen, Le; Heckman, C J; Jiang, M C

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastative neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motoneurons. While several breakthroughs have been made in identifying ALS genetic defects, the detailed molecular mechanisms are still unclear. These genetic defects involve in numerous biological processes, which converge to a common destiny: motoneuron degeneration. In addition, the common comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) further complicates the investigation of ALS etiology. In this study, we aimed to explore the protein-protein interaction network built on known ALS-causative genes to identify essential proteins and common downstream proteins between classical ALS and ALS+FTD (classical ALS + ALS/FTD) groups. The results suggest that classical ALS and ALS+FTD share similar essential protein set (VCP, FUS, TDP-43 and hnRNPA1) but have distinctive functional enrichment profiles. Thus, disruptions to these essential proteins might cause motoneuron susceptible to cellular stresses and eventually vulnerable to proteinopathies. Moreover, we identified a common downstream protein, ubiquitin-C, extensively interconnected with ALS-causative proteins (22 out of 24) which was not linked to ALS previously. Our in silico approach provides the computational background for identifying ALS therapeutic targets, and points out the potential downstream common ground of ALS-causative mutations.

  3. Hypoxia and its downstream targets in DMBA induced mammary carcinoma: protective role of Semecarpus anacardium nut extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathivadhani, Panneerselvam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2007-04-05

    Tumors are usually exposed to a hypoxic microenvironment due to their irregular growth and abnormal vascular supply. Under hypoxia, gene regulation (selective activation and inactivation of genes) plays an important role in maintenance of tumor. Multiple hypoxic and angiogenic growth factors are expressed for tumor cell survival. In search of novel anticancer drug, Semecarpus anacardium nut extract (SA) was tried against breast cancer. Mammary carcinoma was induced in vivo by 7,12-dimethyl benz(a) anthracene (DMBA) (25mg/kg b.w., p.o.). Tumor development and vascular structures were accelerated by DMBA. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1) was coexpressed with its downstream genes in mammary tissue. Cancer rats were then treated with S. anacardium nut extract (SA) (250mg/kg b.w., p.o.). Delay in the tumor growth was paralleled with a drastic reduction in vascularization by SA treatment. Activities of glycolytic enzymes were normalized with decreased expression of glucose transporter-1 and carbonic anhydrase IX by drug treatment. Inhibition of HIF-1, vascular endothelial growth factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase by SA may in part explain its antiangiogenic action. SA also inhibits endothelial cell proliferation by blocking the overexpressed survival cytokines. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that at least some part of the antitumor activity of SA is due to the suppression of hypoxic and angiogenic factors. The mechanism of this inhibition seems to be through an action of SA on expression of HIF-1 and its downstream targets.

  4. Generation of recombinant Orf virus using an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene as a selectable marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhangyong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter genes are often used as a selectable marker for generation of recombinant viruses in order to investigate the mechanism of pathogenesis and to obtain candidate vaccine viruses. Routine selection of the recombinant parapoxvirus is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, developing a novel method for selection is critical. Results In this study, we developed a rapid method to generate recombinant Orf viruses (ORFV based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP reporter gene as a selectable marker. The coding sequence of EGFP gene was amplified from pEGFP-N1 vector and subcloned into the pZIPPY-neo/gus plasmid under the control of the early-late vaccinia virus (VACV VV7.5 promoter and flanked by two multiple cloning sites (MCS to generate a novel transfer vector pSPV-EGFP. Using the pSPV-EGFP, two recombination cassettes pSPV-113LF-EGFP-113RF and pSPV-116LF-EGFP-116RF were constructed by cloning the flanking regions of the ORFV113 and ORFV116 and inserted into two MCS flanking the EGFP gene. Using this novel system, two single gene deletion mutants OV-IA82Δ113 and OV-IA82Δ116 were successfully generated. Conclusions This approach shortens the time needed to generate recombinant ORFVs (rORFVs. Thus, the pSPV-EGFP vector provides a direct, fast, and convenient way to manipulate the recombinant viruses, indicating that it is highly suited for its designed purpose.

  5. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Progress report, May 1, 1988--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-06-01

    Our goal is to clone genes in lettuce determining resistance to downy mildew. One approach involves the mobilization of transposons into resistance genes to mutate and tag the target gene. Because transposons have yet to be isolated and characterized from lettuce, the majority of our experiments have involved Ac from corn as this is increasingly the best characterized transposon. Over the past several years, various labs have contributed to a detailed understanding of the biology of Ac in corn and heterologous plant species. We have collaborated closely with several of these labs, exchanged materials and incorporated their advances into our analysis of transposition in lettuce. The original proposal described the development of a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and its subsequent use to tag disease resistance genes. The development phase involved characterization and manipulation of Ac transposition, identification of suitable whole plant selectable markers for the construction of chimeric non-autonomous elements, and investigation of the stability of resistance genes. Investigation of Ac transposition in lettuce has received the majority of our attention. Initially, we made a simple construct with wildtype Ac and introduced it into lettuce. No transposition was observed; although other labs demonstrated that the same construct was functional in tomato. We then focused on assaying for Ac transposition with constructs of increasing sophistication that had been demonstrated by others to be functional in other species. The latest constructs for transposon mutagenesis clearly demonstrated transposition in lettuce. This allowed us to generate seed stocks that we will start to screen for insertional inactivation of resistance genes this year.

  6. A novel SNP in 3' UTR of INS gene: A case report of neonatal diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogari, Neda M; Rayes, Husni H; Mostafa, Fakri; Abdel-Latif, Azza M; Ramadan, Abeer; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Fawzy, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1 in 300,000 live births. We have found 3 known SNPs in 5'UTR and a novel SNP in 3' UTR in the INS gene. These SNPs were present in 9-month-old girl from Saudi Arabia and also present in the father and mother. The novel SNP we found is not present in 1000 Genome project or other databases. Further, the newly identified 3' UTR mutation in the INS gene may abolish the polyadenylation signal and result in severe RNA instability.

  7. ABCB2 (TAP1) as the downstream target of SHH signaling enhances pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhiqiang; Jiao, Zhijun; Xu, Ping; Kong, Xiangyu; Huang, Haojie; Zhang, Youli

    2013-06-10

    Hedgehog signaling plays critical roles in drug resistance of PDAC. We demonstrate that SHH is highly expressed in PDAC patients and cell lines. SHH signaling protects PDAC cells against gemcitabine induced apoptosis, because either over-expression or knockdown of SHH in PDAC cells affects the sensitivity to gemcitabine. Mechanistic studies show that ABCB2 serves as the downstream target of SHH signaling, leading to the drug resistance of PDAC cells. Combinational treatments with gemcitabine and cyclopamine yield synergistic antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that inhibiting SHH signaling or targeting ABCB2 gene improves the efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with PDAC.

  8. Arabidopsis MAPKKK18 positively regulates drought stress resistance via downstream MAPKK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Cai, Huixian; Liu, Pu; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Huiyang; Wu, Changai; Yan, Kang; Zhang, Shizhong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2017-03-04

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved and vital signaling components in the responses to various ambient stresses. Here, we report the identification of MAPKKK18, a drought resistance associated MAPK kinase kinase in Arabidopsis. The mapkkk18 knockout mutants displayed hypersensitivity to drought stress, whereas overaccumulation of MAPKKK18 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants significantly enhanced the resistance to drought. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the inducible expression of MAPKKK18 by osmotic stress was ABA and the canonical ABA signaling pathway dependent. Furthermore, MAPKKK18 mainly exerted its regulatory roles via downstream MAPKK3. These findings uncovered important roles for MAPKKK18 in drought resistance and expanded our understanding of the MAPK pathways in modulating abiotic stress responses.

  9. Assessment of biomarkers for contaminants of emerging concern on aquatic organisms downstream of a municipal wastewater discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Edyta J; Goss, Greg G; Gillis, Patricia L; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Matsumoto, Jacqueline; de Souza Machado, Anderson A; Giacomin, Marina; Moon, Thomas W; Massarsky, Andrey; Gagné, Francois; Servos, Mark R; Wilson, Joanna; Sultana, Tamanna; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2015-10-15

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), including pharmaceuticals, personal care products and estrogens, are detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. However, analytical monitoring of wastewater and surface water does not indicate whether CECs are affecting the organisms downstream. In this study, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and freshwater mussels Pyganodon grandis Say, 1829 (synonym: Anodonta grandis Say, 1829) were caged for 4 weeks in the North Saskatchewan River, upstream and downstream of the discharge from the WWTP that serves the Edmonton, AB, Canada. Passive samplers deployed indicated that concentrations of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, an estrogen (estrone) and an androgen (androstenedione) were elevated at sites downstream of the WWTP discharge. Several biomarkers of exposure were significantly altered in the tissues of caged fathead minnows and freshwater mussels relative to the upstream reference sites. Biomarkers altered in fish included induction of CYP3A metabolism, an increase in vitellogenin (Vtg) gene expression in male minnows, elevated ratios of oxidized to total glutathione (i.e. GSSG/TGSH), and an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase). In mussels, there were no significant changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and the levels of Vtg-like proteins were reduced, not elevated, indicating a generalized stress response. Immune function was altered in mussels, as indicated by elevated lysosomal activity per hemocyte in P. grandis caged closest to the wastewater discharge. This immune response may be due to exposure to bacterial pathogens in the wastewater. Multivariate analysis indicated a response to the CECs Carbamazepine (CBZ) and Trimethoprim (TPM). Overall, these data indicate that there is a 1 km zone of impact for aquatic organisms downstream of WWTP discharge. However, multiple stressors in municipal wastewater make measurement and

  10. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulp, Rein P; Vos, Yvonne J; Mol, Bart; Karrenbeld, Arend; de Raad, Monique; van der Mijle, Huub J C; Sijmons, Rolf H

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast m

  11. Transformation of somatic embryos of Prunus incisa ‘February Pink’ with a visible reporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system was developed for the ornamental cherry species Prunus incisa. This system uses both an antibiotic resistance gene (NPTII) and a visible selectable marker, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), to select plants. Cells from leaf and root explants were tr...

  12. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falchook, Aaron D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Salloum, Ramzi G. [Department of Health Services Policy and Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  13. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, S; Chambers, D B; Lowe, L M; Bontoux, J G

    1999-09-01

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media (water, sediments, and aquatic organisms) of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed (whole body) dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 microGy h(-1). These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations (about 400 microGy h(-1)), and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations (about 100 microGy h(-1)). As a result, chronic levels of radioactivity, artificial and natural, measured in aquatic media downstream of Marcoule are unlikely to result in adverse health impacts on the categories and species of aquatic organisms studied. Thus, based on the screening level analysis discussed in this paper, a more detailed evaluation of the dose rates does not appear to be warranted.

  14. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Conventional hydropower can be turned on and off quicker and less expensively than thermal generation (coal, nuclear, or natural gas). These advantages enable hydropower utilities to respond to rapid fluctuations in energy supply and demand. More recently, a growing renewable energy sector has underlined the need for flexible generation capacity that can complement intermittent renewable resources such as wind power. While wind power entails lower variable costs than other types of generation, incorporating it into electric power systems can be problematic. Due to variable and unpredictable wind speeds, wind power is difficult to schedule and must be used when available. As a result, integrating large amounts of wind power into the grid may result in atypical, swiftly changing demand patterns for other forms of generation, placing a premium on sources that can be rapidly ramped up and down. Moreover, uncertainty in wind power forecasts will stipulate increased levels of 'reserve' generation capacity that can respond quickly if real-time wind supply is less than expected. These changes could create new hourly price dynamics for energy and reserves, altering the short-term financial signals that hydroelectric dam operators use to schedule water releases. Traditionally, hourly stream flow patterns below hydropower dams have corresponded in a very predictable manner to electricity demand, whose primary factors are weather (hourly temperature) and economic activity (workday hours). Wind power integration has the potential to yield more variable, less predictable flows at hydro dams, flows that at times could resemble reciprocal wind patterns. An existing body of research explores the impacts of standard, demand-following hydroelectric dams on downstream ecological flows; but weighing the benefits of increased reliance on wind power against further impacts to ecological flows may be a novel challenge for the environmental community. As a preliminary step in meeting this

  15. The First Report of a 290-bp Deletion in β-Globin Gene in the South of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Nejad, Ladan Dawoody; Shariati, Gholamreza; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Alihossein; Mohammadi-Anaei, Marziye

    2017-01-01

    Background: β-thalassemia is one of the most widespread diseases in the world, including Iran. In this study, we reported, for the first time, a 290-bp β-globin gene deletion in the south of Iran. Methods: Four individuals from three unrelated families with Arabic ethnic background were studied in Khuzestan Province. Red blood cell indices and hemoglobin analysis were carried out according to the standard methods. Genomic DNA was obtained from peripheral blood cells by salting out procedures. β-globin gene amplification, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and DNA sequencing were performed. Results: The PCR followed by sequencing and MLPA test of the β-globin gene confirmed the presence of a 290-bp deletion in the heterozygous form, along with -88C>A mutation. All the individuals had elevated hemoglobin A2 and normal fetal hemoglobin levels. Conclusions: This mutation causes β0-thalassemia and can be highly useful for prenatal diagnosis in compound heterozygous condition with different β-globin gene mutations. PMID:26948378

  16. Evidence of associations between cytokine genes and subjective reports of sleep disturbance in oncology patients and their family caregivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Miaskowski

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to identify distinct latent classes of individuals based on subjective reports of sleep disturbance; to examine differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics between the latent classes; and to evaluate for variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between the latent classes. Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two latent classes. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effect of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on GSDS group membership. Two latent classes were identified: lower sleep disturbance (88.5% and higher sleep disturbance (11.5%. Participants who were younger and had a lower Karnofsky Performance status score were more likely to be in the higher sleep disturbance class. Variation in two cytokine genes (i.e., IL6, NFKB predicted latent class membership. Evidence was found for latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance trajectories. Unique genetic markers in cytokine genes may partially explain the interindividual heterogeneity characterizing these trajectories.

  17. Extraction and downstream processing of plant-derived recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, J F; Twyman, R M; Fischer, R

    2015-11-01

    Plants offer the tantalizing prospect of low-cost automated manufacturing processes for biopharmaceutical proteins, but several challenges must be addressed before such goals are realized and the most significant hurdles are found during downstream processing (DSP). In contrast to the standardized microbial and mammalian cell platforms embraced by the biopharmaceutical industry, there are many different plant-based expression systems vying for attention, and those with the greatest potential to provide inexpensive biopharmaceuticals are also the ones with the most significant drawbacks in terms of DSP. This is because the most scalable plant systems are based on the expression of intracellular proteins in whole plants. The plant tissue must therefore be disrupted to extract the product, challenging the initial DSP steps with an unusually high load of both particulate and soluble contaminants. DSP platform technologies can accelerate and simplify process development, including centrifugation, filtration, flocculation, and integrated methods that combine solid-liquid separation, purification and concentration, such as aqueous two-phase separation systems. Protein tags can also facilitate these DSP steps, but they are difficult to transfer to a commercial environment and more generic, flexible and scalable strategies to separate target and host cell proteins are preferable, such as membrane technologies and heat/pH precipitation. In this context, clarified plant extracts behave similarly to the feed stream from microbes or mammalian cells and the corresponding purification methods can be applied, as long as they are adapted for plant-specific soluble contaminants such as the superabundant protein RuBisCO. Plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins cannot yet compete directly with established platforms but they are beginning to penetrate niche markets that allow the beneficial properties of plants to be exploited, such as the ability to produce 'biobetters' with tailored

  18. Molecular advances in reporter genes: the need to witness the function of stem cells in failing heart in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Silvia; Recchia, Fabio A; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells possess the ability to terminally differentiate in cell phenotypes belonging to several different lineages. Over the last decade, transplant of adult stem cells into the injuried myocardium has been widely studied as a revolutionary approach to promote the non-pharmacological improvement or replacement of the lost function. In spite of the tantalizing perspectives and controversial results, several questions about the viability and biology of transplanted stem cells in the beating heart still remain unanswered, mostly because of the current technological limitations. Recent advances in bio- and nano-technology are allowing the development of molecular probes for imaging thus providing a better understanding of stem cells physiology and fate in vivo. Reporter gene based molecular imaging is a high-throughput and sensitive tool used to unscramble over time the mechanisms underlying cell-induced myocardial repair in vivo. To date, the employed reporter genes have been exogenous (proteins which are expressed after gene engineering), or endogenous (detected by tracer substrates). This review will highlight current and outstanding experimental investigations, which are developing new probes to monitor the fate of stem cells transplanted in failing myocardium in vivo.

  19. Multiplex PCR-based simultaneous amplification of selectable marker and reporter genes for the screening of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Chhabra, Rashmi; Singh, Monika

    2009-06-24

    The development and commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops with enhanced insect and herbicide resistance, abiotic stress tolerance, and improved nutritional quality has expanded dramatically. Notwithstanding the huge potential benefits of GM crops, the perceived environmental risks associated with these crops need to be addressed in proper perspective. One critical concern is the adventitious presence or unintentional mixing of GM seed in non-GM seed lots, which can seriously affect the global seed market. It would therefore be necessary though a challenging task to develop reliable, efficient, and economical assays for GM detection, identification, and quantification in non-GM seed lots. This can be systematically undertaken by preliminary screening for control elements and selectable or scorable (reporter) marker genes. In this study, simplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays individually as well as simultaneously amplifying the commonly used selectable marker genes, i.e., aadA, bar, hpt, nptII, pat encoding, respectively, for aminoglycoside-3'-adenyltransferase, Streptococcus viridochromogenes phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, hygromycin phosphotransferase, neomycin phosphotransferase, Streptococcus hygroscopicus phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, and a reporter gene uidA encoding beta-d-glucuronidase, were developed as a reliable tool for qualitative screening of GM crops. The efficiency of the assays was also standardized in the test samples prepared by artificial mixing of transgenic seed samples in different proportions. The developed multiplex PCR assays will be useful in verifying the GM status of a sample irrespective of the crop and GM trait.

  20. Identification of the first in Poland CACNA1A gene mutation in familial hemiplegic migraine. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Biruta; Dziewulska, Dorota; Pronicka, Ewa; Trubicka, Joanna; Rokicki, Dariusz; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Kaliszewska, Magdalena; Tonska, Katarzyna; Bartnik, Ewa; Ploski, Rafal; Kaminska, Anna M

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder characterized by a particular phenotype, complex pathophysiology and a heterogeneous genetic background. Among several heritable forms, familial hemiplegic migraine is the best described one. In the majority of cases it is caused by mutations in one of three different genes. Clinical symptoms of a 47 year old proband (and independently described in his 20 year old son) as well as differential diagnosis are discussed in the presented report. The most characteristic were recurrent attacks of blurred vision, paresthesias and hemiparesis often accompanied by speech disturbances and followed by severe headache with vomiting. Advanced morphological and genetic procedures were required to exclude MELAS, CADASIL and Call-Fleming syndrome. Finally, the definite diagnosis was possible after the application of the whole exome sequencing technique. It confirmed, for the first time in the Polish population, a heterozygous T666M mutation (c.1997C>T; p.Thr666Met) in the CACNA1A gene in the proband, the proband's son and in several other family members. The presented report provides clinical and genetic insight into familial hemiplegic migraine 1 resulting from a mutation in the CACNA1A gene. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sin Hang Lee,1,21Pathology Department, Milford Hospital, Milford, CT, USA; 2Milford Molecular Diagnostics, Milford, CT, USA Abstract: Lyme disease (LD, the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, homeologous 16S rRNA genes, DNA sequencing

  2. Cytoplasmically Retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP Reporter Gene Mutants for Optimization of Noninvasive Molecular-Genetic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ponomarev

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the sensitivity of imaging HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene expression, a series of HSV1-tk/GFP mutants was developed with altered nuclear localization and better cellular enzymatic activity, compared to that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP fusion protein (HSVi-tk/GFP. Several modifications of HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene were performed, including targeted inactivating mutations in the nuclear localization signal (NLS, the addition of a nuclear export signal (NES, a combination of both mutation types, and a truncation of the first 135 by of the native hsvl-tk coding sequence containing a “cryptic” testicular promoter and the NLS. A recombinant HSV1-tk/GFP protein and a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HSV1-tk/GFP were developed to quantitate the amount of reporter gene product in different assays to allow normalization of the data. These different mutations resulted in various degrees of nuclear clearance, predominant cytoplasmic distribution, and increased total cellular enzymatic activity of the HSV1-tk/GFP mutants, compared to native HSV1-tk/GFP when expressed at the same levels. This appears to be the result of improved metabolic bioavailability of cytoplasmically retargeted mutant HSV1-tk/GFP enzymes for reaction with the radiolabeled probe (e.g., FIAU. The analysis of enzymatic properties of different HSV1-tk/GFP mutants using FIAU as a substrate revealed no significant differences from that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP. Improved total cellular enzymatic activity of cytoplasmically retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP mutants observed in vitro was confirmed by noninvasive imaging of transduced subcutaneous tumor xenografts bearing these reporters using [131I]FIAU and γ-camera.

  3. Binary gene induction and protein expression in individual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conolly Rory B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic gene transcription is believed to occur in either a binary or a graded fashion. With binary induction, a transcription activator (TA regulates the probability with which a gene template is switched from the inactive to the active state without affecting the rate at which RNA molecules are produced from the template. With graded, also called rheostat-like, induction the gene template has continuously varying levels of transcriptional activity, and the TA regulates the rate of RNA production. Support for each of these two mechanisms arises primarily from experimental studies measuring reporter proteins in individual cells, rather than from direct measurement of induction events at the gene template. Methods and results In this paper, using a computational model of stochastic gene expression, we have studied the biological and experimental conditions under which a binary induction mode operating at the gene template can give rise to differentially expressed "phenotypes" (i.e., binary, hybrid or graded at the protein level. We have also investigated whether the choice of reporter genes plays a significant role in determining the observed protein expression patterns in individual cells, given the diverse properties of commonly-used reporter genes. Our simulation confirmed early findings that the lifetimes of active/inactive promoters and half-lives of downstream mRNA/protein products are important determinants of various protein expression patterns, but showed that the induction time and the sensitivity with which the expressed genes are detected are also important experimental variables. Using parameter conditions representative of reporter genes including green fluorescence protein (GFP and β-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that graded gene expression is more likely to be observed with GFP, a longer-lived protein with low detection sensitivity. Conclusion The choice of reporter genes may determine whether protein

  4. Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis with A665 G Perforin Gene Mutation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Yenicesu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Presentation of the disease such as primarily fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and cytopenia, which are the results of functional degradation in cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, activation of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, over production of proinflammatory cytokines, and hemophagocytosis. In all, 5 genetic loci have been identified in FHL, and all known affected genes encode critical components of the granule exocytosis pathway, which is essential for the release of cytotoxic granules and proteases that are necessary for targeted cell death. Herein we present an FHL patient with a severe clinical course and a very rare perforin gene mutation. The patient was homozygous for A665G mutation. However, the child died in a short period of time. Prenatal diagnosis was performed in the family and the fetus was found to be heterozygous for the mutation.

  5. Familial adult spinal muscular atrophy associated with the VAPB gene: report of 42 cases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kosac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Familial spinal muscular atrophy (FSMA associated with the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB gene is a rare autosomal dominant disease with late onset and slow progression. We studied 10 of 42 patients from 5 families by taking clinical histories and performing physical exams, electrophysiological studies, and genetic tests. All patients presented late onset disease with slow progression characterized by fasciculations, proximal weakness, amyotrophy, and hypoactive deep tendon reflex, except two who exhibited brisk reflex. Two patients showed tongue fasciculations and respiratory insufficiency. Electrophysiological studies revealed patterns of lower motor neuron disease, and genetic testing identified a P56S mutation of the VAPB gene. Although it is a rare motor neuron disease, FSMA with this mutation might be much more prevalent in Brazil than expected, and many cases may be undiagnosed. Genetic exams should be performed whenever it is suspected in Brazil.

  6. In vivo Monitoring of microRNA Biogenesis Using Reporter Gene Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs regulating gene expression, through base paring with their target mRNAs, which have been actively investigated as key regulators in a wide range of biological processes. Conventional methods such as Northern blot are generally time-consuming, non-repeatable, and cannot be applied in vivo due to the requirement for cell fixation. Therefore, a noninvasive imaging system is required for the monitoring of microRNA biogenesis to understand the versatile functions...

  7. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  8. Single-gene dual-color reporter cell line to analyze RNA synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangat, Murali; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    RNA synthesis occurs through the multi-step process of transcription which consists of initiation, elongation, termination, and cleavage of the nascent RNA. In recent years, post-initiation events have attracted considerable attention as regulatory steps in gene expression. In particular, changes in elongation rate have been proposed to alter RNA fate either through changes in RNA secondary structure or recruitment of trans-acting factors, but systematic approaches for perturbing and measuring elongation rate are currently lacking. Here, we describe a system for precisely measuring elongation dynamics for single nascent transcripts at a single gene locus in human cell lines. The system is based on observing the production of fluorescently labeled RNA stem loops which flank a region of interest. The region of interest can be altered using flp recombinases, thus allowing one to study the effects of cis-acting sequences on transcription rate. The dual-color RNAs which are made during this process are exported and translated, thus enabling visualization of each step in gene expression.

  9. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.

    1986-10-01

    Investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows were conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with two equation turbulence models. It was found that the flow fields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity, and shock. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setpup obscures the physical downstream boundary and therefore presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  10. Reporter Gene-Facilitated Detection of Compounds in Arabidopsis Leaf Extracts that Activate the Karrikin Signalling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Kelly Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Karrikins are potent germination stimulants generated by the combustion of plant matter. Treatment of Arabidopsis with karrikins triggers a signalling process that is dependent upon a putative receptor protein KARRIKIN INSENSITIVE 2 (KAI2. KAI2 is a homologue of DWARF 14 (D14, the receptor for endogenous strigolactone hormones. Genetic analyses suggest that KAI2 also perceives endogenous signal(s that are not strigolactones. Activation of KAI2 by addition of karrikins to Arabidopsis plants induces expression of transcripts including D14-LIKE 2 (DLK2. We constructed the synthetic reporter gene DLK2:LUC in Arabidopsis, which comprises the firefly luciferase gene (LUC driven by the DLK2 promoter. Here we describe a luminescence-based reporter assay with Arabidopsis seeds to detect chemical signals that can activate the KAI2 signalling pathway. We demonstrate that the DLK2:LUC assay can selectively and sensitively detect karrikins and a functionally similar synthetic strigolactone analogue. Crucially we show that crude extracts from Arabidopsis leaves can also activate DLK2:LUC in a KAI2-dependent manner. Our work provides the first direct evidence for the existence of endogenous chemical signals that can activate the KAI2-mediated signalling pathway in Arabidopsis. This sensitive reporter system can now be used for the bioassay-guided purification and identification of putative endogenous KAI2 ligands or their precursors, and endogenous compounds that might modulate the KAI2 signalling pathway.

  11. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilchung [Ames Laboratory; Ray, Judhajeet [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Vinayak [Iowa State University; Ilgu, Muslum [Ames Laboratory; Beasley, Jonathan [Iowa State University; Bendickson, Lee [Ames Laboratory; Mehanovic, Samir [Molecular Express; Kraus, George A. [Iowa State University; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit [Ames Laboratory

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  12. Comprehensive Luciferase-Based Reporter Gene Assay Reveals Previously Masked Up-Regulatory Effects of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danae Campos-Melo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the majority of the transcriptome at a post-transcriptional level. Because of this critical role, it is important to ensure that the assays used to determine their functionality are robust and reproducible. Typically, the reporter gene assay in cell-based systems has been the first-line method to study miRNA functionality. In order to overcome some of the potential errors in interpretation that can be associated with this assay, we have developed a detailed protocol for the luciferase reporter gene assay that has been modified for miRNAs. We demonstrate that normalization against the effect of the miRNA and cellular factors on the luciferase coding sequence is essential to obtain the specific impact of the miRNA on the 3'UTR (untranslated region target. Our findings suggest that there is a real possibility that the roles for miRNA in transcriptome regulation may be misreported due to inaccurate normalization of experimental data and also that up-regulatory effects of miRNAs are not uncommon in cells. We propose to establish this comprehensive method as standard for miRNA luciferase reporter assays to avoid errors and misinterpretations in the functionality of miRNAs.

  13. Targets downstream of Cdk8 in Dictyostelium development

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    Skelton Jason

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cdk8 is a component of the mediator complex which facilitates transcription by RNA polymerase II and has been shown to play an important role in development of Dictyostelium discoideum. This eukaryote feeds as single cells but starvation triggers the formation of a multicellular organism in response to extracellular pulses of cAMP and the eventual generation of spores. Strains in which the gene encoding Cdk8 have been disrupted fail to form multicellular aggregates unless supplied with exogenous pulses of cAMP and later in development, cdk8- cells show a defect in spore production. Results Microarray analysis revealed that the cdk8- strain previously described (cdk8-HL contained genome duplications. Regeneration of the strain in a background lacking detectable gene duplication generated strains (cdk8-2 with identical defects in growth and early development, but a milder defect in spore generation, suggesting that the severity of this defect depends on the genetic background. The failure of cdk8- cells to aggregate unless rescued by exogenous pulses of cAMP is consistent with a failure to express the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A. However, overexpression of the gene encoding this protein was not sufficient to rescue the defect, suggesting that this is not the only important target for Cdk8 at this stage of development. Proteomic analysis revealed two potential targets for Cdk8 regulation, one regulated post-transcriptionally (4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD and one transcriptionally (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR1. Conclusions This analysis has confirmed the importance of Cdk8 at multiple stages of Dictyostelium development, although the severity of the defect in spore production depends on the genetic background. Potential targets of Cdk8-mediated gene regulation have been identified in Dictyostelium which will allow the mechanism of Cdk8 action and its role in development to be determined.

  14. Oxidative stress and its downstream signaling in aging eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinazo-Durán MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available María Dolores Pinazo-Durán,1,* Roberto Gallego-Pinazo,2,* Jose Javier García-Medina,1,3,* Vicente Zanón-Moreno,1,4 Carlo Nucci,5 Rosa Dolz-Marco,2 Sebastián Martínez-Castillo,2 Carmen Galbis-Estrada,1 Carla Marco-Ramírez,1 Maria Isabel López-Gálvez,6,* David J Galarreta,6,* Manuel Díaz-Llópis4,*1Ophthalmic Research Unit "Santiago Grisolía", Valencia, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Macula Section, The University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Reina Sofia, Murcia, Spain; 4Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Spain; 5University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 6Instituto de Oftalmobiología Aplicada (IOBA, Valladolid, Spain *Members of the Spanish Net of Ocular Pathology of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Madrid, OFTAREDBackground: Oxidative stress (OS and its biomarkers are the biochemical end point of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS production and the ability of the antioxidant (AOX biological systems to fight against oxidative injury.Objective: We reviewed the role of OS and its downstream signaling in aging eyes.Methods: A search of the literature and current knowledge on the physiological and pathological mechanisms of OS were revisited in relation to the eyes and the aging process. Most prevalent ocular diseases have been analyzed herein in relation to OS and nutraceutic supplements, such as dry-eye disorders, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.Results: Clinical, biochemical, and molecular data from anterior and posterior eye segment diseases point to OS as the common pathogenic mechanism in the majority of these ocular disorders, many of which are pathologies causing visual impairment, blindness, and subsequent loss of life quality. Studies with nutraceutic supplements in aging eye-related pathologies have also been reviewed.Conclusion: OS, nutritional status, and nutraceutic supplements have

  15. Downstream signaling pathways in mouse adipose tissues following acute in vivo administration of fibroblast growth factor 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muise, Eric S; Souza, Sandra; Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Thompson, John R; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation.

  16. Temsirolimus in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion proteins: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brown

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinomas (TRCCs are a rare family of tumors newly recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2004. These tumors result in the fusion of partner genes to the TFE3 gene located on Xp11.2. They are most common in the pediatric population, but have been recently implicated in adult renal cell carcinoma (RCC presenting at an early age. TFE3-mediated direct transcriptional upregulation of the Met tyrosine kinase receptor triggers dramatic activation of downstream signaling pathways including the protein kinase B (Akt/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways. Temsirolimus is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR kinase, a component of intracellular signaling pathways involved in the growth and proliferation of malignant cells. Here we present a case of a 22-year old female who has been treated with temsirolimus for her Xp11.2/TFE3 gene fusion RCC.

  17. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods: We report…

  18. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods:…

  19. RFX2 is a candidate downstream amplifier of A-MYB regulation in mouse spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistler Malathi K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian spermatogenesis involves formation of haploid cells from the male germline and then a complex morphological transformation to generate motile sperm. Focusing on meiotic prophase, some tissue-specific transcription factors are known (A-MYB or suspected (RFX2 to play important roles in modulating gene expression in pachytene spermatocytes. The current work was initiated to identify both downstream and upstream regulatory connections for Rfx2. Results Searches of pachytene up-regulated genes identified high affinity RFX binding sites (X boxes in promoter regions of several new genes: Adam5, Pdcl2, and Spag6. We confirmed a strong promoter-region X-box for Alf, a germ cell-specific variant of general transcription factor TFIIA. Using Alf as an example of a target gene, we showed that its promoter is stimulated by RFX2 in transfected cells and used ChIP analysis to show that the promoter is occupied by RFX2 in vivo. Turning to upstream regulation of the Rfx2 promoter, we identified a cluster of three binding sites (MBS for the MYB family of transcription factors. Because testis is one of the few sites of A-myb expression, and because spermatogenesis arrests in pachytene in A-myb knockout mice, the MBS cluster implicates Rfx2 as an A-myb target. Electrophoretic gel-shift, ChIP, and co-transfection assays all support a role for these MYB sites in Rfx2 expression. Further, Rfx2 expression was virtually eliminated in A-myb knockout testes. Immunohistology on testis sections showed that A-MYB expression is up-regulated only after pachytene spermatocytes have clearly moved away from the tubule wall, which correlates with onset of RFX2 expression, whereas B-MYB expression, by contrast, is prevalent only in earlier spermatocytes and spermatogonia. Conclusion With an expanding list of likely target genes, RFX2 is potentially an important transcriptional regulator in pachytene spermatocytes. Rfx2 itself is a good candidate to be

  20. Evaluation of the In-vessel Downstream Effects for the APR1400 Design and License

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong-kwan; Kim, Jae-won; Kwon, Sun-guk; Lee, Jae-yong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    These reports include the licensing issues as follows; the effect of a flow channel gap change, the effect of debris settling, the accuracy of the GF630 flow meter, the effect of bubbles impinging on the bottom nozzle, and the bypass fiber amount. In this paper, the valuation results of the in-vessel downstream effects for the APR1400 were described. In addition, the effect of a flow channel gap change and the bypass fiber amount were evaluated. In-vessel downstream effect tests with a mock-up PLUS7 fuel assembly were performed to confirm that the head losses caused by debris meet the available driving head following a LOCA. All the test results showed lower pressure drops than the available head limits. Therefore, a sufficient driving force is available to maintain an adequate flow rate, and the LTCC capability is adequately maintained in the APR1400. A sensitivity test was conducted to assess the effect of a change in the gap size between the mock-up fuel assembly and the test column. The maximum pressure drop recorded for the test was 19.73 kPa under the re-manufactured condition. This value is larger by 1.6% than the previous test result (19.4 kPa) under the same conditions. As such, changing the gap of the flow path between the mock-up fuel assembly and the test column from the previous manufactured conditions to the re-manufactured conditions is expected to result in a slight increase in the differential pressure. However, this is a negligible amount compared to the test uncertainty value of 25%.

  1. Environmental radiological studies downstream from Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Dawson, J.W.; Brunk, J.L.; Jokela, T.A.

    1985-03-22

    This report summarizes the information compiled in 1984 while assessing the environmental impact of radionuclides in aquatic releases from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station. Gamma-emitting radionuclides discharged since 1981 are found in many of the dietary components derived from the creeks receiving the effluent wastewater. Some soils and crops are found to contain radionuclides that originate from the contaminated water that was transferred to land during the irrigation season. /sup 134/Cs and /sup 137/Cs are the primary gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the edible flesh of fish from the creeks. Concentrations in the flesh of fish decreased exponentially with distance from the plant. No significant differences in the /sup 137/Cs activity were found between male and female fish of equal size, but concentrations may vary in fish of different size, with the season and diet. 21% of the total /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs discharged between 1981 and 1984 is associated with the creek sediments to a distance of 27 km from the plant. Fractions of the missing inventory have been transferred to land during the irrigation season or to downstream regions more distant than 27 km from the plant. The radiocesium content of the sediments in 1984 decreased significantly in a downstream direction, much in the same manner as concentrations decreased in fish. Radioactivity originating from the plant was not above detection limits in any terrestrial food item sampled beyond 6.5 km from the plant. Based on the usage factors provided by individuals interviewed in a 1984 survey, the fish and aquatic-organism ingestion pathway contributed the largest radiological dose to humans utilizing products contaminated with the radionuclides in the liquid wastes discharged from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station in 1984.

  2. Working Group report 3: sensitivity to organic dusts--atopy and gene polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kline, JN; Doekes, G; Bønløkke, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    Working Group 3 (Sensitivity to Organic Dusts-Atopy and Gene Polymorphisms) was convened to review the current understanding of how effects of inhaled organic dust may be modified by genetic factors-both those that increase as well as those that may reduce susceptibility. Furthermore, the group...... was asked to suggest areas that require more investigation in this field. The discussion focused on individual sensitivity to inhaled agents as the most important determinant of inter-individual heterogeneiety in responses to exposures. Genetic modifiers are known for a number of pathologic conditions...

  3. Molecular characterization of a maize regulatory gene. Annual progress report, March 1990--November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessler, S.R.

    1991-12-01

    Based on initial bombardment studies we have previously concluded that promoter diversity was responsible for the diversity of naturally occurring R alleles. During this period we have found that R is controlled at the level of translation initiation and intron 1 is alternatively spliced. The experiments described in Sections 1 and 2 sought to quantify these effects and to determine whether they contribute to the tissue specific expression of select R alleles. This study was done because very little is understood about the post-transcriptional regulation of plant genes. Section 3 and 4 describe experiments designed to identify important structural components of the R protein.

  4. Substrate-induced gene expression screening: a method for high-throughput screening of metagenome libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    The SIGEX (substrate-induced gene expression) method is a novel approach for the screening of gene (genome) libraries. In addition to the commonly used function- and sequence-driven approaches to screening, SIGEX provides a third option; in SIGEX, positives are identified using a reporter gene, and the library is constructed using an "operon-trap" vector. This vector contains the reporter gene immediately downstream of the cloning site for the genomic insert so that the expression of the inserted gene(s) is coupled with that of the reporter gene. This system is especially suitable for screening catabolic genes that are induced in response to metabolically relevant compounds, such as substrates. If expression of the inserted gene(s) is activated in response to the addition of these compounds, then positive clones can be identified based on the reporter signal. The most effective selection is obtained by the use of a FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) in conjunction with a FACS-compatible fluorescent reporter protein, such as GFP (green fluorescent protein). Activity-based screening of metagenomic libraries often suffers from low sensitivity and low throughput. In contrast, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and versatility of SIGEX make it a particularly suitable method for screening metagenomic libraries.

  5. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-01-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six...... different primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups, and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven of nine cases, the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal samples...

  6. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples, however differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different...... primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven out of nine cases the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal-samples that had...

  7. Characterization of three mnp genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and report of additional class II peroxidases in the order hymenochaetales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L; Hibbett, David S

    2010-10-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only.

  8. Risk assessment of gene flow from genetically engineered virus resistant cassava to wild relatives in Africa: an expert panel report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokanson, Karen E; Ellstrand, Norman C; Dixon, Alfred G O; Kulembeka, Heneriko P; Olsen, Kenneth M; Raybould, Alan

    2016-02-01

    The probability and consequences of gene flow to wild relatives is typically considered in the environmental risk assessment of genetically engineered crops. This is a report from a discussion by a group of experts who used a problem formulation approach to consider existing information for risk assessment of gene flow from cassava (Manihot esculenta) genetically engineered for virus resistance to the 'wild' (naturalized) relative M. glaziovii in East Africa. Two environmental harms were considered in this case: (1) loss of genetic diversity in the germplasm pool, and (2) loss of valued species, ecosystem resources, or crop yield and quality due to weediness or invasiveness of wild relatives. Based on existing information, it was concluded that gene flow will occur, but it is not likely that this will reduce the genetic diversity in the germplasm pool. There is little existing information about the impact of the virus in natural populations that could be used to inform a prediction about whether virus resistance would lead to an increase in reproduction or survival, hence abundance of M. glaziovii. However, an increase in the abundance of M. glaziovii should be manageable, and would not necessarily lead to the identified environmental harms.

  9. Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  10. Zika virus inhibits type-I interferon production and downstream signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Hou, Shangmei; Airo, Adriana M; Limonta, Daniel; Mancinelli, Valeria; Branton, William; Power, Christopher; Hobman, Tom C

    2016-12-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen that is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and microcephaly and other neurological defects in newborns. Despite being declared an international emergency by the World Health Organization, comparatively little is known about its biology. Here, we investigate the strategies employed by the virus to suppress the host antiviral response. We observe that once established, Zika virus infection is impervious to interferon treatment suggesting that the virus deploys effective countermeasures to host cell defences. This is confirmed by experiments showing that Zika virus infection impairs the induction of type-I interferon as well as downstream interferon-stimulated genes. Multiple viral proteins affect these processes. Virus-mediated degradation of STAT2 acts to reduce type-I and type-III interferon-mediated signaling. Further, the NS5 of Zika virus binds to STAT2, and its expression is correlated with STAT2 degradation by the proteasome. Together, our findings provide key insights into how Zika virus blocks cellular defense systems. This in turn is important for understanding pathogenesis and may aid in designing antiviral therapies. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  12. Nucleic acids from long-term preserved FFPE tissues are suitable for downstream analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludyga, Natalie; Grünwald, Barbara; Azimzadeh, Omid; Englert, Sonja; Höfler, Heinz; Tapio, Soile; Aubele, Michaela

    2012-02-01

    Tissues used for clinical diagnostics are mostly formalin-f