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Sample records for dow chemical triga-mk-1 reactor

  1. 77 FR 7613 - Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-264; NRC-2012-0026] Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Facility Operating License No. R-108 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Dow Chemical Company...

  2. Dow's chemical exposure index guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.T.; Mundt, A.

    1995-01-01

    A number of events in the 1970's and 1980's impacted the course of process safety. Incidents such as Flixborough, Seveso, Three-Mile Island, and Bhopal are well known throughout industry and are recognized as examples of major disasters. Even though events leading up to these disasters were completely different they had one common element between them: a substance was released from a manufacturing unit, became airborne and presented a hazard of such magnitude as to place the safety of both employees and the surrounding public in jeopardy. As a result, industry became increasingly concerned regarding potential loss, in human and economic terms, as plants and equipment grew in size. The Flixborough incident raised the level of concern for process safety, particularly in terms of the hazards presented by fire and explosion. Seveso and Three-Mile Island emphasized the need to consider far-field exposure. The Bhopal incident created an urgent need to recognize and understand the expected downwind impact of potential releases of acutely toxic substances to the air. In order to meet this need, the Dow Chemical Company, a recognized leader in the area of safety and loss prevention, presented a Chemical Exposure Index in 1986. AIChE has recently published an updated version entitled Dow's Chemical Exposure Index Guide. 7 refs., 5 figs

  3. 77 FR 42771 - License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Chemical Company in Midland, MI and is a part of the Analytical Sciences Laboratory. The reactor is housed... releases of liquid radioactive waste by any of the disposal methods. Solid low-level radioactive waste... addition, denial of the application for license renewal would cause the loss of the benefits of teaching...

  4. Applications of the Dow TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, C.W.; Quinn, T.J.; Krueger, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Dow TRIGA Mark I reactor is a one-hundred kilowatt nuclear reactor installed by General Atomics using the Torrey Pines reactor console, seventy-five used stainless-steel clad fuel elements and one new aluminium clad fuel element. The reactor is equipped with a forty-position rotating Lazy Susan in the reflector, a pneumatic transfer system with its terminal in the F-ring of the core, and a central thimble which can be used for irradiation of samples in the center of the core or which can be emptied of the shielding water to produce a beam of neutrons and gamma rays in the area atop the pool. Samples can also be irradiated in or near the core. There is no provision for pulsing this TRIGA reactor. The neutron activation analysis program uses the Dow TRIGA reactor as a source of thermal neutrons and a Kaman A711 generator as a source of 14-MeV neutrons. The associated counting equipment includes one Gel(Li) detector and two Nal(Tl) detectors, each using a 100-position sample changer and all interfaced to a Tracor-Northern TN-11 data acquisition and computing system, one Ge(Li) detector and its TN-11 system for the pneumatic transfer system and the beam tube experiments, and two NaKTl)detectors with a TN-4000 system used with the Kaman neutron generator. The activation analysis program gets samples from all parts of the manufacturing and research efforts at Dow: raw materials, intermediates, products, effluents, research samples, samples from customers who use Dow products, and environmental samples. This presentation is devoted to the progress made in the past year on the pneumatic transfer system and the renewed work on prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy including the extensive process of method validation

  5. The role of neutron activation analysis at The Dow Chemical Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigot, W.L.; Buchmann, M.E.; Quinn, T.J.; Romick, J.D.; Yusuf, S.O.

    2000-01-01

    The role of neutron activation analysis (NAA) at The Dow Chemical Company has not changed significantly since the first operations, which were conducted in July, 1967. That role is threefold; provide results with appropriate precision, accuracy and sensitivity; provide results in a timely manner; and provide results for a reasonable cost. What has changed, are the requirements for satisfying each of the three components of the role. In a business-focused environment, analyses need to be performed faster with better sensitivity and/or precision and be more cost efficient. In order to meet these requirements, operations at The Dow TRIGA Research Reactor are devoted to NAA activities. (author)

  6. Providing policy information at the local level. [Dow Chemical Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, H W

    1977-01-01

    Dow Chemical's approach to plant waste management has enabled the company to conribute to a broader understanding of worldwide environmental problems at no net cost to the company. A Corporate Ecology Council was formed in 1970 in response to public concern over mercury in St. Claire River fish. The Council adopted an environmental policy dedicated to providing quality and leadership in environmental improvement. This was followed by steps to identify and monitor hazardous wastes and to improve waste treatment technology. A group of sub-councils and technology centers was established. The company increased employee responsibilities rather than expand the staff and incorporated environmental performance in the employee evaluation procedure. (DCK)

  7. The Dow Chemical Company's synchrotron radiation effort - A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubeck, R.A.; Bare, S.R.; DeKoven, B.M.; Heaney, M.D.; Rudolf, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is used in a broad array of technologies to study everything from molecular orientation at interfaces, through the structure of active catalyst phases. It is also a key to understanding structure-property relationships and providing fundamental information in polymers, ceramics, and other materials. The Dow Synchrotron User group, formed in 1991, has developed a long-term plan for effective utilization of synchrotron technology. The current efforts at Brookhaven National Lab. and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source are examined, as will the long-term commitment at the Advanced Photon Source. Current examples included are in-situ studies of polymer processing, surface and interfaces characterization, and real-time deformation studies. The APS is one of only three open-quotes Third Generationclose quotes synchrotron sources that are planned world-wide, the others being in France and Japan. With a scheduled completion date of mid-1995, the APS has remained both on-budget and ahead-of-schedule since ground-breaking in the spring of 1990. The DuPont - Northwestern University - Dow Collaborative Access Team (DND-CAT) is the first CAT to successfully pass all the necessary hurdles before beamline construction can begin. Some of the goals of the DND-CAT program are mentioned, together with the strengths of this unique collaborative effort

  8. Design, manufacturing and commissioning of mobile unit for EDF (Dow Chemical process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cangini, D.; Cordier, J.P.; PEC Engineering, Osny, France)

    1985-01-01

    To process their spent ion exchange resins and the liquid wastes, EDF has ordered from PEC a mobile unit using the DOW CHEMICAL binder. This paper presents the EDF's design requirements as well as the new French regulation for waste embedding. The mobile unit was started in January 1983 and commissioned successfully in January 1985 in the TRICASTIN EDF's power plant

  9. Chemical plant personnel training, Rocky Flats Division, Dow Chemical U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugum, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    Described are training techniques used to prepare personnel for handling radioactive materials and specialized equipment. A plutonium recovery plant utilizes procedures, equipment, and facilities not normally found in other types of processing. New Chemical Process Operators require a high school degree or equivalent with no training or testing requirements, so training provides a basis for operators to work with various kinds of equipment. A Safety and Work Indoctrination Check Sheet is completed, and 12 major job assignments are studied in depth before new personnel are assigned to production shifts. The training techniques used are audio-visual intermixed with equipment displays, lectures, tours, and on-the-job training. The final goal is to advance operators in a three-year program, to prepare them for job assignments in a new plutonium recovery plant under construction, and for future environmental and energy programs which are being established

  10. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  11. DOW AGROSCIENCES TODAY AND NEW REVOLUTIONARY SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Vujević

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dow AgroSciences LLC, based in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, is a top tier agricultural company providing innovative crop protection, pest and vegetation management, seed, and agricultural biotechnology solutions to serve the world's growing population. Global sales for Dow AgroSciences, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, are $3.8 billion. The company's roots in the agricultural marketplace date back to 1950 as the agricultural unit of The Dow Chemical Company and as part of Eli Lilly and Company's agricultural business. In 1989, the DowElanco joint venture was formed, and the company continued to develop new products and acquire strategic businesses. DowElanco acquired majority ownership in Mycogen Seeds in 1996; in 1997, The Dow Chemical Company acquired 100 percent of DowElanco and the company was renamed Dow AgroSciences. Other significant acquisitions include acetochlor herbicide, Cargill Hybrid Seeds, several Brazilian seed companies and the agricultural chemicals business of Rohm and Haas. Dow AgroSciences is positioned for the future through focused implementation of its strategy which revolves around productivity, portfolio management and innovation. This focus allows the company to grow through an ambitious innovation program that maximizes the products being sold today and creates new, revolutionary solutions that will surprise customers in the future. D Dow AgroSciences is committed to sustainable chemistry and has a competitive advantage in our natural products discovery capability. We've won a prestigious award for technical innovation incorporating "green" chemistry principles into chemical design, manufacture and use. Dow AgroSciences offers a full range of seeds for corn, sunflowers, canola, cotton, soybeans and alfalfa. In addition, we have developed seeds specifically bred for nutritional quality. Dow AgroSciences uses conventional breeding techniques and tools of biotechnology to produce oils that are low in

  12. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  13. Dow Jones tugevdab oma koostist / Virge Lahe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lahe, Virge

    2008-01-01

    USA tööstusettevõtteid koondav indeks Dow Jones vahetab nimekirjast välja kaks firmat ning lisab finants- ja kütusesektori osakaalu suurendamiseks Bank of America ja Chevroni. Vt. samas: Dow Jonesi tööstuskeskmisse lisandumine pole aktsiatele tiibu andnud; Dow Jonesi tööstuskeskmine

  14. Nancy Dowe | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench scale integration and scale up of biological processes to produce fuels and chemicals from Zymomonas mobilis strain 8b through continuous adaptation on dilute acid pretreated corn stover hydrolysate development and integration. Please do NOT contact me directly for jobs-see instead information on NREL's

  15. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  16. Chemical analysis of reactor and commercial columbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The methods cover the chemical analysis of reactor and commercial columbium having chemical compositions within specified limits. The following analytical procedures are discussed along with apparatus, reagents, photometric practice, safety precautions, sampling, and rounding calculated values: nitrogen, by distillation (photometric) method; molybdenum and tungsten by the dithiol (photometric) method; iron by the 1,10-phenanthroline (photometric) method

  17. Redesigning flows via European ports for Dow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Kuei-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Dow is a worldwide company with customers all over the world. Therefore, transportation is one of the important issues they are facing. Dow has been aware of the tight availability of transportation assets and of the increasing difficulty of meeting delivery requirements. The aim of this report is

  18. Chemical decontamination of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.; Berthold, H.O.

    1977-08-01

    A solution for the decontamination of reactor components of the primary system was developed. This solution is a modification of the APAC- (Alkaline Permanganate Ammonium Citrate) system described in the literature. The most important advantage of the present solution over the APAC-method is that it does not induce any selective corrosion attack on materials like stainless steel (austenitic), Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800. (orig.) [de

  19. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICAL REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Labutin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the analytical synthesis of the synergetic control system of chemical reactor for the realization of a complex series-parallel exothermal reaction has been solved. The synthesis of control principles is performed using the analytical design method of aggregated regulators. Synthesized nonlinear control system solves the problem of stabilization of the concentration of target component at the exit of reactor and also enables one to automatically transfer to new production using the equipment.

  20. Chemical surveillance of commercial fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, H.H.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1988-01-01

    After BN-600 (USSR) and SUPERPHENIX (France) were started succesfully, the international development of LMFBRs is standing at the doorstep of commercial use. For commercial use of LMFBRs cost reductions for construction and operation are highly desirable and necessary. Several nations developing breeder reactors have joined in a common effort in order to reach this aim by standardization and harmonization. On the base of more than 20 years of operation experience of experimental reactors (EBR-II, FFTF, RAPSODIE, DFR, BR-5/BR-10, BOR-60, JOYO, KNK-II) and demonstration plants (PHENIX, PFR, BN-350), possibilities for standardization in chemical surveillance of commercial breeder reactors without any loss of availability, reliability and reactor safety will be discussed in the following chapters. Loop-type reactors will be considered as well as pool-type reactors, although all commercial plants under consideration so far (SUPERPHENIX II, BN-800, BN-1600, CFBR, SNR-2, EFR) include pool-type reactors only. Table 1 gives a comparison of the Na inventories of test reactors, prototype plants and commercial LMFBRs

  1. Computer Controlled Chemical Micro-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechtilde, Schaefer; Eduard, Stach; Adreas, Foitzik

    2006-01-01

    Chemical reactions or chemical equilibria can be influenced and controlled by several parameters. The ratio of two liquid ingredients, the so called reactants or educts, plays an important role in determining the end product and its yield. The reactants must be weighed and accordingly mixed with the conventional batch mode. If the reaction is done in a microreactor or in several parallel working micro-reactors, units for allotting the educts in appropriate quantities are required. In this report we present a novel micro-reactor that allows the constant monitoring of the chemical reaction via Raman spectroscopy. Such monitoring enables an appropriate feedback on the steering parameters for the PC controlled micro-pumps for the appropriate educt flow rate of both liquids to get optimised ratios of ingredients at an optimised total flow rate. The micro-reactors are the core pieces of the design and are easily removable and can therefore be changed at any time to adapt the requirements of the chemical reaction. One type of reactor consists of a stainless steel base containing small scale milled channels covered with anodically bonded Pyrex glass. Another type of reactor has a base of anisotropically etched silicon, and is also covered with anodically bonded Pyrex glass. The glass window allows visual observation of the initial phase interface of the two educts in the reaction channels by optical microscopy and does not affect, in contrast to infrared spectroscopy, the Raman spectroscopic signal for detection of the reaction kinetics. On the basis of a test reaction, we present non-invasive and spatially highly resolved in-situ reaction analysis using Raman spectroscopy measured along the reaction channel at different locations

  2. General areas needing chemical competence to support reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.; Bildstein, H.

    1963-01-01

    Chemical competence is needed not only for the development of new types of reactors but also for the start-up and safe operation of reactors. The activities of chemistry and chemical engineering cover a number of fields, namely chemical analysis, radiochemical analysis, corrosion research, radiolysis of water and water purification. The author reviews fields in reactor operation and maintenance in which chemical competence is needed. (author). 9 refs

  3. Fractal solutions of recirculation tubular chemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezowski, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of fractal solutions of model of recirculation non-adiabatic tubular chemical reactors are presented. The first kind concerns the structure of Feigenbaum's diagram on the limit of chaos. The second kind and the third one concern the effect of initial conditions on the dynamic solutions of models. In the course of computations two types of recirculation were considered, viz. the recirculation of mass (return of a part of products' stream) and recirculation of heat (heat exchange in the external heat exchanger)

  4. Chemical reactor development : from laboratory synthesis to industrial production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoenes, D.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Development is written primarily for chemists and chemical engineers who are concerned with the development of a chemical synthesis from the laboratory bench scale, where the first successful experiments are performed, to the design desk, where the first commercial reactor is

  5. Modelling chemical behavior of water reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, R G.J.; Hanshaw, J; Mason, P K; Mignanelli, M A [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    For many applications, large computer codes have been developed which use correlation`s, simplifications and approximations in order to describe the complex situations which may occur during the operation of nuclear power plant or during fault scenarios. However, it is important to have a firm physical basis for simplifications and approximations in such codes and, therefore, there has been an emphasis on modelling the behaviour of materials and processes on a more detailed or fundamental basis. The application of fundamental modelling techniques to simulated various chemical phenomena in thermal reactor fuel systems are described in this paper. These methods include thermochemical modelling, kinetic and mass transfer modelling and atomistic simulation and examples of each approach are presented. In each of these applications a summary of the methods are discussed together with the assessment process adopted to provide the fundamental parameters which form the basis of the calculation. (author). 25 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  8. Packed Bed Reactor Technology for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as an alternative for conventional power production processes to intrinsically integrate power production and CO2 capture. In this work a new reactor concept for CLC is proposed, based on dynamically operated packed bed reactors. With analytical

  9. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Pyakullya, Boris Ivanovich; Kladiev, Sergey Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  10. Identification of Chemical Reactor Plant’s Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyakillya Boris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a solution of the identification problem of chemical reactor plant’s mathematical model. The main goal is to obtain a mathematical description of a chemical reactor plant from experimental data, which based on plant’s time response measurements. This data consists sequence of measurements for water jacket temperature and information about control input signal, which is used to govern plant’s behavior.

  11. Dynamics and Control of Chemical Reactors-Selectively Surveyed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.; Jensen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical reactor or bioreactor is physically at a central position in a process, and often with a decisive role on the overall technical and economical performance. Even though application of feedback control on reactors is gaining momentum and on-line optimization has been implemented....... For bioreactors the theory and practice of reactor design, dynamics and control have to be adapted to the peculiarities of the biological catalysts. Enzymes, the protein catalysts, are the simplest ones, which have many common features with chemical catalysts. The living cells are much more complex, these growing...... in industry, many reactor control problems are still left unsolved or only partly solved using open loop strategies where disturbance rejection and model inaccuracies have to be handled through manual reactor control and feedback control of raw material preprocessing and product purification operations...

  12. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  13. Antifoaming effect of chemical compounds in manure biogas reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan

    2013-01-01

    A precise and efficient antifoaming control strategy in bioprocesses is a challenging task as foaming is a very complex phenomenon. Nevertheless, foam control is necessary, as foam is a major operational problem in biogas reactors. In the present study, the effect of 14 chemical compounds on foam......), siloxanes (polydimethylsiloxane) and ester (tributylphosphate) were found to be the most efficient compounds to suppress foam. The efficiency of antifoamers was dependant on their physicochemical properties and greatly correlated to their chemical characteristics for dissolving foam. The antifoamers were...... more efficient in reducing foam when added directly into the liquid phase rather than added in the headspace of the reactor....

  14. The Performance of Dow Jones Country Islamic Indexes Against Dow Jones Country Conventional Indexes in Asia and the Middle East : An Empirical Study of the Last Decade

    OpenAIRE

    Suharwardy, Zain

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine the performance of six countries spanning from Asia and the Middle East. Countries are selected from the Dow Jones Islamic Market Index and the focus is kept to only choose countries that have an active Dow Jones Islamic Market Country Index along with a parallel Dow Jones Conventional Country Index. Further break down is made by comparing the country performances to their respective Dow Jones regional index’s (Dow Jones Asia Index and the Dow Jones MENA) in ord...

  15. Applying chemical engineering concepts to non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro AFFONSO, NOBREGA; Alain, GAUNAND; Vandad, ROHANI; François, CAUNEAU; Laurent, FULCHERI

    2018-06-01

    Process scale-up remains a considerable challenge for environmental applications of non-thermal plasmas. Undersanding the impact of reactor hydrodynamics in the performance of the process is a key step to overcome this challenge. In this work, we apply chemical engineering concepts to analyse the impact that different non-thermal plasma reactor configurations and regimes, such as laminar or plug flow, may have on the reactor performance. We do this in the particular context of the removal of pollutants by non-thermal plasmas, for which a simplified model is available. We generalise this model to different reactor configurations and, under certain hypotheses, we show that a reactor in the laminar regime may have a behaviour significantly different from one in the plug flow regime, often assumed in the non-thermal plasma literature. On the other hand, we show that a packed-bed reactor behaves very similarly to one in the plug flow regime. Beyond those results, the reader will find in this work a quick introduction to chemical reaction engineering concepts.

  16. Neutronics and mass transport in a chemical reactor associated with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.; Lazareth, O.W.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-05-01

    The formation of ozone from oxygen and the dissociation carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and oxygen is studied in a gamma-neutron chemical process blanket associated with a controlled thermonuclear reactor. Materials used for reactor tube wall will affect the efficiency of the energy absorption by the reactants and consequently the yield of reaction products. Three kinds of materials, aluminum, stainless steel and fiber (Al 2 O 3 )-aluminium are investigated for the tube wall material in the study

  17. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-01-01

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  18. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I., E-mail: roxana.both@aut.utcluj.ro [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. System for chemical decontamination of nuclear reactor primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlonski, J.S.; McGiure, M.F.; Corpora, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of chemically decontaminating a nuclear reactor primary system, having a residual heat removal system with one or more residual heat removal heat exchangers, each having an upstream and a downstream side, at or above ambient pressure. It comprises: injecting decontamination chemicals using an injection means; circulating the injected decontamination chemicals throughout the primary system; directing the circulated decontamination chemicals and process fluids to a means for removing suspended solids and dissolved materials after the circulated chemicals and process fluids have passed through the residual heat removal heat exchanger; decontaminating the process fluids; and feeding the decontaminated process fluids to the injection means. This patent also describes a chemical decontamination system for use at, or above, ambient pressure in a nuclear reactor primary system having a residual heat removal system. It comprises: means for injecting decontamination chemicals into the primary system; means for removing dissolved and suspended materials and decontamination chemicals from the primary system; one or more residual heat removal pumps; means located downstream of one of the residual heat removal heat exchangers; and a return line connecting the means

  20. Chemical modification and blending of polymers in an extruder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prut, Eduard V; Zelenetskii, Alexandr N

    2001-01-01

    Chemical modification and blending of polymers in an extruder reactor are discussed. Relationships between the parameters affecting the reaction kinetics, viz., mixing time, duration of a chemical reaction and the residence time of the system in the extruder reactor, and the structure of the materials produced are analysed. The mechanisms of (i) grafting of low-molecular-mass compounds onto polymers; (ii) reactions between terminal groups of different polymers and (iii) transesterification and interchange reactions are considered. The factors affecting the mechanism of dynamic vulcanisation and the properties of thermoplastic elastomers are identified. Solid-phase reactions of polysaccharides in an extruder are discussed. The priority aspects of studies on the chemical modification and blending of polymers are noted. The bibliography includes 90 references.

  1. Research reactor FR2 - 20 years chemical and radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Oschinski, J.; Hoffmann, W.; Beyer, J.

    1986-09-01

    The FR2 has been a D 2 O cooled and moderated research reactor with a thermal output of 44 MW. It was in operation from 1961 to 1981. Because of the operating conditions of the reactor, only a small number of routine measurements were performed. For these however special techniques had to be developed. During the 20 years of operation a number of special events occured or have been observed, sometimes with very amazing results, e.g. the 'aceton effect'. This report describes the chemical and radiochemical conditions of the reactor systems, as well as the results of the surveilance work. Not described are measurements for the many experiments. The last chapter gives in a short form a description of the most unusual events and observations. (orig.) [de

  2. Not Fully Developed Turbulence in the Dow Jones Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincado, Estrella; Vindel, Jose María

    2013-08-01

    The shape of the curves relating the scaling exponents of the structure functions to the order of these functions is shown to distinguish the Dow Jones index from other stock market indices. We conclude from the shape differences that the information-loss rate for the Dow Jones index is reduced at smaller time scales, while it grows for other indices. This anomaly is due to the construction of the index, in particular to its dependence on a single market parameter: price. Prices are subject to turbulence bursts, which act against full development of turbulence.

  3. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hirotaka; Kitaoka, Takuya; Isogai, Akira

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  5. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  6. Water-chemical regime of a fast reactor ower complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikhin, R.N.; Piskunov, E.M.; Samarkin, A.A.; Yurchenko, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some peculiarities of water-chemical regime of a power compleX in Shevchenko are considered. The complex comprises a desalination unit, a gas-masout heating-and-power plant and the BN-350 reactor. The compleX is used for the production of electric and thermal energy and fresh water. The power complex peculiarity is the utilization of disalinated seawater in a technological cycle along with highly mineralized seawater with a total salt content of 13.5 g/l (for cooling) in heat exchanges. A regime of ammoniacal correction of feed water was used as a basic water-chemical regime in the initial period of the BN-350 steam generator operation. Deposits composed mainly of iron oxide slime were observed on steam generator surfaces during the operation under these conditions. A conclusion is made that the regime with chelating agent providing steam generator safe operation without chemical cleaning is the most expedient one

  7. On Study of Application of Micro-reactor in Chemistry and Chemical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2018-02-01

    Serving as a micro-scale chemical reaction system, micro-reactor is characterized by high heat transfer efficiency and mass transfer, strictly controlled reaction time and good safety performance; compared with the traditional mixing reactor, it can effectively shorten reaction time by virtue of these advantages and greatly enhance the chemical reaction conversion rate. However, problems still exist in the process where micro-reactor is used for production in chemistry and chemical field, and relevant researchers are required to optimize and perfect the performance of micro-reactor. This paper analyzes specific application of micro-reactor in chemistry and chemical field.

  8. Do America's Schools Need a "Dow Jones Index"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses America's fascination with measuring education. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a single composite indicator, akin to the Dow Jones Index, to measure educational productivity. Describes progress in the California State Education Department in developing a composite index to measure student performance. (SR)

  9. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely

  10. A reduced fidelity model for the rotary chemical looping combustion reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike O.; Zhao, Zhenlong; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2017-01-01

    The rotary chemical looping combustion reactor has great potential for efficient integration with CO capture-enabled energy conversion systems. In earlier studies, we described a one-dimensional rotary reactor model, and used it to demonstrate

  11. Efficiency factor of a chemical nuclear reactor with gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    A chemonuclear reactor is simulated in order to calculate the efficiency factor of molecular species in chemical reactions induced by gamma radiation, with the purpose to obtain information for its design and consider the electromagnetic energy as a possible solution to the present problem of energy. The research is based on a mathematical model of succesive Compton processes applied to spherical and cylindrical geometry and corroborated through the absorbed dose and the experimental date of the increase factor, for the radioisotopic sources Co-60 and Cs-137 relating the quantity of energy deposited into various cylinders with the G value, the relation radius/height of the reactor is optimized according to the molecular production. This is illustrated with the radiolysis of a solution of CH 3 OH/H 2 O which forms H 2 and with the obtainment of C 2 H 5 Br that represents and industrial process induced radioactively. The results show a greater energy deposition with Cs-137 but a larger production of H 2 /hr with Co-60, and besides we can find high production values of C 2 H 5 Br. The cylinder with more advantages is that whose relation R/H is of 0.5. It can be concluded that the final selection of the reactor should be made after a more intense study of the used isotope and the source activity. The efficiency factor of H 2 can be increased selecting the appropriate type and concentration of solute of the irradiated aqueous solutions

  12. A TRIGA reactor in an industrial laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Oswald U.

    1980-01-01

    The Dow TRIGA Reactor is a well established facility in its industrial environment. It is used extensively for internal Dow projects. The primary use of the TRIGA is as neutron source for NAA. It faces similar technical and organizational challenges as other TRIGA installations and over the years developed its own solutions

  13. The chemical energy unit partial oxidation reactor operation simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakin, A. N.; Selivanov, A. A.; Batrakov, P. A.; Sotnikov, D. G.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical energy unit scheme for synthesis gas, electric and heat energy production which is possible to be used both for the chemical industry on-site facilities and under field conditions is represented in the paper. The partial oxidation reactor gasification process mathematical model is described and reaction products composition and temperature determining algorithm flow diagram is shown. The developed software product verification showed good convergence of the experimental values and calculations according to the other programmes: the temperature determining relative discrepancy amounted from 4 to 5 %, while the absolute composition discrepancy ranged from 1 to 3%. The synthesis gas composition was found out practically not to depend on the supplied into the partial oxidation reactor (POR) water vapour enthalpy and compressor air pressure increase ratio. Moreover, air consumption coefficient α increase from 0.7 to 0.9 was found out to decrease synthesis gas target components (carbon and hydrogen oxides) specific yield by nearly 2 times and synthesis gas target components required ratio was revealed to be seen in the water vapour specific consumption area (from 5 to 6 kg/kg of fuel).

  14. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  15. Reactor chemical considerations of the accelerator molten-salt breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Kato, Yoshio; Ohno, Hideo; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1982-01-01

    A single phase of the molten fluoride mixture is simultaneously functionable as a nuclear reaction medium, a heat medium and a chemical processing medium. Applying this characteristics of molten salts, the single-fluid type accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) concept was proposed, in which 7 LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 was served as a target-and-blanket salt (Fig. 1 and Table 1), and the detailed discussion on the chemical aspects of AMSB are presented (Tables 2 -- 4 and Fig.2). Owing to the small total amount of radiowaste and the low concentrations of each element in target salt, AMSB would be chemically managable. The performance of the standard-type AMSB is improved by adding 0.3 -- 0.8 m/o 233 UF 4 as follows(Tables 1 and 4, and Figs. 2 and 3): (a) this ''high-gain'' type AMSB is feasible to design chemically, in which still only small amount of radiowaste is included ; (b) the fissile material production rate will be increased significantly; (c) this target salt is straightly fed as an 233 U additive to the fuel of molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR) ; (d) the dirty fuel salt suctioned from MSCR is batch-reprocessed in the safeguarded regional center, in which many AMSB are facilitated ; (e) the isolated 233 UF 4 is blended in the target salt sent to many MSCRs, and the cleaned residual fertile salt is used as a diluent of AMSB salt ; (f) this simple and rational thorium fuel breeding cycle system is also suitable for the nuclear nonproliferation and for the fabrication of smaller size power-stations. (author)

  16. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF A CHEMICAL REACTOR BY NONLINEAR NATURAL OSCILLATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RAY, AK

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of two coupled continuous stirred tank reactors in sequence is studied when the first reactor is being operated under limit cycle regimes producing self-sustained natural oscillations. The periodic output from the first reactor is then used as a forced input into the second

  18. Fuel clad chemical interactions in fast reactor MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, R., E-mail: rvis@igcar.gov.in

    2014-01-15

    Clad corrosion being one of the factors limiting the life of a mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel element pin at high burn-up, some aspects known about the key elements (oxygen, cesium, tellurium, iodine) in the clad-attack are discussed and many Fuel–Clad-Chemical-Interaction (FCCI) models available in the literature are also discussed. Based on its relatively superior predictive ability, the HEDL (Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory) relation is recommended: d/μm = ({0.507 ⋅ [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-705) ⋅ [(O/M)_i-1.935]} + 20.5) for (O/M){sub i} ⩽ 1.98. A new model is proposed for (O/M){sub i} ⩾ 1.98: d/μm = [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-800){sup 0.5} ⋅ [(O/M){sub i}-1.94] ⋅ [P/(W cm{sup −1})]{sup 0.5}. Here, d is the maximum depth of clad attack, B is the burn-up, T is the clad inner surface temperature, (O/M){sub i} is the initial oxygen-to-(uranium + plutonium) ratio, and P is the linear power rating. For fuels with [n(Pu)/n(M = U + Pu)] > 0.25, multiplication factors f are recommended to consider the potential increase in the depth of clad-attack.

  19. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenouard, J.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.; Vignet, P.; Platzer, R.

    1959-01-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [fr

  20. Chemical reactor for converting a first material into a second material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2012-10-16

    A chemical reactor and method for converting a first material into a second material is disclosed and wherein the chemical reactor is provided with a feed stream of a first material which is to be converted into a second material; and wherein the first material is combusted in the chemical reactor to produce a combustion flame, and a resulting gas; and an electrical arc is provided which is passed through or superimposed upon the combustion flame and the resulting gas to facilitate the production of the second material.

  1. Chemical radwaste solidification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Some of these processes and their problems are briefly reviewed: early cement systems; urea-formaldehyde; Dow solidification process; low-viscosity chemical agents (POLYPAC); and water-extensible polyester. 9 refs

  2. The effect of gas permeation through vertical membranes on chemical switching reforming (CSR) reactor performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassie, S.A.; Gallucci, F.; Cloete, S.; Zaabout, A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Amini, S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel membrane assisted fluidized bed reactor concept has been proposed for ultra-pure hydrogen production with integrated CO2 capture from steam methane reforming. The so-called Chemical Switching Reactor (CSR) concept combines the use of an oxygen carrier for supplying heat and catalysing the

  3. Mechanical, chemical and radiological characterization of the graphite of the UNGG reactors type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresard, I.; Bonal, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of UNGG reactors type dismantling procedures, the characterization of the graphite, used as moderator, has to be realized. This paper presents the mechanical, chemical and radiological characterizations, the properties measured and gives some results in the case of the Bugey 1 reactor. (A.L.B.)

  4. Microwave-ultrasound combined reactor suitable for atmospheric sample preparation procedure of biological and chemical products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagha, A.; Chemat, S.; Bartels, P.V.; Chemat, F.

    1999-01-01

    A compact apparatus in which a specific position can be irradiated by microwaves (MW) and ultrasound (US) simultaneously has been developed. The MW-US reactor has been designed for atmospheric pressure digestion and dissolution of biological and chemical products. The reactor can treat a range of

  5. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Chen, Tianjiao; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two

  6. Chemical looping reforming in packed-bed reactors : modelling, experimental validation and large-scale reactor design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spallina, V.; Marinello, B.; Gallucci, F.; Romano, M.C.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    This paper addresses the experimental demonstration and model validation of chemical looping reforming in dynamically operated packed-bed reactors for the production of H2 or CH3OH with integrated CO2 capture. This process is a combination of auto-thermal and steam methane reforming and is carried

  7. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  8. 77 FR 29362 - Kohler Company, Malvern Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Staffing and Dow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Staffing and Dow Cleaning Services, Malvern, AR..., and components. The company reports that workers from Dow Cleaning Services were employed on-site at... leased from Dow Cleaning Services working on-site at the Malvern, Arkansas location of Kohler Company...

  9. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  10. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  11. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  12. Chemical immobilization of fission products reactive with nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Kaznoff, A.I.; Clukey, H.V.

    1975-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of immobilizing deleterious fission products produced in nuclear fuel materials during nuclear fission chain reactions through the use of additives. The additives are disposed with the nuclear fuel materials in controlled quantities to form new compositions preventing attack of reactor components, especially nuclear fuel cld, by the deleterious fission products. (Patent Office Record)

  13. Ozone decay in chemical reactor for ozone-dynamical disintegration of used tyres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golota, V.I.; Manuilenko, O.V.; Taran, G.V.; Dotsenko, Yu.V.; Pismenetskii, A.S.; Zamuriev, A.A.; Benitskaja, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    The ozone decay kinetics in the chemical reactor intended for used tyres disintegration is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Ozone was synthesized in barrierless ozonizers based on the streamer discharge. The chemical reactor for tyres disintegration in the ozone-air environment represents the cylindrical chamber, which feeds from the ozonizer by ozone-air mixture with the specified rate of volume flow, and with known ozone concentration. The output of the used mixture, which rate of volume flow is also known, is carried out through the ozone destructor. As a result of ozone decay in the volume and on the reactor walls, and output of the used mixture from the reactor, the ozone concentration in the reactor depends from time. In the paper, the analytical expression for dependence of ozone concentration in the reactor from time and from the parameters of a problem such as the volumetric feed rate, ozone concentration on the input in the reactor, volume flow rate of the used mixture, the volume of the reactor and the area of its internal surface is obtained. It is shown that experimental results coincide with good accuracy with analytical ones.

  14. An endothermic chemical process facility coupled to a high temperature reactor. Part I: Proposed accident scenarios within the chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Seker, Volkan; Revankar, Shripad T.; Downar, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The paper identifies possible transient and accident scenarios in a coupled PBMR and thermochemical sulfur cycle based hydrogen plant. ► Key accidents scenarios were investigated through qualitative reasoning. ► The accidents were found to constitute loss of heat sink event for the nuclear reactor. - Abstract: Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. Quantitative study of the possible operational or accident events within the coupled plant is largely absent from the literature. In this paper, seven unique case studies are proposed based on a thorough review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another with an accompanying parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without emergency nuclear reactor shutdown, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. The qualitative parameters of each case study are outlined as well as the basis in literature. A previously published modeling scheme is described and adapted for application as a simulation platform for these transient events. The results of the quantitative case studies are described within part II of this paper.

  15. On-line chemical sensors for applications in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, V.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sensors are essential components of fast reactor sodium circuits. These sensors are needed in fast reactors for the immediate detection of any steam leak into sodium during reactor operation which can lead to failure of steam generator. Depending on the operating power of the reactor, sodium-water reaction results in either an increase in dissolved hydrogen level in sodium or an increase in hydrogen content of argon cover gas used above sodium coolant. Hence, on-line monitoring of hydrogen continuously in sodium and cover circuits helps in detection of any steam leak. In the event of accidental leak of high temperature sodium, it reacts with oxygen and moisture in air leading to sodium fires. These fires produce sodium aerosol containing oxides of sodium (Na 2 O and Na 2 O 2 ) and NaOH. For early detection of sodium fires, sensor systems based on sodium ionization detector, pH measurement and modulation of conductivity of graphite films are known in the literature. This presentation deals with the development of on-line sensors for these two applications. A diffusion based sensor using a thin walled nickel coil at 773 K and a sensitive thermal conductivity detector (TCD) has been developed for monitoring hydrogen levels in argon cover gas. This sensor has a lower detection limit of 30 ppm of hydrogen in argon. To extend the detection limit of the sensor, a surface conductivity based sensor has been developed which makes use of a thin film of semi-conducting tin oxide. Integration of this sensor with the TCD, can extend the lower detection limit to 2 ppm of hydrogen in cover gas. Electrochemical sensor based on sodium-beta-alumina has been designed, fabricated and its performance in laboratory and industrial environment was evaluated. This paper presents the logical development of these sensors highlighting their merits and limitations

  16. Chemical dosimetry at the RA reactor; Hemijska dozimetrija reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, O [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This report presents the results of measurements of absorbed doses axial and radial distribution in the vertical experimental channels of the RA reactor. Measurements were done in channels VK-5, VK-7, VK-9 and GF-36. Results were compared to the results of calorimetry measurements and measured neutron flux values performed by other laboratories. Fricke and oxalate dosemeters were used in addition to the cobalt indicators.

  17. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  18. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveria Lopes, M.J. de.

    1974-03-01

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  19. The chemical monitoring and control during temporary turbine trip or reactor scram of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heng

    2012-01-01

    During normal operation, a malfunction of equipment or improper operation sometimes results in a turbine trip or reactor scram or even cold shutdown. Because present chemical control strategy and programs aimed at the situation of normal operation and planed refueling outage, no integrate emergency program of radiochemical and chemical control had been developed to focus on this urgent and unexpected situation. After many years of practice and experience feedback, chemists have created an emergency collaborative program of radiochemical and chemical control which aims at these unexpected situations such as unplanned unit down power, turbine trip, or reactor scram. The program defines different radiochemical and chemical control measures and steps during different status to monitor primary loop dose rate variation, fuel assembly integrity and water chemical excursion to prevent components from corrosion. (author)

  20. Are there Long-Run Diversification Gains from the Dow Jones Islamic Finance Index?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Balcilar; Charl Jooste; Shawkat Hammoudeh; Rangan Gupta; Vassilios Babalos

    2014-01-01

    We compare nonlinear cointegration tests with the standard cointegration tests in studying the relationship of the Dow Jones Islamic finance index with three other conventional equity market indices. Our results show that there is a long-run nonlinear cointegrating relationship between the Dow Jones Islamic stock market index and other conventional stock market indices. Our findings rely on a battery of standard tests as well as on the Bierens and Martins (2010) test that investigates time-va...

  1. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  2. A reduced fidelity model for the rotary chemical looping combustion reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike O.

    2017-01-11

    The rotary chemical looping combustion reactor has great potential for efficient integration with CO capture-enabled energy conversion systems. In earlier studies, we described a one-dimensional rotary reactor model, and used it to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous reactor operation. Though this detailed model provides a high resolution representation of the rotary reactor performance, it is too computationally expensive for studies that require multiple model evaluations. Specifically, it is not ideal for system-level studies where the reactor is a single component in an energy conversion system. In this study, we present a reduced fidelity model (RFM) of the rotary reactor that reduces computational cost and determines an optimal combination of variables that satisfy reactor design requirements. Simulation results for copper, nickel and iron-based oxygen carriers show a four-order of magnitude reduction in simulation time, and reasonable prediction accuracy. Deviations from the detailed reference model predictions range from 3% to 20%, depending on oxygen carrier type and operating conditions. This study also demonstrates how the reduced model can be modified to deal with both optimization and design oriented problems. A parametric study using the reduced model is then applied to analyze the sensitivity of the optimal reactor design to changes in selected operating and kinetic parameters. These studies show that temperature and activation energy have a greater impact on optimal geometry than parameters like pressure or feed fuel fraction for the selected oxygen carrier materials.

  3. A reduced fidelity model for the rotary chemical looping combustion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike O.; Zhao, Zhenlong; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Methodology for developing a reduced fidelity rotary CLC reactor model is presented. • The reduced model determines optimal reactor configuration that meets design and operating requirements. • A 4-order of magnitude reduction in computational cost is achieved with good prediction accuracy. • Sensitivity studies demonstrate importance of accurate kinetic parameters for reactor optimization. - Abstract: The rotary chemical looping combustion reactor has great potential for efficient integration with CO_2 capture-enabled energy conversion systems. In earlier studies, we described a one-dimensional rotary reactor model, and used it to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous reactor operation. Though this detailed model provides a high resolution representation of the rotary reactor performance, it is too computationally expensive for studies that require multiple model evaluations. Specifically, it is not ideal for system-level studies where the reactor is a single component in an energy conversion system. In this study, we present a reduced fidelity model (RFM) of the rotary reactor that reduces computational cost and determines an optimal combination of variables that satisfy reactor design requirements. Simulation results for copper, nickel and iron-based oxygen carriers show a four-order of magnitude reduction in simulation time, and reasonable prediction accuracy. Deviations from the detailed reference model predictions range from 3% to 20%, depending on oxygen carrier type and operating conditions. This study also demonstrates how the reduced model can be modified to deal with both optimization and design oriented problems. A parametric study using the reduced model is then applied to analyze the sensitivity of the optimal reactor design to changes in selected operating and kinetic parameters. These studies show that temperature and activation energy have a greater impact on optimal geometry than parameters like pressure or feed fuel

  4. Evaluation on Safety of Stainless Steels in Chemical Decontamination Process with Immersion Type of Reactor Coolant Pump for Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Joon

    2011-01-01

    Due to commercialization of nuclear power, most countries have taken interest in decontamination process of nuclear power plant and tried to develop a optimum process. Because open literature of the decontamination process are rare, it is hard to obtain skills on decontamination of foreign country and it is necessarily to develop proper chemical decontamination process system in Korea. In this study, applicable possibility in chemical decontamination for reactor coolant pump (RCP) was investigated for the various stainless steels. The stainless steel (STS) 304 showed the best electrochemical properties for corrosion resistance and the lowest weight loss ratio in chemical decontamination process with immersion type than other materials. However, the pitting corrosion was generated in both STS 415 and STS 431 with the increasing numbers of cycle. The intergranular corrosion in STS 431 was sporadically observed. The sizes of their pitting corrosion also increased with increasing cycle numbers

  5. On the chemical constitution of a molten oxide core of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodkin, D.J.; Potter, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    A knowledge of the chemical constitution of a molten oxide fast reactor core is of great importance in the assessment of heat transfer from a cooling molten pool of debris and in the selection of materials for the construction of sacrificial beds for core containment. In this paper we describe some thermodynamic assessments of the likely chemical constitution of a molten oxide core, and then support our assessments by experimental observations

  6. Design of an isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump with exothermic reactors in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Min; Duan, Yanjun; Xin, Fang; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Xunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The isopropanol–acetone–hydrogen chemical heat pump system with a series of exothermic reactors in which the reaction temperatures decrease successively is proposed. This system shows the better energy performances as compared with the traditional system with a single exothermic reactor, especially when the higher upgraded temperature is need. At the same amounts of the heat released, the work input of the compressor and the heater are both reduced notably. The results indicate that the advantages of the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series are obvious. - Highlights: • We propose the IAH-CHP system with exothermic reactors in series. • The COP and exergy efficiency of the system increase by 7.6% and 10.3% respectively. • The work input of the system is reduced notably at the same quantity of heat released

  7. Chemical processing of liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, J.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Yonco, R.M.; Hines, J.B.; Maroni, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    A 50-gallon-capacity lithium loop constructed mostly from 304L stainless steel has been operated for over 6000 hours at temperatures in the range from 360 to 480 0 C. This facility, the Lithium Processing Test Loop (LPTL), is being used to develop processing and monitoring technology for liquid lithium fusion reactor blankets. Results of tests of a molten-salt extraction method for removing impurities from liquid lithium have yielded remarkably good distribution coefficients for several of the more common nonmetallic elements found in lithium systems. In particular, the equilibrium volumetric distribution coefficients, D/sub v/ (concentration per unit volume of impurity in salt/concentration per unit volume of impurity in lithium), for hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen and carbon are approx. 3, approx. 4, > 10, approx. 2, respectively. Other studies conducted with a smaller loop system, the Lithium Mini-Test Loop (LMTL), have shown that zirconium getter-trapping can be effectively used to remove selected impurities from flowing lithium

  8. Chemical-looping combustion in a reverse-flow fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lu; Bollas, George M.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse-flow fixed bed reactor concept for CLC (chemical-looping combustion) is explored. The limitations of conventional fixed bed reactors, as applied to CLC, are overcome by reversing the gas flow direction periodically to enhance the mixing characteristics of the bed, thus improving oxygen carrier utilization and energy efficiency with respect to power generation. The reverse-flow reactor is simulated by a dusty-gas model and compared with an equivalent fixed bed reactor without flow reversal. Dynamic optimization is used to calculate conditions at which each reactor operates at maximum energy efficiency. Several cases studies illustrate the benefits of reverse-flow operation for the CLC with CuO and NiO oxygen carriers and methane and syngas fuels. The results show that periodic reversal of the flow during reduction improves the contact between the fuel and unconverted oxygen carrier, enabling the system to suppress unwanted catalytic reactions and axial temperature and conversion gradients. The operational scheme presented reduces the fluctuations of temperature during oxidation and increases the high-temperature heat produced by the process. CLC in a reverse-flow reactor has the potential to achieve higher energy efficiency than conventional fixed bed CLC reactors, when integrated with a downstream gas turbine of a combined cycle power plant. - Highlights: • Reverse-flow fixed bed CLC reactors for combined cycle power systems. • Dynamic optimization tunes operation of batch and transient CLC systems. • The reverse-flow CLC system provides stable turbine-ready gas stream. • Reverse-flow CLC fixed bed reactor has superior CO 2 capture and thermal efficiency.

  9. LASTRON - Second generation accelerators and chemical reactors for EBFGT facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edinger, R.

    2011-01-01

    Commercializing reliable affordable electron beam flue gas treatment technology requires both, the optimization of accelerator technology and chemical reaction chambers. Moreover, this engineering process involves the integration of beam specific characteristics, such as dosage distribution and penetration of electrons into the flue gas stream. In consideration of the treatment economy, it might be required to calculate the overall process performance without merely limiting the evaluation to accelerator efficiency. For example, a higher energy beam, 1MeV to 2 MeV, reduces the losses in the beam window and penetrates further into the gas stream and, therefore, increases the overall process economy. The energy distribution should be optimized with respect to the configuration of the chemical reaction chamber in order to treat the flue gas uniformly. All these measures are required to achieve high removal rates in large flue gas streams. Today removal rates of more than 99% SO x and more than 80% SO x are required to be compliant with future emission legislations. It is planed to establish a 100,000m³ electron beam flue gas treatment facility that can achieve constant removal rates of higher than 99.4% SO x and more than 80% NO x . The high removal rates would allow us to place CO 2 capture technologies down stream of the EBFGT facility. (author)

  10. LASTRON - Second generation accelerators and chemical reactors for EBFGT facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edinger, R. [PAVAC Industries Inc. Richmond, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Commercializing reliable affordable electron beam flue gas treatment technology requires both, the optimization of accelerator technology and chemical reaction chambers. Moreover, this engineering process involves the integration of beam specific characteristics, such as dosage distribution and penetration of electrons into the flue gas stream. In consideration of the treatment economy, it might be required to calculate the overall process performance without merely limiting the evaluation to accelerator efficiency. For example, a higher energy beam, 1MeV to 2 MeV, reduces the losses in the beam window and penetrates further into the gas stream and, therefore, increases the overall process economy. The energy distribution should be optimized with respect to the configuration of the chemical reaction chamber in order to treat the flue gas uniformly. All these measures are required to achieve high removal rates in large flue gas streams. Today removal rates of more than 99% SO{sub x} and more than 80% SO{sub x} are required to be compliant with future emission legislations. It is planed to establish a 100,000m³ electron beam flue gas treatment facility that can achieve constant removal rates of higher than 99.4% SO{sub x} and more than 80% NO{sub x}. The high removal rates would allow us to place CO{sub 2} capture technologies down stream of the EBFGT facility. (author)

  11. Reactor design, cold-model experiment and CFD modeling for chemical looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Ma, Jinchen; Hu, Xintao; Zhao, Haibo; Wang, Baowen; Zheng, Chuguang [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an efficient, clean and cheap technology for CO{sub 2} capture, and an interconnected fluidized bed is more appropriate solution for CLC. This paper aims to design a reactor system for CLC, carry out cold-model experiment of the system, and model fuel reactor using commercial CFD software. As for the CLC system, the air reactor (AR) is designed as a fast fluidized bed while the fuel reactor (FR) is a bubbling bed; a cyclone is used for solid separation of the AR exit flow. The AR and FR are separated by two U-type loop seals to remain gas sealed. Considered the chemical kinetics of oxygen carrier, fluid dynamics, pressure balance and mass balance of the system simultaneously, some key design parameters of a CH{sub 4}-fueled and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based CLC reactor (thermal power of 50 kWth) are determined, including key geometric parameters (reactor cross-sectional area and reactor height) and operation parameters (bed material quantity, solid circulation rate, apparent gas velocity of each reactor). A cold-model bench having same geometric parameters with its prototype is built up to study the effects of various operation conditions (including gas velocity in the reactors and loop seals, and bed material height, etc.) on the solids circulation rate, gas leakage, and pressure balance. It is witnessed the cold-model system is able to meet special requirements for CLC system such as gas sealing between AR and FR, the circulation rate and particles residence time. Furthermore, the thermal FR reactor with oxygen carrier of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and fuel of CH{sub 4} is simulated by commercial CFD solver FLUENT. It is found that for the design case the combustion efficiency of CH{sub 4} reaches 88.2%. A few part of methane is unburned due to fast, large bubbles rising through the reactor.

  12. Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI

  13. Development of hydraulic analysis code for optimizing thermo-chemical is process reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Atsuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro; Hirayama, Toshio; Nakajima, Norihiro; Sugiyama, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting study on thermochemical IS process for water splitting hydrogen production. Based on the test results and know-how obtained through the bench-scale test, a pilot test plant, which has a hydrogen production performance of 30 Nm 3 /h, is being designed conceptually as the next step of the IS process development. In design of the IS pilot plant, it is important to make chemical reactors compact with high performance from the viewpoint of plant cost reduction. A new hydraulic analytical code has been developed for optimizing mixing performance of multi-phase flow involving chemical reactions especially in the Bunsen reactor. Complex flow pattern with gas-liquid chemical interaction involving flow instability will be characterized in the Bunsen reactor. Preliminary analytical results obtained with above mentioned code, especially flow patterns induced by swirling flow agreed well with that measured by water experiments, which showed vortex breakdown pattern in a simplified Bunsen reactor. (author)

  14. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  15. Investigation of hydrogen generation in a three reactor chemical looping reforming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-reactor based chemical looping reforming system for hydrogen production. • Investigation of operating parameters using a system-level model. • Optimum operating conditions for hydrogen production are identified. • Different operating parameters affect the reactor temperatures differently. - Abstract: Chemical looping reforming (CLR) is a relatively new method to produce hydrogen (H_2) and is also used as an energy conversion method for solid, liquid or gaseous fuels. There are various advantages of this method such as inherent carbon dioxide (CO_2) capture, minimal NOx emissions and the H_2 production. In this process, there is no direct contact between the fuel and oxidizer. This method utilizes oxygen from an oxygen carrier which may be a transition metal. The idea is to split the combustion process into three separate sub-processes by employing three separate reactors: air reactor where the oxygen carrier is oxidized by air, fuel reactor where natural gas is oxidized to produce a stream of CO_2 and H_2O and steam reactor where the steam is reduced to produce H_2. In this study, a thermodynamic model with iron oxides as oxygen carrier has been developed using Aspen Plus by employing conservation of mass and energy for all the components of the CLR system. The developed model was employed to investigate the effect of various operating parameters such as mass flow rates of air, fuel, steam and oxygen carrier and fraction of inert material on H_2 and CO_2 production and key reactor temperatures. The results show that the H_2 production increases with the increase in air, fuel and steam flow rates up to a certain limit and stays constant for higher flow rates. The CO_2 production follows a similar trend. Similarly, the H_2 production also increases with the increase in oxide flow rate and fraction of inert material up to a particular value, but then decrease for higher oxide flow rates and inert fractions. Reactor temperatures were also

  16. Assessment of impacts at the advanced test reactor as a result of chemical releases at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.

    1991-02-01

    This report provides an assessment of potential impacts at the Advanced Test Reactor Facility (ATR) resulting from accidental chemical spill at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Spills postulated to occur at the Lincoln Blvd turnoff to ICPP were also evaluated. Peak and time weighted average concentrations were calculated for receptors at the ATR facility and the Test Reactor Area guard station at a height above ground level of 1.0 m. Calculated concentrations were then compared to the 15 minute averaged Threshold Limit Value - Short Term Exposure Limit (TLV-STEL) and the 30 minute averaged Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) limit. Several different methodologies were used to estimate source strength and dispersion. Fifteen minute time weighted averaged concentrations of hydrofluoric acid and anhydrous ammonia exceeded TLV-STEL values for the cases considered. The IDLH value for these chemicals was not exceeded. Calculated concentrations of ammonium hydroxide, hexone, nitric acid, propane, gasoline, chlorine and liquid nitrogen were all below the TLV-STEL value

  17. Chemical engineering challenges in driving thermochemical hydrogen processes with the tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.; Werner, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor is described and compared with Tokamaks, both from a basic physics viewpoint and from the suitability of the respective reactor for synfuel production. Differences and similarities between the TMR as an electricity producer or a synfuel producer are also cited. The Thermochemical cycle chosen to link with the fusion energy source is the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle, which is a purely thermal-driven process with no electrochemical steps. There are real chemical engineering challenges of getting this high quality heat into the large thermochemical plant in an efficient manner. We illustrate with some of our approaches to providing process heat via liquid sodium to drive a 1050 K, highly-endothermic, catalytic and fluidized-bed SO 3 Decomposition Reactor. The technical, economic, and safety tradeoffs that arise are discussed

  18. Chemical compatibility issues associated with use of SiC/SiC in advanced reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites are of interest for components that will experience high radiation fields in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), or the Fluoride-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR). In all of the reactor systems considered, reactions of SiC/SiC composites with the constituents of the coolant determine suitability of materials of construction. The material of interest is nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites, which consist of a SiC matrix [high-purity, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC or liquid phase-sintered SiC that is crystalline beta-phase SiC containing small amounts of alumina-yttria impurity], a pyrolytic carbon interphase, and somewhat impure yet crystalline beta-phase SiC fibers. The interphase and fiber components may or may not be exposed, at least initially, to the reactor coolant. The chemical compatibility of SiC/SiC composites in the three reactor environments is highly dependent on thermodynamic stability with the pure coolant, and on reactions with impurities present in the environment including any ingress of oxygen and moisture. In general, there is a dearth of information on the performance of SiC in these environments. While there is little to no excess Si present in the new SiC/SiC composites, the reaction of Si with O2 cannot be ignored, especially for the FHR, in which environment the product, SiO2, can be readily removed by the fluoride salt. In all systems, reaction of the carbon interphase layer with oxygen is possible especially under abnormal conditions such as loss of coolant (resulting in increased temperature), and air and/ or steam ingress. A global outline of an approach to resolving SiC/SiC chemical compatibility concerns with the environments of the three reactors is presented along with ideas to quickly determine the baseline compatibility performance of SiC/SiC.

  19. 3D CFD for chemical transport profiles in a rotating disk CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Hyun; Yoon, Do-Young

    2010-06-01

    The RDCVD (Rotating Disk Chemical Vapor Deposition) technique is an appropriate method for uniform deposition of grains, such as compound semiconductior materials. The substrate temperature and rotation speed are the major factors, which determine the thickness uniformity of the deposited films. This paper investigates 3D CFD (3 Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results of flow and heat transfer in a reactor of RDCVD using Fluent. In order to establish the reducibility of buoyancy effect on deposition quality, the chemical transport profile upon the disk heated is examined successfully in 3D domain for different rotating speeds. The resulting vortex flows due the simultaneous buoyance and centrifuge are discussed qualitatively in the 3D virtual system of a RDCVD reactor. 3D CFD is even more effective to describe the internal vortex flows due to the competitive inlet, buoyancy and centrifuge flows, which cannot be realized in the general 2D (2 Dimensional) CFD.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Weisz, David G; Zaug, Joseph M; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L; Cappelli, Mark A; Rose, Timothy P

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  1. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  2. Conversion of metallurgical coke and coal using a Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) moving bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Siwei; Bayham, Samuel; Zeng, Liang; McGiveron, Omar; Chung, Elena; Majumder, Ankita; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Accumulated more than 300 operation hours were accomplished for the moving bed reducer reactor. • Different reactor operation variables were investigated with optimal conditions identified. • High conversions of sub-bituminous coal and bituminous coal were achieved without flow problems. • Co-current and counter-current contact modes were tested and their applicability was discussed. - Abstract: The CLC process has the potential to be a transformative commercial technology for a carbon-constrained economy. The Ohio State University Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) process directly converts coal, eliminating the need for a coal gasifier oran air separation unit (ASU). Compared to other solid-fuel CLC processes, the CDCL process is unique in that it consists of a countercurrent moving bed reducer reactor. In the proposed process, coal is injected into the middle of the moving bed, whereby the coal quickly heats up and devolatilizes, splitting the reactor roughly into two sections with no axial mixing. The top section consists of gaseous fuel produced from the coal volatiles, and the bottom section consists of the coal char mixed with the oxygen carrier. A bench-scale moving bed reactor was used to study the coal conversion with CO 2 as the enhancing gas. Initial tests using metallurgical cokefines as feedstock were conducted to test the effects of operational variables in the bottom section of the moving bed reducer, e.g., reactor temperature, oxygen carrier to char ratio, enhancer gas CO 2 flow rate, and oxygen carrier flow rates. Experiments directly using coal as the feedstock were subsequently carried out based on these test results. Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and Illinois #6 coal were tested as representative sub-bituminous and bituminous coals, respectively. Nearly complete coal conversion was achieved using composite iron oxide particles as the oxygen carriers without any flow problems. The operational results demonstrated that a

  3. Pullide galopp või karude agoonia? : Dow Jonesi püssirohi on kuiv / Mehis Replik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Replik, Mehis

    1999-01-01

    USA väärtpaberituru tõusud ja langused. Dow Jonesi ajalugu. Tabel: Dow Jones Industrial Average indeksi muutused; Standard & Poors 500 indeksi aastased sulgemishinad ja P/E ration 1950-1998; USA aktsiaindeksi Standard & Poorshi 500 languseelsed P/E tasemed

  4. An endothermic chemical process facility coupled to a high temperature reactor. Part II: Transient simulation of accident scenarios within the chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Revankar, Shripad T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Seven quantitative transient case studies were analyzed in a coupled PBMR and thermochemical sulfur cycle based hydrogen plant. ► Positive power excursion in the nuclear reactor were found for helium-inlet overcoolings. ► In all cases studied the maximum fuel temperatures in the nuclear reactor were 200 K below the design basis limit. - Abstract: Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. Transient study of the operational or accident events within the coupled plant is largely absent from the literature. In this paper, seven quantitative transient case studies are analyzed. The case studies consist of: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another with an accompanying parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without emergency nuclear reactor shutdown, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric studies based on the magnitude of the events were also performed. The only chemical plant initiated events that caused a positive power excursion in the nuclear reactor were helium-inlet overcoolings due to process holding tank failures or reaction chamber ruptures. Even for a severe sustained overcooling, the calculated maximum fuel temperatures in the nuclear reactor were 200 K below the design basis limit. The qualitative basis for the case studies and the analysis models are summarized in part I of this paper.

  5. Treatment of chemical-pharmaceutical wastewater in packed bed anaerobic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacheva, P.M.; Pena-Loera, B.; Moralez-Guzman, F. [Mexican Institute for Water Technology, Jiutepec (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Biological degradation in packed bed anaerobic mesophilic reactors with five different support materials was studied for the treatment of chemical-pharmaceutical wastewater with high COD (23-31 g/L), which contains toxic organic compounds. Experimental up-flow bio-filters were operated at different organic loads for a two-year period. Removals of 80-98% were obtained in the reactors with sand, anthracite and black tezontle, but at relatively low organic loads, less than 3.6 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The reactor with granular activated carbon (GAC) had a better performance; efficiencies higher than 95% were obtained at loads up to 17kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1} and higher than 80% with loads up to 26 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. Second in performance was the reactor with red tezontle which allows COD removals higher than 80% with loads up to 6 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The use of GAC as support material allows greater biodegradation rates than the rest of the materials and it makes the process more resistant to organic load increases, inhibition effects and toxicity. Methanogenic activity was inhibited at loads higher than 21.9 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1} in the GAC-reactor and at loads higher than 3.6 kg m{sup -3} d{sup -1} in the rest of the reactors. At loads lower than the previously mentioned, high methane production yield was obtained, 0.32-0.35 m{sup 33}CH4/kg CODremoved.

  6. 75 FR 43563 - Dow Jones & Company, Sharon Pennsylvania Print Plant a Subsidiary of News Corporation, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ..., Sharon Pennsylvania Print Plant a Subsidiary of News Corporation, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania; Notice of..., Sharon Pennsylvania Print Plant, a subsidiary of News Corporation, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania, was... between Dow Jones & Company, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania, and any Konica facility. The petitioner did not...

  7. 76 FR 771 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicones); Carrollton...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicones); Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville, KY Pursuant to..., located in Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville, Kentucky (FTZ Docket 20-2009, filed 5-1-2009... Corning Corporation, located in Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville, Kentucky (Subzone 29K), as...

  8. Machine News and Volatility: The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the TRNA Sentiment Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of the relationship between the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Index and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA) provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry

  9. Ritual in Unity Dow's Far And Beyon | Kgafela-Mokoka | Marang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This reinforces the article's argument that the violation of sexual mores leads to HIV and AIDS, and to death. The article also examines Dow's prejudice against rituals and the idea that adherence to cultural and religious sexual mores, and not ritual performance, is the solution to the problem of early deaths in the novel.

  10. Innkeeper's Liability for Loss Suffered by Guests:Drake v Dow

    OpenAIRE

    Du Plessis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Drake v Dow is concerned with the issue of strict liability attributed to innkeepers for loss suffered by guests. The case also contains an entertaining foray into the historical development of the law of delict in Scotland and may therefore be of interest to legal historians.

  11. Simulation of the Fuel Reactor of a Coal-Fired Chemical Looping Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalatkar, Kartikeya; O'Brien, Thomas; Huckaby, E. David; Kuhlman, John

    2009-06-01

    Responsible carbon management (CM) will be required for the future utilization of coal for power generation. CO2 separation is the more costly component of CM, not sequestration. Most methods of capture require a costly process of gas separation to obtain a CO2-rich gas stream. However, recently a process termed Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) has been proposed, in which an oxygen-carrier is used to provide the oxygen for combustion. This process quite naturally generates a separate exhaust gas stream containing mainly H2O and CO2 but requires two reaction vessels, an Air Reactor (AR) and a Fuel Reactor (FR). The carrier (M for metal, the usual carrier) is oxidized in the AR. This highly exothermic process provides heat for power generation. The oxidized carrier (MO) is separated from this hot, vitiated air stream and transported to the FR where it oxidizes the hydrocarbon fuel, yielding an exhaust gas stream of mainly H2O and CO2. This process is usually slightly endothermic so that the carrier must also transport the necessary heat of reaction. The reduced carrier (M) is then returned to the air reactor for regeneration, hence the term "looping." The net chemical reaction and energy release is identical to that of conventional combustion of the fuel. However, CO2 separation is easily achieved, the only operational penalty being the slight pressure losses required to circulate the carrier. CLC requires many unit operations involving gas-solid or granular flow. To utilize coal in the fuel reactor, in either a moving bed or bubbling fluidized bed, the granular flow is especially critical. The solid coal fuel must be heated by the recycled metal oxide, driving off moisture and volatile material. The remaining char must be gasified by H2O (or CO2), which is recycled from the product stream. The gaseous product of these reactions must then contact the MO before leaving the bed to obtain complete conversion to H2O and CO2. Further, the reduced M particles must be

  12. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 1: Fundamentals and design methodology

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet, and depleted air and product streams at exit. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of micro-channels with oxygen carriers (OC) coated on the inner surface of the channel walls. In the CC application, the OC oxidizes the fuel while the channel is in the fuel zone to generate undiluted CO2, and is regenerated while the channel is in the air zone. In this two-part series, the effect of the reactor design parameters is evaluated and its performance with different OCs is compared. In Part 1, the design objectives and criteria are specified and the key parameters controlling the reactor performance are identified. The fundamental effects of the OC characteristics, the design parameters, and the operating conditions are studied. The design procedures are presented on the basis of the relative importance of each parameter, enabling a systematic methodology of selecting the design parameters and the operating conditions with different OCs. Part 2 presents the application of the methodology to the designs with the three commonly used OCs, i.e., nickel, copper, and iron, and compares the simulated performances of the designs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The overpressure protection for the chemical reactors: the batch-size approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellavedova, M.; Gigante, L.; Lunghi, A.; Pasturenzi, C.; Cardillo, P.; Gerosa, N.P.; Rota, R.

    2008-01-01

    Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) main feature is to run batch and semi-batch processes, working on job orders. They generally have multi propose reactors with an emergency relief system (ERS) already installed. These are normally sized when the reactor is designed, assuming as worst incidental scenario a single phase vapour flow generated by a fire developed outside the apparatus. These assumptions can lead to a big underestimation of the vent area if the actual flow is two-phase and besides generated by a runaway reaction. ERS sizing is particularly hazardous and complex for small mills, as for example fine chemicals and pharmaceutical companies. These factories have usually narrow financial and personal resources, moreover they often use fast processes turnovers. In many cases a complete safety study or the replacement of the ERS is not possible and it can lead to not sustainable costs. The batch-size approach is focused on discontinuous process conditions: aim of this approach is to find the reactor fill level that can lead a vapour single phase flow whether an incident occurs, this condition is considered safe that the ERS installed on the reactor can protect the plant from explosions [it

  14. Variations in the chemical speciation behaviour of radioiodines in the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, G.; Gokhale, A.S.; Moorthy, P.N.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of radioiodines in the primary coolant of the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor has been studied under different operating conditions. During normal operation, radioiodines speciated mainly as I - (≅60%) and IO 3 - (≅35%) with 2 . At 1-5 h into reactor shutdown conditions, radioiodines existed predominantly as IO 3 - species (>80%). Beyond 5 h after shutdown, quantitative conversion of IO 3 - to I - was observed to occur in about 20 h duration. Long time after reactor shutdown, radioiodines were present in the coolant as I - species only. A quantitative conversion of near carrier-free IO 3 - to I - was observed in laboratory low dose rate (0.95 kGy/h), low and high dose gamma irradiation experiments in near neutral solutions both in absence and presence of externally added H 2 O 2 . However, near carrier-free I - solutions irradiated under the same conditions yielded ≅15% IO 3 - species only which is in agreement with the literature data. The radioiodine speciation behaviour in reactor water has been explained by a qualitative model coupling iodine release from defective fuel elements and the associated gamma irradiation effects. (author)

  15. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veriansyah, Bambang [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: vaveri@kist.re.kr; Kim, Jae-Duck [Supercritical Fluid Research Laboratory, Clean Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Green Process and System Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jdkim@kist.re.kr; Lee, Jong-Chol [Agency for Defense Development (ADD), P.O. Box 35-1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jcleeadd@hanafos.com

    2007-08-17

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion.

  16. Physical and chemical feasibility of fueling molten salt reactors with TRU's trifluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Feinberg, O.; Konakov, S.; Subbotine, S.; Surenkov, A.; Zakirov, R.

    2001-01-01

    The molten salt reactor (MSR) concept is very important for consideration as an element of future nuclear energy systems. These reactor systems are unique in many ways. Particularly, the MSRs appear to have substantial promise not only as advanced TRU free system operating in U-Th cycle, but also as transmuter of TRU. Physical and chemical feasibility of fueling MSR with TRU trifluorides is examined. Solvent compositions with and without U-Th as fissile / fertile addition are considered. The principle reactor and fuel cycle variables available for optimizing the performance of MSR as TRU transmuting system are discussed. These efforts led to the definition in minimal TRU mass flow rate, reduced total losses to waste and maximum possible burn up rate for the molten salt transmuter. The current status of technology and prospects for revisited interest are summarized. Significant chemical problems are remain to be resolved at the end of prior MSRs programs, notably, graphite life durability, tritium control, fate of noble metal fission products. Questions arising from plutonium and minor actinide fueling include: corrosion and container chemistry, new redox buffer for systems without uranium, analytical chemistry instrumentation, adequate constituent solubilities, suitable fuel processing and waste form development. However these problems appear to be soluble. (author)

  17. Investigation of the Pulsed Annular Gas Jet for Chemical Reactor Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvegintsev Valery Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most economical technology for production of titanium dioxide pigment is plasma-chemical syntheses with the heating of the oxygen. The highlight of the given reaction is formation of a solid phase as a result of interactions between two gases, thus brings the formation of particle deposits on the reactor walls, and to disturbing the normal operation of the technological process. For the solving of the task of reactor internal walls cleaning the pulsed gaseous system was suggested and investigated, which throws circular oxygen jet along surfaces through regular intervals. Study of aerodynamic efficiency of the impulse system was carried by numerical modeling and experimentally with the help of a specially created experimental facility. The distribution of the pulsed flow velocity at the exit of cylindrical reactor was measured. The experimental results have shown that used impulse device creates a pulsed jet with high value of the specified flow rate. It allows to get high velocities that are sufficient for the particle deposits destruction and their removal away. Designed pulsed peelings system has shown high efficiency and reliability in functioning that allows us to recommend it for wide spreading in chemical industry.

  18. Membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M J; Parsons, S A; Jeffrey, P; Pidou, M; Jefferson, B

    2006-01-01

    Urban water recycling is now becoming an important issue where water resources are becoming scarce. This paper looks at reusing grey water; the preference is treatment processes based on biological systems to remove the dissolved organic content. Here, an alternative process, photocatalysis is discussed as it is an attractive technology that could be well-suited for treating the recalcitrant organic compounds found in grey water. The photocatalytic process oxidises organic reactants at a catalyst surface in the presence of ultraviolet light. Given enough exposure time, organic compounds will be oxidized into CO2 and water. The best contact is achieved in a slurry reactor but a second step to separate and recover the catalyst is need. This paper discusses a new membrane chemical reactor (MCR) combining photocatalysis and microfiltration for grey water treatment.

  19. Nonequilibrium chemical instabilities in continuous flow stirred tank reactors: The effect of stirring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsthemke, W.; Hannon, L.

    1984-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for stirred chemical reactors. In the limiting case of practical interest, i.e., fast stirring, we solve for the characteristic function in steady state and derive expressions for the stationary moments through a perturbation expansion. Moments are explicitly calculated for a generic model of bistable behavior. We find that stirring decreases the area of the bistable region essentially by changing the point of transition from the high reaction rate state to the low reaction rate state. This is in remarkable agreement with the experimental findings of Roux, et al. Our results indicate that stirring should not be considered simply as an ''enhanced diffusion'' process and that nucleation plays only a minor role in transitions between multiple steady states in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

  20. Sources of radioactive waste from light-water reactors and their physical and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Collins, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    The general physical and chemical properties of waste streams in light-water reactors (LWRs) are described. The principal mechanisms for release and the release pathways to the environment are discussed. The calculation of liquid and gaseous source terms using one of the available models is presented. These calculated releases are compared with observed releases from operating LWRs. The computerized mathematical model used is the GALE Code which is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff's model for calculating source terms for effluents from LWRs (USNRC76a, USNRC76b). Programs currently being conducted at operating reactors by the NRC, Electric Power Research Institute, and various utilities to better define the characteristics of waste streams and the performance of radwaste process equipment are described

  1. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  2. Low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S. Venkata; Rao, N. Chandrasekhara; Sarma, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was evaluated for the treatment of low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater (low BOD/COD ratio ∼0.3, high sulfate content: 1.75 g/l) in aerobic metabolic function. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h [fill: 15 min; reaction: 23 h (aeration along with recirculation); settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min] and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 0.92, 1.50, 3.07 and 4.76 kg COD/cum-day. Substrate utilization showed a steady increase with increase in OLR and system performance sustained at higher loading rates. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization was observed after 4 h of the cycle operation. Sulfate removal efficiency of 20% was observed due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm matrix. Biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBR) showed comparatively higher efficiency to the corresponding suspended growth and granular activated carbon (GAC) configured systems studied with same wastewater. Periodic discontinuous batch mode operation of the biofilm reactors results in a more even distribution of the biomass throughout the reactor and was able to treat large shock loads than the continuous flow process. Biofilm configured system coupled with periodic discontinuous batch mode operation imposes regular variations in the substrate concentration on biofilm organisms. As a result, organisms throughout the film achieve maximum growth rates resulting in improved reaction potential leading to stable and robust system which is well suited for treating highly variable wastes

  3. Low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, S. Venkata [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)]. E-mail: vmohan_s@yahoo.com; Rao, N. Chandrasekhara [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Biotechnologies and Process Engineering for the Environment, Universite de Savoie Technolac, Chambery, 73376 Le Bourget Du Lac Cedex (France); Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2007-06-01

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was evaluated for the treatment of low-biodegradable composite chemical wastewater (low BOD/COD ratio {approx}0.3, high sulfate content: 1.75 g/l) in aerobic metabolic function. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h [fill: 15 min; reaction: 23 h (aeration along with recirculation); settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min] and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 0.92, 1.50, 3.07 and 4.76 kg COD/cum-day. Substrate utilization showed a steady increase with increase in OLR and system performance sustained at higher loading rates. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization was observed after 4 h of the cycle operation. Sulfate removal efficiency of 20% was observed due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm matrix. Biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBR) showed comparatively higher efficiency to the corresponding suspended growth and granular activated carbon (GAC) configured systems studied with same wastewater. Periodic discontinuous batch mode operation of the biofilm reactors results in a more even distribution of the biomass throughout the reactor and was able to treat large shock loads than the continuous flow process. Biofilm configured system coupled with periodic discontinuous batch mode operation imposes regular variations in the substrate concentration on biofilm organisms. As a result, organisms throughout the film achieve maximum growth rates resulting in improved reaction potential leading to stable and robust system which is well suited for treating highly variable wastes.

  4. Physico-chemical investigations in relation with the tritium circuit in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Courvoisier, P.; Mauvisseau, J.; Sauzay, G.

    1986-06-01

    The tritium flow diagram within a fusion reactor may be splitted in a series of chemical engineering units. For them, the E.E.C. has launched a review program as well as experimental work. In this framework the CEA has carried out conceptual studies on fuel clean-up process, on gaseous waste treatment and on atmosphere detritiation systems. Moreover measurements with experimental loops are running to determine data necessary to assess unit dimensions; among others: hydrogen permeation rate through Pd-Ag membranes and tritium oxidation catalyst performances

  5. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-20

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies.

  6. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukitaka; Yamada, Mitsuteru; Kanie, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg -1 . The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO 2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  7. Characteristics of isotope-selective chemical reactor with gas-separating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshunov, N.M.; Kalitin, S.A.; Laguntsov, N.I.; Neshchimenko, Yu.P.; Sulaberidze, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made on characteristics of separating stage, composed of isotope-selective chemical (or photochemical) reactor and membrane separating cascade (MSC), designated for separation of isotope-enriched products from lean reagents. MSC represents the counterflow cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. Calculations show that for the process of carton isotope separation the electric power expences for MSC operation are equal to 20 kWxh/g of CO 2 final product at 13 C isotope content in it equal to 75%. Application of the membrane gas-separating cascade at rather small electric power expenses enables to perform cascading of isotope separation in the course of nonequilibrium chemical reactions

  8. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.

    1999-01-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  9. Chemical conditions in the repository for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, M.; Uotila, H.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical conditions in the proposed repositories for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste at Haestholmen (IVO) and Olkiluoto (TVO) have been discussed with respect to materials introduced into the repository, their possible long-term changes and interaction with groundwater flowing into the repository. The main possible groundwater-rock interactions have been discussed, as well as the role of micro-organisms, organic acids and colloids in the estimation of the barrier integrity. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the basis of the natural groundwater compositions expected at the repository sites. Main emphasis is put on the chemical parameters which might influence the integrity of the different barriers in the repository as well as on the parameters which might effect the release and transport of radionuclides from the repository

  10. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  11. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Water chemical control of the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, Lucia M.L.A; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Damazio, Ilza; Fagundes, Oliene dos R.; Cintra, Maria Olivia C.; Andrade, Geraldo V. de; Amaral, Angela M.; Franco, Milton B.; Fortes, Flavio; Gomes, Nilton Carlos; Vidal, Andrea; Maretti Junior, Fausto; Knupp, Eliana A.N.; Souza, Wagner de; Guedes, Joao B.; Furtado, Renato C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor located at CDTN/CNEN has been in operation and contributed to research and with services to society since 1960. Is has been used in several activities such as nuclear power plant operation, graduate and post-graduate training courses, isotope production, and as an analytical irradiation tool of different types of samples. Among the several structural and operational safety requirements is the chemical quality control of the primary circuit cooling water. The aim of this work was to check the cooling water quality from the pool reactor. A water sampling plan was proposed (May, 2011 - June, 2012) and presents the results obtained in this period. The natural radioactivity level as gross alpha and gross beta activity and other chemical parameters (pH and electric conductivity) of the samples were analyzed. Some instrumental techniques were used: potentiometric methods (pH), conductometric methods (electrical conductivity, EC) and gross α and gross β proportional counting system). (author)

  13. Volatility Transmission between Dow Jones Stock Index and Emerging Bond Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Saadaoui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use a bivariate GARCH model to estimate simultaneously of the mean and the conditional variance between the Dow Jones stock index and some emerging bond indices. We used the DCC-GARCH model to graphically demonstrate the peaks of the volatility transmission. We examined this transmission using daily returns between July, 30, 2009 and January, 18, 2011 extracted from Datastream. Our results demonstrate that there is a significant transmission of shocks and volatility between the Dow Jones stock index and bond indices of the emerging countries. The results also confirm the idea that the crisis was transmitted from the United States to the emerging countries due to foreign investment made in these countries.

  14. Chemical looping reactor system design double loop circulating fluidized bed (DLCFB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-05-15

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the oxygen of the injected fluidising air. Afterwards the particles are sent to the other reactor where the fuel is injected, the fuel reactor (FR). There, they transport heat and oxygen necessary for the reaction with the injected fuel to take place. At high temperatures, the particle's oxygen reacts with the fuel producing Co2 and steam, and the particles are ready to start the loop again. The overall reaction, the sum of the enthalpy changes of the oxygen carrier oxidation and reduction reactions, is the same as for the conventional combustion. Two are the key features, which make CLC promising both for costs and capture efficiency. First, the high inherent irreversibility of the conventional combustion is avoided because the energy is utilized stepwise. Second, the Co2 is intrinsically separated within the process; so there is in principle no need either of extra carbon capture devices or of expensive air separation units to produce oxygen for oxy-combustion. A lot of effort is taking place worldwide on the development of new chemical looping oxygen carrier particles, reactor systems and processes. The current work is focused on the reactor system: a new design is presented, for the construction of an atmospheric 150kWth prototype working with gaseous fuel and possibly with inexpensive oxygen carriers derived from industrial by-products or natural minerals. It consists of two circulating fluidized beds capable to operate in fast fluidization regime; this will increase the

  15. Chemical Reactor Automation as a way to Optimize a Laboratory Scale Polymerization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Saenz de Buruaga, Isabel; Lopez, Raymundo

    2004-10-01

    The automation of the registration and control of variables involved in a chemical reactor improves the reaction process by making it faster, optimized and without the influence of human error. The objective of this work is to register and control the involved variables (temperatures, reactive fluxes, weights, etc) in an emulsion polymerization reaction. The programs and control algorithms were developed in the language G in LabVIEW®. The designed software is able to send and receive RS232 codified data from the devices (pumps, temperature sensors, mixer, balances, and so on) to and from a personal Computer. The transduction from digital information to movement or measurement actions of the devices is done by electronic components included in the devices. Once the programs were done and proved, chemical reactions of emulsion polymerization were made to validate the system. Moreover, some advanced heat-estimation algorithms were implemented in order to know the heat caused by the reaction and the estimation and control of chemical variables in-line. All the information gotten from the reaction is stored in the PC. The information is then available and ready to use in any commercial data processor software. This work is now being used in a Research Center in order to make emulsion polymerizations under efficient and controlled conditions with reproducible results. The experiences obtained from this project may be used in the implementation of chemical estimation algorithms at pilot plant or industrial scale.

  16. Evaluation of linkages between equity indices : evidence from İstanbul Stock Exchange and Dow Jones

    OpenAIRE

    Ertan, Aytekin

    2009-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Management, Bilkent Univiversity, 2009. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2009. Includes bibliographical references leaves 30-33. This study investigates the linkage between the major stock market indices of Turkey (ISE National 100) and USA (Dow Jones Industrial Average). Main purpose of this research is to measure the interdependence and cointegration between these indices and figure out the significance and the direction of short run r...

  17. Experience with dilute chemical decontamination in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Subramanian, Veena; Mittal, V.K.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) process has been used in several full system and components of nuclear coolant systems to effectively remove the radioactive contaminants that causes radiation field and consequent MANREM problem. The DCD process uses chemicals in very low concentrations (millimolar) and dissolves the oxide film along with the activity incorporated in the oxide film. In DCD process operated under the regenerative mode, the chemical formulation spent in the process of oxide dissolution is replenished by passing through cation exchange columns. Finally, after achieving sufficient decontamination of the system/component, the added decontamination chemicals along with the activities and metal ions released during the process are removed by mixed bed ion exchange columns and the system is restored to normal operating condition in few days time. In PHWRs, the regenerative DCD process is applied for full primary coolant system decontamination. The chemicals are added directly to the heavy water coolant with the fuel in the core. In Indian PHWRs (MAPS-1 and 2, RAPS-1 and 2, NAPS-1 and 2 and KAPS-1), the process has been applied eleven times. A chemical formulation based on NTA, Citric acid and Ascorbic acid has been applied seven times with good results. Decontamination factors in the range 2-30 have been obtained in different components with good MANREM savings in the subsequent maintenance works. Efforts are on to modify the process to take care of the challenges posed by antimony isotope. An inhibitor (Rodine-92B) based process was successfully tested in NAPS-2 for removing antimony isotopes ( 122 Sb and 124 Sb). Further refining of the antimony removal process is being worked out. Similarly, the process is being modified to effectively remove the hotspot causing stellite particles in the moderator system of PHWRs. A permanganate based process has been developed and tested in several adjustor rod drive mechanisms in KAPS and NAPS. The experience of

  18. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for c...

  19. Transient simulation of an endothermic chemical process facility coupled to a high temperature reactor: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Seker, Volkan; Revankar, Shripad T.; Downar, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Models for PBMR and thermochemical sulfur cycle based hydrogen plant are developed. ► Models are validated against available data in literature. ► Transient in coupled reactor and hydrogen plant system is studied. ► For loss-of-heat sink accident, temperature feedback within the reactor core enables shut down of the reactor. - Abstract: A high temperature reactor (HTR) is a candidate to drive high temperature water-splitting using process heat. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Three thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. The models and coupling scheme are presented here, as well as a transient test case initiated within the chemical plant. The 50% feed flow failure within the chemical plant results in a slow loss-of-heat sink (LOHS) accident in the nuclear reactor. Due to the temperature feedback within the reactor core the nuclear reactor partially shuts down over 1500 s. Two distinct regions are identified within the coupled plant response: (1) immediate LOHS due to the loss of the sulfuric

  20. 3D printing in chemical engineering and catalytic technology: structured catalysts, mixers and reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Cabrera, Cesar; Achille, Clement; Kuhn, Simon; Ameloot, Rob

    2018-01-02

    Computer-aided fabrication technologies combined with simulation and data processing approaches are changing our way of manufacturing and designing functional objects. Also in the field of catalytic technology and chemical engineering the impact of additive manufacturing, also referred to as 3D printing, is steadily increasing thanks to a rapidly decreasing equipment threshold. Although still in an early stage, the rapid and seamless transition between digital data and physical objects enabled by these fabrication tools will benefit both research and manufacture of reactors and structured catalysts. Additive manufacturing closes the gap between theory and experiment, by enabling accurate fabrication of geometries optimized through computational fluid dynamics and the experimental evaluation of their properties. This review highlights the research using 3D printing and computational modeling as digital tools for the design and fabrication of reactors and structured catalysts. The goal of this contribution is to stimulate interactions at the crossroads of chemistry and materials science on the one hand and digital fabrication and computational modeling on the other.

  1. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    In the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) reactor primary coolant leakage incident, which occurred in Tsuruga-2 (4-loop PWR, 3,423 MWt, 1,160 MWe) on July 12, 1999, it took about 14 hours before the leakage isolation. The delayed leakage isolation and a large amount of leakage have become a social concern. Effective procedure modification was studied. Three betterments were proposed based on a qualitative analysis to reduce the pressure and temperature of the primary loop as fast as possible by the current plant facilities while maintaining enough subcooling of the primary loop. I analyzed the incident with RETRAN code in order to quantitatively evaluate the leakage reduction when these betterments are adopted. This paper is very new because it created a typical analysis method for PWR plant behavior during plant shutdown procedure which conventional RETRAN transient analyses rarely dealt with. Also the event time is very long. To carry out this analysis successfully, I devised new models such as an Residual Heat Removal System (RHR) model etc. and simplified parts of the conventional model. Based on the analysis results, I confirmed that leakage can be reduced by about 30% by adopting these betterments. Then the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) modified the operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events adopting these betterments. (author)

  2. Optimization of operating parameters in polysilicon chemical vapor deposition reactor with response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li-sha; Liu, Chun-jiao; Liu, Ying-wen

    2018-05-01

    In the polysilicon chemical vapor deposition reactor, the operating parameters are complex to affect the polysilicon's output. Therefore, it is very important to address the coupling problem of multiple parameters and solve the optimization in a computationally efficient manner. Here, we adopted Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to analyze the complex coupling effects of different operating parameters on silicon deposition rate (R) and further achieve effective optimization of the silicon CVD system. Based on finite numerical experiments, an accurate RSM regression model is obtained and applied to predict the R with different operating parameters, including temperature (T), pressure (P), inlet velocity (V), and inlet mole fraction of H2 (M). The analysis of variance is conducted to describe the rationality of regression model and examine the statistical significance of each factor. Consequently, the optimum combination of operating parameters for the silicon CVD reactor is: T = 1400 K, P = 3.82 atm, V = 3.41 m/s, M = 0.91. The validation tests and optimum solution show that the results are in good agreement with those from CFD model and the deviations of the predicted values are less than 4.19%. This work provides a theoretical guidance to operate the polysilicon CVD process.

  3. Geochemical properties and nuclear chemical characteristics of Oklo natural fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    There are six uranium deposits in the Gabonese Republic in the cnetral Africa. `Fission reactor zone`, the fission chain reactions generated about 200 billion years ago, was existed in a part of them. CEA begun geochemical researches of Oklo deposits etc. in 1991. The geochemical and nuclear chemical properties of Oklo were reviewed from the results of researches. Oklo deposits is consisted of main five sedimentary faces such as sandstone (FA), Black Shale formation (FB), mudstone (FC), tuff (FD) and volcaniclastic sandstone (FE) from the bottom on the base rock of granite in the Precambrian era. Uranium is enriched in the upper part of FA layer and the under part of FB layer. {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U, U content, fission proportion, duration time, neutron fluence, temperature, restitution factor of {sup 235}U and epithermal index ({gamma}) were investigated and compared. The geochemical properties of Oklo are as followed: large enrich of uranium, the abundance ratio of {sup 235}U as same as that of enriched uranium, interaction of natural water and small rear earth elements. These factors made casually Oklo fission reactor. (S.Y.)

  4. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, Oleg, E-mail: volokitin-oleg@mail.ru; Volokitin, Gennady, E-mail: vgg-tomsk@mail.ru; Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mai.ru; Shekhovtsov, Valentin, E-mail: shehovcov2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Vlasov, Viktor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ r{sub p} ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ r{sub p} ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  5. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behaviour of simulant fission product species such as caesium iodide, caesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapour deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high-density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO/sub 2/ clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapour phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  6. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and deposition of fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behavior of simulant fission product species such as cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapor deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO 2 clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapor phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  7. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium-clad spent fuel in water-chemical and microbiological influenced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksin, T.N.; Dobrijevic, R.P.; Idjakovic, Z.E.; Pesic, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating research reactor RA at the Vinca Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool. It has been left in the ambient temperature and humidity for more then fifteen years so intensive corrosion processes were notice. We have spent fuel pools under control, after first research coordination meeting (RCM), of the first CRP, by monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of water in the pools, including temperature, pH-factor, electrical conductivity, mass concentration of corrosion products in the water and mud, mass concentration of relevant ions etc. The rack of standard corrosion coupons, was given at that time, has been in poor quality water for six years. We pick up rack assembly from basin and analysed. The results of this investigation are present in this article. (author)

  8. Evaluation of a dilute chemical decontaminant for pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a dilute chemical decontamination formulation based on ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid is evaluated for its efficacy in removing oxide layers in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). An ion exchange system that is specifically suited for fission product-dominated contamination in a PHWR is suggested for the reagent regeneration stage of the decontamination process. An attempt has been made to understand the redeposition behavior of various isotopes during the decontamination process. The polarographic method of identifying the species formed in the dissolution process is explained. Electrochemical measurements are employed to follow the course of oxide removal during the dissolution process. Scanning electron micrographs of metal coupons before and after the dissolution process exemplify the involvement of base metal in the formation of a ferrous oxalate layer. Material compatibility tests between the decontaminant and carbon steel, Monel-400, and Zircaloy-2 are reported

  9. Proposed chemical plant initiated accident scenarios in a sulphur-iodine cycle plant coupled to a pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.R.; Revankar, S.T.; Seker, V.; Downar, Th.J.

    2010-01-01

    In the sulphur-iodine (S-I) cycle nuclear hydrogen generation scheme the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). Thus, any accident which occurs in the chemical plant must feedback to the nuclear reactor. There are many different types of accidents which can occur in a chemical plant. These accidents include intra-reactor piping failure, inter-reactor piping failure, reaction chamber failure and heat exchanger failure. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, any of these accidents induce a loss-of-heat-sink accident in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, several chemical plant initiated accident scenarios are presented. The following accident scenarios are proposed: i) failure of the Bunsen chemical reactor; ii) product flow failure from either the H 2 SO 4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iii) reactant flow failure from either the H 2 SO 4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iv) rupture of a reaction chamber. Qualitative analysis of these accident scenarios indicates that each result in either partial or total loss of heat sink accidents for the nuclear reactor. These scenarios are reduced to two types: i) discharge rate limited accidents; ii) discontinuous reaction chamber accidents. A discharge rate limited rupture of the SO 3 decomposition section of the SI cycle is proposed and modelled. Since SO 3 decomposition occurs in the gaseous phase, critical flow out of the rupture is calculated assuming ideal gas behaviour. The accident scenario is modelled using a fully transient control volume model of the S-I cycle coupled to a THERMIX model of a 268 MW pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR-268) and a point kinetics model. The Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot source model for choked gas flows from a pressurised chamber was utilised as a discharge rate model. A discharge coefficient of 0.62 was assumed. Feedback due to the rupture is observed in the nuclear

  10. Model experiments on simulation of the WWER water-chemical conditions at loop facilities of the MIR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderskaya, O.S.; Zotov, E.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on simulation of the WWER type reactors water-chemical conditions have been started at the State Scientific Center RIAR. These experiments are being conducted at the multi-loop research MIR reactor at the PVK-2 loop facility. The dosage stand was created. It allows introduction of boric acid, potassium and lithium hydroxides, ammonia solutions and gaseous hydrogen. Corrosion tests of the Russian E-635 and E-110 alloys are being conducted at the PVK-2 loop under the WWER water-chemical conditions. If necessary, fuel elements are periodically extracted from the reactor to perform visual examination, to measure their length, diameter, to remove the deposits from the claddings, to measure the burnup and to distribute the fission products over the fuel element by gamma-spectrometry. The chemical analytical 'on line' equipment produced by the ORBISPHERE Laboratory (Switzerland) will be commissioned in the nearest future to measure concentration of the dissolved hydrogen and oxygen as well as pH and specific conductivity. The objective of the report is to familiarize the participants of the IAEA Technical Committee with the capabilities of performing the model water-chemical experiments under the MIR reactor loop facility conditions. (author)

  11. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  12. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Chen, Tianjiao; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated

  13. In-reactor performance of methods to control fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, E.T.; Gibby, R.L.; Wilson, C.N.; Lawrence, L.A.; Adamson, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Inner surface corrosion of austenitic stainless steel cladding by oxygen and reactive fission product elements requires a 50 μm wastage allowance in current FBR reference oxide fuel pin design. Elimination or reduction of this wastage allowance could result in better reactor efficiency and economics through improvements in fuel pin performance and reliability. Reduction in cladding thickness and replacement of equivalent volume with fuel result in improved breeding capability. Of the factors affecting fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI), oxygen activity within the fuel pin can be most readily controlled and/or manipulated without degrading fuel pin performance or significantly increasing fuel fabrication costs. There are two major approaches to control oxygen activity within an oxide fuel pin: (1) control of total oxygen inventory and chemical activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) by use of low oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M) fuel; and (2) incorporation of a material within the fuel pin to provide in-situ control of oxygen activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) and fixation of excess oxygen prior to, or in preference to reaction with the cladding. The paper describes irradiation tests which were conducted in EBR-II and GETR incorporating oxygen buffer/getter materials and very low O/M fuel to control oxygen activity in sealed fuel pins

  14. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S.D.; Madeira, Luis M.; Boaventura, Rui A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5 h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD 5 and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  15. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2012-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical admixtures in the cementation process of radioactive wastes. These additives are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. Then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were: the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  16. The Value of Multivariate Model Sophistication: An Application to pricing Dow Jones Industrial Average options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jeroen V.K.; Stentoft, Lars; Violante, Francesco

    innovation for a Laplace innovation assumption improves the pricing in a smaller way. Apart from investigating directly the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses, we also use the model condence set approach to statistically infer the set of models that delivers the best pricing performance.......We assess the predictive accuracy of a large number of multivariate volatility models in terms of pricing options on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. We measure the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses by considering a set 248 multivariate models that differer...

  17. Effect of water losses by evaporation and chemical reaction in an industrial slaker reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andreola

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of the slaker reactor was developed and validated for Klabin Paraná Papéis causticizing system, responsable for white liquor generation used by the plant. The model considered water losses by evaporation and chemical reaction. The model showed a good agreement with the industrial plant measures of active alkali, total titratable alkali and temperature, without the need of adjustment of any parameter. The simulated results showed that the water consumption by the slaking reaction and evaporation exerted significant influence on the volumetric flow rate of limed liquor, which imposed a decrease of 4.6% in the amount of water in reactor outlet.Foi desenvolvido e testado um modelo dinâmico do reator de apagamento do sistema de caustificação da Klabin Paraná Papéis, responsável pela geração do licor branco utilizado na planta. O modelo contempla perdas de água por evaporação e por reação química e apresentou boa concordância com dados industriais de álcali ativo, álcali total titulável e temperatura, sem a necessidade de ajuste de nenhum parâmetro. Os resultados obtidos a partir de simulações revelam que o consumo de água pela reação de apagamento, bem como pela evaporação, exercem uma influência significativa sobre a vazão volumétrica na saída do reator, impondo uma diminuição de 4,6% sobre o teor de água na corrente de saída do reator em relação à alimentação.

  18. Several perspectives on water-chemical cycles for nuclear power stations equipped with type VVER and RBMK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamet, A.P.; Mamet, V.A.; Pashevich, V.I.; Nazarenko, P.N.

    1982-01-01

    Water-chemical cycles for loops I and II of VVER reactors are discussed. These cycles are mixed ammonia-sodium with a variable concentration of boric acid and ammonia hydrazine with a pH factor of 9.1 +/- 0.1. New water-chemical cycles are considered for use in both existing and new nuclear power plants. Application of these new water-chemical cycles showed produce a significant improvement in operating conditions of nuclear power plants. Upon accumulation of sufficient operating experience with these cycles, it should be possible to raise the issue of revising applicable standard documentation

  19. Incorporation of statistical distribution of particle properties in chemical reactor design and operation: the cooled tubular reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Pellet heat and mass transfer coefficients inside packed beds do not have definite deterministic values, but are stochastic quantities with a certain distribution. Here, a method is presented to incorporate the stochastic distribution of pellet properties in reactor design and operation models. The

  20. Treatment of Copper Contaminated Municipal Wastewater by Using UASB Reactor and Sand-Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a laboratory scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor and its posttreatment unit of sand-chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust (CCRWSD column system for the treatment of a metal contaminated municipal wastewater was investigated. Copper ion contaminated municipal wastewater was introduced to a laboratory scale UASB reactor and the effluent from UASB reactor was then followed by treatment with sand-CCRWSD column system. The laboratory scale UASB reactor and column system were observed for a period of 121 days. After the posttreatment column the average removal of monitoring parameters such as copper ion concentration (91.37%, biochemical oxygen demand (BODT (93.98%, chemical oxygen demand (COD (95.59%, total suspended solid (TSS (95.98%, ammonia (80.68%, nitrite (79.71%, nitrate (71.16%, phosphorous (44.77%, total coliform (TC (99.9%, and fecal coliform (FC (99.9% was measured. The characterization of the chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF, and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Overall the system was found to be an efficient and economical process for the treatment of copper contaminated municipal wastewater.

  1. Treatment of Copper Contaminated Municipal Wastewater by Using UASB Reactor and Sand-Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Mishra, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and its posttreatment unit of sand-chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust (CCRWSD) column system for the treatment of a metal contaminated municipal wastewater was investigated. Copper ion contaminated municipal wastewater was introduced to a laboratory scale UASB reactor and the effluent from UASB reactor was then followed by treatment with sand-CCRWSD column system. The laboratory scale UASB reactor and column system were observed for a period of 121 days. After the posttreatment column the average removal of monitoring parameters such as copper ion concentration (91.37%), biochemical oxygen demand (BODT) (93.98%), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (95.59%), total suspended solid (TSS) (95.98%), ammonia (80.68%), nitrite (79.71%), nitrate (71.16%), phosphorous (44.77%), total coliform (TC) (99.9%), and fecal coliform (FC) (99.9%) was measured. The characterization of the chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Overall the system was found to be an efficient and economical process for the treatment of copper contaminated municipal wastewater.

  2. The physico-chemical 131I species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1982-12-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the physico-chemical 131 I species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during 12 months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental 131 I released to the environment. The retention of the 131 I species by iodine filters was also investigated. On an average, 45% of the 131 I discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhaust from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The other 55% consisted almost entirely of organic I. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The physico-chemical I-131 species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1984-02-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the pysico-chemical I-131 species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during four months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental I-131 released to the environment. On an average 13% of the I-131 discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhausts from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The main component was organic-bound I. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  5. Retrofit of existing Dow solidification system at quad cities nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekitis, L.; Jarvis, N.; Petri, R.; Testa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past year ATCOR has been involved in the design, testing and supply of an In-container Mixing System Retrofit for Commonwealth Edison's Quad Cities Nuclear Station Solidification System. The system supplied by DOW, itself a retrofit of a urea formaldehyde system, was based upon use of 50 cubic foot containers (liners). ATCOR's retrofit increased liner capacity to 170 cubic feet and allowed in-cask solidification of highly radioactive material. This paper discusses the reasons for the decision to replace equipment within the originally furnished system and the development of the ATCOR plan to proof-test this equipment prior to delivery at the site. Results of this pre-testing, and a comparison between pre-tested conditions and the actual in-plan start-up tests are presented. Development of improved instrumentation and mechanical modifications which enhance the reliability of the ATCOR/DOW process In-container Mixing System was provided as a part of this project. Test results are presented on instruments, controls and the unique method of mechanical attachment of the Mixing Head to the solidification container

  6. Mechanical properties of chemical vapor deposited coatings for fusion reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullendore, A.W.; Whitley, J.B.; Pierson, H.O.; Mattox, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposited coatings of TiB 2 , TiC and boron on graphite substrates are being developed for application as limiter materials in magnetic confinement fusion reactors. In this application severe thermal shock conditions exist and to do effective thermo-mechanical modelling of the material response it is necessary to acquire elastic moduli, fracture strength and strain to fracture data for the coatings. Four point flexure tests have been conducted from room temperature to 2000 0 C on TiB 2 and boron coated graphite with coatings in tension and compression and the mechanical properties extracted from the load-deflection data. In addition, stress relaxation tests from 500 to 1150 0 C were performed on TiB 2 and TiC coated graphite beams to assess the low levels of plastic deformation which occur in these coatings. Significant differences have been observed between the effective mechanical properties of the coatings and literature values of the bulk properties

  7. Chemical and physical changes at sodium-stainless steel interfaces in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, C K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.

    1977-01-01

    In the sodium loops of a fast reactor, mass transfer occurs due to the interaction of flowing sodium on stainless steel surfaces. Under the non-isothermal conditions prevailing in the loop some elements are preferentially leached from the surface layers of the hot zone and transported by sodium to the cooled zone where deposition may take place. The available information on the mass transport in non-isothermal sodium loops has been summarised, and an attempt has been made to understand the mechanisms involved, of which the chemical reactions at the sodium-stainless steel interface are especially important. The rate of diffusion towards the solid/liquid interface may be the rate-determining step in some of these reactions. When a ferritic surface layer is formed by the selective removal of austenitic stabilizing elements, diffusion of alloying constituents through the ferritic layer limits the growth of this layer. Only when the surface film is adherent, the diffusion across this layer becomes important. NaCrO/sub 2/, for instance, has poor adherence, and a surface film of this compound may not inhibit further corrosion.

  8. Transient heat transfer in a directly-irradiated solar chemical reactor for the thermal dissociation of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Lipinski, W.; Steinfeld, A.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation is carried out in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal dissociation of ZnO at 2000 K using concentrated solar energy. The reactor consists of a cavity-receiver lined with ZnO particles and directly exposed to high-flux irradiation. A transient heat transfer model is formulated to link the rate of radiation, convection, and conduction heat transfer to the reaction kinetics. The radiosity and Monte Carlo methods are applied to obtain the distribution of net radiative fluxes at the internal surfaces of the reactor cavity and at the surface of the ZnO bed. Validation is accomplished in terms of the calculated and measured transient temperature profiles and chemical reaction rates

  9. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion in a packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.; Van Noyen, J.; Larring, Y.; Mccann, M.; Pishahang, M.; Amini, S.; Ortiz, M.; Galluci, F.; Sint-Annaland, M.V.; Tournigant, D.; Louradour, E.; Snijkers, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ilmenite-based oxygen carriers were developed for packed-bed chemical looping. • Addition of Mn_2O_3 increased mechanical strength and microstructure of the carriers. • Oxygen carriers were able to withstand creep and thermal cycling up to 1200 °C. • Ilmenite-based granules are a promising shape for packed-bed reactor conditions. - Abstract: Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture technology where cyclic reduction and oxidation of a metallic oxide, which acts as a solid oxygen carrier, takes place. With this system, direct contact between air and fuel can be avoided, and so, a concentrated CO_2 stream is generated after condensation of the water in the exit gas stream. An interesting reactor system for CLC is a packed bed reactor as it can have a higher efficiency compared to a fluidized bed concept, but it requires other types of oxygen carrier particles. The particles must be larger to avoid a large pressure drop in the reactor and they must be mechanically strong to withstand the severe reactor conditions. Therefore, oxygen carriers in the shape of granules and based on the mineral ilmenite were subjected to thermal cycling and creep tests. The mechanical strength of the granules before and after testing was investigated by crush tests. In addition, the microstructure of these oxygen particles was studied to understand the relationship between the physical properties and the mechanical performance. It was found that the granules are a promising shape for a packed bed reactor as no severe degradation in strength was noticed upon thermal cycling and creep testing. Especially, the addition of Mn_2O_3 to the ilmenite, which leads to the formation of an iron–manganese oxide, seems to results in stronger granules than the other ilmenite-based granules.

  10. Chemical aspects of gadolinium nitrate as soluble nuclear poison in Savannah River Plant reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The aqueous solution chemistry of gadolinium nitrate was studied to identify conditions that interfere with successful cleanup of gadolinium in Savannah River Plant reactor systems. Injecting a gadolinium nitrate solution into the D 2 O coolant-moderator constitutes a supplementary mode of reactor shutdown. The resulting approximately 0.001M gadolinium nitrate solution is then deionized by recirculation through mixed-bed ion exchange resins before reactor operation is resumed

  11. Analysis of Chemical Species Along the Process Stages of Demineralized Water Production at Reactor G.A. Siwabessy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Huda; Setyono; Sumijanto; Diah E L; Ihsan, M.

    2003-01-01

    The tank water of multipurpose reactor G.A. Siwabessy is supplied from a water demineralization plant which works based on ion exchange processes. Controlling the quality of the water produced by this plant is one of many factor which effects the quality of the reactor tank water. This experiment resulted a characteristic pattern data of water and its chemical species content along process stages of demineralized water production at the reactor. The experiment results showed that the pH (degree of acidity), electric conductivity and dissolved cation (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) lied at the permissible range. The value fluctuation of these variables showed a right pattern. It can be concluded that the water produced by this plant met the requirements to be used as primary cooling water of the reactor. However, the value of pH is still too low although it lied in the tolerance limit. Beside that, it isn't all of water impurities concentration can be predicted by the value of pH and conductivity. Therefore, the determination of water quality for the need of reactor tank water quiet to be done continually to keep the water condition in order to meet the quality required, and to evaluate and developed its production technology. (author)

  12. Construction of an experimental simplified model for determining of flow parameters in chemical reactors, using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Paiva, J.A. de.

    1981-03-01

    The development of a simplified experimental model for investigation of nuclear techniques to determine the solid phase parameters in gas-solid flows is presented. A method for the measurement of the solid phase residence time inside a chemical reactor of the type utilised in the cracking process of catalytic fluids is described. An appropriate radioactive labelling technique of the solid phase and the construction of an eletronic timing circuit were the principal stages in the definition of measurement technique. (Author) [pt

  13. The physico-chemical radioiodine species in the exhaust air of a pressurized water reactor (PWR2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1981-12-01

    In a German pressurized water reactor, the physico-chemical 131 I species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during 6 months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental 131 I released to the environment. The retention of the 131 I species by iodine filters was also investigated. 20 to 30% of the 131 I discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the unfiltered exhaust from the chemical laboratory hoods and from the annular compartment. (orig.) [de

  14. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  15. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons; Antimutagenesis de moduladores quimicos contra el dano inducido por neutrones termicos de reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamentos de Materiales Radiactivos, de Biologia, del Reactor y Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  16. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  17. Changes in the dow effects in the romanian foreign exchange market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Stefanescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the changes in the daily seasonality of the Romanian foreign market from January 2005 to February 2010. Our investigation employs data from the prices in the Romanian national currency, of the two main currencies used in the financial transactions: euro and US dollar. For the euro we find evidence of a Monday effect between January 2005 and June 2007, no DOW effect between July 2007 and September 2008, a Tuesday effect between October 2008 and April 2009 and a Thursday effect between May 2009 and February 2010. For the US dollar we identify only a Tuesday effect between October 2008 and April 2009. We relate these changes with the consequences of the Romania’s adhesion to the European Union and with the effects of the global crisis.

  18. The Dow is Killing Me: Risky Health Behaviors and the Stock Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Chad; Dunn, Richard A; Tefft, Nathan

    2015-07-01

    We investigate how risky health behaviors and self-reported health vary with the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) and during stock market crashes. Because stock market indices are leading indicators of economic performance, this research contributes to our understanding of the macroeconomic determinants of health. Existing studies typically rely on the unemployment rate to proxy for economic performance, but this measure captures only one of many channels through which the economic environment may influence individual health decisions. We find that large, negative monthly DJIA returns, decreases in the level of the DJIA, and stock market crashes are widely associated with worsening self-reported mental health and more cigarette smoking, binge drinking, and fatal car accidents involving alcohol. These results are consistent with predictions from rational addiction models and have implications for research on the association between consumption and stock prices. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effect of money supply on the Dow Jones Industrial Average stock index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Širůček

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This focus of this paper are the effects and implications of a change in the money supply for share price indices in the USA during 1959–2011. The money supply will be measured by the M2 and MZM aggregates (money with zero maturity. The US stock market is represented by the Dow Jones Industrial Average index. The objective of this paper is to find, describe and evaluate the effects of changes to the money supply (M2 and MZM on the US stock market. A partial objective of this paper is to determine whether a change in the monetary aggregate shows in the stock index immediately or with a delay of several weeks. Another aim is to determine whether asset prices influence the money supply.

  20. An entropy based analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Index and the TRNA Sentiment series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper features an analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Industrial Average Index (DJIA) and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA)1 provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry Research Centre of the Asia Pacic).

  1. Chemical reaction engineering aspects of a rotary reactor for carbothermal synthesis of SiC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijen, F.K.; Metselaar, R.

    1989-01-01

    Heat transfer in a rotary reactor is described for a reactor consisting of a graphite tube with graphite heating elements, and operating at temperatures between 1773 and 2273 K. Under those conditions heat transfer is very good due to radiation and the high thermal conductivity of graphite. An

  2. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources; Rendimiento de un reactor quimico-nuclear con fuentes radioisotopicas gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguis T, C

    1975-07-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  3. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources; Rendimiento de un reactor quimico-nuclear con fuentes radioisotopicas gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguis T, C

    1975-07-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  4. CFD analysis of bubble hydrodynamics in a fuel reactor for a hydrogen-fueled chemical looping combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harichandan, Atal Bihari; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational study of the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology. • The results yield better understanding of the bubble hydrodynamics in fuel reactor. • Increasing the reactor bed length increases the conversion rate. • Small oxygen carrier particles improves the conversion rate. - Abstract: This study investigates the temporal development of bubble hydrodynamics in the fuel reactor of a hydrogen-fueled chemical looping combustion (CLC) system by using a computational model. The model also investigates the molar fraction of products in gas and solid phases. The study assists in developing a better understanding of the CLC process, which has many advantages such as being a potentially promising candidate for an efficient carbon dioxide capture technology. The study employs the kinetic theory of granular flow. The reactive fluid dynamic system of the fuel reactor is customized by incorporating the kinetics of an oxygen carrier reduction into a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. An Eulerian multiphase treatment is used to describe the continuum two-fluid model for both gas and solid phases. CaSO 4 and H 2 are used as an oxygen carrier and a fuel, respectively. The computational results are validated with the experimental and numerical results available in the open literature. The CFD simulations are found to capture the features of the bubble formation, rise and burst in unsteady and quasi-steady states very well. The results show a significant increase in the conversion rate with higher dense bed height, lower bed width, higher free board height and smaller oxygen carrier particles which upsurge an overall performance of the CLC plant

  5. Hydrogen production by enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol in moving-bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Binlin; Song, Yongchen; Wang, Chao; Chen, Haisheng; Yang, Mingjun; Xu, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New approach on continuous high-purity H 2 produced auto-thermally with long time. • Low-cost NiO/NiAl 2 O 4 exhibited high redox performance to H 2 from glycerol. • Oxidation, steam reforming, WSG and CO 2 capture were combined into a reactor. • H 2 purity of above 90% was produced without heating at 1.5–3.0 S/C and 500–600 °C. • Sorbent regeneration and catalyst oxidization achieved simultaneously in a reactor. - Abstract: The continuous high-purity hydrogen production by the enhanced-sorption chemical looping steam reforming of glycerol based on redox reactions integrated with in situ CO 2 removal has been experimentally studied. The process was carried out by a flow of catalyst and sorbent mixture using two moving-bed reactors. Various unit operations including oxidation, steam reforming, water gas shrift reaction and CO 2 removal were combined into a single reactor for hydrogen production in an overall economic and efficient process. The low-cost NiO/NiAl 2 O 4 catalyst efficiently converted glycerol and steam to H 2 by redox reactions and the CO 2 produced in the process was simultaneously removed by CaO sorbent. The best results with an enriched hydrogen product of above 90% in auto-thermal operation for reforming reactor were achieved at initial temperatures of 500–600 °C and ratios of steam to carbon (S/C) of 1.5–3.0. The results indicated also that not all of NiO in the catalyst can be reduced to Ni by the reaction with glycerol, and the reduced Ni can be oxidized to NiO by air at 900 °C. The catalyst oxidization and sorbent regeneration were achieved under the same conditions in air reactor

  6. Micro flow reactor chips with integrated luminescent chemosensors for spatially resolved on-line chemical reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hoera, Christian; Meier, Robert J; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-10-21

    Real-time chemical reaction monitoring in microfluidic environments is demonstrated using luminescent chemical sensors integrated in PDMS/glass-based microscale reactors. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-PDMS chips of only 150 μm width and of 10 to 35 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polystyrene and an oxygen-sensitive platinum porphyrin probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 4 μm were generated by combining spin coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility and response times. These microchips allowed observation of dissolved oxygen concentration in the range of 0 to over 40 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 368 μg L(-1). The sensor layers were then used for observation of a model reaction, the oxidation of sulphite to sulphate in a microfluidic chemical reactor and could observe sulphite concentrations of less than 200 μM. Real-time on-line monitoring of this chemical reaction was realized at a fluorescence microscope setup with 405 nm LED excitation and CCD camera detection.

  7. Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-01

    CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation

  8. Experimental research subject and renovation of chemical processing facility (CPF) for advanced fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tomozo; Shinozaki, Tadahiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Koma, Yoshikazu; Miyachi, Shigehiko; Ichige, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance economical efficiency, environmental impact and nuclear nonproliferation resistance, the Advanced Reprocessing Technology, such as simplification and optimization of process, and applicability evaluation of the innovative technology that was not adopted up to now, has been developed for the reprocessing of the irradiated fuel taken out from a fast reactor. Renovation of the hot cell interior equipments, establishment and updating of glove boxes, installation of various analytical equipments, etc. in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was done to utilize the CPF more positivity which is the center of the experimental field, where actual fuel can be used, for research and development towards establishment of the Advanced Reprocessing Technology development. The hot trials using the irradiated fuel pins of the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' for studies on improved aqueous reprocessing technology, MA separation technology, dry process technology, etc. are scheduled to be carried out with these new equipments. (author)

  9. Assessment of chemical processes for the post-accident decontamination of reactor-coolant systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.; Divine, J.R.

    1983-02-01

    Previously used chemical decontamination processes and potentially useful new decontamination processes were examined for the usefulness following a reactor accident. Both generic fuel damage accidents and the accident at TMI-2 were considered. A total of fourteen processes were evaluated. Process evaluation included data in the following categories: technical description of the process, recorded past usage, effectiveness, process limitation, safety consideration, and waste management. These data were evaluated, and cost considerations were presented along with a description of the applicability of the process to TMI-2 and development and demonstration needs. Specific recommendations regarding a primary-system decontamination development program to support TMI-2 recovery were also presented

  10. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, H.

    2001-01-01

    JAPC purchased RETRAN, a program for transient thermal hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow system, from the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute in 1992. Since then, JAPC has been utilizing RETRAN to evaluate safety margins of actual plant operation, in coping with troubles (investigating trouble causes and establishing countermeasures), and supporting reactor operation (reviewing operational procedures etc.). In this paper, a result of plant analysis performed on a CVCS reactor primary coolant leakage incident which occurred at JAPC's Tsuruga-2 plant (4-loop PWR, 3423 MWt, 1160 MW) on July 12 of 1999 and, based on the result, we made a plan to modify our operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events in order to make earlier plant shutdown and this reduced primary coolant leakage. (author)

  11. How long the singular value decomposed entropy predicts the stock market? - Evidence from the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rongbao; Shao, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new concept of multi-scales singular value decomposition entropy based on DCCA cross correlation analysis is proposed and its predictive power for the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index is studied. Using Granger causality analysis with different time scales, it is found that, the singular value decomposition entropy has predictive power for the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index for period less than one month, but not for more than one month. This shows how long the singular value decomposition entropy predicts the stock market that extends Caraiani's result obtained in Caraiani (2014). On the other hand, the result also shows an essential characteristic of stock market as a chaotic dynamic system.

  12. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO 2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  13. Coupling of high temperature nuclear reactor with chemical plant by means of steam loop with heat pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeć Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature nuclear reactors (HTR can be used as an excellent, emission-free source of technological heat for various industrial applications. Their outlet helium temperature (700°-900°C allows not only for heat supply to all processes below 600°C (referred to as “steam class”, but also enables development of clean nuclear-assisted hydrogen production or coal liquefaction technologies with required temperatures up to 900°C (referred to as “chemical class”. This paper presents the results of analyses done for various configurations of the steam transport loop coupled with the high-temperature heat pump designed for “chemical class” applications. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the key issues are discussed in comparison with alternative solutions, trying to answer the question whether the system with the steam loop and the hightemperature heat pump is viable and economically justified.

  14. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design

  15. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  16. Reactor operating procedures for start up of continuously operated chemical plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijs, J.W.; Verwijs, J.W.; Kösters, P.H.; van den Berg, Henderikus; Westerterp, K.R.; Kosters, P.G.H.

    1995-01-01

    Rules are presented for the startup of an adiabatic tubular reactor, based on a qualitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of continuously-operated vapor- and liquid-phase processes. The relationships between the process dynamics, operating criteria, and operating constraints are investigated,

  17. A multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of financial market efficiency: Comparison using Dow Jones sector ETF indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aviral Kumar; Albulescu, Claudiu Tiberiu; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2017-10-01

    This study challenges the efficient market hypothesis, relying on the Dow Jones sector Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF) indices. For this purpose, we use the generalized Hurst exponent and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) methods, using daily data over the timespan from 2000 to 2015. We compare the sector ETF indices in terms of market efficiency between short- and long-run horizons, small and large fluctuations, and before and after the global financial crisis (GFC). Our findings can be summarized as follows. First, there is clear evidence that the sector ETF markets are multifractal in nature. We also find a crossover in the multifractality of sector ETF market dynamics. Second, the utilities and consumer goods sector ETF markets are more efficient compared with the financial and telecommunications sector ETF markets, in terms of price prediction. Third, there are noteworthy discrepancies in terms of market efficiency, between the short- and long-term horizons. Fourth, the ETF market efficiency is considerably diminished after the global financial crisis.

  18. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Calloway, B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10 4 rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste

  19. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235 U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited to

  20. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2001-02-27

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited

  1. Comparative Studies on the pH Dependence of DOW of Microcystin-RR and -LR Using LC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaodao Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are well known worldwide as hepatotoxins produced by cyanobacteria, but little is known about the physicochemical properties of these compounds. The dependence of the n-octanol/water distribution ratio (DOW of MC-RR and -LR to pH was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (LC-MS. There was a remarkable difference in such relationships between MC-RR and -LR. The log DOW of MC-LR decreased from 1.63 at pH 1.0 to -1.26 at pH 6.5, and stabilized between -1.04 and -1.56 at a pH of 6.5~12.0; log DOW of MC-RR varied between -1.24 and -0.67 at a pH of 1.00~4.00, and stabilized between -1.20 and -1.54 at a pH of 4.00~12.00. The difference of hydrophobicity in acidic condition between MC-RR and -LR is important, not only for the analytical method of both toxins, but perhaps also for understanding the difference of toxicity to animals between the two toxins.

  2. Chemical modeling of a high-density inductively-coupled plasma reactor containing silane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    We carried out the modeling of chemical reactions in a silane-containing remote Inductively Coupled Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICPECVD) system, intended for deposition of silicon, silicon oxide, and silicon nitride layers. The required electron densities and Electron Energy

  3. Chemical reactions inside the plasma chamber of the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.M.; Ebert, E.; Mazille, F.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant or loss of vacuum accidents may lead to chemical reactions between the protecting materials of the plasma facing components and air or water. A production of energy, reaction products and hydrogen may be induced. The paper defines the operating conditions and chemical reactions and presents the main results from the underlying studies. (orig.)

  4. Chemical elimination of alumina in suspension in nuclear reactors heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, A.

    1967-02-01

    Corrosion of aluminium in contact with moderating water in nuclear reactor leads to the formation of an alumina hydrosol which can have an adverse effect on the operation of the reactor. Several physical methods have been used in an attempt to counteract this effect. The method proposed here consists in the elimination of the aluminium by dissolution and subsequent fixation in the ionic form on mixed-bed ion-exchange resin. In order to do this, the parameters and the values of these parameters most favorable to the dissolution process have been determined. If the moderator is heavy water, the deuterated acid can be prepared by converting a solution in heavy water to a salt of the acid using a deuterated cationic resin. (author) [fr

  5. Biomass characteristics in three sequencing batch reactors treating a wastewater containing synthetic organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Z.Q.; Ferraina, R.A.; Ericson, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    in all reactors. In contrast, effluent 3-nitrobenzoate was recorded when its influent concentration was increased to 5 mg L-1 and dropped only to below 1 mg L-1 after 300 days of operation. The competent (active) biomass fractions for these compounds were between 0.04% and 5.52% of the total biomass...... characteristics in the aerobic SBR and SBBR. While all reactors had very good COD removal (> 90%) and displayed nitrification, substantial nitrogen removal (74%) was only achieved in the anoxic/aerobic SBR. During the entire operational period, benzoate, theophylline and 4-chlorophenol were completely removed...... inferred from substrate-specific microbial enumerations. The measured competent biomass fractions for 4-chlorophenol and 3-nitrobenzoate degradation were significantly lower than the influent COD fractions of these compounds. Correspondent to the highest competent biomass fraction for benzoate degradation...

  6. Alkylation of mixed olefins with isobutane in a stratco chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichailak, M. [ABB Lummus Global Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Hopper, J.R.; Yaws, C.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States); Pike, R.W. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The 17 reaction model for the sulfuric acid alkylation of isobutane with propylene as proposed by Langley and Pike has been used to simulate the effluent refrigeration reactor. The simulation conditions selected to minimize the formation of light and heavy by-product were determined to be: Temperature: 9 - 10 {degrees}C,- Isobutane/Olefin Ratio: 8 - 10; % Volume of Acid: 50 %. The reactor effluent composition from the simulation program has been used to compare with several sets of published data with reasonable agreement. This model has been extrapolated to simulate the alkylation of isobutane with butylenes and amylenes. The model will be optimized with commercial data. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Radionuclide characterization of graphite stacks from plutonium production reactors of the Siberian group of chemical enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushuev, A.V.; Verzilov, Yu.M.; Zubarev, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The residual radionuclide concentrations and distributions in graphite from moderator stack of plutonium production reactors at Tomsk-7 have been investigated. It was found that the dominant activity of graphite is 14 C. To gain information on surface and volume contamination of graphite blocks from the moderator stack, the special sets of samples were collected and assayed. The schemes are proposed for evaluation of individual radionuclide inventories together with results of the evaluations performed. (author)

  8. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, N; Barbosa, R; Lopes, M H; Mendes, B; Abelha, P; Boavida, D; Gulyurtlu, I; Oliveira, J Santos

    2007-08-17

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub-products of such type

  9. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, N. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)]. E-mail: ncsn@fct.unl.pt; Barbosa, R. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Lopes, M.H. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Mendes, B. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Abelha, P. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Gulyurtlu, I. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Oliveira, J. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2007-08-17

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  10. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapa, N.; Barbosa, R.; Lopes, M.H.; Mendes, B.; Abelha, P.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Santos Oliveira, J.

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  11. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  12. Detecting macroeconomic phases in the Dow Jones Industrial Average time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jian Cheng; Lian, Heng; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we perform statistical segmentation and clustering analysis of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJI) time series between January 1997 and August 2008. Modeling the index movements and log-index movements as stationary Gaussian processes, we find a total of 116 and 119 statistically stationary segments respectively. These can then be grouped into between five and seven clusters, each representing a different macroeconomic phase. The macroeconomic phases are distinguished primarily by their volatilities. We find that the US economy, as measured by the DJI, spends most of its time in a low-volatility phase and a high-volatility phase. The former can be roughly associated with economic expansion, while the latter contains the economic contraction phase in the standard economic cycle. Both phases are interrupted by a moderate-volatility market correction phase, but extremely-high-volatility market crashes are found mostly within the high-volatility phase. From the temporal distribution of various phases, we see a high-volatility phase from mid-1998 to mid-2003, and another starting mid-2007 (the current global financial crisis). Transitions from the low-volatility phase to the high-volatility phase are preceded by a series of precursor shocks, whereas the transition from the high-volatility phase to the low-volatility phase is preceded by a series of inverted shocks. The time scale for both types of transitions is about a year. We also identify the July 1997 Asian Financial Crisis to be the trigger for the mid-1998 transition, and an unnamed May 2006 market event related to corrections in the Chinese markets to be the trigger for the mid-2007 transition.

  13. DOW-PR DOlphin and Whale Pods Routing Protocol for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadud, Zahid; Ullah, Khadem; Hussain, Sajjad; Yang, Xiaodong; Qazi, Abdul Baseer

    2018-05-12

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) have intrinsic challenges that include long propagation delays, high mobility of sensor nodes due to water currents, Doppler spread, delay variance, multipath, attenuation and geometric spreading. The existing Weighting Depth and Forwarding Area Division Depth Based Routing (WDFAD-DBR) protocol considers the weighting depth of the two hops in order to select the next Potential Forwarding Node (PFN). To improve the performance of WDFAD-DBR, we propose DOlphin and Whale Pod Routing protocol (DOW-PR). In this scheme, we divide the transmission range into a number of transmission power levels and at the same time select the next PFNs from forwarding and suppressed zones. In contrast to WDFAD-DBR, our scheme not only considers the packet upward advancement, but also takes into account the number of suppressed nodes and number of PFNs at the first and second hops. Consequently, reasonable energy reduction is observed while receiving and transmitting packets. Moreover, our scheme also considers the hops count of the PFNs from the sink. In the absence of PFNs, the proposed scheme will select the node from the suppressed region for broadcasting and thus ensures minimum loss of data. Besides this, we also propose another routing scheme (whale pod) in which multiple sinks are placed at water surface, but one sink is embedded inside the water and is physically connected with the surface sink through high bandwidth connection. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme has high Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR), low energy tax, reduced Accumulated Propagation Distance (APD) and increased the network lifetime.

  14. Radiochemical problems of radiation chemical synthesis in n, γ-field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, V.P.; Frejdus, N.V.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kalyazin, E.P.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    A wide applicability of products of radiation chemical synthesis (RCS), using n, γ-irradiation, is limited by possible contamination of the latter with long-lived radioactive isotopes of chemical elements included in the composition of the reagent and compounds syntesized (chemically non-separable radionuclides - CNR). A technique of the determination of the limit accumulation CNR on the basis of radiation chemical parameters of the synthesis (radiation-chemical yield, the dose rate absorbed, singleness of purpose of RCS etc.) and radiochemical parameters of formation and accumulation of CNR (radiochemical yields of CNR in the products of radiolysis, neutron fluence, the reagent purity etc.) is suggested. The radiochemical evaluation of CNR accumulation (tritium and carbon-14), formed at the expense of activation with neutrons of chemical elements of water and organic substances, consisting of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen has shown that at relatively low yields of final products (> or approximately 3 molecules/100 eV) no accumulation of radionuclides in concentrations reaching the average admissible concentration takes place [ru

  15. An integrated mathematical model for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) including predation and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Marta; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2016-07-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed for modelling a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) under aerobic conditions. The composite model combines the following: (i) a one-dimensional biofilm model, (ii) a bulk liquid model, and (iii) biological processes in the bulk liquid and biofilm considering the interactions among autotrophic, heterotrophic and predator microorganisms. Depending on the values for the soluble biodegradable COD loading rate (SCLR), the model takes into account a) the hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable compounds in the bulk liquid, and b) the growth of predator microorganisms in the bulk liquid and in the biofilm. The integration of the model and the SCLR allows a general description of the behaviour of COD removal by the MBBR under various conditions. The model is applied for two in-series MBBR wastewater plant from an integrated cellulose and viscose production and accurately describes the experimental concentrations of COD, total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen and phosphorous obtained during 14 months working at different SCLRs and nutrient dosages. The representation of the microorganism group distribution in the biofilm and in the bulk liquid allow for verification of the presence of predator microorganisms in the second reactor under some operational conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of improved chemical waste disposal and recovery methods for N reactor fuel fabrication operations: 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, T.L.; Hartley, J.N.

    1984-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory personnel identified and evaluated alternative methods for recovery, recycle, and disposal of waste acids produced during N Reactor fuel operations. This work was conducted under a program sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc.; the program goals were to reduce the volume of liquid waste by rejuvenating and recycling acid solutions and to generate a residual waste low in nitrates, fluorides, and metals. Disposal methods under consideration included nitric acid reclamation, grout encapsulation of final residual waste, nitrogen fertilizer production, biodenitrifaction, chemical or thermal destruction of NO 3 , and short-term impoundment of liquid NO 3 /SO 4 wastes. Preliminary testing indicated that the most feasible and practicable of these alternatives were (1) nitric acid reclamation followed by grouting of residual waste and (2) nitrogen fertilizer production. This report summarizes the investigations, findings, and recommendations for the 1984 fiscal year

  17. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  18. Microbiological and chemical approaches to degradation of mecoprop in a Moving-Bed Biofilm-Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Tue Kjærgaard Nielsen, Tue; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    Micro-pollutants are ubiquitous in wastewater effluents. Therefore, in-situ treatments of highly polluted water or polishing treatments after classical wastewater treatment have been proposed as a solution. Moving Bed Biofilm-Reactors (MBBRs) are a recent-developed biofilm technology for wastewater...... treatment. MBBRs consist incontain biofilms which are grown on small (1-4 cm diameter) plastic chips that are suspended and mixed in a water tank. These systems have been recognized as robust and versatile. Besides, biofilm systems fdescribe acilitatedemonstrate a clear, but slow, biodegradation of some...... recalcitrant compounds. For all these reasonsThus, MBBRs are pointed as a valuable tool for the elimination of micro-pollutants. Several studies have focused in on describing degradation processes in biofilm by quantifying the loss of micro-pollutants over time. This can be helpful foraid optimizing...

  19. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten, E-mail: vogt@umb.ufz.de; Alfreider, Albin [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany); Lorbeer, Helmut [University of Technology Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment (Germany); Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Boehme, Olaf [GFE GmbH Halle (Germany); Weiss, Holger [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany)

    2002-05-15

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L{sup -1}; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found.

  20. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Carsten; Alfreider, Albin; Lorbeer, Helmut; Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd; Boehme, Olaf; Weiss, Holger; Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L -1 ; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found

  1. Chemical and X-ray diffraction analysis on selected samples from the TMI-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleykamp, H.; Pejsa, R.

    1991-05-01

    Selected samples from different positions of the damaged TMI-2 reactor core were investigated by X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The measurements yield the following resolidified phases after cooling: Cd and In depleted Ag absorber material, intermetallic Zr-steel compounds, fully oxidized Zircaloy, UO 2 -ZrO 2 solid solutions and their decomposed phases, and Fe-Al-Cr-Zr spinels. The composition of the phases and their lattice parameters as well as the eutectic and monotectic character can serve as indicators of local temperatures of the core. The reaction sequences are estimated from the heterogeneous equilibria of these phases. The main conclusions are: (1) Liquefaction onset is locally possible by Inconel-Zircaloy and steel-Zircaloy reactions of spacers and absorber guide tubes at 930deg C. However, increased rates of dissolution occur above 1200deg C. (2) UO 2 dissolution in the Inconel-steel-Zircaloy melt starts at 1300deg C with increased rates above 1900deg C. (3) Fuel temperatures in the core centre are increased above 2550deg C, liquid (U,Zr)O 2 is generated. (4) Square UO 2 particles are reprecipitated from the Incoloy-steel-Zircaloy-UO 2 melt during cooling, the remaining metallic melt is oxygen poor; two types of intermetallic phases are formed. (5) Oxidized Fe and Zr and Al 2 O 3 from burnable absorber react to spinels which form a low melting eutectic with the fuel at 1500deg C. The spinel acts as lubricant for fuel transport to the lower reactor plenum above 1500deg C. (6) Ruthenium (Ru-106) is dissolved in the steel phase, antimony (Sb-125) in the α-Ag absorber during liquefaction. (7) Oxidation of the Zircaloy-steel phases takes place mainly in the reflood stage 3 of the accident scenario. (orig.) [de

  2. A Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Processing Design for Production of Molybdenum-99 with Crystalline Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Gary Michael

    Medical radioisotopes are used in tens of millions of procedures every year to detect and image a wide variety of maladies and conditions in the human body. The most widely-used diagnostic radioisotope is technetium-99m, a metastable isomer of technetium-99 that is generated by the radioactive decay of molybdenum-99. For a number of reasons, the supply of molybdenum-99 has become unreliable and the techniques used to produce it have become unattractive. This has spurred the investigation of new technologies that avoid the use of highly enriched uranium to produce molybdenum-99 in the United States, where approximately half of the demand originates. The first goal of this research is to develop a critical nuclear reactor design powered by solid, discrete pins of low enriched uranium. Analyses of single-pin heat transfer and whole-core neutronics are performed to determine the required specifications. Molybdenum-99 is produced directly in the fuel of this reactor and then extracted through a series of chemical processing steps. After this extraction, the fuel is left in an aqueous state. The second goal of this research is to describe a process by which the uranium may be recovered from this spent fuel solution and reconstituted into the original fuel form. Fuel recovery is achieved through a crystallization step that generates solid uranyl nitrate hexahydrate while leaving the majority of fission products and transuranic isotopes in solution. This report provides background information on molybdenum-99 production and crystallization chemistry. The previously unknown thermal conductivity of the fuel material is measured. Following this is a description of the modeling and calculations used to develop a reactor concept. The operational characteristics of the reactor core model are analyzed and reported. Uranyl nitrate crystallization experiments have also been conducted, and the results of this work are presented here. Finally, a process flow scheme for uranium

  3. Chemical interactions of reactor core materials up to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Hagen, S.; Schanz, G.; Skokan, A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes which chemical interactions may occur in a LWR fuel rod bundle containing (Ag, In, Cd) absorber rods or (Al 2 O 3 /B 4 C) burnable poison rods with increasing temperature up to the complete melting of the components and the formed reaction products. The kinetics of the most important chemical interactions has been investigated and the results are described. In most cases the reaction products have lower melting points or ranges than the original components. This results in a relocation of liquefied components often far below their melting points. There exist three distinct temperature regimes in which liquid phases can form in the core in differently large quantities. These temperature regimes are described in detail. The phase relations in the important ternary (U, Zr, O) system have been extensively studied. The effect of steel constituents on the phase relations is given in addition. All the considerations are focused on PWR conditions only. (orig.) [de

  4. Influences of in-fuel physical-chemical processes on serviceability of energy reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibilashvili, Yu K; Nekrasova, G A; Sukhanov, G I

    1989-01-01

    In-fuel physico-chemical processes and their effect on stress corrosion cracking of fuel element zirconium cladding are considered in the review. The mechanism of fission product release from the fuel is studied and the negative role of primarily iodine on the cladding corrosion process is demonstrated. Directions for improving the fuel element claddings and fuel to increase the fuel element serviceability are specified.

  5. Influences of in-fuel physical-chemical processes on serviceability of energy reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Nekrasova, G.A.; Sukhanov, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    In-fuel physico-chemical processes and their effect on stress corrosion cracking of fuel element zirconium cladding are considered in the review. The mechanism of fission product release from the fuel is studied and the negative role of primarily iodine on the cladding corrosion process is demonstrated. Directions for improving the fuel element claddings and fuel to increase the fuel element serviceability are specified

  6. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2011-01-01

    Cementation is a very useful process to solidify radioactive wastes. Depending on the waste it can be necessary to use of chemical additives (admixtures) to improve the cementation process and its product. Admixtures are materials, other than cement, aggregate and water, that are added either before or during the mixing to alter some properties, such as workability, curing temperature range, and setting time. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. In this changeable scenario it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their characteristics. In this research the effects of chemical admixtures in the solidification process has been studied. For the tests it was prepared a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste, cemented by two different formulations, and three chemical admixtures from two manufacturers. The tested admixtures were accelerators, set retarders and super plasticizers. The experiments were organized by a planning factorial 23 to quantify the effects of formulations, of the admixtures, its quantity and manufacturer in properties of the paste and products. The measured parameters were the density, the viscosity and the setting time of the paste, and the product compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  7. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  8. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase chemical kinetics under tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow reactor for simulating the interaction in the troposphere is set forth. A first reactant mixed with a carrier gas is delivered from a pump and flows through a duct having louvers therein. The louvers straighten out the flow, reduce turbulence and provide laminar flow discharge from the duct. A second reactant delivered from a source through a pump is input into the flowing stream, the second reactant being diffused through a plurality of small diffusion tubes to avoid disturbing the laminar flow. The commingled first and second reactants in the carrier gas are then directed along an elongated duct where the walls are spaced away from the flow of reactants to avoid wall interference, disturbance or turbulence arising from the walls. A probe connected with a measuring device can be inserted through various sampling ports in the second duct to complete measurements of the first and second reactants and the product of their reaction at selected XYZ locations relative to the flowing system.

  9. Chemical and toxicological characterization of slurry reactor biotreatment of explosives-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.

    1998-08-01

    Treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil in the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) soil slurry bioreactor (SSBR) eliminated detectable TNT but left trace levels of residual monoamino and diamino metabolites under some reactor operating conditions. The reduction of solvent-extractable bacterial mutagenicity in the TNT-contaminated soil was substantial and was similar to that achieved by static pile composts at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA) field demonstration. Aquatic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia from TNT in the leachates of TNT-contaminated soil was eliminated in the leachates of JAAP SSBR product soil. The toxicity of soil product leachates to Ceriodaphnia dubia was reasonably predicted using the specific toxicities of the components detected, weighted by their leachate concentrations. In samples where TNT metabolites were observed in the soil product and its leachates, this method determined that the contribution to predicted toxicity values was dominated by trace amounts of the diamino-metabolites, which are very toxic to ceriodaphnia dubia. When the SSBR operating conditions reduced the concentrations of TNT metabolites in the product soils and their leachates to undetectable concentrations, the main contributors to predicted aquatic toxicity values appeared to be molasses residues, potassium, and bicarbonate. Potassium and bicarbonate are beneficial or benign to the environment, and molasses residues are substantially degraded in the environment. Exotoxins, pathogenic bacteria, inorganic particles, ammonia, and dissolved metals did not appear to be important to soil product toxicity.

  10. Characterization and modeling of the thermal hydraulic and chemical environment of fuel claddings of PWR reactors during boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurised water reactors (PWR), nucleate boiling can strongly influence the oxidation rate of the fuel cladding. To improve our understanding of the effect of the boiling phenomenon on corrosion kinetics, information about the chemical and thermal hydraulic boundary conditions at the heating rod surface is needed. Moreover, very few data are available in the range of thermal hydraulic parameters of PWR cores (15,5 MPa and 340 deg C) concerning the two-phase flow pattern close to the fuel cladding. A visualization device has been adapted on an out-of-pile loop Reggae to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data. These observations provide a direct access to the geometrical properties of the vapor inclusions, the onset of nucleate boiling and the gas velocity and trajectory. An image processing method has been validated to measure both void fraction and interfacial area concentration in a bubbly two-phase flow. Thus, the visualization device proves to be a suitable and accurate instrumentation to characterize nucleate boiling in PWR conditions. The experimental results analysis indicates that a local approach is needed for the modelling of the fuel rod chemical environment. To simulate the chemical additives enrichment, a new model is proposed where the vapor bubbles are now considered as physical obstacles for the liquid access to the rod surface. The influence of the two-phase flow pattern appears to be of major importance for the enrichment phenomenon. This study clearly demonstrates the existence of strong interactions between the two-phase flow pattern, the rod surface condition, the corrosion process and the water chemistry. (author)

  11. Reactor component chemical decontamination-developments in waste handling and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papesch, R.; Atwood, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Because of restrictive limits on man-rem exposure in European nuclear plants, a company has developed and applied a number of chemical decontamination techniques for components that must be periodically maintained. These techniques are particularly effective for components that can be placed in a decontamination bath for dose reduction prior to performing maintenance. The cleaning technique has the ability to achieve decontamination factors of at least 20 and in some cases much greater. For components with before cleaning dose rates of between 1 to as high as 80 R/hr, significant man-rem reductions are achieved when hundreds of manhours may be required to complete required component maintenance. Transferring this solvent technology to the U.S. required a program to develop solidification formulas to allow the solvent wastes to be disposed of in accordance with regulations and in a cost effective manner. This paper demonstrates in chemical decontaminations with small liquid volume systems that concentrated decontamination solvents can be employed to achieve high decontamination factors

  12. National demonstration of full reactor coolant system (RCS) chemical decontamination at Indian Point 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovato, S.A.; Parry, J.O. [Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Key to the safe and efficient operation of the nation`s civilian nuclear power plants is the performance of maintenance activities within regulations and guidelines for personnel radiation exposure. However, maintenance activities, often performed in areas of relatively high radiation fields, will increase as the nation`s plant age. With the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) lowering the allowable radiation exposure to plant workers in 1994 and considering further reductions and regulations in the future, it is imperative that new techniques be developed and applied to reduce personnel exposure. Full primary system chemical decontamination technology offers the potential to be single most effective method of maintaining workers exposure {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) while greatly reducing plant operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. A three-phase program underway since 1987, has as its goal to demonstrate that full RCS decontamination is a visible technology to reduce general plant radiation levels without threatening the long term reliability and operability of a plant. This paper discusses research leading to and plans for a National Demonstration of Full RCS Chemical Decontamination at Indian Point 2 nuclear generating station in 1995.

  13. Volatility Transmission Between Dow Jones Stock Index And Emerging Islamic Stock Index: Case Of Subprime Financial Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Saadaoui

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the recent global crisis, the stock shocks are distributed and transmitted from their homes in the developed stock market to emerging stock markets. By supporting the development of emerging stock markets, this study aims to see the transmission of volatility between the Dow Jones stock index and the Dow Jones emerging Islamic stock indiex. In this study we have divided the period into three, periods, before, during and after this crisis to demonstrate the resilience of the Islamic market index in response to the global financial crisis. Another aim of this study is to provide a new guide line for investors in emerging stock market before making investment decisions. The data are daily, going from 02/01/2005 until 31/12/2012. To measure the transmission we used bivariate BEKK-GARCH and DCC-GARCH model. The result shows that there is a transmission mainly during the crisis period which means that the crisis affects all the financial assets whether Islamic or not. The same result also shows the preference to invest in both Islamic and classical stock indexes since they are less risky.

  14. Chemical dosimetry of the RA reactor at Vinca, Yugoslavia; Hemijska dozimetrija reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, O; Markovic, V; Radak, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    The ten-year work on in-pile chemical dosimetry of the Radiation chemistry Department at the Boris Kidric Institute at Vinca is reviewed. As an introduction, the general theory of the dosimetry of two-component radiation field is given and the uses of the derived equations in calorimetry and chemical dosimetry have been discussed. The chemical systems worked out for the in-pile use: solid oxalic acid and their solutions in light and heavy water, are then described and also the procedures of their use. The latter two are treated as a double system particularly suitable for two-component radiation fields. Finally, the limitations in use are discussed and some other systems, the study of which is in progress, mentioned (malonic and succinic acid) (author) [Serbo-Croat] Merenje energije koju apsorbuje sistem izlozen zracenju sastavni je deo svakog radijaciono-hemijskog eksperimenta. Time se moze objasniti veliki interes za koriscenje postojecih i razvijanje novih metoda dozimetrije u laboratorijama koje se bave radijacionom hemijom. Poslednjih godina posebna paznja se posvecuje dozimetriji vrlo visokih doza (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} mrad) narocito onih sa kojima se radi u polju mesovitog zracenja reaktora. U laboratoriji za radijacionu hemiju Instituta 'Boris Kidric' u Vinci na dozimetriji zracenja reaktorskog jezgra radi se vec skoro 10 godina. Ta aktivnost je deo rada na hemijskoj dozimetriji uopste, kojom se bavi ova laboratorija od svog postanka (kraj 1955. godine). Sa radom na dozimetriji kod nas otpocelo se u periodu prvog podizanja na snagu reaktora RA, krajem 1959. godine. Paralelno su razvijane i primenjivane i hemijske i kalorimetrijske metode i njima vrsena dozimetrijska kalibracija reaktora. U ovom radu ucestvovalo je vise istrazivaca iz Laboratorije za radijacionu hemiju uz tesnu saradnju sa reaktorskim fizicarima i osobljem reaktora RA. Cilj ovog napisa je da sumira nas rad na hemijskoj dozimetriji reaktora. Pri tom se, najpre, zeli da ukaze na sustinu

  15. Washing of gel particles in wet chemical manufacture of reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, H.

    1980-07-01

    In the manufacture of HTR fuel particles and particles of fertile material by wet chemical methods, the ammonium nitrate formed during the precipitation reaction must be washed out of the gel particles. This washing process has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A counter-current washer has been developed which in particular takes account of the aspects of refabrication - such as compact construction and minimum waste. A counter-current washing column of 17 mm internal diameter and 640 mm length gives to gel particle throughput of 0.65 1/h. The volume ratio of wash water to gel particles is 5, and the residual nitrate concentration in the particles is 7 x 10 -3 mols of NO - 3 /1. (orig.) [de

  16. Chemical Looping Combustion of Hematite Ore with Methane and Steam in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bayham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical looping combustion is considered an indirect method of oxidizing a carbonaceous fuel, utilizing a metal oxide oxygen carrier to provide oxygen to the fuel. The advantage is the significantly reduced energy penalty for separating out the CO2 for reuse or sequestration in a carbon-constrained world. One of the major issues with chemical looping combustion is the cost of the oxygen carrier. Hematite ore is a proposed oxygen carrier due to its high strength and resistance to mechanical attrition, but its reactivity is rather poor compared to tailored oxygen carriers. This problem is further exacerbated by methane cracking, the subsequent deposition of carbon and the inability to transfer oxygen at a sufficient rate from the core of the particle to the surface for fuel conversion to CO2. Oxygen needs to be readily available at the surface to prevent methane cracking. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of steam to overcome this issue and improve the conversion of the natural gas to CO2, as well as to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD validation. The steam will gasify the deposited carbon to promote the methane conversion. This work studies the performance of hematite ore with methane and steam mixtures in a 5 cm fluidized bed up to approximately 140 kPa. Results show an increased conversion of methane in the presence of steam (from 20–45% without steam to 60–95% up to a certain point, where performance decreases. Adding steam allows the methane conversion to carbon dioxide to be similar to the overall methane conversion; it also helped to prevent carbon accumulation from occurring on the particle. In general, the addition of steam to the feed gas increased the methane conversion. Furthermore, the addition of steam caused the steam methane reforming reaction to form more hydrogen and carbon monoxide at higher steam and methane concentrations, which was not completely converted at higher concentrations and

  17. A two-cavity reactor for solar chemical processes: heat transfer model and application to carbothermic reduction of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieckert, Christian; Palumbo, Robert; Frommherz, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    A 5 kW two-cavity beam down reactor for the solar thermal decomposition of ZnO with solid carbon has been developed and tested in a solar furnace. Initial exploratory experiments show that it operates with a solar to chemical energy conversion efficiency of about 15% when the solar flux entering the reactor is 1300 kW/m 2 , resulting in a reaction chamber temperature of about 1500 K. The solid products have a purity of nearly 100% Zn. Furthermore, the reactor has been described by a numerical model that combines radiant and conduction heat transfer with the decomposition kinetics of the ZnO-carbon reaction. The model is based on the radiosity exchange method. For a given solar input, the model estimates cavity temperatures, Zn production rates, and the solar to chemical energy conversion efficiency. The model currently makes use of two parameters which are determined from the experimental results: conduction heat transfer through the reactor walls enters the model as a lumped term that reflects the conduction loss during the experiments, and the rate of the chemical reaction includes an experimentally determined term that reflects the effective amount of ZnO and CO participating in the reactor. The model output matches well the experimentally determined cavity temperatures. It suggests that reactors built with this two-cavity concept already on this small scale can reach efficiencies exceeding 25%, if operated with a higher solar flux or if one can reduce conduction heat losses through better insulation and if one can maintain or improve the effective amount of ZnO and CO that participates in the reaction

  18. Operation of the NETL Chemical Looping Reactor with Natural Gas and a Novel Copper-Iron Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Douglas [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Bayham, Samuel [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Weber, Justin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-02-21

    The proposed Clean Power Plan requires CO2 emission reductions of 30% by 2030 and further reductions are targeted by 2050. The current strategies to achieve the 30% reduction targets do not include options for coal. However, the 2016 Annual Energy Outlook suggests that coal will continue to provide more electricity than renewable sources for many regions of the country in 2035. Therefore, cost effective options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel power plants are vital in order to achieve greenhouse gas reduction targets beyond 2030. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Combustion Program, the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Research and Innovation Center (NETL R&IC) is investigating the feasibility of a novel combustion concept in which the GHG emissions can be significantly reduced. This concept involves burning fuel and air without mixing these two reactants. If this concept is technically feasible, then CO2 emissions can be significantly reduced at a much lower cost than more conventional approaches. This indirect combustion concept has been called Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) because an intermediate material (i.e., a metal-oxide) is continuously cycled to oxidize the fuel. This CLC concept is the focus of this research and will be described in more detail in the following sections. The solid material that is used to transport oxygen is called an oxygen carrier material. The cost, durability, and performance of this material is a key issue for the CLC technology. Researchers at the NETL R&IC have developed an oxygen carrier material that consists of copper, iron, and alumina. This material has been tested extensively using lab scale instruments such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical attrition (ASTM D5757), and small fluidized bed reactor tests. This report will describe the results from a realistic, circulating, proof-of-concept test that was

  19. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  20. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponza, Delia Teresa, E-mail: delya.sponza@deu.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Dokuz Eyluel University, Buca Kaynaklar Campus, Tinaztepe, 35160 Izmir (Turkey); Demirden, Pinar, E-mail: pinar.demirden@kozagold.com [Environmental Engineer, Koza Gold Company, Environmental Department, Ovacik, Bergama Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  1. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Demirden, Pinar

    2010-01-01

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  2. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated on the surfaces of the channels periodically adsorbs oxygen from air and releases it to oxidize the fuel. A one-dimensional model is also developed in part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103). This paper presents the simulation results based on the base-case design parameters. The results indicate that both the fuel conversion efficiency and the carbon separation efficiency are close to unity. Because of the relatively low reduction rate of copper oxide, fuel conversion occurs gradually from the inlet to the exit. A total of 99.9% of the fuel is converted within 75% of the channel, leading to 25% redundant length near the exit, to ensure robustness. In the air sector, the OC is rapidly regenerated while consuming a large amount of oxygen from air. Velocity fluctuations are observed during the transition between sectors because of the complete reactions of OCs. The gas temperature increases monotonically from 823 to 1315 K, which is mainly determined by the solid temperature, whose variations with time are limited within 20 K. The overall energy in the solid phase is balanced between the reaction heat release, conduction, and convective cooling. In the sensitivity analysis, important input parameters are identified and varied around their base-case values. The resulting changes in the model-predicted performance revealed that the most important parameters are the reduction kinetics, the operating pressure, and the feed stream temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Design guide for category II reactors light and heavy water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in the ERDA Manual, requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification operation, maintainance, and decommissioning of DOW-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guide and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of Category II reactor structure, components, and systems

  4. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloshenko, I. A.; Tsiolko, V. V.; Pogulay, S. S.; Terent'yeva, A. G.; Bazhenov, V. Yu; Shchedrin, A. I.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Kuzmichev, A. I.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2 O5 and NO3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm-3. It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2O5 and NO3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of silicon under reduced pressure in a hot-wall reactor: Equilibrium and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlais, F.; Hottier, F.; Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon chemical vapour deposition (SiH 2 Cl 2 /H 2 system), under reduced pressure conditions, in a hot-wall reactor, is presented. The vapour phase composition is assessed by evaluating two distinct equilibria. The homogeneous equilibrium , which assumes that the vapour phase is not in equilibrium with solid silicon, is thought to give an adequate description of the vapour phase in the case of low pressure, high gas velocities, good temperature homogeneity conditions. A comparison with heterogeneous equilibrium enables us to calculate the supersaturation so evidencing a highly irreversible growth system. The experimental determination of the growth rates reveals two distinct temperature ranges: below 1000 0 C, polycrystalline films are usually obtained with a thermally activated growth rate (+40 kcal mole -1 ) and a reaction order, with respect to the predominant species SiCl 2 , close to one; above 1000 0 C, the films are always monocrystalline and their growth rate exhibits a much lower or even negative activation energy, the reaction order in SiCl 2 remaining about one. (orig.)

  6. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloshenko, I A; Tsiolko, V V; Pogulay, S S; Terent'yeva, A G; Bazhenov, V Yu; Shchedrin, A I; Ryabtsev, A V; Kuzmichev, A I

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm -3 . It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values

  7. Sodium--sulphur battery system. Annual report, May 19, 1975--May 19, 1976. [Dow Chemical U. S. A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, C.A.

    1976-11-01

    The development of the hollow-glass-fiber sodium--sulfur battery progressed significantly. Glass fiber quality improved greatly, and the fiber spinning and assembly machinery was made capable of more uniform operation. Impurities in the sulfur, including H, C, Zn/sup + +/, and Al/sup + + +/, do not appear to affect cell lifetime, while impurities in the Na are important. The Ca and ''oxide'' contents of the Na must be held to low levels. Corrosion products of a 316 stainless steel case are harmless to at least 75-day lifetimes. The Mg content of aluminum alloys can leach out in the catholyte and cause cell resistance to increase. Lifetime does not seem to be a function of total current passed or current density across the fibers. On 1000-fiber, 0.5-Ah cells, over 1400 deep charge--discharge cycles were achieved in 75 days of operating life. A larger 5-Ah cell went through 130 cycles at over 80 percent depth. Cell resistance and capacity remained constant, even at the /sup 1///sub 2/ hour rate. At lesser depths of discharge, the cells lasted longer. Failure was usually in the fibers when ''dirty'' Na was used, and usually just below the tube sheet when ''clean'' Na was used. An updated estimate of ''cost for sale'' of the bare cell is approximately $23.15 per kWh, based on 0.8-kWh cells. 21 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Studying Human Resource Information Systems Implementation using Adaptive Structuration Theory: The Case of an HRIS Implementation at Dow Chemical Company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Chiemeke, Charles C.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    2009-01-01

    Research on Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS) implementation lacks theoretical depth and richness. For that reason this paper applies a theory to HRIS implementation developed by Gerardine DeSanctis and Marshal Scott Poole originally for studying information systems implementation, namely

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of the use a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water-splitting cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved 'steam' parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625degC and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600degC. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the 'nuclear' heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of

  10. FY 1998 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. Development of ocean-based artificial deep ocean water (DOW) upwelling devices and researches into enhancement of productivity of surface waters, CO2 fixation and biological effects of DOW; 1998 nendo yojo kaiyo shinsosui shusui system no kaihatsu to kaiyo hiyokuka, nisanka tanso kyushu oyobi seibutsu koka no kenkyu kaihatsu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The R and D project is implemented for design, fabrication and installation of ocean-based artificial deep ocean water (DOW) upwelling devices which can take DOW at low cost in an ocean; experiments for enhancing productivity of ocean by adding DOW using mesocosms; and studying the biological effects of DOW for keeping freshness of marine products. DOW is successfully taken by the upwelling system from a depth of 800 m in a sea area 2,000 m or more in depth. The system has worked to perform its functions even when attacked by typhoons, which caused wave height of 10 m or more. For enhancing productivity of ocean, the culture experiments are conducted in a small-size, on-shore tank, and the mesocosm experiments in a harbor. The results indicate that addition of DOW increases the phytoplankton phase and its quantity. It is also observed that addition of iron ion further accelerates the fertilizing effect. The results of the experiments conducted in a harbor also indicate that DOW has the fertilizing effect, even in a very small quantity, increasing quantity of small zooplankton. No definite effect of DOW, liquid or ice, is observed for keeping freshness of sliced raw sea bream and bonito. (NEDO)

  11. Micro structured reactors for synthesis/decomposition of hazardous chemicals. Challenging prospects for micro structured reaction architectures (4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebrov, E.V.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    A review. This paper completes a series of four publications dealing with the different aspects of the applications of micro reactor technol. This article focuses on the application of micro structured reactors in the processes for synthesis/decompn. of hazardous chems., such as unsym.

  12. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) to more..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) more...

  13. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

  14. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  15. Modelling the chemical behaviour of tellurium species in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor cooling system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Gonzalez, C.

    1991-07-01

    This state of the art report contains information on the behaviour of tellurium and its compounds in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor coolant system under light water reactor severe accident conditions. To characterise tellurium behaviour, it is necessary the previous knowledge of the species of tellurium released from the core, and simultaneity of its release with that of other materials which can alter the transport, for instance, control rod and structural materials. Release and transport experiments have been reviewed along with the models implemented in the codes which are used in the international community: TRAPMELT, RAFT, VICTORIA and SOPHIE. From the experiments, it can be concluded that other species different to Te 2 , such as tin telluride and cesium telluride, may be released from the fuel. That is why they must be considered in the transport phenomena. There is also experimental evidence of the strong interaction of Te 2 with Inconel 600 and stainless steel of the pipe walls and structures, however this strong interaction is in competition with the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, which under severe accident conditions may represent an area greater than that of the primary system. It is for the absence of significant tellurium species in the transport models, and also for the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, for which some codes show the greatest deficiencies

  16. Exergy analysis of a system using a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, M.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M. A.; Pioro, I

    2007-01-01

    The power generation efficiency of nuclear plants is mainly determined by the permissible temperatures and pressures of the nuclear reactor fuel and coolants. These parameters are limited by materials properties and corrosion rates and their effect on nuclear reactor safety. The advanced materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ steam as a coolant and heat carrier, permit the increased steam parameters (outlet temperature up to 625 degree C and pressure of about 25 MPa). Supercritical water-cooled (SCW) nuclear power plants are expected to increase the power generation efficiency from 35 to 45%. Supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors can be linked to thermochemical water splitting cycles for hydrogen production. An increased steam temperature from the nuclear reactor makes it also possible to utilize its energy in thermochemical water splitting cycles. These cycles are considered by many as one of the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require a heat supply at the temperatures over 550-600 degree C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump which increases the temperature the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. A high temperature chemical heat pump which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with a SCW nuclear plant on one side and thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature level of the 'nuclear' heat and, thus, the intensity of

  17. Research and development on chemical reactors made of industrial structural materials and hydriodic acid concentration technique for thermochemical hydrogen production IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Shinji; Iwatsuki, Jin; Takegami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Seiji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Noguchi, Hiroki; Kamiji, Yu; Onuki, Kaoru

    2015-10-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a study on IS process for thermochemical hydrogen production in order to develop massive hydrogen production technology for hydrogen society. Integrity of the chemical reactors and concentration technology of hydrogen iodide in HIx solution were studied. In the former study, the chemical reactors were trial-fabricated using industrial materials. A test of 30 times of thermal cycle test under circulating condition of the Bunsen reaction solution showed integrity of the Bunsen reactor made of fluororesin lined steel. Also, 100 hours of reaction tests showed integrity of the sulfuric acid decomposer made of silicon carbide and of the hydrogen iodide decomposer made of Hastelloy C-276. In the latter study, concerning electro-electrodialysis using cation-exchange membrane, sulfuric acid in the anolyte had little influence on the concentration performance. These results suggest the purification system of HIx solution can be simplified. Based on the Nernst-Planck equation and the Smoluchowski equation, proton transport number, water permeance, and IR drop of the cation exchange membrane were formulated. The derived equations enable quantitative estimation for the performance indexes of Nafion ® membrane and, also, of ETFE-St membranes made by radiation-induced graft polymerization method. (author)

  18. Design of a multi-model observer-based estimator for Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI strategy: application to a chemical reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chetouani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a FDI strategy for nonlinear dynamic systems. It shows a methodology of tackling the fault detection and isolation issue by combining a technique based on the residuals signal and a technique using the multiple Kalman filters. The usefulness of this combination is the on-line implementation of the set of models, which represents the normal mode and all dynamics of faults, if the statistical decision threshold on the residuals exceeds a fixed value. In other cases, one Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is enough to estimate the process state. After describing the system architecture and the proposed FDI methodology, we present a realistic application in order to show the technique's potential. An algorithm is described and applied to a chemical process like a perfectly stirred chemical reactor functioning in a semi-batch mode. The chemical reaction used is an oxido reduction one, the oxidation of sodium thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Temporal development and chemical efficiency of positive streamers in a large scale wire-plate reactor as a function of voltage waveform parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winands, G. J. J.; Liu, Z.; Pemen, A. J. M.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Yan, K.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper a large-scale pulsed corona system is described in which pulse parameters such as pulse rise-time, peak voltage, pulse width and energy per pulse can be varied. The chemical efficiency of the system is determined by measuring ozone production. The temporal and spatial development of the discharge streamers is recorded using an ICCD camera with a shortest exposure time of 5 ns. The camera can be triggered at any moment starting from the time the voltage pulse arrives on the reactor, with an accuracy of less than 1 ns. Measurements were performed on an industrial size wire-plate reactor. The influence of pulse parameters like pulse voltage, DC bias voltage, rise-time and pulse repetition rate on plasma generation was monitored. It was observed that for higher peak voltages, an increase could be seen in the primary streamer velocity, the growth of the primary streamer diameter, the light intensity and the number of streamers per unit length of corona wire. No significant separate influence of DC bias voltage level was observed as long as the total reactor voltage (pulse + DC bias) remained constant and the DC bias voltage remained below the DC corona onset. For those situations in which the plasma appearance changed (e.g. different streamer velocity, diameter, intensity), a change in ozone production was also observed. The best chemical yields were obtained for low voltage (55 kV), low energetic pulses (0.4 J/pulse): 60 g (kWh)-1. For high voltage (86 kV), high energetic pulses (2.3 J/pulse) the yield decreased to approximately 45 g (kWh)-1, still a high value for ozone production in ambient air (RH 42%). The pulse repetition rate has no influence on plasma generation and on chemical efficiency up to 400 pulses per second.

  20. Temporal development and chemical efficiency of positive streamers in a large scale wire-plate reactor as a function of voltage waveform parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winands, G J J [EPS Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Liu, Z [EPS Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Pemen, A J M [EPS Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Heesch, E J M van [EPS Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Yan, K [EPS Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, E M van [EPG Group, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-07-21

    In this paper a large-scale pulsed corona system is described in which pulse parameters such as pulse rise-time, peak voltage, pulse width and energy per pulse can be varied. The chemical efficiency of the system is determined by measuring ozone production. The temporal and spatial development of the discharge streamers is recorded using an ICCD camera with a shortest exposure time of 5 ns. The camera can be triggered at any moment starting from the time the voltage pulse arrives on the reactor, with an accuracy of less than 1 ns. Measurements were performed on an industrial size wire-plate reactor. The influence of pulse parameters like pulse voltage, DC bias voltage, rise-time and pulse repetition rate on plasma generation was monitored. It was observed that for higher peak voltages, an increase could be seen in the primary streamer velocity, the growth of the primary streamer diameter, the light intensity and the number of streamers per unit length of corona wire. No significant separate influence of DC bias voltage level was observed as long as the total reactor voltage (pulse + DC bias) remained constant and the DC bias voltage remained below the DC corona onset. For those situations in which the plasma appearance changed (e.g. different streamer velocity, diameter, intensity), a change in ozone production was also observed. The best chemical yields were obtained for low voltage (55 kV), low energetic pulses (0.4 J/pulse): 60 g (kWh){sup -1}. For high voltage (86 kV), high energetic pulses (2.3 J/pulse) the yield decreased to approximately 45 g (kWh){sup -1}, still a high value for ozone production in ambient air (RH 42%). The pulse repetition rate has no influence on plasma generation and on chemical efficiency up to 400 pulses per second.

  1. Temporal development and chemical efficiency of positive streamers in a large scale wire-plate reactor as a function of voltage waveform parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winands, G J J; Liu, Z; Pemen, A J M; Heesch, E J M van; Yan, K; Veldhuizen, E M van

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a large-scale pulsed corona system is described in which pulse parameters such as pulse rise-time, peak voltage, pulse width and energy per pulse can be varied. The chemical efficiency of the system is determined by measuring ozone production. The temporal and spatial development of the discharge streamers is recorded using an ICCD camera with a shortest exposure time of 5 ns. The camera can be triggered at any moment starting from the time the voltage pulse arrives on the reactor, with an accuracy of less than 1 ns. Measurements were performed on an industrial size wire-plate reactor. The influence of pulse parameters like pulse voltage, DC bias voltage, rise-time and pulse repetition rate on plasma generation was monitored. It was observed that for higher peak voltages, an increase could be seen in the primary streamer velocity, the growth of the primary streamer diameter, the light intensity and the number of streamers per unit length of corona wire. No significant separate influence of DC bias voltage level was observed as long as the total reactor voltage (pulse + DC bias) remained constant and the DC bias voltage remained below the DC corona onset. For those situations in which the plasma appearance changed (e.g. different streamer velocity, diameter, intensity), a change in ozone production was also observed. The best chemical yields were obtained for low voltage (55 kV), low energetic pulses (0.4 J/pulse): 60 g (kWh) -1 . For high voltage (86 kV), high energetic pulses (2.3 J/pulse) the yield decreased to approximately 45 g (kWh) -1 , still a high value for ozone production in ambient air (RH 42%). The pulse repetition rate has no influence on plasma generation and on chemical efficiency up to 400 pulses per second

  2. CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping combustion with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU)—Experiments in a continuously operating fluidized-bed reactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Rydé n, Magnus; Lyngfelt, Anders; Mattisson, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Particles of the perovskite material CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 has been examined as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling, and for chemical-looping combustion of natural gas, by 70h of experiments in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor

  3. Program of chemical research organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R

    1961-07-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  4. Program of chemical research on organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  5. Organic chemistry and radiochemistry: study of chemical interactions between iodine and paint of French nuclear reactor in a severe accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aujollet, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In Phebus (French in pile facility; PWR scale 1/5000) experiments, performed by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, few quantities of organic iodides were registered after interaction between iodine and reactor containment paint. This study concerns all mechanisms of chemical reactions between iodine and the polymer of the paint in order to estimate the organic iodides released from the paint. At first, all the paint components had been identified. Several models of chemical sites of the polymer were synthesized and tested with iodine in different conditions of temperature and radiation. These experiments showed interactions between iodine and secondary or tertiary amines by charge transfer. In few cases, the complex of tertiary amines creates oxidation reactions. (author)

  6. The physico-chemical 131I species in the stack exhaust air of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1982-07-01

    In the stack exhaust air of a German boiling water reactor, the fractions of elemental, particulate and organic 131 I were determined over a period of three years. The average fraction of elemental 131 I, which is decisive for the ingestion dose, was about 20% during the first two years and about 50% during the third year. (orig.) [de

  7. The Dow Ethyl Bromide Process: An Industrial Application of Radiation Chemistry; Application industrielle de la radiochimie a la production de bromure d'ethyle; Promyshlennoe primenenie radiatsionnoj khimii dlya proizvodstva ehtilbromida (metod dau); Aplicacion industrial de los efectos quimicos de las radiaciones a la produccion de bromuro de etilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmer, D. E.; Beale, J. S.; Pumpelly, C. T.; Wilkinson, B. W. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    1963-11-15

    Beginning in March 1963, the Dow Chemical Company started manufacturing its entire production of the organic chemical, ethyl bromide, by a process in which the addition of hydrogen bromide to ethylene is induced by a source of gamma radiation. This process constitutes a competitive, commercial use of 1800 curies of cobalt-60 as the reaction initiator. Drawings and photographs of this production plant are presented, and radiation yields are given. Experiences gained during the actual start-up of this process unit are discussed. (author) [French] Depuis mars 1963, la societe Dow Chemical produit la totalite de son bromure d'ethyle en utilisant un piocede dans lequel la combinaison de l'acide bronhydrique et de l'ethylene est amorcee par une source de rayons gamma. Il s'agit la d'une utilisation commerciale et rentable du cobalt-60 (1800 c) comme initiateur d'une reaction. L'auteur presente des plans ainsi que des photographies de l'usine et etudie le rendement de l'operation. Il donne enfin les resultats de l'experience acquise depuis le demarrage de l'installation de production. (author) [Spanish] Desde marzo de 1963 la Dow Chemical Company produce todo su bromuro de etilo por un metodo en el que la adicion de acido bromhfdrico al etileno es inducida por una fuente de rayos gamma. Este proceso constituye una aplicacion comercial rentable del cobalto-60 (1800 c), como iniciador del proceso. Se presentan planos y fotografias de la planta y se examinan los rendimientos radiatorios. Se tratan asimismo los aspectos relativos a la experiencia adquirida durante la puesta en servicio de la planta. (author) [Russian] V marte 1963 goda firma ''Dau kemikl kompani'' tselikom pereshla na proizvodstvo ehtilbromida: teper' prisoedinenie bromistogo vodoroda k ehtilenu proiskhodit pod dejstviem gamma-oblucheniya. Ehtot protsess predstavlyaet soboj primer promyshlenno vygodnogo, rentabel'nogo primeneniya Co{sup 60} s aktivnost'yu 800 kyuri - vozbuditelya reaktsii. Predstavleny

  8. Experimental results of acetone hydrogenation on a heat exchanger type reactor for solar chemical heat pump; Solar chemical heat pump ni okeru acetone suisoka hanno netsu kaishu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, T; Doi, T; Tanaka, T; Ando, Y [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Miyahara, R; Kamoshida, J [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    With the purpose of converting solar heat energy to industrial heat energy, an experiment of acetone hydrogenation was carried out using a heat exchanger type reactor that recovers heat generated by acetone hydrogenation, an exothermic reaction, and supplies it to an outside load. In the experiment, a pellet-like activated carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst was used for the acetone hydrogenation with hydrogen and acetone supplied to the catalyst layer at a space velocity of 400-1,200 or so. In the external pipe of the double-pipe type reactor, a heating medium oil was circulated in parallel with the flow of the reactant, with the heat of reaction recovered that was generated from the acetone hydrogenation. In this experiment, an 1wt%Ru/C catalyst and a 5wt%Ru/C catalyst were used so as to examine the effects of variation in the space velocity. As a result, from the viewpoint of recovering the heat of reaction, it was found desirable to increase the reaction speed by raising catalytic density and also to supply the reactant downstream inside the reaction pipe by increasing the space velocity. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Méthodologie de l'extrapolation des réacteurs chimiques Methodology for Scaling Up Chemical Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trambouze P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Après un exposé général relatif à la méthodologie du développement des procédés, applicable à l'extrapolation des réacteurs, est présenté un rapide examen critique des deux principales techniques mises en oeuvre, à savoir : - la théorie de la similitude ; - l'élaboration de modèles mathématiques. Deux exemples pratiques, relatifs aux réacteurs homogènes et aux réacteurs catalytiques à lit fixe et deux phases fluides, sont ensuite examinés à la lumière des considérations générales précédentes. After giving a general description of process-development methodology applicable to scaling up reactors, this article makes a quick critical examination of the two main techniques involved, i. e. : (a the theory of similarity, and (b the compiling of mathematical models. Two practical examples relating to homogeneous reactors and trickle-bed catalytic reactors are then examined in the light of the preceding general considerations.

  10. Kinetics of methane fermentation yield in biogas reactors: Genetic variation and association with chemical composition in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieder, Christoph; Mittweg, Greta; Dhillon, Baldev S.; Montes, Juan M.; Orsini, Elena; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2012-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the most competitive crop for methane production in Germany. Methane fermentation yield per unit of dry matter (MFY) is a determinant of methane yield, but little information is available on this trait. Our objectives were to investigate the kinetics of MFY during fermentation of maize, estimate quantitative-genetic parameters for different traits related to MFY and examine the relationship of MFY with chemical composition and silage quality. Whole-plant material of 16 inbreds and their 32 testcrosses was analyzed for MFY over 35 days of fermentation using a discontinuous laboratory assay. Data were also generated on chemical composition and in vitro digestible organic matter (IVDOM). Significant genotypic variances and high heritabilities were observed for MFY at early fermentation stages (up to 5 days) probably due to different concentrations of easily degradable chemical components. However, genotypic variances and heritability of MFY reduced as fermentation progressed, because of complete or partial degradation of all chemical components. Further, there were strong correlations of MFY with chemical components at early fermentation stages but not at later stages. Therefore, MFY at later stages, which is closer to potential MFY, does not seem to be amenable to selection. High heritability of IVDOM and its strong correlation with MFY in testcrosses indicated its possible use for preliminary or indirect selection. Keeping in view the magnitude of genetic variance that was low for MFY and high for dry matter yield (DMY), the other component of methane yield, more emphasis on breeding for DMY seems appropriate. -- Highlights: ► We investigated methane fermentation yield (MFY) of diverse germplasm of maize. ► The kinetics of MFY and its correlations with chemical composition were examined. ► Genetic variance and heritability for MFY decreased with fermentation time. ► Complete fermentation (35 d) reduced correlations of MFY with chemical

  11. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  12. Modified DLC coatings prepared in a large-scale reactor by dual microwave/pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbella, C.; Bialuch, I.; Kleinschmidt, M.; Bewilogua, K.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films find abundant applications as hard and protective coatings due to their excellent mechanical and tribological performances. The addition of new elements to the amorphous DLC matrix tunes the properties of this material, leading to an extension of its scope of applications. In order to scale up their production to a large plasma reactor, DLC films modified by silicon and oxygen additions have been grown in an industrial plant of 1m 3 by means of pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition (PACVD). The use of an additional microwave (MW) source has intensified the glow discharge, partly by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), accelerating therefore the deposition process. Hence, acetylene, tetramethylsilane (TMS) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) constituted the respective gas precursors for the deposition of a-C:H (DLC), a-C:H:Si and a-C:H:Si:O films by dual MW/pulsed-DC PACVD. This work presents systematic studies of the deposition rate, hardness, adhesion, abrasive wear and water contact angle aimed to optimize the technological parameters of deposition: gas pressure, relative gas flow of the monomers and input power. This study has been completed with measures of the atomic composition of the samples. Deposition rates around 1 μm/h, typical for standard processes held in the large reactor, were increased about by a factor 10 when the ionization source has been operated in ECR mode

  13. Experimental results of 2-propanol dehydrogenation with a falling-liquid film reactor for solar chemical heat pump; Solar chemical heat pump ni okeru ryuka ekimakushiki 2-propanol bunkai hanno jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, T; Tanaka, T; Ando, Y; Takashima, T [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Koike, M; Kamoshida, J [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    A solar chemical heat pump is intended to attempt multi-purposed effective utilization of solar energy by raising low temperature solar heat of about 100 degC to 150 to 200 degC by utilizing chemical reactions. The chemical heat pump under the present study uses a 2-propanol (IPA)/acetone/hydrogen system which can utilize low-temperature solar heat and has large temperature rising degree. It was found from the result of experiments and analyses that IPA dehydrogenation reaction can improve more largely the heat utilization rate in using a falling-liquid film reactor than using a liquid phase suspended system. As an attempt to improve further the heat utilization rate, this paper reports the result of experimental discussions on inclination angles of a reaction vessel and feed liquid flow rate which would affect the fluid condition of the liquid film. As a result of the experiments, the initial deterioration in the catalyst has settled in about 15 hours, and its activity has decreased to about 60% of the initial activity. It was made clear that the influence of the inclination angle of the reaction vessel on the reaction is small. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion in a packed bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.; Van Noyen, J.; Larring, Y.; McCann, M.; Pishahang, M.; Amini, S.; Ortiz, M.; Galluci, F.; Sint-Annaland, M. V.; Tournigant, D.; Louradour, E.; Snijkers, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture technology where cyclic reduction and oxidation of a metallic oxide, which acts as a solid oxygen carrier, takes place. With this system, direct contact between air and fuel can be avoided, and so, a concentrated CO2 stream is generated

  15. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting points of Na and NaOH, phase transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of sodium monoxide (Na 2 O) generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na 2 O generation at the secondary overall reaction should be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  16. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal chemical industry wastewater using the catalytic ozonation process combined with a gas-liquid-solid internal circulating fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Feng; You, Hong; Ding, Yi; Yao, Jie; Jin, Chao

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigated the performance of the combined system of catalytic ozonation and the gas-liquid-solid internal circulating fluidized bed reactor for the advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal chemical industry wastewater (CCIW). The results indicated that with ozonation alone for 60min, the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) could reach 34%. The introduction of activated carbon, pumice, γ-Al 2 O 3 carriers improved the removal performance of COD, and the removal efficiency was increased by 8.6%, 4.2%, 2%, respectively. Supported with Mn, the catalytic performance of activated carbon and γ-Al 2 O 3 were improved significantly with COD removal efficiencies of 46.5% and 41.3%, respectively; however, the promotion effect of pumice supported with Mn was insignificant. Activated carbon supported with Mn had the best catalytic performance. The catalytic ozonation combined system of MnO X /activated carbon could keep ozone concentration at a lower level in the liquid phase, and promote the transfer of ozone from the gas phase to the liquid phase to improve ozonation efficiency.

  17. The influence of the physico-chemical form of the aerosol on the radiological consequences of notional accidental releases of radioactivity from a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.; Jones, J.A.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological consequences of a wide range of notional accidental releases from a 1300 MW(e) LMFBR (Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) were assessed in a study published by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1977. In that study representative values were in general adopted for each of the important parameters while recognising that in reality they could vary considerably. The present study is concerned with the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to the physico-chemical form of the released aerosol. Of particular interest is the importance of a mixed sodium-transuranium element aerosol which may be formed in accidental releases of activity from sodium cooled FBRs. Two significant findings emerge from the study. First the predicted consequences in general are relatively insensitive to the range of physico-chemical forms analysed. For generic assessments therefore it is sufficient to assume the properties of the aerosol adopted in the initial study (1 μm AMAD and each element in the oxide form); the exception concerns the estimation of the incidence of early morbidity, and to a lesser extent early mortality, but only for a limited range of release composition. The second finding is that the radiological consequences are not, contrary to what might have been expected, significantly increased for the release of a mixed sodium-element aerosol

  18. Gravimetrical and chemical characterization of SiOx structures deposited on fine powders by short plasma exposure in a plasma down stream reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, Adrian; Sonnenfeld, Axel; Rohr, Philipp Rudolf von

    2008-01-01

    The surface of lactose particles was modified by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process to improve the flow behavior of the powder. For this, the particulates were treated in a plasma down stream reactor which provides a short (50 ms) and homogeneous exposure to the capacitively coupled RF discharge. The organosilicon monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used as a precursor for the formation of SiO x which is deposited on the substrate particle surface. For varying process gas mixtures (O 2 /Ar/HMDSO) and RF power applied, the amount of the deposited material was determined gravimetrically after dissolution of the lactose substrate particles and the chemical composition of the accumulated deposition material was investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The concentration of the deposited SiO x relating to the substrate material was found to be in the range of 0.1 wt.%. Based on the ATR-FTIR analysis, the inorganic, i.e. oxidic SiO x fraction of the obtained deposits was shown to be controllable by varying the process parameters, whilst a relatively large amount of organic structures must be considered.

  19. Effect of chemical composition on irradiation embrittlement and annealing in Ni-Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novosad, P [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Results concerning copper and phosphorus influence on radiation-induced changes in the Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel mechanical properties, are presented. Correlations between different mechanical properties for steels with different chemical composition, are presented. A comparison of transition temperature shifts obtained for static and dynamic fracture toughness tests and Charpy impact tests, is discussed. Recovery of radiation hardening, measured by hardness test after isochronal annealing of steels with different compositions, is also shown. Copper content strongly affects irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties, but phosphorus content in connection with variable copper content has only a small effect. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Degradation of organic pollutants and characteristics of activated sludge in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic reactor treating chemical industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic system operated at the hydraulic retention times (HRT of 20, 40, and 60 h with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS concentrations of 3 g/L and 6 g/L was considered for treating chemical industrial wastewater rich in complex organic compounds and total dissolved solids. Extending the HRT and increasing the MLSS concentration resulted in higher removal efficiency for chemical oxygen demand at 72%. Organic compounds in wastewater could be classified into easily-removed and refractory compounds during treatment. The easily-removed compounds consisted primarily of ethers, alcohols, and aldehydes, whereas the refractory compounds included mainly oxygen-containing heterocyclic and benzene-containing compounds. Results from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that several metal ions accumulated in activated sludge, particularly Fe(III. Fe accumulated mainly on the surface of sludge floc pellets and resulted in the compactness of activated sludge, which caused the values of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids /MLSS and sludge volume index to decrease.

  1. Immobilisation of laccase on Eupergit supports and its application for the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, L; Hollmann, F; Eibes, G; Feijoo, G; Moreira, M T; Lema, J M

    2012-06-01

    Laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila was covalently immobilised on Eupergit C and Eupergit C 250L yielding specific activities of up to 17 and 80 U/g, respectively. Due to its superior activity, Eupergit C 250L was chosen for further research. The somewhat lower catalytic efficiency (based on the ratio between the turnover number and the Michaelis constant, k(cat)/K(M)) of the immobilised enzyme in comparison with that of the free enzyme was balanced by its increased stability and broader operational window related to temperature and pH. The feasibility of the immobilised laccase was tested by using a packed bed reactor (PBR) operating in consecutive cycles for the removal of Acid Green 27 dye as model substrate. High degrees of elimination were achieved (88, 79, 69 and 57% in 4 consecutive cycles), while the levels of adsorption on the support varied from 18 to 6%, proving that dye removal took place mainly due to the action of the enzyme. Finally, a continuous PBR with the solid biocatalyst was applied for the treatment of a solution containing the following endocrine disrupting chemicals: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). At steady-state operation, E1 was degraded by 65% and E2 and EE2 were removed up to 80% and only limited adsorption of these compounds on the support, between 12 and 22%, was detected. In addition, a 79% decrease in estrogenic activity was detected in the effluent of the enzymatic reactor while only 14% was attained by inactivated laccase.

  2. Reactor as furnace and reactor as lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldanskii, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    There are presented general characteristics of the following ways of transforming of nuclear energy released in reactors into chemical : ordinary way (i.e. trough the heat, mechanical energy and electricity); chemonuclear synthesis ; use of high-temperature fuel elements (reactor as furnace); use of the mixed nγ-radiation of reactors; use of the radiation loops; radiation - photochemical synthesis (reactor as lamp). Advantage and disadvantages of all above variants are compared. The yield of the primary product of fixation of nitrogen (nitric oxide NO) in reactor with the high-temperature (above ca. 1900degC) fuel elements (reactor-furnace) can exceed W ∼ 200 kg per gram of burned uranium. For the latter variant (reactor-lamp) the yield of chemical products can reach W ∼ 60 kg. per gram of uranium. Such values of W are close to or even strongly exceed the yields of chemical products for other abovementioned variants and - what is particularly important - are not connected to the necessity of archscrupulous removal of radioactive contamination of products. (author)

  3. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 2: Comparison of copper-, nickel-, and iron-based oxygen carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    with micro-channel structures. Part 1 of this series studied the fundamentals of the reactor design and proposed a comprehensive design procedure, enabling a systematic methodology of designing and evaluating the rotary CLC reactor with different OCs

  4. Operation of the NETL Chemical Looping Reactor with Natural Gas and a Novel Copper-Iron Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayham, Sanuel [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Straub, Doug [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Weber, Justin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Combustion Program, the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Research and Innovation Center (NETL R&IC) is investigating the feasibility of a novel combustion concept in which the GHG emissions can be significantly reduced. This concept involves burning fuel and air without mixing these two reactants. If this concept is technically feasible, then CO2 emissions can be significantly reduced at a much lower cost than more conventional approaches. This indirect combustion concept has been called Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) because an intermediate material (i.e., a metaloxide) is continuously cycled to oxidize the fuel. This CLC concept is the focus of this research and will be described in more detail in the following sections.

  5. CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping combustion with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU)—Experiments in a continuously operating fluidized-bed reactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Rydén, Magnus

    2011-03-01

    Particles of the perovskite material CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3 has been examined as oxygen carrier for chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling, and for chemical-looping combustion of natural gas, by 70h of experiments in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor system. For the oxygen uncoupling experiments, it was found that the particles released O2 in gas phase at temperatures above 720°C when the fuel reactor was fluidized with CO2. The effect increased with increased temperature, and with the O2 partial pressure in the air reactor. At 950°C, the O2 concentration in the outlet from the fuel reactor was in the order of 4.0vol%, if the particles were oxidized in air. For the chemical-looping combustion experiments the combustion efficiency with standard process parameters was in the order of 95% at 950°C, using 1000kg oxygen carrier per MW natural gas, of which about 30% was located in the fuel reactor. Reducing the fuel flow so that 1900kg oxygen carrier per MW natural gas was used improved the combustion efficiency to roughly 99.8%. The particles retained their physical properties, reactivity with CH4 and ability to release gas-phase O2 reasonably well throughout the testing period and there were no problems with the fluidization or formation of solid carbon in the reactor. X-ray diffraction showed that the particles underwent changes in their phase composition though. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, F.; Hussain, M.; Ahmad, S.S.; Aslam, M.; Haq, E.U.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  7. A review of the UK fast reactor programme. March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports on the Fast Reactor Programme of United Kingdom. These are the main lines: Dounreay Fast Reactor; Prototype Fast Reactor; Commercial Fast Reactor; engineering development; materials development; chemical engineering/sodium technology; fast reactor fuel; fuel cycle; safety; reactor performance study

  8. Physical-chemical and operational performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR treating swine wastewater - 10.4025/actascitechnol.v32i4.7203

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlon Lopes Pereira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Since hog raising concentrates a huge amount of swine manure in small areas, it is considered by the environmental government organizations to be one of the most potentially pollutant activities. Therefore the main objective of this research was to evaluate by operational criteria and removal efficiency, the performance of a Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR, working as a biological pre-treatment of swine culture effluents. The physical-chemical analyses carried out were: total COD, BOD5, total solids (TS, fix (TFS and volatiles (TVS, temperature, pH, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, phosphorus, total acidity and alkalinity. The ABR unit worked with an average efficiency of 65.2 and 76.2%, respectively, concerning total COD and BOD5, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT about 15 hours. The results for volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR, organic loading rate (OLR and hydraulic loading rate (HLR were: 4.46 kg BOD m-3 day-1; 1.81 kg BOD5 kg TVS-1 day-1 and 1.57 m3 m-3 day-1, respectively. The average efficiency of the whole treatment system for total COD and BOD5 removal were 66.5 and 77.8%, showing an adequate performance in removing the organic matter from swine wastewater.

  9. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  10. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 2: Comparison of copper-, nickel-, and iron-based oxygen carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. Part 1 of this series studied the fundamentals of the reactor design and proposed a comprehensive design procedure, enabling a systematic methodology of designing and evaluating the rotary CLC reactor with different OCs and operating conditions. This paper presents the application of the methodology to the designs with three commonly used OCs, i.e., copper, nickel, and iron. The physical properties and the reactivities of the three OCs are compared at operating conditions suitable for the rotary CLC. Nickel has the highest reduction rate, but relatively slow oxidation reactivity while the iron reduction rate is most sensitive to the fuel concentration. The design parameters and the operating conditions for the three OCs are selected, following the strategies proposed in Part 1, and the performances are evaluated using a one-dimensional plug-flow model developed previously. The simulations show that for all OCs, complete fuel conversion and high carbon separation efficiency can be achieved at periodic stationary state with reasonable operational stabilities. The nickel-based design includes the smallest dimensions because of its fast reduction rate. The operation of nickel case is mainly limited to the slow oxidation rate, and hence a relatively large share of air sector is used. The iron-based design has the largest size, due to its slow reduction reactivity near the exit or in the fuel purge sector where the fuel concentration is low. The gas flow temperature increases monotonically for all the cases, and is mainly determined by the solid temperature. In the periodic state, the local temperature variation is within 40 K and the thermal distortion is limited. The design of the rotary CLC is

  11. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors; Etudes relatives au comportement physico-chimique de l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenouard, J; Dirian, G; Roth, E; Vignet, P; Platzer, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [French] Parmi les degradations subies par l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires, les deux plus importantes sont la pollution chimique et isotopique et la decomposition radiolytique. La pollution chimique a conduit a mettre au point pour le cas particulier des reacteurs, des circuits d'epuration par echange d'ions. On decrit ici en detail la mise en oeuvre de cette methode dans les reacteurs de recherche du CEA; les controles qu'elle necessite, les resultats obtenus et leur interpretation. En ce qui concerne la dissociation radiolytique de l'eau, les renseignements obtenus sur ces memes reacteurs sont communiques, ainsi que les details des dispositifs de recombinaison et des moyens de controle. Enfin, on fait le point des etudes poursuivies au CEA sur ces memes problemes de recombinaison dans le cas des reacteurs de puissance. (auteur)

  12. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors; Etudes relatives au comportement physico-chimique de l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenouard, J.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.; Vignet, P.; Platzer, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [French] Parmi les degradations subies par l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires, les deux plus importantes sont la pollution chimique et isotopique et la decomposition radiolytique. La pollution chimique a conduit a mettre au point pour le cas particulier des reacteurs, des circuits d'epuration par echange d'ions. On decrit ici en detail la mise en oeuvre de cette methode dans les reacteurs de recherche du CEA; les controles qu'elle necessite, les resultats obtenus et leur interpretation. En ce qui concerne la dissociation radiolytique de l'eau, les renseignements obtenus sur ces memes reacteurs sont communiques, ainsi que les details des dispositifs de recombinaison et des moyens de controle. Enfin, on fait le point des etudes poursuivies au CEA sur ces memes problemes de recombinaison dans le cas des reacteurs de puissance. (auteur)

  13. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  15. Nuclear chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Shin, Young Jun

    1989-08-01

    The contents of this book are introduction of chemical engineering and related chemistry on an atomic reactor, foundation of the chemistry nuclear chemical engineering, theory on nuclear engineering, the cycle of uranium and nuclear fuel, a product of nuclear division, nuclear reprocessing, management of spent fuel separation of radioisotope, materials of an atomic reactor, technology and chemistry related water in atomic reactors and utilization of radioisotope and radiation. This book has the exercises and reference books for the each chapter.

  16. Chemical kinetic study of a novel lignocellulosic biofuel: Di-n-butyl ether oxidation in a laminar flow reactor and flames

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming; Sudholt, Alena; Lee, Dongjoon; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Pitsch, Heinz G.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Sarathy, Mani

    2014-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of promising alternative fuels have been studied extensively in the recent years. Nevertheless, the pyrolysis and oxidation kinetics for many oxygenated fuels are not well characterized compared to those of hydrocarbons. In the present investigation, the first chemical kinetic study of a long-chain linear symmetric ether, di-n-butyl ether (DBE), is presented and a detailed reaction model is developed. DBE has been identified recently as a candidate biofuel produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The model includes both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways with reaction rates generated using appropriate rate rules. In addition, experimental studies on fundamental combustion characteristics, such as ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds have been performed. A laminar flow reactor was used to determine the ignition delay times of lean and stoichiometric DBE/air mixtures. The laminar flame speeds of DBE/air mixtures were measured in the stagnation flame configuration for a wide rage of equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure and an unburned reactant temperature of 373. K. All experimental data were modeled using the present kinetic model. The agreement between measured and computed results is satisfactory, and the model was used to elucidate the oxidation pathways of DBE. The dissociation of keto-hydroperoxides, leading to radical chain branching was found to dominate the ignition of DBE in the low temperature regime. The results of the present numerical and experimental study of the oxidation of di-n-butyl ether provide a good basis for further investigation of long chain linear and branched ethers. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Chemical kinetic study of a novel lignocellulosic biofuel: Di-n-butyl ether oxidation in a laminar flow reactor and flames

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2014-03-01

    The combustion characteristics of promising alternative fuels have been studied extensively in the recent years. Nevertheless, the pyrolysis and oxidation kinetics for many oxygenated fuels are not well characterized compared to those of hydrocarbons. In the present investigation, the first chemical kinetic study of a long-chain linear symmetric ether, di-n-butyl ether (DBE), is presented and a detailed reaction model is developed. DBE has been identified recently as a candidate biofuel produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The model includes both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways with reaction rates generated using appropriate rate rules. In addition, experimental studies on fundamental combustion characteristics, such as ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds have been performed. A laminar flow reactor was used to determine the ignition delay times of lean and stoichiometric DBE/air mixtures. The laminar flame speeds of DBE/air mixtures were measured in the stagnation flame configuration for a wide rage of equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure and an unburned reactant temperature of 373. K. All experimental data were modeled using the present kinetic model. The agreement between measured and computed results is satisfactory, and the model was used to elucidate the oxidation pathways of DBE. The dissociation of keto-hydroperoxides, leading to radical chain branching was found to dominate the ignition of DBE in the low temperature regime. The results of the present numerical and experimental study of the oxidation of di-n-butyl ether provide a good basis for further investigation of long chain linear and branched ethers. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  19. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  20. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  1. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  2. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dong-Sheng; He, Ruo; Liu, Xin-Wen; Long, Yan

    2006-08-25

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L(-1) PCP and 1250-10000 mg L(-1) COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L(-1). [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L(-1) in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L(-1) to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L(-1), respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent, the range of variation

  3. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dongsheng; He Ruo; Liu Xinwen; Long Yan

    2006-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L -1 PCP and 1250-10000 mg L -1 COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L -1 . [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L -1 in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L -1 to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L -1 , respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent, the range of variation of

  4. Practices of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Ahmed, Javed; Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Sonekhi, Gomand Beekho; Fayyaz, Nargis; Zainulabdin, Zeeshan; Jindani, Rahim

    2016-02-01

    Self-medication practice among nursing students is of growing concern. Access to drugs and handling them in their future practices make nursing students susceptible to self-prescription and self-medication. This cross-sectional study assesses the prevalence and pattern of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. A random sample of convenience of 160 nursing students underwent a predesigned questionnaire. More than half of nursing students 79 (52.7%) experienced self-medication with antibiotics. It was more prevalent among males 49 (62%) . Knowledge about the drug 59 (74.7%) and convenience 13 (16.5%) were the key reasons to self-medicate. Fever 37 (46.8%) and sore throat 27 (34.2%) were the common symptoms predisposing to self-medication. Beta-lactam group of antibiotics 35 (44.3%) was most frequent used. Only 26 (32.9%) respondents completed the entire antibiotic course. Efforts must be directed towards educating nursing students about responsible and informed self-medication practices.

  5. Thermal Aging Study of a Dow Corning SE 1700 Porous Structure Made by Direct Ink Writing: 1-Year Results and Long-Term Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Ward [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearson, Mark A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Maiti, Amitesh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Metz, Thomas R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duoss, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Thomas S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Dow Corning SE 1700 (reinforced polydimethylsiloxane) porous structures were made by direct ink writing (DIW). The specimens (~50% porosity) were subjected to various compressive strains (15, 30, 45%) and temperatures (room temperature, 35, 50, 70°C) in a nitrogen atmosphere (active purge) for 1 year. Compression set and load retention of the aged specimens were measured periodically during the study. Compression set increased with strain and temperature. After 1 year, specimens aged at room temperature, 35, and 50°C showed ~10% compression set (relative to the applied compressive deflection), while those aged at 70°C showed 20-40%. Due to the increasing compression set, load retention decreased with temperature, ranging from ~90% at room temperature to ~60-80% at 70°C. Long-term compression set and load retention at room temperature were predicted by applying time-temperature superposition (TTS). The predictions show compression set relative to the compressive deflection will be ~10-15% with ~70-90% load retention after 50 years at 15-45% strain, suggesting the material will continue to be mechanically functional. Comparison of the results to previously acquired data for cellular (M97*, M9760, M9763) and RTV (S5370) silicone foams suggests that the SE 1700 DIW porous specimens are on par with, or outperform, the legacy foams.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    technique. This report summarizes the measurements and simulations completed so far. This work will continue under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation and Dow Corning Corporation. This phase of the work is part of the DOE/Industry/University Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium. Optimization of the LaPorte pilot plant reactor was attempted by rearranging the heat exchangers. The paper accepted for presentation at the Sixth World Congress of Chemical Engineering, Melbourne, Australia, September 23-27, 2001 is a part of this report.

  7. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawroski, S.; Vogel, R. C.; Levenson, Milton; Munnecke, V. H.

    1963-07-01

    Work reported includes: Chemical-Metallurgical Processing; Fuel Cycle Applications of Volatility and Fluidization Techniques; Calorimetry; Reactor Safety; Energy Conversion; and Determination of Nuclear Constants.

  8. Two modelling approaches to water-quality simulation in a flooded iron-ore mine (Saizerais, Lorraine, France): a semi-distributed chemical reactor model and a physically based distributed reactive transport pipe network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, V; Collon-Drouaillet, P; Fabriol, R

    2008-02-19

    The flooding of abandoned mines in the Lorraine Iron Basin (LIB) over the past 25 years has degraded the quality of the groundwater tapped for drinking water. High concentrations of dissolved sulphate have made the water unsuitable for human consumption. This problematic issue has led to the development of numerical tools to support water-resource management in mining contexts. Here we examine two modelling approaches using different numerical tools that we tested on the Saizerais flooded iron-ore mine (Lorraine, France). A first approach considers the Saizerais Mine as a network of two chemical reactors (NCR). The second approach is based on a physically distributed pipe network model (PNM) built with EPANET 2 software. This approach considers the mine as a network of pipes defined by their geometric and chemical parameters. Each reactor in the NCR model includes a detailed chemical model built to simulate quality evolution in the flooded mine water. However, in order to obtain a robust PNM, we simplified the detailed chemical model into a specific sulphate dissolution-precipitation model that is included as sulphate source/sink in both a NCR model and a pipe network model. Both the NCR model and the PNM, based on different numerical techniques, give good post-calibration agreement between the simulated and measured sulphate concentrations in the drinking-water well and overflow drift. The NCR model incorporating the detailed chemical model is useful when a detailed chemical behaviour at the overflow is needed. The PNM incorporating the simplified sulphate dissolution-precipitation model provides better information of the physics controlling the effect of flow and low flow zones, and the time of solid sulphate removal whereas the NCR model will underestimate clean-up time due to the complete mixing assumption. In conclusion, the detailed NCR model will give a first assessment of chemical processes at overflow, and in a second time, the PNM model will provide more

  9. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nad, Shreya [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  10. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  11. Hairy foam: carbon nanofibers on solid foam as catalyst support : synthesis, mass transfer, and reactor modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenmakers, P.W.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical reactor is at the heart of many chemical processes. The chemical industry strives for the most efficient, most compact, and safest chemical reactor. The efficiency of a chemical reactor is determined by the delicate balance of catalyst performance (i.e. selectivity and activity) and the

  12. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  13. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  14. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  15. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  16. Quantification of the inert chemical oxygen demand of raw wastewater and evaluation of soluble microbial product production in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors under different operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Sergio F; Gloria, Roberto M; Silva, Silvana Q; Chernicharo, Carlos A L

    2009-06-01

    This paper investigates the production of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in demonstration-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors operated under different conditions and fed with raw wastewater. The results showed that 9.2 +/- 1.3% of the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be considered inert to anaerobic treatment and that the amount of COD produced by biomass varied from 30 to 70 mg x L(-1), accounting for 45 to 63% of the soluble effluent COD. The accumulation of SMP appeared to be dependent on the hydraulic retention time (HRT) applied to the reactors, with a larger accumulation of SMP observed at the lowest HRT (5 hours); this may have been due to stress conditions caused by high upflow velocity (1.1 m x h(-1)). In terms of residual COD characterization, ultrafiltration results showed that higher amounts of high molecular weight compounds were found when HRT was the lowest (5 hours), and that the molecular weight distribution depended on the operational condition of the reactors. Biodegradability tests showed that the low and high molecular weight SMPs were only partially degraded anaerobically (10 to 60%) and that the high molecular weight SMPs were difficult to degrade aerobically.

  17. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  18. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  19. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  20. Problems related with the power regulation of reactors by physico-chemical methods, and the behaviour of water and heavy water in nuclear reactors; Comportement de l'eau et de l'eau lourde dans les reacteurs nucleaires et problemes de la regulation de puissance par voie physico-chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, L; Conan, D; Dirian, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The observation of the behaviour of water and heavy water in working reactors contributes to their safe running and provides information useful in studies relating to reactivity control techniques using soluble poisons. The use of nuclear poisons dissolved in the water of a reactor leads to its chemical pollution. The conditions under which they can be used without causing the undesirable effects of this pollution are studied. Problems of analysis, although important, are not tackled in this paper. Behaviour of heavy water in working reactors. Isotopic pollution of heavy water: The rate at which this pollution occurs depends on the type of reactor and on certain characteristic incidents. The use of a re-concentration column is an efficient way of maintaining the heavy water isotopic concentration in a reactor which cannot be considered exempt from slow isotopic pollution. Heavy water leak detection: The instantaneous rates of small leaks can be measured, the leak localised, and the atmospheric contamination in the reactor building checked. Isotopic analysis for deuterium or tritium determination, is carried out on samples. Chemical pollution and purification of heavy water Chemical pollution of heavy water is one of the most complex problems in reactor chemistry Corrosion of the materials which make up the core and the heavy water circuits varies extensively with the state of purity of the heavy water, as may be appreciated from the performances of the purification circuits and from direct measurements From the knowledge acquired it has been possible to work out standards of purity which, if observed will guarantee satisfactory running of the reactor. Radiolytic decomposition of heavy water : A better knowledge of its quantitative aspects in reactors is necessary in order to foresee the amounts of explosive gas mixture given off in power reactors. The radiolysis rate develops with the chemical purity of the water and the instantaneous power of the reactor

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  2. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  3. Chemical and spectrochemical production analysis of ThO2 and 233UO2-ThO2 pellets for the light water breeder reactor core for Shippingport (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukowski, J.F.; Hollis, E.D.

    1975-06-01

    The Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory has utilized wet chemical, emission spectrochemical, and mass spectrometric analytical techniques for the production analysis of the ThO 2 and 233 UO 2 -ThO 2 (1 to 6 wt percent 233 UO 2 ) pellets for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core for Shippingport. Proof of the fuel breeding concept necessitates measurement of precise and accurate chemical characterization of all fuel pellets before core life. Chemistry's efforts toward this goal are presented in three main sections: (1) general discussions relating the chemical requirements for ThO 2 and 233 UO 2 -ThO 2 core materials to the analytical capabilities, (2) technical discussions of the chemical and instrumental technology applied for the analysis of aluminum, boron, calcium, carbon, chloride plus bromide, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, iron, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, samarium, silicon, titanium, vanadium, thorium, and uranium (total, trace, and uranium VI), and (3) a formal presentation of the analytical procedures as applied to the LWBR Development Program. (U.S.)

  4. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  5. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  7. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  8. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  9. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  10. Nuclear reactor plant for production process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature reactor is suitable as a heat source for carrying out endothermal chemical processes. A heat exchanger is required for separating the reactor coolant gases and the process medium. The heat of the reactor is transferred at a temperature lower than the process temperature to a secondary gas and is compressed to give the required temperature. The compression energy is obtained from the same reactor. (RW) [de

  11. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  12. Assessment of realization possibility of borate-lithium water chemical regime of the PGV-100 secondary circuit for NPP with WWER-1000 type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smykov, V.B.; Ermolaev, N.P.; Borzov, I.A.

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental assessment of chemical equilibrium reactions resulting in the weak-alkaline boric buffering water chemistry of secondary side PGV-1000 has been performed out in the article. 18 refs

  13. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  14. A review of the UK fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the United Kingdom Fast Reactor Programme is introduced. Operational experience with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) is briefly summarized. The design concept of the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) is given in some detail. The emphasis is on materials development, chemical engineering/sodium technology, fuel reprocessing and fuel cycle, engineering component development and reactor safety

  15. Application of hollow fiber supported liquid membrane as a chemical reactor for esterification of lactic acid and ethanol to ethyl lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teerachaiyapat, Thanyarutt; Ramakul, Prakorn [Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom (Thailand)

    2016-01-15

    Hollow fiber supported liquid membrane was applied as a reactor to synthesize ethyl lactate from lactic acid. Lactic acid in the feed solution was extracted by tri-n-octylamine (TOA) and stripped by ethanol with p-toluene sulfonic acid acting as the catalyst to form ethyl lactate. Central composite design (CCD) was used to determine the significant factors and their interactions. The response surface was applied for optimization. An optimized yield of 30% was predicted and its validity was evaluated by comparison with experimental results at different concentrations of lactic acid in the feed solution, with good agreement achieved.

  16. Application of hollow fiber supported liquid membrane as a chemical reactor for esterification of lactic acid and ethanol to ethyl lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teerachaiyapat, Thanyarutt; Ramakul, Prakorn

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber supported liquid membrane was applied as a reactor to synthesize ethyl lactate from lactic acid. Lactic acid in the feed solution was extracted by tri-n-octylamine (TOA) and stripped by ethanol with p-toluene sulfonic acid acting as the catalyst to form ethyl lactate. Central composite design (CCD) was used to determine the significant factors and their interactions. The response surface was applied for optimization. An optimized yield of 30% was predicted and its validity was evaluated by comparison with experimental results at different concentrations of lactic acid in the feed solution, with good agreement achieved.

  17. Request for interim approval to operate Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground as a chemical waste landfill for disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl waste in submarine reactor compartments. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, G.D.

    1994-06-01

    This request is submitted to seek interim approval to operate a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 chemical waste landfill for the disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. Operation of a chemical waste landfill for disposal of PCB waste is subject to the TSCA regulations of 40 CFR 761. Interim approval is requested for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of approval. This request covers only the disposal of small 10 quantities of solid PCB waste contained in decommissioned, defueled submarine reactor compartments (SRC). In addition, the request applies only to disposal 12 of this waste in Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground (Trench 94) in the 13 200 East Area of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Facility. Disposal of this waste will be conducted in accordance with the Compliance 15 Agreement (Appendix H) between the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and 16 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. During the 5-year interim approval period, the DOE-RL will submit an application seeking final 18 approval for operation of Trench 94 as a chemical waste landfill, including 19 any necessary waivers, and also will seek a final dangerous waste permit from 20 the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for disposal of lead 21 shielding contained in the SRCS.

  18. Request for interim approval to operate Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground as a chemical waste landfill for disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl waste in submarine reactor compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, G.D.

    1994-06-01

    This request is submitted to seek interim approval to operate a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 chemical waste landfill for the disposal of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. Operation of a chemical waste landfill for disposal of PCB waste is subject to the TSCA regulations of 40 CFR 761. Interim approval is requested for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of approval. This request covers only the disposal of small 10 quantities of solid PCB waste contained in decommissioned, defueled submarine reactor compartments (SRC). In addition, the request applies only to disposal 12 of this waste in Trench 94 of the 218-E-12B Burial Ground (Trench 94) in the 13 200 East Area of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Facility. Disposal of this waste will be conducted in accordance with the Compliance 15 Agreement (Appendix H) between the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and 16 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. During the 5-year interim approval period, the DOE-RL will submit an application seeking final 18 approval for operation of Trench 94 as a chemical waste landfill, including 19 any necessary waivers, and also will seek a final dangerous waste permit from 20 the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for disposal of lead 21 shielding contained in the SRCS

  19. Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bartholomay; L. L. Knobel; B. J. Tucker; B. V. Twining (USGS)

    2000-06-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997-98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A total of 91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen quality-assurance samples were also collected and analyzed; seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  20. Methodology of Supervision by Analysis of Thermal Flux for Thermal Conduction of a Batch Chemical Reactor Equipped with a Monofluid Heating/Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Henini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the thermal behavior of a batch reactor to jacket equipped with a monofluid heating/cooling system. Heating and cooling are provided respectively by an electrical resistance and two plate heat exchangers. The control of the temperature of the reaction is based on the supervision system. This strategy of management of the thermal devices is based on the usage of the thermal flux as manipulated variable. The modulation of the monofluid temperature by acting on the heating power or on the opening degrees of an air-to-open valve that delivers the monofluid to heat exchanger. The study shows that the application of this method for the conduct of the pilot reactor gives good results in simulation and that taking into account the dynamics of the various apparatuses greatly improves ride quality of conduct. In addition thermal control of an exothermic reaction (mononitration shows that the consideration of heat generated in the model representation improve the results by elimination any overshooting of the set-point temperature.

  1. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1990--91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Knobel, L.L.; Tucker, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 12 wells as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. Sixty samples were collected from eight groundwater monitoring wells and four production wells. Ten quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Most of the samples contained concentrations of total sodium and dissolved anions that exceeded reporting levels. The predominant category of nitrogen-bearing compounds was nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Concentrations of total organic carbon ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.2 milligrams per liter. Total phenols in 52 of 69 samples ranged from 1 to 8 micrograms per liter. Extractable acid and base/neutral organic compounds were detected in water from 16 of 69 samples. Concentrations of dissolved gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity in all samples exceeded the reporting level. Radium-226 concentrations were greater than the reporting level in 63 of 68 samples

  2. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  3. Non-empirical analysis of the chemical reaction of cesium with steam; Cs+H{sub 2}O {yields} CsOH+H, in severe light water reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Yasuzi [Fuji Research Inst. Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Computational Engineering Div.

    1998-04-01

    The elementary chemical reaction of cesium which is a volatile fission product with steam (water) shown in the title are analyzed from the first principle. The activation energies for both reactions of the forward and the backward are calculated for the first time with a computer program Gamess, which is based on the non-empirical molecular orbital theory. The calculated values are expected to agree with those of experiments within an accuracy of several tens of kJ/mol. Using the values obtained above, the rate constants are also calculated in the framework of the transition state theory. The derived rate constants will allow us to predict the orders of magnitude of experimental values under high temperature conditions (1,000 K or higher). Thus these rate constants are available as input data for the kinetic (non-equilibrium state) study of cesium in severe light water reactor accidents. (author)

  4. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  5. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  10. Temporal development and chemical efficiency of positive streamers in a large scale wire-plate reactor as a function of voltage waveform parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winands, G.J.J.; Liu, Zhen; Pemen, A.J.M.; Heesch, van E.J.M.; Yan, K.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a large-scale pulsed corona system is described in which pulse parameters such as pulse rise-time, peak voltage, pulse width and energy per pulse can be varied. The chemical efficiency of the system is determined by measuring ozone production. The temporal and spatial development of

  11. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  12. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  13. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  15. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  17. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  18. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  19. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A system for controlling combustible gases, it has been constituted at present such that the combustible gases are controlled by exhausting them to the wet well of a reactor container. In this system, however, there has been a problem, in a reactor container having plenums in addition to the wet well and the dry well, that the combustible gases in such plenums can not be controlled. In view of the above, in the present invention, suction ports or exhaust ports of the combustible gas control system are disposed to the wet well, the dry well and the plenums to control the combustible gases in the reactor container. Since this can control the combustible gases in the entire reactor container, the integrity of the reactor container can be ensured. (T.M.)

  20. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  2. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  3. Radioactive nuclides in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1982-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also chemical subject materials. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry was considered for students of the school in the previous report (JAERI-M 9827), where the first part of the plan, ''Fundamentals of Reactor Chemistry'', was reviewed. This report is a review of the second part of the plan containing fission products chemistry, actinoids elements chemistry and activated reactor materials chemistry. (author)

  4. Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radak, B.; Markovic, V.; Draganic, I.

    1961-01-01

    Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation is relatively new reactor dosimetry method and the number of relevant papers is rather small. Some difficulties in applying standard methods (chemical dosemeters, ionization chambers) exist because of the complexity of radiation. In general application of calorimetric dosemeters for measuring absorbed doses is most precise. In addition to adequate choice of calorimetric bodies there is a possibility of determining the yields of each component of the radiation mixture in the total absorbed dose. This paper contains a short review of the basic calorimetry methods and some results of measurements at the RA reactor in Vinca performed by isothermal calorimeter [sr

  5. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  6. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Kawashima, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the temperature distribution of the reactor container so as to moderate the thermal stress distribution on the reactor wall of LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: A good heat conductor (made of Al or Cu) is appended on the outer side of the reactor container wall from below the liquid level to the lower face of a deck plate. Further, heat insulators are disposed to the outside of the good heat conductor. Furthermore, a gas-cooling duct is circumferentially disposed at the contact portion between the good heat conductor and the deck plate around the reactor container. This enables to flow the cold heat from the liquid metal rapidly through the good heat conductor to the cooling duct and allows to maintain the temperature distribution on the reactor wall substantially linear even with the abrupt temperature change in the liquid metal. Further, by appending the good heat conductor covered with inactive metals not only on the outer side but also on the inside of the reactor wall to introduce the heat near the liquid level to the upper portion and escape the same to the cooling layer below the roof slab, the effect can be improved further. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  8. Numerical Simulation of Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reforming Reactors: Hydrodynamics / Chemical Kinetics Coupling Simulation numérique des réacteurs de reformage catalytique en lit fixe : couplage hydrodynamique-cinétique chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferschneider G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bed reactors with a single fluid phase are widely used in the refining or petrochemical industries for reaction processes catalysed by a solid phase. The design criteria for industrial reactors are relatively well known. However, they rely on a one-dimensional writing and on the separate resolution of the equation of conservation of mass and energy, and of momentum. Thus, with complex geometries, the influence of hydrodynamics on the effectiveness of the catalyst bed cannot be taken into account. The calculation method proposed is based on the multi-dimensional writing and the simultaneous resolution of the local conservation equations. The example discussed concerns fixed-bed catalytic reactors. These reactors are distinguished by their annular geometry and the radial circulation of the feedstock. The flow is assumed to be axisymmetric. The reaction process is reflected by a simplified kinetic mechanism involving ten chemical species. Calculation of the hydrodynamic (mean velocities, pressure, thermal and mass fields (concentration of each species serves to identify the influence of internal components in two industrial reactor geometries. The map of the quantity of coke formed and deposited on the catalyst, calculated by the model, reveals potential areas of poor operation. Les réacteurs à lit fixe avec une seule phase fluide sont largement utilisés dans l'industrie du raffinage et de la pétrochimie, pour mettre en oeuvre un processus réactionnel catalysé par une phase solide. Les règles de conception des réacteurs industriels sont relativement bien connues. Cependant, elles reposent sur l'écriture monodimensionnelle et la résolution séparée, d'une part, des équations de conservation de la masse et de l'énergie et d'autre part, de la quantité de mouvement. Ainsi dans le cas de géométries complexes, l'influence de l'hydrodynamique sur l'efficacité du lit catalytique ne peut être prise en compte. La méthode de calcul

  9. The thermo-mechano-chemical twin-screw reactor, a new perspective for the biorefinery of sunflower whole plant: aqueous extraction of oil and other biopolymers, and production of biodegradable fiberboards from cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evon Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biorefinery of sunflower whole plant was performed successfully using a thermo-mechano-chemical twin-screw reactor. This led to the aqueous extraction of oil and other biopolymers like proteins, pectins and non pectic sugars. It resulted in the overall fractionation of biomass, thus allowing a complete valorization of the input. This biorefinery process was not only efficient but it was also environment-friendly. In addition, it contributed to the production of different end products for various industrial applications. Firstly, the hydrophilic phase will be recycled to the process. Secondly, the densest oil-in-water emulsion is a promising candidate for the formulation of cosmetic creams. Thirdly, the upper hydrophobic phase will be usable for the waterproofing treatment of the surface of agromaterials by coating. Its demixing will also lead to the production of proteins with tensioactive properties. These will serve for the food industry. Lastly, the cake was a mixture of plasticized proteins and lignocellulosic fibers. It was thus considered as a natural composite. Its molding into cohesive fiberboards was conducted successfully using both thermopressing and compression molding processes. The self-bonded boards with high density will be suitable for use as load bearing boards in dry conditions (floor underlayers, interior partitions, furniture, etc.. Positioned in walls and ceilings, boards with medium and low density will contribute to the heat insulation of buildings. In addition, the bulk cake will be also usable as a loose fill insulation material. As proposed, this flow chart thus allows a valorization for all fractions originating from the twin-screw reactor.

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshihito; Sano, Tamotsu; Ueda, Sabuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the liquid surface disturbance in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A horizontal flow suppressing mechanism mainly comprising vertical members is suspended near the free liquid surface of coolants in the upper plenum. The horizontal flow of coolants near the free liquid surface is reduced by the suppressing mechanism to effectively reduce the surface disturbance. The reduction in the liquid surface disturbance further prevails to the entire surface region with no particular vertical variations to the free liquid surface to remarkably improve the preventive performance for the liquid surface disturbance. Accordingly, it is also possible to attain the advantageous effects such as prevention for the thermal fatigue in reactor vessel walls, reactor upper mechanisms, etc. and prevention of burning damage to the reactor core due to the reduction of envolved Ar gas. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  15. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollion, H.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components [fr

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  17. Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  18. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  19. Fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  20. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  1. Nanoscale Polysulfides Reactors Achieved by Chemical Au-S Interaction: Improving the Performance of Li-S Batteries on the Electrode Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Xiao, Pin; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Xie, Hai-Ming; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2015-12-23

    In this work, the chemical interaction of cathode and lithium polysulfides (LiPSs), which is a more targeted approach for completely preventing the shuttle of LiPSs in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, has been established on the electrode level. Through simply posttreating the ordinary sulfur cathode in atmospheric environment just for several minutes, the Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) were well-decorated on/in the surface and pores of the electrode composed of commercial acetylene black (CB) and sulfur powder. The Au NPs can covalently stabilize the sulfur/LiPSs, which is advantageous for restricting the shuttle effect. Moreover, the LiPSs reservoirs of Au NPs with high conductivity can significantly control the deposition of the trapped LiPSs, contributing to the uniform distribution of sulfur species upon charging/discharging. The slight modification of the cathode with batteries. Moreover, this cathode exhibited an excellent anti-self-discharge ability. The slight decoration for the ordinary electrode, which can be easily accessed in the industrial process, provides a facile strategy for improving the performance of commercial carbon-based Li-S batteries toward practical application.

  2. Una reinterpretación de las metodologías económicas “tradicional” y “nueva” a partir de la Teoría de los Modos de Pensamiento de Dow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Garcia-Arias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo empleamos la Teoría de los Modos de Pensamiento (Cartesiano/Euclídeo vs. Babilónico/Estoico, con el objetivo de, a partir de una metodología analítica, realizar un recorrido por las escuelas de Filosofía de la Ciencia más relacionadas con la Economía y ofrecer una reinterpretación de los avances en metodología económica a la luz de las aportaciones de Sheila Dow. La principal conclusión es que nuestra aproximación permite entender cómo parte de las diferencias metodológicas en Economía -y las diferentes maneras en que los economistas hacen Economía-, están basadas en el empleo de modos de pensamiento diferentes.

  3. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  4. Research reactors; Les piles de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarski, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; [Organisation europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1955-07-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  5. Research reactors; Les piles de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarski, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires]|[Organisation europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1955-07-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  6. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Process and device for decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritium and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a process and a device for the decontamination of the wate gases of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritum and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form, in which the waste gas is taken over an oxidation catalyst and then over a hot metal bed, tritium and/or deuterium is released from its compounds, separated from the waste gas and is returned to the fuel circuit. The process is intended to prevent losses of tritum and/or deuterium by permeation and the high loading of the hot metal getter materials, as occurs in the previously known corresponding process, and to avoid the formation of nitrogen oxides. This is achieved by: a) The catalytic oxidation reaction being carried out at a temperature of 200 0 C to 300 0 C. b) The gas mixture then being brought into contact with a hot metal bed at 200 0 C to 300 0 C to remove the remaining O 2 and for the selective conversion of the proportion of water into the hydrogen isotope. c) The gas mixture being brought into contact with a diaphragm made of palladium or a palladium-silver alloy at 400 0 C to 450 0 C to decompose the ammonia, all the released hydrogen isotope being passed through the diaphragm, separated from the remaining waste gas flow and removed. (orig.) [de

  8. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID; Herring, J Stephen [Idaho Falls, ID; Grandy, Jon D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  9. Pulsed Compression Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, T. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-06-07

    The advantages of the Pulsed Compression Reactor (PCR) over the internal combustion engine-type chemical reactors are briefly discussed. Over the last four years a project concerning the fundamentals of the PCR technology has been performed by the University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. In order to assess the feasibility of the application of the PCR principle for the conversion methane to syngas, several fundamental questions needed to be answered. Two important questions that relate to the applicability of the PCR for any process are: how large is the heat transfer rate from a rapidly compressed and expanded volume of gas, and how does this heat transfer rate compare to energy contained in the compressed gas? And: can stable operation with a completely free piston as it is intended with the PCR be achieved?.

  10. Multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulation based on ultra-accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics method for structural materials in boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Akira; Sato, Etsuko; Sato, Ryo; Inaba, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    In collaboration with experimental experts we have reported in the present conference (Hatakeyama, N. et al., “Experiment-integrated multi-scale, multi-physics computational chemistry simulation applied to corrosion behaviour of BWR structural materials”) the results of multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulations applied to the corrosion behaviour of BWR structural materials. In macro-scale, a macroscopic simulator of anode polarization curve was developed to solve the spatially one-dimensional electrochemical equations on the material surface in continuum level in order to understand the corrosion behaviour of typical BWR structural material, SUS304. The experimental anode polarization behaviours of each pure metal were reproduced by fitting all the rates of electrochemical reactions and then the anode polarization curve of SUS304 was calculated by using the same parameters and found to reproduce the experimental behaviour successfully. In meso-scale, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulator was applied to an actual-time simulation of the morphological corrosion behaviour under the influence of an applied voltage. In micro-scale, an ultra-accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics (UA-QCMD) code was applied to various metallic oxide surfaces of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , Cr 2 O 3 modelled as same as water molecules and dissolved metallic ions on the surfaces, then the dissolution and segregation behaviours were successfully simulated dynamically by using UA-QCMD. In this paper we describe details of the multi-scale, multi-physics computational chemistry method especially the UA-QCMD method. This method is approximately 10,000,000 times faster than conventional first-principles molecular dynamics methods based on density-functional theory (DFT), and the accuracy was also validated for various metals and metal oxides compared with DFT results. To assure multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulation based on the UA-QCMD method for

  11. Thermochemical data for reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Turrini, F.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a computer database of thermochemical properties of nuclear reactor materials to be used for source term calculations in reactor accident codes. In the first part, the structure and the content of the computer file is described. In the second part a set of thermochemical data is presented pertaining to chemical reactions occurring during severe nuclear reactor accidents and involving fuel (uranium dioxide), fission products and structural materials. These data are complementary to those collected in the databook recently published by Cordfunke and Potter after a study supported by the Commission of the European Communities. The present data were collected from review articles and databanks and follow a discussion on the uncertainties and errors involved in the calculation of complex chemical equilibria in the extrapolated temperature range

  12. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  13. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  14. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  15. Baking method for thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigetada.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transmission property to the reactor core structures thereby shortening the baking time for the reactor core in thermonuclear reactors. Constitution: High temperature airs are supplied from a baking system to cooling pipeways disposed within reactor core structures and helium gas is supplied from a helium gas supply system through the reactor core structures to the inside of the reactor core for scavenging. The scavenging operation may be combined with vacuum suction. Further, the inside of the reactor is scavenged while maintaining at such a negative pressure as within a range not degrading the heat conduction property. Since the helium gas is chemically inert and poor in the depositing property, it shows no adsorbability even for the material heated to high temperature. Further, since the diffusion and heat conduction properties are high, the heat conduction property to the materials upon baking can be improved to shorten the baking time. No disadvantages are caused by the introduction of the helium gas upon baking. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Reactor accidents of four decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Z.

    1982-11-01

    The report covers the period between 1942 and June 30, 1982. A detailed description and a comparative analysis of reactor accidents and chemical-processing-plant excursions are presented. The analysis takes into account the following points: causes (design, maintenance, operation); events (initiating event and sequence of events); consequences (environmental impacts, personnel effects and equipment damages). (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  19. Globalization : the challenge of the 1990s for the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcock, D.

    1992-01-01

    The challenges facing the chemical industry in Canada were discussed. In recent years, Canada has scored low in polls measuring public confidence in the chemical industry. The industry is also suffering from continuing recession, global competition, increased environmental demands and strict legislation. The impact of globalization, total quality management, free trade, environmental concerns, and government policies on the chemical industry were reviewed. In the view of this author (President and CEO of Dow Chemicals) globalization is not a matter of choice, it is an industry imperative. Survival in the globalized economy will require not only to be successful competitors, but even more importantly to be successful cooperators with other stakeholders, and successful in forming partnerships with customers

  20. Sodium fast reactors with closed fuel cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Baldev; Vasudeva Rao, PR 0

    2015-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors with Closed Fuel Cycle delivers a detailed discussion of an important technology that is being harnessed for commercial energy production in many parts of the world. Presenting the state of the art of sodium-cooled fast reactors with closed fuel cycles, this book:Offers in-depth coverage of reactor physics, materials, design, safety analysis, validations, engineering, construction, and commissioning aspectsFeatures a special chapter on allied sciences to highlight advanced reactor core materials, specialized manufacturing technologies, chemical sensors, in-service inspecti

  1. A Novel TiQ2-Assisted Solar Photocatalytic Batch-Process Disinfection Reactor for the Treatment of Biological and Chemical Contaminants in Domestic Drinking Water in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, E. F.; Al Touati, F.; Kehoe, S. C.; McLoughlin, O. A.; Gill, L. W.; Gernjak, W.; Oller, I.; Maldonado, M. I.; Malato, S.; Cassidy, John; Reed, R. H.; McGuigan, K. G.

    2004-01-01

    he technical feasibility and performance of photocatalytic Ti02 coatings in batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) reactors to improve potability of drinking water in developing countries have been studied. Borosilicate glass and PET plastic SODIS reactors fitted with flexible plastic inserts coated with Ti02 powder were shown to be 2(Jt1o and 25% more effective, respectively, than standard SODIS reactors for the inactivation of E. coli K12. Isopropanol at 100 ppm concentration levels was o...

  2. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  3. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  4. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  6. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  9. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  10. New about research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorenkov, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The multi-purpose research reactor MAPLE (Canada) and concept of new reactor MAPLE-CNF as will substitute the known Canadian research reactor NRU are described. New reactor will be used as contributor for investigations into materials, neutron beams and further developments for the CANDU type reactor. The Budapest research reactor (BRR) and its application after the last reconstruction are considered also [ru

  11. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  12. High-temperature and breeder reactors - economic nuclear reactors of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djalilzadeh, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The thesis begins with a review of the theory of nuclear fission and sections on the basic technology of nuclear reactors and the development of the first generation of gas-cooled reactors applied to electricity generation. It then deals in some detail with currently available and suggested types of high temperature reactor and with some related subsidiary issues such as the coupling of different reactor systems and various schemes for combining nuclear reactors with chemical processes (hydrogenation, hydrogen production, etc.), going on to discuss breeder reactors and their application. Further sections deal with questions of cost, comparison of nuclear with coal- and oil-fired stations, system analysis of reactor systems and the effect of nuclear generation on electricity supply. (C.J.O.G.)

  13. Nordic studies in reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Programme SIK programme in reactor safety is part of a major joint Nordic research effort in nuclear safety. The report summarizes the achievements of the SIK programme, which was carried out during 1990-1993 in collaboration between Nordic nuclear utilities, safety authorities, and research institutes. Three main projects were successfully completed dealing with: 1) development and application of a living PSA concept for monitoring the risk of core damage, and of safety indicators for early warning of possible safety problems; 2) review and intercomparison of severe accident codes, case studies of potential core melt accidents in nordic reactors, development of chemical models for the MAAP code, and outline of a system for computerized accident management support; 3) compilation of information about design and safety features of neighbouring reactors in Germany, Lithuania and Russia, and for naval reactors and nuclear submarines. The report reviews the state-of-the-art in each subject matter as an introduction to the individual project summaries. The main findings of each project are highlighted. The report also contains an overview of reactor safety research in the Nordic countries and a summary of fundamental reactor safety principles. (au) (69 refs.)

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  18. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  3. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Sakae.

    1990-01-01

    At least one valve rack is disposed in a reactor building, on which pipeways to a main closure valve, valves and bypasses of turbines are placed and contained. The valve rack is fixed to the main body of the building or to a base mat. Since the reactor building is designed as class A earthquake-proofness and for maintaining the S 1 function, the valve rack can be fixed to the building main body or to the base mat. With such a constitution, the portions for maintaining the S 1 function are concentrated to the reactor building. As a result, the dispersion of structures of earthquake-proof portion corresponding to the reference earthquake vibration S 1 can be prevented. Accordingly, the conditions for the earthquake-proof design of the turbine building and the turbine/electric generator supporting rack are defined as only the class B earthquake-proof design conditions. In view of the above, the amount of building materials can be saved and the time for construction can be shortened. (I.S.)

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. MLR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Hatamiya, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Terufumi; Fukui, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Murase, Michio; Naito, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    In order to suppress the pressure elevation in a reactor container due to high temperature and high pressure steams jetted out upon pipeway rupture accidents in the reactor container, the steams are introduced to a pressure suppression chamber for condensating them in stored coolants. However, the ability for suppressing the pressure elevation and steam coagulation are deteriorated due to the presence of inactive incondensible gases. Then, there are disposed a vent channel for introducing the steams in a dry well to a pressure suppression chamber in the reactor pressure vessel, a closed space disposed at the position lower than a usual liquid level, a first channel having an inlet in the pressure suppression chamber and an exit in the closed space and a second means connected by way of a backflow checking means for preventing the flow directing to the closed space. The first paths are present by plurality, a portion of which constitutes a syphon. The incondensible gases and the steams are discharged to the dry well at high pressure by using the difference of the water head for a long cooling time after the pipeway rupture accident. Then, safety can be improved without using dynamic equipments as driving source. (N.H.)

  8. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  9. Method to chemically decontaminate nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertholdt, H.O.

    1984-01-01

    The large decontamination of components of the primary circuit of activated corrosion products in the oxide layer of the structure materials firstly involves an approx. 1 hour oxidation treatment with alkali permanganate solution. Following intermediate rinsing with deionate, they are etched with an inhibited citrate-oxalate solution for 5-20 hours. This is followed by post-treatment with a citric acid/H2O2 solution containing suspended fiber particles. (orig./PW)

  10. Transport phenomena for chemical reactor design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belfiore, Laurence A

    2003-01-01

    ...-Averaged Specific Heats, 48 3-2 Conversion Dependence of Mass Fraction and Heat Capacity of the Mixture, 50 3-3 Plug-Flow Mass Balance in Terms of CO Conversion, 51 3-4 Thermal Energy Balance for ...

  11. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  12. Increased SRP reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  13. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  15. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  18. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  19. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units

  20. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  2. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  3. Reactor monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tamotsu.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors a reactor so that each of the operations for the relocation of fuel assemblies and the withdrawal and the insertion of control rods upon exchange of fuel assemblies and control rods in the reactor. That is, when an operator conducts relocating operation by way of a fuel assembly operation section, the device of the present invention judges whether the operation indication is adequate or not, based on the information of control rod arrangement in a control rod memory section. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to a fuel assembly relocating device. Further, when the operator conducts control rod operation by way of a control rod operation section, the device of the present invention judges in the control rod withdrawal judging section, as to whether the operation indication given by the operator is adequate or not by comparing it with fuel assembly arrangement information. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to control rod drives. With such procedures, increase of nuclear heating upon occurrence of erroneous operation can be prevented. (I.S.)

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  5. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  6. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-11-01

    This single page document is the November 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the production reactor.

  7. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-01

    This single page document is the October 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  8. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-15

    This single page document is the October 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  9. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-09-15

    This single page document is the September 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  10. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-15

    This single page document is the December 16, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  11. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-01

    This single page document is the December 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  12. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  13. The CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Two main research reactors, specifically designed, PEGASE reactor and Laue-Langevin high flux reactor, are presented. The PEGASE reactor was designed at the end of the 50s for the study of the gas cooled reactor fuel element behaviour under irradiation; the HFR reactor, was designed in the late 60s to serve as a high yield and high level neutron source. Historical backgrounds, core and fuel characteristics and design, flux characteristics, etc., are presented. 5 figs

  14. Solar chemical heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.; Levitan, R.; Rosin, H.; Rubin, R.

    1991-08-01

    The performance of a solar chemical heat pipe was studied using CO 2 reforming of methane as a vehicle for storage and transport of solar energy. The endothermic reforming reaction was carried out in an Inconel reactor, packed with a Rh catalyst. The reactor was suspended in an insulated box receiver which was placed in the focal plane of the Schaeffer Solar Furnace of the Weizman Institute of Science. The exothermic methanation reaction was run in a 6-stage adiabatic reactor filled with the same Rh catalyst. Conversions of over 80% were achieved for both reactions. In the closed loop mode the products from the reformer and from the metanator were compressed into separate storage tanks. The two reactions were run either separately or 'on-line'. The complete process was repeated for over 60 cycles. The overall performance of the closed loop was quite satisfactory and scale-up work is in progress in the Solar Tower. (authors). 35 refs., 2 figs

  15. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  16. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  17. Safeguards challenges of Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Although the safeguards system of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) seems similar to that of Light Water Reactor (LWR), it was raised safeguards challenges of SFR that resulted from the visual opacity of liquid sodium, chemical reactivity of sodium and other characteristics of fast reactor. As it is the basic concept stage of the safeguards of SFR in Korea, this study tried to analyze the latest similar study of safeguards issues of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) at Joyo and Monju in Japan. For this reason, this study is to introduce some potential safeguards challenges of Fast Breeder Reactor. With this analysis, future study could be to address the safeguards challenges of SFR in Korea

  18. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  19. Flow Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The twelve principles of Green Chemistry presented by Anastas and Warner provide the philosophical basis and identify potential areas to increase the level of greenness in designing or implementing chemical reactions in the pharmaceutical industry. With these efforts in mind, the...

  20. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  1. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  4. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Hideyasu; Oyamada, Osamu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a container for a reactor provided with a pressure suppressing chamber pool which can prevent bubble vibrating load, particularly negative pressure generated at the time of starting to release exhaust from a main steam escape-safety valve from being transmitted to a lower liner plate of the container. Constitution: This arrangement is characterized in that a safety valve exhaust pool for main steam escape, in which a pressure suppressing chamber pool is separated and intercepted from pool water in the pressure suppressing chamber pool, a safety valve exhaust pipe is open into said safety valve exhaust pool, and an isolator member, which isolates the bottom liner plate in the pressure suppressing chamber pool from the pool water, is disposed on the bottom of the safety valve exhaust pool. (Nakamura, S.)

  5. Overview moderator material for nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairing Manutu Pongtuluran; Hendra Prihatnadi

    2009-01-01

    In order for a reactor design is considered acceptable absolute technical requirement is fulfilled because the most important part of a reactor design. Safety considerations emphasis on the handling of radioactive substances emitted during the operation of a reactor and radioactive waste handling. Moderator material is a layer that interacts directly with neutrons split the nuclear fuel that will lead to changes in physical properties, nuclear properties, mechanical properties and chemical properties. Reviews moderator of this time is of the types of moderator is often used to meet the requirements as nuclear material. (author)

  6. The dismantling of fast reactors: sodium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Berte, M.; Serpante, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Fast reactors require a coolant that does not slow down neutrons so water can not be used. Metallic sodium has been chosen because of its outstanding neutronic and thermal properties but sodium reacts easily with air and water and this implies that sodium-smeary components can not be considered as usual nuclear wastes. A stage of sodium neutralizing is necessary in the processing of wastes from fast reactors. Metallic sodium is turned into a chemically stable compound: soda, carbonates or sodium salts. This article presents several methods used by Framatome in an industrial way when dismantling sodium-cooled reactors. (A.C.)

  7. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  8. Lifelong Learning: The Value of an Industrial Internship for a Graduate Student Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Gregory S.; Pazmino, Jorge H.; Hickman, Daniel A.; Varma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A chemical engineering PhD student from Purdue University completed an internship at The Dow Chemical Company, evaluating the effect of scale on the hydrodynamics of a trickle bed reactor. A unique aspect of this work was that it arose from an ongoing collaboration, so that the project was within the scope of the graduate student's thesis. This…

  9. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  10. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 -UF 4 ) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate [fr

  11. Vitrification of reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The vitrification of low and intermediate level wastes from the NPP operation has been studied in the frame of a Franco-Czech agreement. The laboratory experiments concentrated on a search for a suitable borosilicate glass matrix which could incorporate relatively high quantities of boron and sodium, main components of liquid wastes from the WWER reactor type NPPs. A relatively wide area of waste compositions has been studied and properties of glasses suitable for the technology and waste disposal were measured. Great attention has been paid to the chemical stability (leachability), other properties like thermal dependence of viscosity and electrical conductivity of melts, and the microstructure of the final solidification product have also been evaluated. The feasibility of the vitrification process has been proved during pilot plant tests which were accomplished at the French establishment in Marcoule. The results of tests were promising. (authors). 4 tabs., 7 figs

  12. Vitrification of reactor wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A [CEA Centre d` Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. des Procedes de Retraitement; Sussmilch, J [Nuclear Research Institut, Rez (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    The vitrification of low and intermediate level wastes from the NPP operation has been studied in the frame of a Franco-Czech agreement. The laboratory experiments concentrated on a search for a suitable borosilicate glass matrix which could incorporate relatively high quantities of boron and sodium, main components of liquid wastes from the WWER reactor type NPPs. A relatively wide area of waste compositions has been studied and properties of glasses suitable for the technology and waste disposal were measured. Great attention has been paid to the chemical stability (leachability), other properties like thermal dependence of viscosity and electrical conductivity of melts, and the microstructure of the final solidification product have also been evaluated. The feasibility of the vitrification process has been proved during pilot plant tests which were accomplished at the French establishment in Marcoule. The results of tests were promising. (authors). 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  14. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kimitaka; Fukuie, Ken; Iijima, Tooru; Shimpo, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor for exchanging fuels by pulling up reactor core upper mechanisms, a connection mechanism is disposed for connecting the top of the reactor core and the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms. In addition, a cylindrical body is disposed surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, and a support member is disposed to the cylindrical body for supporting an intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is connected to the top of the reactor core. Same displacements are caused to both of them upon occurrence of earthquakes and, as a result, it is possible to eliminate mutual horizontal displacement between a control rod guide hole of the reactor core upper mechanisms and a control rod insertion hole of the reactor core. In addition, since the intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms is supported by the support member disposed to the cylindrical body surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, deformation caused to the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is reduced, so that the mutual horizontal displacement with respect to the control rod insertion hole of the reactor core can be reduced. As a result, performance of control rod insertion upon occurrence of the earthquakes is improved, so that reactor shutdown is conducted more reliably to improve reactor safety. (N.H.)

  15. The prototype fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), which is a liquid metal cooled fast reactor power station, situated at Dounreay, Scotland. The principal design features of a Fast Reactor and the PFR are given, along with key points of operating history, and health and safety features. The role of the PFR in the development programme for commercial reactors is discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  17. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities

  18. Reactor safety method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  19. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  20. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  1. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  2. Thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutomi, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Moroo; Sawai, Yuichi; Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon composited with reinforcing metals is used for a divertor cooling substrate having an effect as a cooling tube to provide a silicon base composite material having increased electric resistance and toughness. The blending ratio of reinforcing materials in the form of granules, whiskers or long fibers is controlled in order to control heat conductivity, electric resistivity and mechanical performances. The divertor cooling substrate comprising the silicon base composite material is integrated with a plasma facing material. The production method therefor includes ordinary metal matrix composite forming methods such as powder metallurgy, melting penetration method, high pressure solidification casting method, centrifugal casting method and vacuum casting method. Since the cooling plate is constituted with the light metal and highly electric resistant metal base composite material, sharing force due to eddy current can be reduced, and radiation exposure can be minimized. Accordingly, a cooling structure for a thermonuclear reactor effective for the improvement of environmental problems caused by waste disposal can be attained. (N.H.)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  6. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author gives a survey of 'fast breeder reactors'. In detail the process of breeding, the reasons for the development of fast breeders, the possible breeder reactors, the design criteria, fuels, cladding, coolant, and safety aspects are reported on. Design data of some experimental reactors already in operation are summarized in stabular form. 300 MWe Prototype-Reactors SNR-300 and PFR are explained in detail and data of KWU helium-cooled fast breeder reactors are given. (HR) [de

  7. Laser reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellak, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    A device is described for producing reactions in the chemical to thermonuclear range and beyond. Physical principles entail pressures, kinetic temperatures, and electromagnetic field strengths obtainable from convergent electromagnetic energy. Process converges closed electromagnetic wave on reactants thereby heating, compressing and confining, and stressing reactants under focal electromagnetic intensities, inducing endothermic, equithermic, exothermic or combination reactions, all types furnishing energy useful externally and the exothermic type furnishing energy useful as feedback for generating new electromagnetic waves for process cyclic operation. Embodiment consists of closed shell lasing element enclosing reaction chamber, source of reactants, sink for reactant by-products, and a source of initial energy for priming the lasing element

  8. Industrialization of hot wire chemical vapor deposition for thin film applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical

  9. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J. K.; Moseley, F.

    1960-01-01

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author) [fr

  10. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  11. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, G.; Eberhardt, K.; Trautmann, N.

    2006-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Institut fuer Kernchemie became first critical on August 3 rd , 1965. It can be operated in the steady state mode with a maximum power of 100 kWth and in the pulse mode with a peak power of 250 MWth. A survey of the research programmes performed at the TRIGA Mainz is given covering applications in basic research as well as applied science in nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics. Furthermore, the reactor is used for neutron activation analysis and for education and training of scientists, teachers, students and technical personal. Important projects for the future of the TRIGA Mainz are the UCN (ultra cold neutrons) experiment, fast chemical separation, medical applications and the use of the NAA as well as the use of the reactor facility for the training of students in the fields of nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics and radiation protection. Taking into account the past and future operation schedule and the typically low burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements (∝4 g U-235/a), the reactor can be operated for at least the next decade taking into account the fresh fuel elements on stock and without changing spent fuels. (orig.)

  12. CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF HYDROXYPROPYL STARCH IN A STATIC MIXER REACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMMERS, G; STAMHUIS, EJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    A novel type of reactor for the chemical derivatization of starch pastes is presented. The design is based on the application of static mixers. The reactor shows excellent plug flow behaviour with a Peclet number of about 100. The viscosity behaviour of concentrated starch pastes in the static mixer

  13. Evaluation of an automated struvite reactor to recover phosphorus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-03

    Apr 3, 2015 ... A reactor was developed that can run fully automated and recover up to 93% ..... uncertainty. This technique will work best when the concentration of ... Ken Jack at the School of Chemical Engineering to help build the reactor ...

  14. Industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, G.J.; Chewter, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    To reveal trends in the design and operation of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors, this paper describes, in historical sequence, three industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors developed and operated by Shell Chemicals during the last five decades. For each case, we

  15. 04 - Sodium cooled fast breeder fourth-generation reactors - The experimental reactor ALLEGRO, the other ways for fast breeder fourth-generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The authors first present the technology of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors (basic principles, specific innovations, feasibility studies, fuel element, safety) and notably the ALLEGRO project (design options and expected performances, preliminary safety demonstration). Then, they present the lead-cooled fast-breeder reactor technology: interests and obstacles, return on experience, the issue of lead density, neutron assessment, transmutation potential, dosimetry, safety chemical properties and compatibility with the fuel, water, air and steels. The next part addresses the technology of molten-salt fast-breeder reactors: choice of the liquid fuel and geometry, reactor concept (difficulties, lack of past R and D), demonstration and demonstrators, international context

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of bubble column reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, W.

    2010-01-01

    Due to various advantages, such as simple geometry, ease of operation, low operating and maintenance costs, excellent heat and mass transfer characteristics, bubble column reactors are frequently used in chemical, petrochemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, metallurgical industries for a variety of

  17. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  18. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments for and against the fast breeder reactor are debated. The case for the fast reactor is that the world energy demand will increase due to increasing population over the next forty years and that the damage to the global environment from burning fossil fuels which contribute to the greenhouse effect. Nuclear fission is the only large scale energy source which can achieve a cut in the use of carbon based fuels although energy conservation and renewable sources will also be important. Fast reactors produce more energy from uranium than other types of (thermal) reactors such as AGRs and PWRs. Fast reactors would be important from about 2020 onwards especially as by then many thermal reactors will need to be replaced. Fast reactors are also safer than normal reactors. The arguments against fast reactors are largely economic. The cost, especially the capital cost is very high. The viability of the technology is also questioned. (UK)

  19. Chemical considerations in severe accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Kress, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study presented the first systematic attempt to include fission product physicochemical effects in the determination of expected consequences of hypothetical nuclear reactor power plant accidents. At the time, however, the data base was sparse, and the treatment of fission product behavior was not entirely consistent or accurate. Considerable research has since been performed to identify and understand chemical phenomena that can occur in the course of a nuclear reactor accident, and how these phenomena affect fission product behavior. In this report, the current status of our understanding of the chemistry of fission products in severe core damage accidents is summarized and contrasted with that of the Reactor Safety Study

  20. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)