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Sample records for double-flash experiments resolve

  1. Musicians have enhanced audiovisual multisensory binding: experience-dependent effects in the double-flash illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2016-10-01

    Musical training is associated with behavioral and neurophysiological enhancements in auditory processing for both musical and nonmusical sounds (e.g., speech). Yet, whether the benefits of musicianship extend beyond enhancements to auditory-specific skills and impact multisensory (e.g., audiovisual) processing has yet to be fully validated. Here, we investigated multisensory integration of auditory and visual information in musicians and nonmusicians using a double-flash illusion, whereby the presentation of multiple auditory stimuli (beeps) concurrent with a single visual object (flash) induces an illusory perception of multiple flashes. We parametrically varied the onset asynchrony between auditory and visual events (leads and lags of ±300 ms) to quantify participants' "temporal window" of integration, i.e., stimuli in which auditory and visual cues were fused into a single percept. Results show that musically trained individuals were both faster and more accurate at processing concurrent audiovisual cues than their nonmusician peers; nonmusicians had a higher susceptibility for responding to audiovisual illusions and perceived double flashes over an extended range of onset asynchronies compared to trained musicians. Moreover, temporal window estimates indicated that musicians' windows (audiovisual binding. Collectively, findings indicate a more refined binding of auditory and visual cues in musically trained individuals. We conclude that experience-dependent plasticity of intensive musical experience extends beyond simple listening skills, improving multimodal processing and the integration of multiple sensory systems in a domain-general manner.

  2. Enlarged temporal integration window in schizophrenia indicated by the double-flash illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haß, Katharina; Sinke, Christopher; Reese, Tanya; Roy, Mandy; Wiswede, Daniel; Dillo, Wolfgang; Oranje, Bob; Szycik, Gregor R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the present study we were interested in the processing of audio-visual integration in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. The amount of sound-induced double-flash illusions served as an indicator of audio-visual integration. We expected an altered integration as well as a

  3. Experiments towards resolving the proton charge radius puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Antognini, A; Amaro, F D; Amaro, P; Abdou-Ahmed, M; Biraben, F; Chen, T -L; Covita, D S; Dax, A J; Diepold, M; Fernandes, L M P; Franke, B; Galtier, S; Gouvea, A L; Götzfried, J; Graf, T; Hänsch, T W; Hildebrandt, M; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Kirch, K; Knecht, A; Kottmann, F; Krauth, J J; Liu, Y -W; Machado, J; Monteiro, C M B; Mulhauser, F; Nez, F; Santos, J P; Santos, J M F dos; Szabo, C I; Taqqu, D; Veloso, J F C A; Voss, A; Weichelt, B; Pohl, R

    2015-01-01

    We review the status of the proton charge radius puzzle. Emphasis is given to the various experiments initiated to resolve the conflict between the muonic hydrogen results and the results from scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy.

  4. Experiments towards resolving the proton charge radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antognini A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status of the proton charge radius puzzle. Emphasis is given to the various experiments initiated to resolve the conflict between the muonic hydrogen results and the results from scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy.

  5. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Roschewsky, Niklas; Schreier, Michael; Kamra, Akashdeep; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our th...

  6. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roschewsky, Niklas, E-mail: niklas.roschewsky@wmi.badw.de; Schreier, Michael; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Geprägs, Stephan [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Kamra, Akashdeep [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-19

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our thin film hybrid structures.

  7. Altered cross-modal processing in the primary auditory cortex of congenitally deaf adults: a visual-somatosensory fMRI study with a double-flash illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karns, Christina M; Dow, Mark W; Neville, Helen J

    2012-07-11

    The developing brain responds to the environment by using statistical correlations in input to guide functional and structural changes-that is, the brain displays neuroplasticity. Experience shapes brain development throughout life, but neuroplasticity is variable from one brain system to another. How does the early loss of a sensory modality affect this complex process? We examined cross-modal neuroplasticity in anatomically defined subregions of Heschl's gyrus, the site of human primary auditory cortex, in congenitally deaf humans by measuring the fMRI signal change in response to spatially coregistered visual, somatosensory, and bimodal stimuli. In the deaf Heschl's gyrus, signal change was greater for somatosensory and bimodal stimuli than that of hearing participants. Visual responses in Heschl's gyrus, larger in deaf than hearing, were smaller than those elicited by somatosensory stimulation. In contrast to Heschl's gyrus, in the superior-temporal cortex visual signal was comparable to somatosensory signal. In addition, deaf adults perceived bimodal stimuli differently; in contrast to hearing adults, they were susceptible to a double-flash visual illusion induced by two touches to the face. Somatosensory and bimodal signal change in rostrolateral Heschl's gyrus predicted the strength of the visual illusion in the deaf adults in line with the interpretation that the illusion is a functional consequence of the altered cross-modal organization observed in deaf auditory cortex. Our results demonstrate that congenital and profound deafness alters how vision and somatosensation are processed in primary auditory cortex.

  8. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  9. A simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved experiment for fully resolved scalar coupling information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Jinyong; Lin, Yanqin; Barker, Peter B.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Proton-proton scalar coupling plays an important role in molecular structure elucidation. Many methods have been proposed for revealing scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons. However, determining all JHH values within a fully coupled network remains as a tedious process. Here, we propose a method termed as simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved spectroscopy (SMS-SEJRES) for simultaneously measuring JHH values out of all coupling networks in a sample within one experiment. In this work, gradient-encoded selective refocusing, PSYCHE decoupling and echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) detection module are adopted, resulting in different selective J-edited spectra extracted from different spatial positions. The proposed pulse sequence can facilitate the analysis of molecular structures. Therefore, it will interest scientists who would like to efficiently address the structural analysis of molecules.

  10. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  11. Resolving 7 problems with OPERA's superluminal neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Physicists have raised many troubling inconsistencies with the OPERA claim of superluminal neutrinos that cast doubt on its validity. This paper examines ways that 7 of these inconsistencies can be resolved. It also discusses evidence that the electron neutrino is superluminal, based on previously published cosmic ray observations, and secondarily a re-examination of tritium beta decay data.

  12. Retrieving the susceptibility from time-resolved terahertz experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schins, J.M.; Hendry, E.; Bonn, M.; Muller, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical expression for the observed signal in time- and phase-resolved pump-probe studies, with particular emphasis on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Maxwell’s equations are solved for the response of damped, harmonic oscillators to a driving probe field in the perturbative reg

  13. A Thought Experiment to Resolve the Black Hole Information Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Felde, Kay zum

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed \\cite{almheiri2012,almheiri2013} that the black hole information paradox is been solved by assuming so-called firewalls, which destroy incoming observers. They violate $CPT$ invariance are thus violate quantum mechanics. Hawking \\cite{hawking2014} objected these proposals, proposing recently that information is not lost behind the event horizon. Thus the horizon is becoming apparent. The forming of the black hole becomes chaotic. It will be like weather forecast on earth, unitarity is conserved. Vaz showed justified that view and evaluated that no singularity is coming into existence, while building a black hole \\cite{vaz2014}. We propose two mechanisms how the black hole information paradox can be resolved. This incorporates also the so-called firewall paradox. The first process is that the black hole shrinks by a first order transition, where the entropy is discontinuous, and which results in a latent heat. The first order transition is a transition from a spacetime which is build of cu...

  14. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  15. Time Resolved Experiments at the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECR Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Runkel, S; Hohn, O; Mironov, V; Shirkov, G D; Schempp, A; Schmidt-Böcking, H

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the basic production processes of highly charged ions and combined phenomena of an ECRIS plasma (e. g. influence of secondary electrons and plasma instabilities) time resolved experiments have been carried out at the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECRIS [1] (see also the contributions to this workshop by O. Hohn et al. and V. Mironov et al.). We report time resolved measurements of the extracted ion currents by pulsing the biased disk voltage [2]. The measurements have shown that the extracted ion currents respond too fast to explain the "biased disk effect" (i. e. the intensity increase of highly charged ions) by enhanced ion breeding. Furthermore the influence of the pulsed biased disk on plasma instabilities has been investigated. It has also been shown that this method can be used to extract pulsed ion beams from an ECRIS.

  16. New level-resolved collision data for neutral argon, benchmarked against the ALEXIS plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nicholas; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor; Thomas, Ed

    2016-10-01

    Performing spectroscopic measurements of emission lines in low temperature laboratory plasmas is challenging because the plasma is often neutral-dominated and not in thermal equilibrium. The densities and temperatures are such that coronal models do not apply; meaning that generalized collisional-radiative (GCR) methods must be employed to theoretically analyze atomic processes. However, for most noble gases, detailed, level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low-charge states does not exist in the literature. We report on a new project, where we use existing atomic physics codes to calculate level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low charge states of argon and compare with previously published, term-resolved theoretical results. In addition, we use the Atomic Structure and Data Analysis (ADAS) suite of codes to calculate a GCR model for low temperature neutral argon, which we compare to published measurements of argon optical emission cross sections. Finally, we compare synthetic spectra generated from our data with observations taken from the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) in an attempt to develop new optical plasma diagnostics for electron temperature and plasma density measurements. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Grant Number: DE-FG02-00ER54476.

  17. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Cooke, David G.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the numerical analysis of a time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy experiment using a modified finite-difference time-domain method. Using this method, we show that ultrafast carrier dynamics can be extracted with a time resolution smaller than the duration of the THz...... probe pulse and can be determined solely by the pump pulse duration. Our method is found to reproduce complicated two-dimensional transient conductivity maps exceedingly well, demonstrating the power of the time-domain numerical method for extracting ultrafast and dynamic transport parameters from time...

  18. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  19. Director tumbling of nematic wormlike micelles under shear: time-resolved rheo-NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyavsky, N. [Dept. of Physics, Baltic State Academy, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Quijada-Garrido, I. [Inst. de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Schmidt, C. [Dept. Chemie, Univ. Paderborn (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Nematic liquid crystals show a complex flow behavior due to the coupling between orientation and flow. Some materials show a stable director orientation in steady shear flow (flow aligning), while for others no stable director orientation exists (tumbling). Director tumbling gives rise to oscillations of shear and normal stresses in rheological experiments and can be detected by optical methods, for example by microscopy or birefringence measurements. We have used deuterium NMR spectroscopy to observe shear-induced director orientations. In the lyotropic system cetylpyridinium chloride/hexanol/brine, which forms a nematic phase of wormlike micelles, time-resolved observations of the director orientation by means of deuterium NMR spectroscopy of D{sub 2}O have been possible for the first time. The time-dependence of the director orientations in both shear start-up and flow-reversal experiments will be presented. (orig.)

  20. State-resolved valence shell photoionization of Be-like ions: experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A; Schippers, S; Braeuning, H [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Phaneuf, R A; Lu, M [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Kilcoyne, A L D; Schlachter, A S [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McLaughlin, B M, E-mail: Alfred.Mueller@iamp.physik.uni-giessen.d [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CTAMOP), School of Mathematics and Physics, The David Bates Building, 7 College Park, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-28

    High-resolution photoionization experiments were carried out using beams of Be-like C{sup 2} {sup +}, N{sup 3} {sup +} and O{sup 4} {sup +} ions with roughly equal populations of the {sup 1}S ground state and the {sup 3}P{sup o} manifold of metastable components. The energy scales of the experiments are calibrated with uncertainties of 1-10 meV depending on photon energy. Resolving powers beyond 20 000 were reached allowing for the separation of contributions from the individual metastable {sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 1} and {sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 2} states. The measured data compare favourably with semi-relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations.

  1. Clinical hypnosis with a Little League baseball population: performance enhancement and resolving traumatic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2011-01-01

    A model for the use of clinical hypnosis with a Little League population was proposed and outlined with dual emphasis: performance enhancement and resolving traumatic experiences. The Performance Enhancement Training Model was developed to enhance performance with this non-patient population. It employed clinical hypnosis to bring to fruition recommendations made by coaches to enhance players' batting proficiency. The second emphasis of the proposed model focused on the resolution of involuntary maladaptive habits secondary to a traumatic experience that impede or compromise optimum performance. Included in this category were detrimental defensive habits "at the plate" after a beaming by a pitch and detrimental defensive habits "on the field" after being hit by a batted ball.

  2. Resolving the uncertainty of preterm symptoms: women's experiences with the onset of preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marianne E; Saks, Nancy P; Harris, Susan

    2002-01-01

    To describe expectant women's experiences with the onset of preterm labor. Qualitative, using grounded theory methods. Southwestern tertiary women's hospital. Thirty pregnant women who were less than 35 weeks gestation, had experienced preterm labor within the past 7 days, and had no previous experience with preterm labor. Taped and transcribed interviews. Themes that emerged from the interview data included the following: recognition and naming of sensations, a consistent pattern of attribution of symptoms, the threat or risk inferred by the attributed cause of the symptom pattern, the associated certainty or uncertainty about these attributions, the process of interpreting and verifying symptom meaning, and the decision to self-manage the symptoms or engage health care assistance. The core process of women experiencing the onset of preterm labor symptoms was identified as "resolving the uncertainty of preterm labor symptoms: recognizing and responding to the possibilities." Preterm labor often is not within expectant women's consciousness. They may attribute the symptoms to nonthreatening causes, which results in delays in seeking care for preterm labor. Education about symptom patterns at the onset of preterm labor will increase the probability that women and their health care providers will recognize and interpret the early, subtle symptoms that herald the onset of preterm labor. Uncertainty in illness theory and attribution theory offer frameworks for understanding women's experiences with the onset of preterm labor.

  3. Halide (Cl(super -)) Quenching of Quinine Sulfate Fluorescence: A Time-Resolved Fluorescence Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutow, Jonathan H.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence experiment investigating the halide quenching of fluorescence from quinine sulfate in water is described. The objectives of the experiment include reinforcing student understanding of the kinetics of competing pathways, making connections with microscopic theories of kinetics through comparison of experimental and…

  4. A novel setup for time-resolved X-ray diffraction on gas gun experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, Frédéric; Chauvin, Camille; Loyen, Arnaud; Combes, Philippe; Petit, Jacques; Bland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions in metals have been investigated for a long time under dynamic loadings through usual dynamic compression diagnostics such as velocity and temperature measurements. Such measurements were valuable for revealing the key role of kinetic effects in most phase transition mechanisms. However, the information extracted was mostly macroscopic. Obtaining direct insight about the crystallographic structure under dynamic loadings is critical for understanding mechanisms governing shock-induced structural changes. For example, in order to evidence a mixture phase or to determine the time scale of a transition, structural information may be extremely valuable. Over the last 20 years a significant number of X-ray diffraction experiments were carried under dynamic loading, either using laboratory X-ray sources or synchrotron radiation. We are developing a novel experimental setup based on a compact High Pulsed Power generator capable of producing intense X radiation through an X-pinch X-ray source. This source is specifically designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry on gas gun experiments. Promising preliminary diffraction data obtained under static conditions are presented.

  5. Assessment of In Situ Time Resolved Shock Experiments at Synchrotron Light Sources*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belak, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Hessler, J. P.

    2005-07-01

    Prior to fielding in situ time resolved experiments of shock wave loading at the Advanced Photon Source, we have performed feasibility experiments assessing a single photon bunch. Using single and poly-crystal Al, Ti, V and Cu shock to incipient spallation on the gas gun, samples were prepared from slices normal to the spall plane of thickness 100-500 microns. In addition, single crystal Al of thickness 500 microns was shocked to incipient spallation and soft recovered using the LLNL e-gun mini-flyer system. The e-gun mini-flyer impacts the sample target producing a 10's ns flat-top shock transient. Here, we present results for imaging, small-angle scattering (SAS), and diffraction. In particular, there is little SAS away from the spall plane and significant SAS at the spall plane, demonstrating the presence of sub-micron voids. * Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 and work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  6. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  7. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  8. Efficient Optimization of Stimuli for Model-Based Design of Experiments to Resolve Dynamical Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdluli, Thembi; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2015-09-01

    This model-based design of experiments (MBDOE) method determines the input magnitudes of an experimental stimuli to apply and the associated measurements that should be taken to optimally constrain the uncertain dynamics of a biological system under study. The ideal global solution for this experiment design problem is generally computationally intractable because of parametric uncertainties in the mathematical model of the biological system. Others have addressed this issue by limiting the solution to a local estimate of the model parameters. Here we present an approach that is independent of the local parameter constraint. This approach is made computationally efficient and tractable by the use of: (1) sparse grid interpolation that approximates the biological system dynamics, (2) representative parameters that uniformly represent the data-consistent dynamical space, and (3) probability weights of the represented experimentally distinguishable dynamics. Our approach identifies data-consistent representative parameters using sparse grid interpolants, constructs the optimal input sequence from a greedy search, and defines the associated optimal measurements using a scenario tree. We explore the optimality of this MBDOE algorithm using a 3-dimensional Hes1 model and a 19-dimensional T-cell receptor model. The 19-dimensional T-cell model also demonstrates the MBDOE algorithm's scalability to higher dimensions. In both cases, the dynamical uncertainty region that bounds the trajectories of the target system states were reduced by as much as 86% and 99% respectively after completing the designed experiments in silico. Our results suggest that for resolving dynamical uncertainty, the ability to design an input sequence paired with its associated measurements is particularly important when limited by the number of measurements.

  9. [Time-Resolved XEOL Experiment System on BL14W1 at SSRF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao-hong; Jiang, Zheng; Xue, Song; Zheng, Li-fang

    2015-08-01

    A novel time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) experiment system was developed for X ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(XAFS) beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The TRXEOL system is composed of three parts: timing system, spectrometer system and nuclear instrument module (NIM) system. These three systems were integrated to measure and record the optical luminescence from the sample excited by the synchrotron X-ray pulses, according to the time-correlated single photon counting methodology. It's the first time in the domestic synchrotron radiation facilities to achieve TRXEOL experiment using the synchrotron X-ray pulses and the time structure of the storage ring. In this work, a SSRF-self-developed timing system was used, which is based on the Field programmable Gate Array and the high-speed serial communication technology. The timing system can provide trigger pulse synchronized with the X-ray pulse. The timing jitter is about 6 ps, and the timing delay resolution is 5 ps. The NIM system is the core of the TRXEOL experiment system, it has three main modules: the Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD), the Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC) and the Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA). During one excitation circle, the spectrometer and the Photomultiplier Tube detector translate the induced luminescence of the sample excited by a single X-ray pulse into electrical pulse. The CFD module eliminates the timing walk larger than 50 ps induced by the amplitude of the electrical pulse. The TAC module calculates the time interval between the timing trigger pulse and the luminescence electrical pulse, and converts the interval into proportional amplitude of voltage. After plenty of circles, the MCA module gets the luminescence decay curve by recording and analyzing the voltage signals. And the data acquisition system gets the TRXEOL spectra by scanning the spectrometer and acquiring the frequency of the voltage pulses from the TAC

  10. An innovative Yb-based ultrafast deep ultraviolet source for time-resolved photoemission experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Dallera, C; Farinello, P; Manzoni, C; Magrez, A; Berger, H; Cerullo, G; Carpene, E

    2014-12-01

    Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids. Here, an innovative optical setup based on a 100-kHz Yb laser source is presented. Exploiting non-collinear optical parametric amplification and sum-frequency generation, ultrashort pump (hν = 1.82 eV) and ultraviolet probe (hν = 6.05 eV) pulses are generated. Overall temporal and instrumental energy resolutions of, respectively, 85 fs and 50 meV are obtained. Time- and angle-resolved measurements on BiTeI semiconductor are presented to show the capabilities of the setup.

  11. An innovative Yb-based ultrafast deep ultraviolet source for time-resolved photoemission experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Dallera, C.; Cerullo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Farinello, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, Università di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Manzoni, C.; Carpene, E., E-mail: ettore.carpene@polimi.it [IFN-CNR Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Magrez, A.; Berger, H. [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics (ICMP), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids. Here, an innovative optical setup based on a 100-kHz Yb laser source is presented. Exploiting non-collinear optical parametric amplification and sum-frequency generation, ultrashort pump (hν = 1.82 eV) and ultraviolet probe (hν = 6.05 eV) pulses are generated. Overall temporal and instrumental energy resolutions of, respectively, 85 fs and 50 meV are obtained. Time- and angle-resolved measurements on BiTeI semiconductor are presented to show the capabilities of the setup.

  12. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Efthimion, P; Pablant, N A; Lu, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Magee, E

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10,000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  13. Pseudo-4D triple resonance experiments to resolve HN overlap in the backbone assignment of unfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagai, Ireena; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-02-01

    The solution NMR resonance assignment of the protein backbone is most commonly carried out using triple resonance experiments that involve (15)N and (1)HN resonances. The assignment becomes problematic when there is resonance overlap of (15)N-(1)HN cross peaks. For such residues, one cannot unambiguously link the "left" side of the NH root to the "right" side, and the residues associated with such overlapping HN resonances remain often unassigned. Here we present a solution to this problem: a hybrid (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HN(CO)CA(CON)CA sequence. In this experiment, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the Ca(i-1) resonance, which helps in resolving the ambiguity involved in connecting the Ca(i) and Ca(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. The experiment has limited sensitivity, and is only suited for small or unfolded proteins. In a companion experiment, (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HNCO(N)CA, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the CO(i-1) resonance, hence resolving the ambiguity existent in pairing up the Ca(i) and CO(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots.

  14. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  15. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    . The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration......The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline....

  16. Data scaling and temperature calibration in time-resolved photocrystallographic experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Benedict, Jason B.;

    2010-01-01

    -steady-state experiments conducted at conventional sources, but not negligible in synchrotron studies in which very short laser exposures may be adequate. The relative scaling of the light-ON and light-OFF data and the correction for temperature differences between the two sets are discussed.......Experiments in which structural changes in crystals are induced by pulsed-laser exposure involve an increase in sample temperature due to the dissipation of the deposited excess energy. The heat increase is especially pronounced when a large number of pulses is needed, as in pseudo...

  17. Follow-up Designs to Resolve Confounding in Split-Plot Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almimi, Ashraf A.; Kulahci, Murat; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Split-plot designs are effective in industry due to time and/or cost constraints, restriction on randomization of the treatment combinations of the hard-to-change factors, and different sizes of experimental units. Some of the results of fractional factorial split-plot experiments can be ambiguou...

  18. Follow-up Designs to Resolve Confounding in Split-Plot Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almimi, Ashraf A.; Kulahci, Murat; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Split-plot designs are effective in industry due to time and/or cost constraints, restriction on randomization of the treatment combinations of the hard-to-change factors, and different sizes of experimental units. Some of the results of fractional factorial split-plot experiments can be ambiguou...

  19. Openness to experience, intellect, schizotypal personality disorder, and psychoticism: resolving the controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Bagby, R Michael; Markon, Kristian; Ring, Angela J; Ryder, Andrew G

    2014-08-01

    Section III of DSM-5 includes an alternative model for personality disorders comprising five higher-order pathological personality traits, four of which resemble domains from the Big Five/Five-Factor Model of Personality (FFM). There has, however, been considerable debate regarding the association of FFM Openness-to-Experience/Intellect (OE/I) with DSM-5 Psychoticism and Schizotypal Personality Disorder (STPD). The authors identify several limitations in the literature, including inattention to (a) differences in the conceptualization of OE/I in the questionnaire and lexical traditions and (b) the symptom heterogeneity of STPD. They then address these limitations in two large patient samples. The results suggest that OE/I per se is weakly associated with Psychoticism and STPD symptoms. However, unique variance specific to the different conceptualizations of OE/I demonstrates much stronger associations, often in opposing directions. These results clarify the debate and the seemingly discrepant views that OE/I is unrelated to Psychoticism and contains variance relevant to Psychoticism.

  20. Calculating time-resolved differential absorbance spectra for ultrafast pump-probe experiments with surface hopping trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, Andrew S.; Subotnik, Joseph E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    We report a surface hopping approach for modeling the full time- and frequency-resolved differential absorbance spectra (beyond the inhomogenous limit) obtained in ultrafast pump-probe experiments. In our approach, we combine dynamical information obtained from ensembles of classical trajectories propagated on the ground and on the excited potential energy surfaces to directly calculate optical response functions and hence spectral lineshapes. We demonstrate that our method is exact for the model problem of two shifted harmonic potentials with identical harmonic frequencies in the absence of electronic relaxation. We then consider a model three state system with electronic relaxation and show that our method is able to capture the effects of nonadiabatic excited state dynamics on the time-dependent differential absorbance spectra. Furthermore, by comparing our spectra against those spectra calculated with either an (1) inhomogenous expression, (2) ground-state Kubo theory, or (3) excited-state Kubo theory, we show that including dynamical information from both the ground and excited potential energy surfaces significantly improves the reliability of the semiclassical approximations. As such, our surface hopping method should find immediate use in modeling the time-dependent differential abosrbance spectra of ultrafast pump-probe experiments.

  1. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  2. Demonstration of space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering capability for warm dense matter experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, T.; Harding, E. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hansen, S. B.; Smith, I. C.; Geissel, M.; Maurer, A.; Reneker, J.; Romero, D.; Sinars, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Benage, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments on the Sandia Z pulsed-power accelerator have demonstrated the ability to produce warm dense matter (WDM) states with unprecedented uniformity, duration, and size, which are ideal for investigations of fundamental WDM properties. For the first time, space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra from shocked carbon foams were recorded on Z. The large (>20 MA) electrical current produced by Z was used to launch Al flyer plates up to 25 km/s. The impact of the flyer plate on a CH2 foam target produced a shocked state with an estimated pressure of 0.75 Mbar, density of 0.52 g/cm3, and temperature of 4.3 eV. Both unshocked and shocked portions of the foam target were probed with 6.2 keV x-rays produced by focusing the Z-Beamlet laser onto a nearby Mn foil. The data are composed of three spatially distinct spectra that were simultaneously captured with a single spectrometer with high spectral (4.8 eV) and spatial (190 μm) resolutions. Detailed spectral information from three target locations is provided simultaneously: the incident x-ray source, the scattered signal from unshocked foam, and the scattered signal from shocked foam.

  3. Implementation of A Nanosecond Time-resolved APD Detector System for NRS Experiment in HEPS-TF

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhen-jie; Li, Qiu-ju; Liu, Peng; Chang, Jin-fan; Zhou, Yang-fan

    2016-01-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved APD detector system is implemented for Nuclear Resonance Scattering (NRS) experiments in High Energy Photon Source-Test Facility (HEPS-TF) project of China. The detector system consists of three parts: the APD sensors, the fast preamplifiers and the TDC readout electronics. To improve the reception solid angle and the quantum efficiency, the C30703FH APDs (fabricated by Excelitas) are used as the sensors of the detectors. The C30703FH has an effective light-sensitive area of 10X10 mm2 and an absorption layer thickness of 110 {\\mu}m. The fast preamplifier with gain of 59 dB and bandwidth of 2 GHz is designed to readout the weak signal outputted by the C30703FH APD. The detector system can work in single photon measurement mode because the preamplifier increases the signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the TDC is realized by FPGA multiphase method with a resolution bin of 1ns. The arrival time of all scattering events between two start triggers can be recorded by the FPGA TDC. In the X-ra...

  4. Spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization toward development of a lensless imaging platform: phantom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Pandya, Aditya; Saiko, Guennadi; Nacy, Lidia; Babar, Hannan; Shah, Duoaud; Lilge, Lothar; Douplik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A portable, spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance lensless imaging technique based on the charge-coupled device or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor directly coupled to the fiber optic bundle is proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as superficial microvasculature in the epithelium. We discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiber-optic cable over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. To evaluate the ability of the technique to recover information about the subsurface linear structures, scattering layers formed of the Sylgard® 184 Silicone Elastomer and titanium dioxide were placed atop the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 mm, and the values of the reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) were between 0.85 and 4.25 mm-1. The results demonstrate that fiber-optic, lensless platform can be used for two-dimensional imaging of absorbing inclusions in diffuse reflectance mode. In these experiments, it was shown that diffuse reflectance imaging can provide sufficient spatial sampling of the phantom for differentiation of 30 μm structural features of the embedded absorbing pattern inside the scattering media.

  5. An ultrafast front-end ASIC for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Fan; Li, Qiu-Ju; Liu, Peng; Fan, Lei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Ye; Li, Zhen-Jie

    2017-06-01

    An ultrafast front-end ASIC chip has been developed for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments. The chip has five channels: four complete channels and one test channel with an analog output. Each complete channel consists of a preamplifier, a voltage discriminator and an open-drain output driver. A prototype chip has been designed and fabricated using 0.13 μm CMOS technology with a chip size of 1.3 mm × 1.9 mm. The electrical characterizations of the circuit demonstrate a very good intrinsic time resolution (rms) on the output pulse leading edge, with the test result better than 30 ps for high input signal charges (> 75 fC) and better than 100 ps for low input signal charges (30-75 fC), while keeping a low power consumption of 5 mW per complete channel. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605227), High Energy Photon Source-Test Facility Project, and the State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics. This research used resources of the BSRF.

  6. Resolving Malpractice Claims after Tort Reform: Experience in a Self-Insured Texas Public Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M; Harding, Molly Colvard; Thomas, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    To describe the litigation experience in a state with strict tort reform of a large public university health system that has committed to transparency with patients and families in resolving medical errors. Secondary data collected from The University of Texas System, which self-insures approximately 6,000 physicians at six health campuses across the state. We obtained internal case management data for all medical malpractice claims closed during 1 year before and 6 recent years following the enactment of state tort reform legislation. We retrospectively reviewed information about malpractice claimants, malpractice claims, and the process and outcome of dispute resolution. We accessed an internal case management database, supplemented by both electronic and paper records compiled by the university's Office of General Counsel. Closed claims dropped from 244 in 2001-2002 to an annual mean of 96 in 2009-2015, closures following lawsuits from 136 in 2001-2002 to an annual mean of 28 in 2009-2015, and paid claims from 60 in 2001 to an annual mean of 20 in 2009-2015. Patterns of resolution suggest efforts by the university to provide some compensation to injured patients in cases that were no longer economically viable for plaintiffs' lawyers to litigate. The percentage of payments relating to cases in which lawsuits had been filed decreased from 82 percent in 2001-2002 to 47 percent in 2009-2012 and again to 29 percent in 2012-2015, although most paid claimants were represented by attorneys. Unrepresented patients received payment in 13 cases closed in 2009-2012 (22 percent of payments; mean amount $60,566) and in 24 cases closed in 2012-2015 (41 percent of payments; mean amount $109,410). Even after tort reform, however, claims that resulted in payment remained slow to resolve, which was worsened for claimants subject to Medicare secondary payer rules. Strict confidentiality became a more common condition of settlement, although restrictions were subsequently relaxed

  7. Quantum-state-resolved reactivity of overtone excited CH4 on Ni(111): Comparing experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Beck, Rainer D.; Guo, Han; Jackson, Bret

    2017-02-01

    Quantum state resolved reactivity measurements probe the role of vibrational symmetry on the vibrational activation of the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Ni(111). IR-IR double resonance excitation in a molecular beam was used to prepare CH4 in three different vibrational symmetry components, A1, E, and F2, of the 2ν3 antisymmetric stretch overtone vibration as well as in the ν1+ν3 symmetric plus antisymmetric C-H stretch combination band of F2 symmetry. The quantum state specific dissociation probability S0 (sticking coefficient) was measured for each of the four vibrational states by detecting chemisorbed carbon on Ni(111) as the product of CH4 dissociation by Auger electron spectroscopy. We observe strong mode specificity, where S0 for the most reactive state ν1+ν3 is an order of magnitude higher than for the least reactive, more energetic 2ν3-E state. Our first principles quantum scattering calculations show that as molecules in the ν1 state approach the surface, the vibrational amplitude becomes localized on the reacting C-H bond, making them very reactive. This behavior results from the weakening of the reacting C-H bond as the molecule approaches the surface, decoupling its motion from the three non-reacting C-H stretches. Similarly, we find that overtone normal mode states with more ν1 character are more reactive: S0(2ν1) > S0(ν1 + ν3) > S0(2ν3). The 2ν3 eigenstates excited in the experiment can be written as linear combinations of these normal mode states. The highly reactive 2ν1 and ν1 + ν3 normal modes, being of A1 and F2 symmetry, can contribute to the 2ν3-A1 and 2ν3-F2 eigenstates, respectively, boosting their reactivity over the E component, which contains no ν1 character due to symmetry.

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  9. Towards convection-resolving, global atmospheric simulations with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS: an extreme scaling experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinzeller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS is a novel set of earth-system simulation components and consists of an atmospheric model, an ocean model and a land-ice model. Its distinct features are the use of unstructured Voronoi meshes and C-grid discretisation to address shortcomings of global models on regular grids and of limited area models nested in a forcing data set, with respect to parallel scalability, numerical accuracy and physical consistency. This makes MPAS a promising tool for conducting climate-related impact studies of, for example, land use changes in a consistent approach. Here, we present an in-depth evaluation of MPAS with regards to technical aspects of performing model runs and scalability for three medium-size meshes on four different High Performance Computing sites with different architectures and compilers. We uncover model limitations and identify new aspects for the model optimisation that are introduced by the use of unstructured Voronoi meshes. We further demonstrate the model performance of MPAS in terms of its capability to reproduce the dynamics of the West African Monsoon and its associated precipitation. Comparing 11 month runs for two meshes with observations and a Weather Research & Forecasting tool (WRF reference model, we show that MPAS can reproduce the atmospheric dynamics on global and local scales, but that further optimisation is required to address a precipitation excess for this region. Finally, we conduct extreme scaling tests on a global 3 km mesh with more than 65 million horizontal grid cells on up to half a million cores. We discuss necessary modifications of the model code to improve its parallel performance in general and specific to the HPC environment. We confirm good scaling (70 % parallel efficiency or better of the MPAS model and provide numbers on the computational requirements for experiments with the 3 km mesh. In doing so, we show that global, convection-resolving atmospheric

  10. Time-resolved dynamic contrast-enhanced MR urography for the evaluation of ureteral peristalsis: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooah; Jacob, Jason S; Kim, Danny C; Rivera, Rafael; Lim, Ruth P; Lee, Vivian S

    2008-11-01

    To determine the feasibility of time-resolved dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography (MRU) for the evaluation of ureteral peristalsis using a data-sharing 3D gradient echo sequence with spiral k-space filling. Eight patients (M=3, F=5, mean 48.1 years) were referred for MRU for the evaluation for renal mass (n=3), hematuria (n=2), urinary tract tuberculosis (n=1), postoperative bladder cancer (n=1), and postoperative ureteric reimplantation (n=1). Dynamic MRU was performed for 120 seconds at 1.5T after intravenous furosemide and gadolinium administration using an oblique sagittal, time-resolved T1 3D gradient echo sequence with 1 second effective temporal resolution. Study quality was assessed based on artifacts and extent of ureteric visualization. Frequency of peristalsis from the renal pelvis to urinary bladder was evaluated for each subject. A total of 16 ureters were examined. Image quality was good in four ureters, satisfactory in 11 ureters, and poor in one ureter. Mean peristaltic frequency was 3.5 waves per minute (range, 2.5-6.5 waves/minute) in normal ureters (n=11). Five ureters were considered abnormal (one urinary tract tuberculosis and four postsurgical ureters), and all had decreased or no peristalsis (0-1.5 waves per minute). MRU using a time-resolved, data-sharing 3D contrast-enhanced technique is able to demonstrate ureteral peristalsis and permits quantification of ureteral peristaltic frequency. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/Ecarbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  12. The pH induced sol-gel transition in skim milk revisited. A detailed study using time-resolved light and x-ray scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitzi, Christian; Menzel, Andreas; Schurtenberger, Peter; Stradner, Anna

    2011-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the evolution of the size, structure and stability of casein micelles upon acidification of skim milk typically applied in yogurt-making processes using a combination of time-resolved light and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. While most of the available light scattering studies on casein acidification have been restricted to transparent and therefore highly diluted samples, we now profit from a newly developed multiangle 3D light scattering instrument, which allows for time-resolved measurements in highly turbid samples. Our experiments clearly demonstrate the presence of two parallel pH-dependent processes, micellar reassembly and aggregation. Using a systematic investigation of the effect of casein concentration, acidification rate, and ionic strength, we are able to decouple these two processes and obtain detailed information about the pH-induced restructuration of the casein micelle structure that occurs prior to destabilization. Moreover, our experiments also unambiguously demonstrate that these micellar reassembly processes are highly concentration dependent, and that typical light scattering studies conducted under highly diluted conditions are resulting in findings that may not be relevant for the situation encountered in industrial processes at higher concentrations. Experiments conducted with covalently cross-linked micelles, where the pH-induced reassembly has been suppressed, further confirm our findings.

  13. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging for Time-Resolved Investigation of the Biological Complexes: Computer Modelling towards the XFEL Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Yefanov, O. M.; Lorenz, U.; Soldatov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The development of the next generation synchrotron radiation sources - free electron lasers - is approaching to become an effective tool for the time-resolved experiments aimed to solve actual problems in various fields such as chemistry’ biology’ medicine’ etc. In order to demonstrate’ how these experiments may be performed for the real systems to obtain information at the atomic and macromolecular levels’ we have performed a molecular dynamics computer simulation combined with quantum chemistry calculations for the human phosphoglycerate kinase enzyme with Mg containing substrate. The simulated structures were used to calculate coherent X-ray diffraction patterns’ reflecting the conformational state of the enzyme, and Mg K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which depend on the local structure of the substrate. These two techniques give complementary information making such an approach highly effective for time-resolved investigation of various biological complexes, such as metalloproteins or enzymes with metal-containing substrate, to obtain information about both metal-containing active site or substrate and the atomic structure of each conformation.

  15. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Lee, J. J.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-01

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic-a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20-500 keV range-has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ˜300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U Kβ). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (˜90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  16. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ∼300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub β}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (∼90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  17. Amide-Exchange-Rate-Edited NMR (AERE-NMR) Experiment:A Novel Method for Resolving Overlapping Resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xue-Hui; LIN Dong-Hai

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an amide-exchange-rate-edited (AERE) NMR method that can effectively alleviate the problem of resonance overlap for proteins and peptides. This method exploits the diversity of amide proton exchange rates and consists of two complementary experiments: (1) SEA (solvent exposed amide)-type NMR experiments to map exchangeable surface residues whose amides are not involved in hydrogen bonding, and (2) presat-type NMR experiments to map solvent inaccessibly buried residues or nonexchangeable residues located in hydrogen-bonded secondary structures with properly controlled saturation transfer via amide proton exchanges with the solvent. This method separates overlapping resonances in a spectrum into two complementary spectra. The AERE-NMR method was demonstrated with a sample of 15N/13C/2H(70%) labeled ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin of 247 residues.

  18. [The influence of leadership experience on the style of resolving management decisions by executives of healthcare institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezhnovets', T A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the influence of age and management experience of executives in healthcare institutions at the style of decision-making. The psychological study of 144 executives was conducted. We found out that the age of executives in healthcare institutions does not affect the style of managerial decision making, while experience in leadership position does. Also it was established that the more experienced leader is, the more often he will make decision in authoritative, autonomous, marginal style and the less management experience is, the more likely is the usage of indulgent and situational style. Moreover, the authoritarian style is typical for younger executives, marginal and autonomous is typical for elder executives.

  19. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this…

  20. Spectral radiative kernel technique and the spectrally-resolved longwave feedbacks in the CMIP3 and CMIP5 experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong; Soden, Brian; Liu, Xu

    2015-04-01

    Radiative feedback is normally discussed in terms of Watts per square meter per K, i.e., the change of broadband flux due to the change of certain climate variable in response to 1K change in global-mean surface temperature. However, the radiative feedback has an intrinsic dimension of spectrum and spectral radiative feedback can be defined in terms of Watts per square meter per K per frequency (or per wavelength). A set of all-sky and clear-sky longwave (LW) spectral radiative kernels (SRK) are constructed using a recently developed spectral flux simulator based on the PCRTM (Principal-Component-based Radiative Transfer Model). The LW spectral radiative kernels are validated against the benchmark partial radiative perturbation method. The LW broadband feedbacks derived using this SRK method are consistent with the published results using the broadband radiative kernels. The SRK is then applied to 12 GCMs in CMIP3 archives and 12 GCMs in CMIP5 archives to derive the spectrally resolved Planck, lapse rate, and LW water vapor feedbacks. The inter-model spreads of the spectral lapse-rate feedbacks among the CMIP3 models are noticeably different than those among the CMIP5 models. In contrast, the inter-model spread of spectral LW water vapor feedbacks changes little from the CMIP3 to CMIP5 simulations, when the specific humidity is used as the state variable. Spatially the far-IR band is more responsible for the changes in lapse-rate feedbacks from the CMIP3 to CMIP5 than the window band. When relative humidity (RH) is used as state variable, virtually all GCMs have little broadband RH feedbacks as shown in Held & Shell (2012). However, the RH feedbacks can be significantly non-zero over different LW spectral regions and the spectral details of such RH feedbacks vary significantly from one GCM to the other. Finally an interpretation based on a one-layer atmospheric model is presented to illustrate under what statistical circumstances the linear technique can be applied

  1. WE-G-BRF-08: Robust Characterization and Patient Experience of a Time-Resolved Ultrasound System for Prostate Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, R; Yan, D; Ionascu, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Characterization of a time resolved ultrasound device (4D-US), used for localization and motion monitoring of prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The 4D-US system accuracy to reproduce prostate motion was investigated and artifacts were determined under detailed experimental and ultimately clinical conditions. Two fields of view (FOV) of 30 and 60 degrees and two corresponding acquisition speeds were evaluated under experimental conditions with gradual increased complexity. The reconstruction ability and trajectory tracking depends on the relative speed between the ultrasound probe and the moving object. Two different types of phantoms were developed; one capable of following a predetermined trajectory with variable speeds, and a second one designed to test the US ability to a track dynamically-deformed prostate. Four hypo-prostate patients (10fx) were monitored during the treatment to detect intrafraction motion. Results: Prostate speeds up to 6mm/s and 3mm/s can be successfully tracked by the system when using the small and large FOV, respectively. The system response time, calculated based on the speedinduced volumetric distortion, is dependent on the FOV, with 1.1s for the small FOV and 1.4s for the large FOV. The response time was also found dependent on the size of target, increasing from 1.4s to 1.7s for target diameters of 4cm to 2.8cm. The deformable dynamic phantom has shown that the system is able to successfully follow a highly-deformed, slowmoving prostate with an error < 0.5mm. The overall range of patient intrafraction motion was (−2.4 to 2.2)mm, (−2.6 to 2.4)mm, (−3.0 to 4.3)mm in the RL, SI and AP directions, respectively. Conclusion: The 4DUS system using a large FOV is appropriate to monitor the prostate motion as well as the adjacent organs at risk. However, infrequent abrupt motion can be problematic and the small FOV system is preferred for such patients, particularly for future applications as online prostate monitoring employed

  2. Application of Radar Reflectivity Factor in Initializing Cloud-Resolving Mesoscale Model. Part Ⅱ: Numerical Simulation Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongya; XU Haiming; XUE Jishan; HU Zhijin; SHEN Tongli

    2008-01-01

    Microphysics elements and vertical velocity retrieved were incorporated using the nudging method into the initial data assimilation of GRAPES (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System) model.Simulation experiments indicated that nudging technique was effective in forcing the model forecast gradually consistent to the observations, yielding the thermodynamically and dynamically balanced analysis field. As viewed from the simulation results, water vapor is vital to precipitation, and it is a governing factor for the amount and duration of precipitation. The initial cloud water, rain water, and vertical velocity determine the strength distribution of convection and precipitation at the beginning time of forecast; the horizontal wind field steers the motion of the mesoscale weather system embedded in and impacts the position of precipitation zone to a large extent. The simulation experiments show that the influence of the initial retrieval data on prediction weakens with the increase of forecast time, and within the first hour of forecast, the retrieval data have an important impact on the evolution of the weather system, but its influence becomes trivial after the first three hours. Changing the nudging coefficient and the integral time-spacing of numerical model will bring some influences to the results. Herein only one radar reflectivity was used, the radar observations did not cover the whole model domain, and some empirical parameters were used in the retrieval method, therefore some differences still lie between simulation and observation to a certain extent, and further studies on several aspects are expected.

  3. Two-Photon Irradiation of an Intracellular Singlet Oxygen Photosensitizer: Achieving Localized Sub-Cellular Excitation in Spatially-Resolved Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Wett; Breitenbach, Thomas; Redmond, Robert W.;

    2010-01-01

    The response of a given cell to spatially-resolved sub-cellular irradiation of a singlet oxygen photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) using a focused laser was assessed. In these experiments, incident light was scattered over a volume greater than that defi ned by the dimensions of the laser...... beam as a consequence of the inherent inhomogeneity of the cell. Upon irradiation at a wavelength readily absorbed by PpIX in a one-photon transition, this scattering of light eliminated any advantage accrued to the use of focused irradiation. However, upon irradiation at a longer wavelength where Pp......IX can only absorb light under non-linear two-photon conditions, meaningful intracellular resolution was achieved in the small spatial domain where the light intensity was high enough for absorption to occur....

  4. Pico-litre Sample Introduction and Acoustic Levitation Systems for Time Resolved Protein Crystallography Experiments at XFELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Docker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The system described in this work is a variant from traditional acoustic levitation first described by, Marzo et al. It uses multiple transducers eliminating the requirement for a mirror surface, allowing for an open geometry as the sound from multiple transducers combines to generate the acoustic trap which is configured to catch pico litres of crystal slurries. These acoustic traps also have the significant benefit of eliminating potential beam attenuation due to support structures or microfluidic devices. Additionally they meet the need to eliminate sample environments when experiments are carried out using an X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS as any sample environment would not survive the exposure to the X-Ray beam. XFELs generate Light a billion times brighter than the sun. The application for this system will be to examine turn over in Beta lactamase proteins which is responsible for bacteria developing antibiotic resistance and therefore of significant importance to future world health. The system will allow for diffraction data to be collected before and after turnover allowing for a better understanding of the underling processes. The authors first described this work at Nanotech 2017.

  5. Development of a polarization resolved spectroscopic diagnostic for measurements of the magnetic field in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma jet experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, Taiichi; Bellan, Paul M.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field strength in current-carrying magnetically confined plasmas are necessary for understanding the underlying physics governing the dynamical behavior. Such a measurement would be particularly useful in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma gun, an experiment used for fundamental studies relevant to spheromak formation, astrophysical jet formation/propagation, solar coronal physics, and the general behavior of twisted magnetic flux tubes that intercept a boundary. In order to measure the field strength in the Caltech experiment, a non-perturbing spectroscopic method is being implemented to observe the Zeeman splitting in the emission spectra. The method is based on polarization-resolving spectroscopy of the Zeeman-split σ components, a technique previously used in both solar and laboratory plasmas. We have designed and constructed an optical system that can simultaneously detect left- and right-circularly polarized emission with both high throughput and small extinction ratio. The system will be used on the 489.5 nm NII line, chosen because of its simple Zeeman structure and minimal Stark broadening.

  6. Sorption of Eu(III)/Cm(III) on Ca-montmorillonite and Na-illite. Part 1: Batch sorption and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabung, Th.; Pierret, M. C.; Bauer, A.; Geckeis, H.; Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sorption of Cm(III) and Eu(III) at trace concentrations onto Ca-montmorillonite (SWy-1) and Na-illite (Illite du Puy) has been studied under anaerobic conditions by batch sorption experiments and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Comparison of the results from spectroscopic and batch sorption experiments with Cm and Eu indicates the existence of outer-sphere complexes at pH 5 for both clay minerals. Five H 2O/OH - molecules remain in the first metal ion coordination sphere of the sorbed Eu/Cm. Measured fluorescence lifetimes of sorbed Eu/Cm and peak deconvolution of Cm-spectra are consistent with the formation of surface complexes of the form ≡S-O-Eu/Cm(OH) x(2-x)(H 2O) 5-x. At pH ≥ 12 Cm becomes incorporated into a surface precipitate at the Ca-montmorillonite surface presumably composed of Ca(OH) 2 or calcium silicate hydrate. A dramatic shift of the fluorescence emission band by more than 20 nm and a clear increase in the fluorescence lifetime suggests the almost complete displacement of coordinated H 2O and OH -. The pH dependent Eu sorption data obtained in batch experiments are consistent with spectroscopic data on Eu and Cm within experimental uncertainties thus demonstrating the validity of Eu as a homologue for trivalent actinides. Parameterization of a two-site protolysis nonelectrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model using the batch sorption data and spectroscopic results is discussed in Part 2 of this work.

  7. A time-resolved x-ray scattering experiment for the study of phase transitions and crystallization processes in metallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, J. F.; Sutton, M.; Altounian, Z.; Saini, S.; Luriom L. B.; Sandy, A. R.; Lumma, D.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    1999-10-29

    An experimental setup to perform high-resolution time-resolved X-ray scattering has been commissioned on the side station of beamline 8-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. A Peltier-cooled diode detector array covering an angle range of 20 degrees is mounted on a 4-circle goniometer and is used to temporally resolve X-ray scattering patterns with a resolution up to 10 ms. Metallic ribbon samples can be quickly heated and cooled from temperatures up to 500 C inside a furnace with controllable atmosphere and equipped with a beryllium window. A description of the setup is presented along with actual results showing time-resolved phase transitions and crystallization processes in AlYNi metallic alloys. These results demonstrate the power of this technique to investigate complex crystallization processes as well as the versatility of this time-resolved X-ray scattering spectrometer.

  8. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; Yio, John J.; Cederwall, Richard T.; McCoy, Renata

    2006-10-01

    This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related to the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Finally, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.

  9. Brief resolved unexplained event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  10. Enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins: experiences from the Lower Mekong River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Douven

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the design and impact of capacity building programmes aimed at enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins. Case study is a programme developed by the Mekong River Commission (MRC. A post training evaluation was applied to assess its impact in terms of individual capacity enhancement and change (use and application of knowledge, factors hampering application, and change in function and opportunities within their organisation. The design of the Capacity Building Programme of the MRC Flood Management and Mitigation Programme showed a well balanced range of subjects (such as IWRM, models and decision support systems and international water law which are required for such an integrated topic. The post training evaluation, 6 months after the last training workshop, showed the increase in familiarity of the topics for all 37 respondents, with highest increase for the respondents with few years of working experience and from training and educational institutions. The relevance of the subjects taught is shown by the fact that 95% of the respondents indicated they saw the relevance of the subjects and 78% had already used some knowledge acquired in their job. The respondents also indicated that they did not have sufficient opportunities to apply all knowledge acquired. The phased implementation and training of lecturers during the training workshops, had a good impact, directly through increasing involvement in facilitation and delivery of the capacity building programme and through the use of the knowledge gained in short courses and development of curricula at their training institute. For these types of capacity building programmes, a few recommendations can be made. The selection of participants is crucial for the application of the learned knowledge in their work. The integrative nature of transboundary water issues calls for a capacity building

  11. Enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins: experiences from the Lower Mekong River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douven, W.; Mul, M. L.; Fernández-Álvarez, B.; Hung, S. Lam; Bakker, N.; Radosevich, G.; van der Zaag, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper analyses the design and impact of capacity building programmes aimed at enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins. The case study is a programme developed by the Mekong River Commission (MRC). A post-training evaluation was applied to assess its impact in terms of individual capacity enhancement and change (use and application of knowledge, factors hampering application, and change in function and opportunities within the organisation). The design of the Capacity Building Programme of the MRC Flood Management and Mitigation Programme required a well balanced range of subjects (such as IWRM (integrated water resources management), model and decision support systems, and international water law). The post-training evaluation, 6 months after the last training workshop, showed an increase in familiarity with the topics for all 37 respondents, with the highest increase for the respondents with few years of working experience and from training and education institutions. The relevance of the subjects taught was highlighted by 95% of the respondents, and 78% of the participants had already used some of the acquired knowledge in their job. The respondents indicated that they did not have sufficient opportunities to apply all knowledge. The phased implementation and training of lecturers during the training workshops had a good impact, directly through increasing involvement in facilitation and delivery of the capacity building programme and through the use of the knowledge gained in short courses and development of curricula at their institute. For these types of capacity building programmes, a few recommendations can be made. The selection of participants is crucial for the application of the learned knowledge in their work. The integrative nature of transboundary water issues calls for a capacity building programme addressing a wide range of subjects, which can be understood by a

  12. Enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins: experiences from the Lower Mekong River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Douven

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the design and impact of capacity building programmes aimed at enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins. The case study is a programme developed by the Mekong River Commission (MRC. A post-training evaluation was applied to assess its impact in terms of individual capacity enhancement and change (use and application of knowledge, factors hampering application, and change in function and opportunities within the organisation. The design of the Capacity Building Programme of the MRC Flood Management and Mitigation Programme required a well balanced range of subjects (such as IWRM (integrated water resources management, model and decision support systems, and international water law. The post-training evaluation, 6 months after the last training workshop, showed an increase in familiarity with the topics for all 37 respondents, with the highest increase for the respondents with few years of working experience and from training and education institutions. The relevance of the subjects taught was highlighted by 95% of the respondents, and 78% of the participants had already used some of the acquired knowledge in their job. The respondents indicated that they did not have sufficient opportunities to apply all knowledge. The phased implementation and training of lecturers during the training workshops had a good impact, directly through increasing involvement in facilitation and delivery of the capacity building programme and through the use of the knowledge gained in short courses and development of curricula at their institute. For these types of capacity building programmes, a few recommendations can be made. The selection of participants is crucial for the application of the learned knowledge in their work. The integrative nature of transboundary water issues calls for a capacity building programme addressing a wide range of subjects, which can be

  13. An Exploratory study on the use of LibAnswers to Resolve, Track and Monitor Electronic Resources Issues: The KAUST Library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-05-03

    An Exploratory study on KAUST library use of LibAnswers in resolving electronic resources questions received in LibAnswers. It describes the findings of the questions received in LibAnswers. The author made suggestions based on the findings to improve the reference services in responding to e-resources questions.

  14. Relativistic Coupled Cluster Calculations with Variational Quantum Electrodynamics Resolve the Discrepancy between Experiment and Theory Concerning the Electron Affinity and Ionization Potential of Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašteka, L. F.; Eliav, E.; Borschevsky, A.; Kaldor, U.; Schwerdtfeger, P.

    2017-01-01

    The first ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) of the gold atom have been determined to an unprecedented accuracy using relativistic coupled cluster calculations up to the pentuple excitation level including the Breit and QED contributions. We reach meV accuracy (with respect to the experimental values) by carefully accounting for all individual contributions beyond the standard relativistic coupled cluster approach. Thus, we are able to resolve the long-standing discrepancy between experimental and theoretical IP and EA of gold.

  15. New fine structures resolved at the ELNES Ti-L{sub 2,3} edge spectra of anatase and rutile: Comparison between experiment and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheynet, M., E-mail: marie.cheynet@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [SIMAP-PHELMA-CNRS, BP 75, 38402 Saint-Martin-d' Heres (France); Pokrant, S. [Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, 73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Irsen, S. [TEM Group, Forschungszentrum Caesar, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Krueger, P. [ICB, UMR 5209 Universite de Bourgogne-CNRS, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon (France)

    2010-07-15

    Anatase and rutile Ti-L{sub 2,3} edge spectra were measured in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) coupled to a CEOS Cs-probe corrector, an omega-type monochromator and an in-column omega-type energy filter fully corrected for 2nd order aberrations. Thanks to the high energy resolution, high electron probe current and high stability achieved under this instrumental configuration, new fine structures, never reported before, were resolved at the L{sub 3} band of both rutile and anatase. The data suggest that new peaks also exist in the L{sub 2} e{sub g} band. The experimental spectra are compared with multichannel multiple scattering (MMS) calculations. Good agreement is found for number, energy position and intensity of the newly resolved spectral features. Up to now, the L{sub 3} e{sub g} band splitting could not be well described by theory not even through the crystal field multiplet approach. We show that the L{sub 3} e{sub g} band splitting is due to long range band structure effects, contrary to the usual interpretations in terms of local ligand field or near-neighbour hybridization effects.

  16. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhi

    2007-01-01

    We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.……

  17. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.

  18. (U) Implementation and demonstration of a time-resolved pyrometry/spectroscopy capability in shock compression experiments on metal oxide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Peter Marvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lang, Jr., John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scharff, Robert Jason [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Temperature is notably the most difficult quantity to measure in shock compression experiments; however, it is critical for accurately constraining theoretical or tabular equations of state. Until now, the temperature achieved during the shock loading of porous materials could only be calculated. The technique presented in this report measures, for the first time, the shocked temperature of porous systems.

  19. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground

  20. Time resolved Faraday rotation and ellipticity experiments with two pump excitation of electrons and holes in InGaAs QDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmscheid, Dennis; Varwig, Steffen; Greilich, Alex; Schwan, Alexander; Mueller, Crispin; Yakovlev, Dmitri R.; Bayer, Manfred [Experimentelle Physik II, TU Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Yugova, Irina A. [Experimentelle Physik II, TU Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Angewandte Festkoerperphysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The investigation of charge carrier spin dynamics in quantum dots plays an important role for the developement of spintronics. For this we perform pump-probe Faraday rotation and ellipticity experiments on self-assembled (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dot ensembles. Due to an excitation with a train of pump pulses, the phase of the spin precessions in the inhomogeneous QD-ensemble is synchronized to the laser repetition time T{sub R}. By two pump excitation scheme, with pumps separated by delay T{sub D}, the spins have to fulfill two phase synchronization conditions simultaneously and show rephasing within T{sub D} and T{sub R}-T{sub D}. This leads to increases of the signal amplitude, called bunches, every multiple of T{sub D}. It can be shown, that these bunches are different phenomena than the spin echoes, which occur after spin rotations. We show how this method provides an additional opportunity to study the interaction of electrons and holes with the nuclei.

  1. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  2. A time-resolved iron-specific X-ray absorption experiment yields no evidence for an Fe2+ --> Fe3+ transition during QA- --> QB electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Sabine; Bremm, Oliver; Garczarek, Florian; Derrien, Valerie; Liebisch, Peter; Loja, Paola; Sebban, Pierre; Gerwert, Klaus; Haumann, Michael

    2006-01-17

    Previous time-resolved FTIR measurements suggested the involvement of an intermediary component in the electron transfer step Q(A)- --> Q(B) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides [Remy and Gerwert (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 637]. By a kinetic X-ray absorption experiment at the Fe K-edge we investigated whether oxidation occurs at the ferric non-heme iron located between the two quinones. In isolated reaction centers with a high content of functional Q(B), at a time resolution of 30 micros and at room temperature, no evidence for transient oxidation of Fe was obtained. However, small X-ray transients occurred, in a similar micro- to millisecond time range as in the IR experiments, which may point to changes in the Fe ligand environment due to the charges on Q(A)- and Q(B)-. In addition, VIS measurements agree with the IR data and do not exclude an intermediate in the Q(A)- --> Q(B) transition.

  3. Resolved SZE Cluster Count

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yu Tang; Zu-Hui Fan

    2003-01-01

    We study the counts of resolved SZE (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) clus-ters expected from an interferometric survey in different cosmological models underdifferent conditions. The self-similar universal gas model and Press-Schechter massfunction are used. We take the observing frequency to be 90 GHz, and consider twodish diameters, 1.2 m and 2.5 m. We calculate the number density of the galaxyclusters dN/(dΩdz) at a high flux limit Slimv = 100mJy and at a relative lowSlimv = 10 mJy. The total numbers of SZE clusters N in two low-Ω0 models arecompared. The results show that the influence of the resolved effect depends notonly on D, but also on Slimv: at a given D, the effect is more significant for a highthan for a low Slim Also, the resolved effect for a flat universe is more impressivethan that for an open universe. For D = 1.2m and Slimv= 10mJy, the resolvedeffect is very weak. Considering the designed interferometers which will be used tosurvey SZE clusters, we find that the resolved effect is insignificant when estimatingthe expected yield of the SZE cluster surveys.

  4. Resolving-Power Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Starting with a general discussion, a program is sketched for a quantization based on dilations. This resolving-power quantization is simplest for scalar field theories. The hope is to find a way to relax the requirement of locality so that the necessity to fine tune mass parameters is eliminated while universality is still preserved.

  5. Operation: Inherent Resolve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer-Larsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet giver læseren indsigt i den internationale koalitions engagement mod IS igennem Operaton Inherent Resolve; herunder koalitionens strategi i forhold til IS strategi, ligesom det belyser kampagnens legalitet og folkeretlige grundlag, ligesom det giver et bud på overvejelser om kampagnens l...

  6. Resolving Disputes in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kenneth R.; Schrant, Nancy E.

    Because of the increasing incidence of disputes in schools, educators need more knowledge about methods of dispute resolution. The adversary system of resolving disputes, on which the U.S. judicial system is founded, assumes that truth is best found through a struggle between two opposing parties. In the adversary system, due process plays a…

  7. Resolvability in Circulant Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad SALMAN; Imran JAVAID; Muhammad Anwar CHAUDHRY

    2012-01-01

    A set W of the vertices of a connected graph G is called a resolving set for G if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a vertex w ∈ W such that d(u,w) ≠ d(v,w).A resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a metric basis for G and the number of vertices in a metric basis is called the metric dimension of G,denoted by dim(G).For a vertex u of G and a subset S of V(G),the distance between u and S is the number mins∈s d(u,s).A k-partition H ={S1,S2,...,Sk} of V(G) is called a resolving partition if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a set Si in Π such that d(u,Si) ≠ d(v,Si).The minimum k for which there is a resolving k-partition of V(G) is called the partition dimension of G,denoted by pd(G).The circulant graph is a graph with vertex set Zn,an additive group ofintegers modulo n,and two vertices labeled i and j adjacent if and only if i - j (mod n) ∈ C,where C C Zn has the property that C =-C and 0(∈) C.The circulant graph is denoted by Xn,△ where A =|C|.In this paper,we study the metric dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,3 with connection set C ={1,-n/2,n - 1} and prove that dim(Xn,3) is independent of choice of n by showing that 3 for all n =0 (mod 4),dim(X,n,3) ={ 4 for all n =2 (mod 4).We also study the partition dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,4 with connection set C ={±1,±2} and prove that pd(Xn,4) is independent of choice of n and show that pd(X5,4) =5 and 3 forall odd n≥9,pd(Xn,4) ={ 4 for all even n ≥ 6 and n =7.

  8. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A resolver rate sensor is disclosed in which dual brushless resolvers are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft. Diverse inputs are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. In one embodiment of the invention the outputs of the first resolver are directly inputted into two separate multipliers and the outputs of the second resolver are inputted into the two separate multipliers, after being demodulated in a pair of demodulator circuits. The multiplied signals are then added in an adder circuit to provide a directional sensitive output. In another embodiment the outputs from the first resolver is modulated in separate modulator circuits and the output from the modulator circuits are used to excite the second resolver. The outputs from the second resolver are demodulated in separate demodulator circuit and added in an adder circuit to provide a direction sensitive rate output.

  9. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  10. Engineering out motion: a surface disulfide bond alters the mobility of tryptophan 22 in cytochrome b5 as probed by time-resolved fluorescence and 1H NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, E M; Grinstead, J S; Campbell, A P; Daggett, V; Atkins, W M

    1999-04-20

    In the accompanying paper [Storch et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5054-5064] equilibrium denaturation studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate localized dynamics on the surface of cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) that result in the formation of a cleft. In those studies, an S18C:R47C disulfide mutant was engineered to inhibit cleft mobility. Temperature- and urea-induced denaturation studies revealed significant differences in Trp 22 fluorescence between the wild-type and mutant proteins. On the basis of the results, it was proposed that wild type populates a conformational ensemble that is unavailable to the disulfide mutant and is mediated by cleft mobility. As a result, the solvent accessibility of Trp 22 is decreased in S18C:R47C, suggesting that the local environment of this residue is less mobile due to the constraining effects of the disulfide on cleft dynamics. To further probe the structural effects on the local environment of Trp 22 caused by inhibition of cleft formation, we report here the results of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, differential phase/modulation fluorescence anisotropy, and 1H NMR studies. In Trp fluorescence experiments, the Stern-Volmer quenching constant increases in wild type versus the oxidized disulfide mutant with increasing temperature. At 50 degrees C, KSV is nearly 1.5-fold greater in wild type compared to the oxidized disulfide mutant. In the reduced disulfide mutant, KSV was the same as wild type. The bimolecular collisional quenching constant, kq, for acrylamide quenching of Trp 22 increases 2.7-fold for wild type and only 1.8-fold for S18C:R47C, upon increasing the temperature from 25 to 50 degrees C. The time-resolved anisotropy decay at 25 degrees C was fit to a double-exponential decay for both the wild type and S18C:R47C. Both proteins exhibited a minor contribution from a low-amplitude fast decay, consistent with local motion of Trp 22. This component was more prevalent in

  11. Is it clean or contaminated soil? Using petrogenic versus biogenic GC-FID chromatogram patterns to mathematically resolve false petroleum hydrocarbon detections in clean organic soils: a crude oil-spiked peat microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Hooper, Francine; Farwell, Andrea J; Pike, Glenna; Kennedy, Jocelyn; Wang, Zhendi; Grunsky, Eric C; Dixon, D George

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) reference method for the Canada-wide standard (CWS) for petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) in soil provides chemistry analysis standards and guidelines for the management of contaminated sites. However, these methods can coextract natural biogenic organic compounds (BOCs) from organic soils, causing false exceedences of toxicity guidelines. The present 300-d microcosm experiment used CWS PHC tier 1 soil extraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis to develop a new tier 2 mathematical approach to resolving this problem. Carbon fractions F2 (C10-C16), F3 (C16-C34), and F4 (>C34) as well as subfractions F3a (C16-C22) and F3b (C22-C34) were studied in peat and sand spiked once with Federated crude oil. These carbon ranges were also studied in 14 light to heavy crude oils. The F3 range in the clean peat was dominated by F3b, whereas the crude oils had approximately equal F3a and F3b distributions. The F2 was nondetectable in the clean peat but was a significant component in crude oil. The crude oil–spiked peat had elevated F2 and F3a distributions. The BOC-adjusted PHC F3 calculation estimated the true PHC concentrations in the spiked peat. The F2:F3b ratio of less than 0.10 indicated PHC absence in the clean peat, and the ratio of greater than or equal to 0.10 indicated PHC presence in the spiked peat and sand. Validation studies are required to confirm whether this new tier 2 approach is applicable to real-case scenarios. Potential adoption of this approach could minimize unnecessary ecological disruptions of thousands of peatlands throughout Canada while also saving millions of dollars in management costs.

  12. Resolving the Confidence Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Terri

    2006-01-01

    As children approach adolescence, they often experience confusion and uncertainty as they attempt to appear more grown up than they really feel. Research on both girls and boys has documented that the buoyant self-confidence of younger children often gives way to self-consciousness as young adolescents become aware of the complexity and difficulty…

  13. Angle resolved photoemission in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, Y.

    1983-02-01

    Bases of angular resolved photoemission: determination of the electronic band structure of solids (bulk), measurements of life-time and mean free path, determination of surfaces states (valence and core) and their relationship with surface reconstruction are described.

  14. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  15. 2D and 3D time-resolved PIV experiments on flow field around vertical and inclined water-exit body%垂直及斜出水流场的二维及三维TR-PIV试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 李英浩; 金朋寿

    2005-01-01

    本文对钝头回转体垂直及斜出水流场采用TR-(Time-Resolved)PIV技术进行测量,并对斜出水流场进行3D-Stereo PIV(三维体视 PIV)测量.文中介绍了测试技术及测量结果,揭示了出水过程中流动结构及其演变,展示了TR-PIV技术对具有瞬态历程特征的出水流场研究的适应性.

  16. Resolving Semantic Interference during Word Production Requires Central Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The semantic picture-word interference task has been used to diagnose how speakers resolve competition while selecting words for production. The attentional demands of this resolution process were assessed in 2 dual-task experiments (tone classification followed by picture naming). In Experiment 1, when pictures and distractor words were presented…

  17. Superlubricity: A Paradox about Confined Fluids Resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingxi; Granick, Steve

    2004-08-01

    Using the method of Frantz and Salmeron to cleave mica [Tribol. Lett.TRLEFS1023-8883 5, 151 (1998)10.1023/A:1019149910047] we investigate alkane fluids in a surface forces apparatus and confirm several predictions of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An oscillatory force-distance profile is observed for the methyl-branched alkane, squalane. Boundary slip is inferred from the frictional sliding of molecularly thin fluids and also from the hydrodynamic flow of thicker films. These findings resolve the paradox that prior experiments disagreed with these aspects of MD predictions, and demonstrate that exceptionally low energy dissipation is possible when fluids move past solid surfaces that are sufficiently smooth.

  18. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-09

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2015)072 smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  19. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  20. Resolving Boosted Jets with XCone

    CERN Document Server

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies---dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs---that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  1. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  2. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  4. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  5. Approaches to resolving trade disputes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D W; Thiermann, A B

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the various approaches to resolving trade disputes available to Member Countries of the OIE (World organisation for animal health). The paper first describes the rights and obligations of Member Countries in setting health measures for the importation of animals and animal products, according to the provisions of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The authors indicate how OIE standards may be used to set import measures and introduce issues such as equivalence and the use of provisional measures, which are both areas of potential conflict. The authors then describe the options available for resolving disputes--bilateral discussions, mediation through the OIE, the use of the WTO SPS Committee and the formal WTO dispute settlement process, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

  6. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  7. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  8. Weak Total Resolvability In Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casel Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A vertex v ∈ V (G is said to distinguish two vertices x, y ∈ V (G of a graph G if the distance from v to x is di erent from the distance from v to y. A set W ⊆ V (G is a total resolving set for a graph G if for every pair of vertices x, y ∈ V (G, there exists some vertex w ∈ W − {x, y} which distinguishes x and y, while W is a weak total resolving set if for every x ∈ V (G−W and y ∈ W, there exists some w ∈ W −{y} which distinguishes x and y. A weak total resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a weak total metric basis of G and its cardinality the weak total metric dimension of G. Our main contributions are the following ones: (a Graphs with small and large weak total metric bases are characterised. (b We explore the (tight relation to independent 2-domination. (c We introduce a new graph parameter, called weak total adjacency dimension and present results that are analogous to those presented for weak total dimension. (d For trees, we derive a characterisation of the weak total (adjacency metric dimension. Also, exact figures for our parameters are presented for (generalised fans and wheels. (e We show that for Cartesian product graphs, the weak total (adjacency metric dimension is usually pretty small. (f The weak total (adjacency dimension is studied for lexicographic products of graphs.

  9. Spectrally resolved femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of astaxanthin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Gupta, Aditya; Goswami, Debabrata

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the coherence and population dynamics of Astaxanthin solution in methanol and acetonitrile by spectrally resolving their photon echo signals. Our experiments indicate that methanol has a much stronger interaction with the ultrafast dynamics of Astaxanthin in comparison to that of acetonitrile.

  10. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  11. Space-Time Resolved Capillary Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berhanu, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report experiments on the full space and time resolved statistics of capillary wave turbulence at the air-water interface. The three-dimensional shape of the free interface is measured as a function of time by using the optical method of Diffusing Light Photography associated with a fast camera. Linear and nonlinear dispersion relations are extracted from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of wave amplitude. When wave turbulence regime is reached, we observe power-law spectra both in frequency and in wave number, whose exponents are found in agreement with the predictions of capillary wave turbulence theory. Finally, the temporal dynamics of the spatial energy spectrum highlights the occurrence of stochastic bursts transferring wave energy through the spatial scales.

  12. LCD Monitors as an Alternative for Precision Demanding Visual Psychophysical Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Anna; Csibri, Péter; András, Csaba Márk; Sáry, Gyula

    2016-09-01

    Precise timing and presentation of stimuli is critical in vision research, still, the limiting factor in successful recognition is often the monitor itself that is used to present the stimuli. The most widespread method is the use of monitors controlled by personal computers. Traditionally, most experiments used cathode-ray tubes but they are more and more difficult to access, and instead, liquid-crystal displays are getting more and more popular. The two types have fundamentally different working principles and limitations in displaying the stimulus.In our experiments, the temporal precision of the stimulus presentation was in focus. We investigated whether liquid-crystal displays, which are not considered to be fit to display fast successive stimuli, can represent an alternative choice for cathode-ray tubes. We used the double flash and the flicker illusion to compare the technical capabilities of the two monitor types. These illusions not only do require a precise timing but also a very short exposure to the stimuli. At the same time, the interstimulus interval is also of extreme importance. In addition, these illusions require peripheral stimulation of the retina, which is more sensitive to the temporal aspects of the visual stimulus. On the basis of previous studies and our own psychophysical results, we suggest that liquid-crystal displays might be a good alternative for precise, frame-to-frame stimulus presentation even if parts of the stimuli are projected on the peripheral retina.

  13. Spectroscopic analysis of time-resolved emission from detonating thin film explosive samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Jilek, Brook A.; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander S.; Damm, David L.

    2017-01-01

    We report a series of time-resolved spectroscopic measurements that aim to characterize the reactions that occur during shock initiation of high explosives. The experiments employ time- and wavelength-resolved emission spectroscopy to analyze light emitted from detonating thin explosive films. This paper presents analysis of optical emission spectra from hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) thin film samples. Both vibrationally resolved and broadband emission features are observed in the spectra and area as electronic transitions of intermediate species.

  14. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    In ice cores a plethora of proxies for paleoclimatic conditions is archived. Air trapped in the ice during firnification allows for direct measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of paleoatmospheric gases while, the isotopic composition of the ice matrix itself is related...... to paleotemperatures. Impurities in the matrix are comprised of particulate and soluble aerosols, each carrying information on its source’s activitiy and|or proximity. Opposed to gases and water isotopes, the seasonality of many aerosols is not smoothed out in the firn column so that large concentration gradients...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...

  15. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    experimentally. Over the last decades Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) has become a well-established technique for aerosol quantification. In CFA, a piece of core is melted continuously and the melt water is analysed for an array of chemical impurities. When designing a CFA system, a trilemma between high sample...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...... impossible to circumvent by employing a third detection technique - laser scattering. Reliable information on size changes, even relative ones, cannot be obtained using optical methods. It is therefore proposed to focus further efforts on electrical measurements, making use of the advancements made over...

  16. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning studies of hexamethylcyclopentadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom....

  17. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of non-adiabatic dynamics in polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Stolow, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses advances in the use of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of non-adiabatic processes in molecules. A theoretical treatment of the experiments is presented together with a number of experimental examples.

  18. On the interpretation of time-resolved anisotropic diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we review existing systematic treatments for the interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns from partially aligned symmetric top molecules. Such patterns arise in the context of time-resolved diffraction experiments. We calculate diffraction patterns for ground-state NaI ex......I excited with an ultraviolet laser. The results are interpreted with the help of a qualitative analytic model, and general recommendations on the analysis and interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns are given....

  19. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  1. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  2. Time resolved pyrolysis of char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    In laboratory experiments, biomass char was produced under controlled conditions using wood chips from French pinewood. Different char qualities were obtained by pyrolysing the biomass at similar heating rates with end-temperatures ranging from 250 to 1000 o C. The char was analysed by flash...

  3. Feature-based attention resolves depth ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Levinthal, B; Franconeri, S L

    2016-09-07

    Perceiving the world around us requires that we resolve ambiguity. This process is often studied in the lab using ambiguous figures whose structures can be interpreted in multiple ways. One class of figures contains ambiguity in its depth relations, such that either of two surfaces could be seen as being the "front" of an object. Previous research suggests that selectively attending to a given location on such objects can bias the perception of that region as the front. This study asks whether selectively attending to a distributed feature can also bias that region toward the front. Participants viewed a structure-from-motion display of a rotating cylinder that could be perceived as rotating clockwise or counterclockwise (as imagined viewing from the top), depending on whether a set of red or green moving dots were seen as being in the front. A secondary task encouraged observers to globally attend to either red or green. Results from both Experiment 1 and 2 showed that the dots on the cylinder that shared the attended feature, and its corresponding surface, were more likely to be seen as being in the front, as measured by participants' clockwise versus counterclockwise percept reports. Feature-based attention, like location-based attention, is capable of biasing competition among potential interpretations of figures with ambiguous structure in depth.

  4. Resolved Parental Infertility and Children's Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Amelia R; Helgertz, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Although difficulty conceiving a child has long been a major medical and social preoccupation, it has not been considered as a predictor of long-term outcomes in children ultimately conceived. This is consistent with a broader gap in knowledge regarding the consequences of parental health for educational performance in offspring. Here we address that omission, asking how resolved parental infertility relates to children's academic achievement. In a sample of all Swedish births between 1988 and 1995, we find that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement (both test scores and GPA) in children at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own. Our results support a conceptualization of infertility as a cumulative physical and social experience with effects extending well beyond the point at which a child is born, and emphasize the need to better understand how specific parental health conditions constrain children's educational outcomes.

  5. Becoming homeless, being homeless, and resolving homelessness among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to more comprehensively articulate the experiences of homeless women and make evidence-based inferences regarding optimal social services. This study was conducted using qualitative meta-synthesis methods. As youth, homeless women experience challenging circumstances that leave them ill-prepared to prevent and resolve homelessness in adulthood. Resolution of homelessness occurs in iterative stages: crisis, assessment, and sustained action. To enhance forward progression through these stages, nurses are encouraged to promote empowerment in concordance with the Transtheoretical and Harm Reduction Models. Services that are highly valued include physical and mental health care and child care assistance.

  6. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  7. Component resolved testing for allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skamstrup Hansen, Kirsten; Poulsen, Lars K

    2010-01-01

    Component resolved diagnostics introduces new possibilities regarding diagnosis of allergic diseases and individualized, allergen-specific treatment. Furthermore, refinement of IgE-based testing may help elucidate the correlation or lack of correlation between allergenic sensitization and allergi...

  8. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  9. TIME-RESOLVED PHOTOLUMINESCENCE OF SINTERED ZnO CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN XIAO-MING(文小明); N.OHNO; ZHANG ZHONG-MING(张中明)

    2001-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) of sintered ZnO ceramics was measured at low temperatures. A broad luminescence band was observed in the visible region. The TRPL experiment shows that photolurninescence decay behaviour can be depicted as t-π(r). The decay rate n(r) and lifetime are wavelength dependent, and the former varies exponentially with wavelength. The power-lowering behaviour of the luminescence intensity indicates that the luminescence band originates from the recombination of donor-acceptor pairs.

  10. High intrinsic energy resolution photon number resolving detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lolli, L; Portesi, C; Monticone, E; Rajteri, M

    2013-01-01

    Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) are characterized by the intrinsic figure of merit to resolve both the energy and the statistical distribution of the incident photons. These properties lead TES devices to become the best single photon detector for quantum technology experiments. For a TES based on titanium and gold has been reached, at telecommunication wavelength, an unprecedented intrinsic energy resolution (0.113 eV). The uncertainties analysis of both energy resolution and photon state assignment has been discussed. The thermal properties of the superconductive device have been studied by fitting the bias curve to evaluate theoretical limit of the energy resolution.

  11. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...... resolved turbulence immediately upstream of the region or structure of interest. Comparing to the alternative of imposing the turbulence at the inlet, there is a large potential to reduce the computational cost of the simulation by reducing the total number of cells. The reduction comes from a lower demand...... of modifying the source terms. None of the two methods can impose synthetic turbulence with good results, but it is shown that by running the turbulence field through a short precursor simulation, very good results are obtained. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  12. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Pincus

    Full Text Available Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  13. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  14. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  15. Angle-Resolved Spectroscopy of Parametric Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Feng-kuo

    2013-01-01

    The parametric fluorescence from a nonlinear crystal forms a conical radiation pattern. We measure the angular and spectral distributions of parametric fluorescence in a beta-barium borate crystal pumped by a 405-nm diode laser employing angle-resolved imaging spectroscopy. The experimental angle-resolved spectra and the generation efficiency of parametric down conversion are compared with a plane-wave theoretical analysis. The parametric fluorescence is used as a broadband light source for the calibration of the instrument spectral response function in the wavelength range from 450 to 1000 nm.

  16. Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm and inverse driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    variant of the Universal Resolving Algorithm for inverse interpretation. The new variant outperforms the original algorithm in several cases, e.g., when unpacking a list using inverse interpretation of a pack program. It uses inverse driving as its main technique, which has not been described in detail......Inverse interpretation is a semantics based, non-standard interpretation of programs. Given a program and a value, an inverse interpreter finds all or one of the inputs, that would yield the given value as output with normal forward evaluation. The Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm is a new...

  17. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  18. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-07-17

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means?

  19. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  20. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  1. Angle-resolved optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Adrien Emmanuel

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a powerful tool for probing the microstructure of biological tissue non-invasively at high-speed. OCT measures depth-resolved reflectance of infrared light, generating cross-sectional images non-invasively with micron-scale resolution. As with other imaging modalities that employ coherent detection, OCT images are confounded by speckle noise. Speckle imposes a grainy texture on images that reduces the signal-to-noise ratio to near unity values. As a result, it conceals subtle differences in scattering properties known to be crucial for differentiating normal from diseased tissue states. In this thesis, we developed a novel OCT modality called "Angle-Resolved OCT" in which depth scans (A-lines) are obtained simultaneously from a broad range of backscattering angles. We demonstrated that high levels of speckle reduction can be achieved by averaging the magnitudes of A-lines corresponding to the same transverse locations. With both experimental and analytic approaches, we demonstrated that this averaging method does not lead to a substantial loss in spatial resolution. We developed two different imaging systems for performing Angle-Resolved OCT. With the first system, angular data was acquired simultaneously; with the second, it was acquired sequentially. The first system had superior speckle-reduction capabilities but image quality degraded significantly with small sample movements. The second system allowed for in vivo imaging, as demonstrated with Resolved OCT systems, the speckle-reduced images showed hitherto unprecedented delineation of tissue microstructure.

  2. Gamma ray spectroscopy with PPM resolving power

    CERN Document Server

    Börner, H; Mutti, P

    2002-01-01

    Applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy with ppm resolving power are presented. The extraordinary resolution allows via the Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening (GRID) technique to determine lifetimes of excited nuclear levels. This has contributed to important nuclear structure information. We report on the current status of the technique

  3. The resolved stellar population of Leo A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E

    1996-01-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Ha filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an a

  4. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  5. Spectrally resolved visualization of fluorescent dyes permeating into skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Ulf; Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Burg, Jan Michael; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    We present a spectrally resolved confocal imaging approach to qualitatively asses the overall uptake and the penetration depth of fluorescent dyes into biological tissue. We use a confocal microscope with a spectral resolution of 5 nm to measure porcine skin tissue after performing a Franz-Diffusion experiment with a submicron emulsion enriched with the fluorescent dye Nile Red. The evaluation uses linear unmixing of the dye and the tissue autofluorescence spectra. The results are combined with a manual segmentation of the skin's epidermis and dermis layers to assess the penetration behavior additionally to the overall uptake. The diffusion experiments, performed for 3h and 24h, show a 3-fold increased dye uptake in the epidermis and dermis for the 24h samples. As the method is based on spectral information it does not face the problem of superimposed dye and tissue spectra and therefore is more precise compared to intensity based evaluation methods.

  6. Note: A new angle-resolved proton energy spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.; Su, L. N.; Liu, M.; Liu, B. C.; Shen, Z. W.; Fan, H. T.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Lu, X.; Ma, J. L.; Wang, W. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, J. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2013-09-15

    In typical laser-driven proton acceleration experiments Thomson parabola proton spectrometers are used to measure the proton spectra with very small acceptance angle in specific directions. Stacks composed of CR-39 nuclear track detectors, imaging plates, or radiochromic films are used to measure the angular distributions of the proton beams, respectively. In this paper, a new proton spectrometer, which can measure the spectra and angular distributions simultaneously, has been designed. Proton acceleration experiments performed on the Xtreme light III laser system demonstrates that the spectrometer can give angle-resolved spectra with a large acceptance angle. This will be conductive to revealing the acceleration mechanisms, optimization, and applications of laser-driven proton beams.

  7. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light.

  8. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  9. Filming the invisible - time-resolved visualization of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, H.

    2010-04-01

    Essentially all processes in gasdynamics are invisible to the naked eye as they occur in a transparent medium. The task to observe them is further complicated by the fact that most of these processes are also transient, often with characteristic times that are considerably below the threshold of human perception. Both difficulties can be overcome by combining visualization methods that reveal changes in the transparent medium, and high-speed photography techniques that “stop” the motion of the flow. The traditional approach is to reconstruct a transient process from a series of single images, each taken in a different experiment at a different instant. This approach, which is still widely used today, can only be expected to give reliable results when the process is reproducible. Truly time-resolved visualization, which yields a sequence of flow images in a single experiment, has been attempted for more than a century, but many of the developed camera systems were characterized by a high level of complexity and limited quality of the results. Recent advances in digital high-speed photography have changed this situation and have provided the tools to investigate, with relative ease and in sufficient detail, the true development of a transient flow with characteristic time scales down to one microsecond. This paper discusses the potential and the limitations one encounters when using density-sensitive visualization techniques in time-resolved mode. Several examples illustrate how this approach can reveal and explain a number of previously undetected phenomena in a variety of highly transient compressible flows. It is demonstrated that time-resolved visualization offers numerous advantages which normally outweigh its shortcomings, mainly the often-encountered loss in resolution. Apart from the capability to track the location and/or shape of flow features in space and time, adequate time-resolved visualization allows one to observe the development of deliberately

  10. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  11. Component resolved testing for allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skamstrup Hansen, Kirsten; Poulsen, Lars K

    2010-01-01

    disease. Novel tools to predict severe outcomes and to plan for allergen-specific treatment are necessary, and because only a small amount of blood is needed to test for a multitude of allergens and allergenic components, component resolved diagnostics is promising. A drawback is the risk of overdiagnosis......Component resolved diagnostics introduces new possibilities regarding diagnosis of allergic diseases and individualized, allergen-specific treatment. Furthermore, refinement of IgE-based testing may help elucidate the correlation or lack of correlation between allergenic sensitization and allergic...... and misinterpretation of the complex results of such tests. Also, the practical use and selection of allergenic components need to be evaluated in large studies including well-characterized patients and healthy, sensitized controls and with representation of different geographical regions....

  12. Fully resolved simulations of particle sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Wang, Yayun; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Progress in computational capabilities - and specifically in the realm of massively parallel architectures - render possible the simulation of fully resolved fluid-particle systems. This development will drastically improve physical understanding and modelling of these systems when the particle size is not negligible and their concentration appreciable. Using a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-sized spheres, we carry out fully resolved simulations of more than one thousand sedimenting spheres. We discuss the results of these simulations focusing on statistical aspects such as particle velocity fluctuations, particle pair distribution function, microstructure, and others. Supported by NSF Grant CBET 1335965.

  13. Can invisible watermarks resolve rightful ownerships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Scott A.; Memon, Nasir D.; Yeo, Boon-Lock; Yeung, Minerva M.

    1997-01-01

    Digital watermarks have been proposed in recent literature as the means for copyright protection of multimedia data. In this paper we address the capability of invisible watermarking schemes to resolve copyright ownerships. We will show that rightful ownerships cannot be resolved by current watermarking schemes alone. In addition, in the absence of standardization of watermarking procedures, anyone can claim ownership of any watermarked image. Specifically, we provide counterfeit watermarking schemes that can be performed on a watermarked image to allow multiple claims of rightful ownerships. We also proposed non-invertible watermarking schemes in this paper and discuss in general the usefulness of digital watermarks in identifying the rightful copyright owners. The results, coupled with the recent attacks on some image watermarks, further imply that we have to carefully re-think our approaches to invisible watermarking of images, and re- evaluate the promises, applications and limitations of such digital means of copyright protection.

  14. AP stars with resolved Zeeman split lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, G.

    1990-06-01

    High-resolution, high SNR observations of a sample of sharp-lined A stars and of Ap stars showing resolved Zeeman split lines are presented. The Fe II lines 6147.7 A and 6149.2 A unexpectedly appear to be asymmetric in all stars where they are resolved. The blue component of the 6149.2 line, which is a Zeeman doublet, is deeper and narrower than its red component. For line 6147.7, whose Zeeman pattern does not differ much from a quadruplet, the red components are deeper than the blue ones. It is shown that a partial Paschen-Back effect can account for these properties. The potential implications of this finding for studies of magnetic Ap stars are discussed.

  15. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Nagele, Stefan; Wais, Michael; Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric effect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the field-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for effective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes $A$@$\\text{C}_{60}$ and discuss how streaking time shifts are modified due to the interaction of the $\\text{C}_...

  16. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  17. The warped, resolved, deformed conifold gets flavoured

    CERN Document Server

    Gaillard, Jerome; Nunez, Carlos; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a simple transformation that allows to generate SU(3) structure solutions of Type IIB supergravity with RR fluxes, starting from non-Kahler solutions of Type I supergravity. The method may be applied also in the presence of supersymmetric source branes. We apply this transformation to a solution describing fivebranes wrapped on the two-sphere of the resolved conifold with additional flavour fivebrane sources. The resulting solution is a generalisation of the resolved deformed conifold solution of Butti et al. by the addition of D5 brane and D3 brane sources. We propose that this solution may be interpreted in terms of a combined effect of Higgsing and cascade of Seiberg dualities in the dual field theory.

  18. Noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale corneal elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive high-resolution depth-resolved measurement of corneal biomechanics is of great clinical significance for improving the diagnosis and optimizing the treatment of various degenerated ocular diseases. Here, we report a micro-scale optical coherence elastography (OCE) method that enables noncontact assessment of the depthwise elasticity distribution in the cornea. The OCE system combines a focused air-puff device with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Low-pressure short-duration air stream is used to load the cornea with the localized displacement at micron level. The phase-resolved OCT detection with nano-scale sensitivity probes the induced corneal deformation at various locations within a scanning line, providing the ultra-fast imaging of the corneal lamb wave propagation. With spectral analysis, the amplitude spectra and the phase spectra are available for the estimation of the frequency range of the lamb wave and the quantification of the wave propagation, respectively. Curved propagation paths following the top and bottom corneal boundaries are selected inside the cornea for measuring the phase velocity of the lamb wave at the major frequency components over the whole depths. Our pilot experiments on ex vivo rabbit eyes indicate the distinct stiffness of different layers in the cornea, including the epithelium, the anterior stroma, the posterior stroma, and the innermost region, which demonstrates the feasibility of this micro-scale OCE method for noncontact depth-resolved corneal elastography. Also, the quantification of the lamb wave dispersion in the cornea could lead to the measurement of the elastic modulus, suggesting the potential of this method for quantitative monitoring of the corneal biomechanics.

  19. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  20. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ningyuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ=π/2. In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  1. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Owens, Clai; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ =π /2 . In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  2. Spaced resolved analysis of suprathermal electrons in dense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinard A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the hot electron fraction is a crucial topic for high energy density laser driven plasmas: first, energy losses and radiative properties depend strongly on the hot electron fraction and, second, in ICF hohlraums suprathermal electrons preheat the D-T-capsule and seriously reduce the fusion performance. In the present work we present our first experimental and theoretical studies to analyze single shot space resolved hot electron fractions inside dense plasmas via optically thin X-ray line transitions from autoionizing states. The benchmark experiment has been carried out at an X-pinch in order to create a dense, localized plasma with a well defined symmetry axis of hot electron propagation. Simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution in the X-ray spectral range has been obtained with a spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal. The high performance of the X-ray diagnostics allowed to identify space resolved hot electron fractions via the X-ray spectral distribution of multiple excited states.

  3. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  4. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB030501 using INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Courvoisier, Thierry J L; Goetz, D; Hudec, R; Hroch, F; Lund, N; Mereghetti, S; Shaw, S E; Wigger, C

    2003-01-01

    The Gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positiioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F = 3.5 * 10^-6 erg cm^-2 in the 20-200 keV energy band) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20 - 400 keV range which is consistent with a spectral photon index of -1.7. No emission line or spectral break was detectable in the spectrum. Although the flux seems to be correlated with the hardness of the GRB spectrum, there is no clear soft to hard evolution seen over the duration of the burst. The INTEGRAL data have been compared with results from the Ulysses and RHESSI experiments.

  5. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  6. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  7. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  8. Chilling injury in stored nectarines and its detection by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurie, S.; Vanoli, M.; Dagar, A.; Weksler, A.; Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Lovati, F.; Feng, R.; Rizzolo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nectarine fruit after cold storage soften normally, but become dry instead of juicy and can develop flesh browning, bleeding and a gel-like or glassy formation of the flesh near the pit. An experiment was conducted to see if time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy could distinguish these internal dis

  9. Spectra-resolved technique of a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouyi; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Yali

    2004-07-01

    The lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates are used for marking substance in time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA), marking the protein, hormone, antibody, nucleic acid probe or biologica alive cell, to measure the concentration of the analysis substance inside the reaction system with time-resolved fluorometry after the reaction system occurred, and attain the quantitative analysis's purpose. TRFIA has been become a kind of new and more sensitive measure method after radioisotope marking, enzymatic marking, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, it primarily is decided by the special physics and chemistry characteristic of lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates. In this paper, the result of spectroscopic evaluation of europium trivalence ion and its chelate, and the principle of spectra-resolved technology and a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument made by ourselves are reported. In the set, a high frequency Xenon pulsed-light was adopted as exciting light, and two special filters was utilized according to spectra-resolved technique. Thus the influence of scattering light and short-lifetime fluorescence was removed. And the sensitivity is 10-12mol/L (when Eu3+ was used for marking substance), examination repeat is CV = 95% (p < 0.01).

  10. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  11. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  12. Analytic Approach to Resolving Parking Problems in Downtown Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolf Malić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parking issue is one of the major problems in Zagreb, andin relation to that Zagreb does not differ from other similar orbigger European cities. The problem the city is facing is beingpresented in the paper. It is complex and can be solved gradually,using operative and planning measures, by applying influentialparameters assessments based on which the appropriateparking-garage spaces assessment would be selected. Besides,all the knowledge learned from experiences of similar Europeancities should be used in resolving stationary traffic problem.Introduction of fast public urban transport would providepassengers with improved services (particularly in relation tothe travelling time introducing modern traffic system thatwould reduce the travelling time to below 30 minutes for the farthestrelations. Further improvement in reducing parking problemsin downtown as well as Zagreb broader area would not bepossible without t,nplementing th.s approach.

  13. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J. [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  14. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  15. How river rocks round: resolving the shape-size paradox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Domokos

    Full Text Available River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to decipher the transport history of a river rock.

  16. How river rocks round: resolving the shape-size paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Domokos, G; Sipos, A Á; Török, Á

    2013-01-01

    River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to ...

  17. Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

    2011-07-21

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

  18. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  19. An IPSN research programme to resolve pending LOCA issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailliat, A.; Grandjean, C.; Clement, B. [CEA Cadarache, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Studies performed in IPSN and elsewhere pointed out that high burnup may induce specific effects under LOCA conditions, especially those related with fuel relocation. Uncertainties exist regarding how much these effects might affect the late evolution of the accident transient and the associated safety issues. IPSN estimates that a better knowledge of specific phenomena is required in order to resolve the pending uncertainties related to LOCA criteria. IPSN is preparing the so called APRP-Irradie (High Burnup fuel LOCA) programme. One of the important aspect of this programme is in-pile experiments involving bundle geometries in the PHEBUS facility located at Cadarache, France. A feasibility study for such an experimental programme is underway and should provide soon, a finalized project including cost and schedule aspects. (authors)

  20. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    of the photoconductivity is observed, due the release of carriers from the quantum dots into the conducting barrier states. Secondly, the carrier dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells subject to a built-in piezoelectric eld is described. An initial fast decay of the photoconductivity as the piezoelectric eld is screened......This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... and by measuring the transmission of a terahertz probe pulse, the photoconductivity of the excited sample can be obtained. By changing the relative arrival time at the sample between the pump and the probe pulse, the photoconductivity dynamics can be studied on a picosecond timescale. The rst studied semiconductor...

  1. Space-resolved Resistive Measurement of Liquid Metal Wall Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhoseini, S M H

    2016-01-01

    In a fusion reactor internally coated with liquid metal, it will be important to diagnose the thickness of the liquid at various locations in the vessel, as a function of time, and possibly respond to counteract undesired bulging or depletion. The electrical conductance between electrodes immersed in the liquid metal can be used as a simple proxy for the local thickness. Here a matrix of electrodes is shown to provide spatially resolved measurements of liquid metal thickness in the absence of plasma. First a theory is developed for mxn electrodes, and then it is experimentally demonstrated for 3x1 electrodes. The experiments were carried out with Galinstan, but are easily extended to Lithium or other liquid metals.

  2. Some results on resolvable incomplete block designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Minqian; FANG; Kaitai

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the uniformity of a certain kind of resolvable incomplete block (RIB for simplicity) design which is called the PRIB design here. A sufficient and necessary condition is obtained, under which a PRIB design is the most uniform in the sense of a discrete discrepancy measure, and the uniform PRIB design is shown to be connected. A construction method for such designs via a kind of U-type designs is proposed, and an existence result of these designs is given. This method sets up an important bridge between PRIB designs and U-type designs.

  3. Inflation on the resolved warped deformed conifold

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, A

    2006-01-01

    Braneworld inflation on the resolved warped deformed conifold is represented by the dynamics of a D3-brane probe with the world volume of a brane spanning the large dimensions of the observable Universe. This model was recently proposed as a string theory candidate for slow-roll inflationary cosmology in hep-th/0511254. During inflation, the scalar curvature of the Universe is determined by the Hubble scale. We argue that taking into account the curvature of the inflationary Universe renders dynamics of the D3-brane fast-roll deep inside the warped throat.

  4. Angle-resolved time delay in photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the relative time delay of photoelectrons originating from different atomic subshells of noble gases. This quantity was measured via attosecond streaking and studied theoretically by Schultze et al. [Science 328, 1658 (2010)] for neon. A substantial discrepancy was found between the measured and the calculated values of the relative time delay. Several theoretical studies were put forward to resolve this issue, e.g., by including correlation effects. In the present paper we explore a further aspect, namely the directional dependence of time delay. In contrast to neon, for argon target a strong angular dependence of time delay is found near a Cooper minimum.

  5. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  6. Spatially Resolved Analysis of Bragg Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sabel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper targets an inherent control of optical shrinkage in photosensitive polymers, contributing by means of spatially resolved analysis of volume holographic phase gratings. Point by point scanning of the local material response to the Gaussian intensity distribution of the recording beams is accomplished. Derived information on the local grating period and grating slant is evaluated by mapping of optical shrinkage in the lateral plane as well as through the depth of the layer. The influence of recording intensity, exposure duration and the material viscosity on the Bragg selectivity is investigated.

  7. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  8. 48 CFR 30.606 - Resolving cost impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.606 Resolving cost... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving cost impacts. 30... negotiating and resolving the cost impact when the estimated cost impact on any of their contracts is at...

  9. Time resolved ESR spectroscopy. ESR pulse radiolysis equipment with microsecond time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1983-01-01

    Time resolved ESR experiments allow the study of the chemical kinetics as well as spin dynamics of free radicals in the liquid phase. Starting from the physical and chemical requirements the experimental parameters of a universal time resolved ESR spectrometer are derived. The main components of the ESR pulse radiolysis equipment are described and their technical parameters are discussed. By two experimental examples it is shown that at a time resolution of 0.3 ..mu..s a sensitivity of c/sub min/ = 10/sup -6/ mol dm/sup -3/ for simple radical spectra can be achieved.

  10. A spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Finch, J. P.; King, N. S. P.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Johnson, D. E.

    2008-10-01

    The concepts and initial development efforts for a spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic are described. The diagnostic is intended for Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility and is an integration of neutron aperture imaging and ion temperature techniques. The neutron imaging technique is extended by recording tomographic projections of the radiation-to-light converter on a streak camera. The streak record is used to calculate images at multiple times during the arrival of the thermally broadened 14.1MeV neutron flux. The resulting set of images is used to determine the spatially resolved ion temperature.

  11. A spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G P; Finch, J P; King, N S P; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Johnson, D E

    2008-10-01

    The concepts and initial development efforts for a spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic are described. The diagnostic is intended for Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility and is an integration of neutron aperture imaging and ion temperature techniques. The neutron imaging technique is extended by recording tomographic projections of the radiation-to-light converter on a streak camera. The streak record is used to calculate images at multiple times during the arrival of the thermally broadened 14.1 MeV neutron flux. The resulting set of images is used to determine the spatially resolved ion temperature.

  12. Healthcare Teams Neurodynamically Reorganize When Resolving Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Stevens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the microscale neural dynamics of social interactions has yet to be translated into improvements in the assembly, training and evaluation of teams. This is partially due to the scale of neural involvements in team activities, spanning the millisecond oscillations in individual brains to the minutes/hours performance behaviors of the team. We have used intermediate neurodynamic representations to show that healthcare teams enter persistent (50–100 s neurodynamic states when they encounter and resolve uncertainty while managing simulated patients. Each of the second symbols was developed situating the electroencephalogram (EEG power of each team member in the contexts of those of other team members and the task. These representations were acquired from EEG headsets with 19 recording electrodes for each of the 1–40 Hz frequencies. Estimates of the information in each symbol stream were calculated from a 60 s moving window of Shannon entropy that was updated each second, providing a quantitative neurodynamic history of the team’s performance. Neurodynamic organizations fluctuated with the task demands with increased organization (i.e., lower entropy occurring when the team needed to resolve uncertainty. These results show that intermediate neurodynamic representations can provide a quantitative bridge between the micro and macro scales of teamwork.

  13. Resolving The Moth at Millimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Ricarte, Angelo; Hughes, A Meredith; Duchêne, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P; Andrews, Sean M; Wilner, David J

    2013-01-01

    HD 61005, also known as "The Moth," is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back "wings" thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.9 arcsec that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution. The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constr...

  14. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  15. Tachometer Derived From Brushless Shaft-Angle Resolver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    1995-01-01

    Tachometer circuit operates in conjunction with brushless shaft-angle resolver. By performing sequence of straightforward mathematical operations on resolver signals and utilizing simple trigonometric identity, generates voltage proportional to rate of rotation of shaft. One advantage is use of brushless shaft-angle resolver as main source of rate signal: no brushes to wear out, no brush noise, and brushless resolvers have proven robustness. No switching of signals to generate noise. Another advantage, shaft-angle resolver used as shaft-angle sensor, tachometer input obtained without adding another sensor. Present circuit reduces overall size, weight, and cost of tachometer.

  16. Insights into gas-phase reaction mechanisms of small carbon radicals using isomer-resolved product detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevitt, Adam J; Goulay, Fabien

    2016-02-17

    For reactive gas-phase environments, including combustion, extraterrestrials atmospheres and our Earth's atmosphere, the availability of quality chemical data is essential for predictive chemical models. These data include reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions. This perspective overviews recent isomer-resolved production detection experiments for reactions of two of the most reactive gas phase radicals, the CN and CH radicals, with a suite of small hydrocarbons. A particular focus is given to flow-tube experiments using synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Coupled with computational studies and other experiment techniques, flow tube isomer-resolved product detection have provided significant mechanistic details of these radical + neutral reactions with some general patterns emerging.

  17. Hemoglobin concentration determination based on near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method has been proved to be more effective than single point spectroscopy method in the experiment to predict the concentration of the Intralipid diluted solutions. However, Intralipid diluted solution is simple, cannot be the representative of turbid liquids. Blood is a natural and meaningful turbid liquid, more complicate. Hemoglobin is the major constituent of the whole blood. And hemoglobin concentration is commonly used in clinical medicine to diagnose many diseases. In this paper, near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra (NIRSRTS) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were used to predict the hemoglobin concentration of human blood. The results showed the prediction ability for hemoglobin concentration of the proposed method is better than single point transmission spectroscopy method. This paper demonstrated the feasibility of the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method for practical liquid composition analysis. This research provided a new thinking of practical turbid liquid composition analysis.

  18. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present.

  19. The RESOLVE Survey: REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Norris, M. A.; Eckert, K. D.; Moffett, A. J.; Stark, D. V.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.; Berlind, A. A.; Wei, L. H.; Baker, A. J.; Vogel, S. N.; Hendel, D. A.; RESOLVE Team

    2011-01-01

    The RESOLVE Survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as merging and star formation within 53,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web in two long equatorial strips. The survey's primary science drivers include relating the galaxy velocity and mass functions to environment, constraining the "missing baryons" problem from a complete accounting perspective, and understanding galaxy disk building in large-scale context. RESOLVE's unique data product is high-resolution multiple-longslit spectroscopy, targeting all 1500 galaxies with baryonic (stellar + cold gas) mass > 109 Msun in the volume. Combined with a complete redshift survey, this spectroscopy will enable an unprecedented high dynamic-range view of how kinematically estimated mass is distributed on scales from dwarf galaxies to clusters. To trace stellar and gas mass, RESOLVE is drawing on deep public surveys at UV, optical, IR, and radio wavelengths, most notably the 21cm ALFALFA Survey. Here we present early results: (1) statistics of our efforts to recover galaxies missed by RESOLVE's parent survey, the SDSS; (2) calibration of indirect atomic and molecular gas estimators to supplement direct observations; (3) progress toward optimizing stellar mass and environment measures; and (4) a first installment of kinematic data focusing on S0 galaxies. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under CAREER award 0955368.

  20. Resolved motion rate and resolved acceleration servo-control of wheeled mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, P.F.; Neuman, C.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Accurate motion control of wheeled mobile robots (WMRs) is required for their application to autonomous, semi-autonomous and teleoperated tasks. The similarities between WMRs and stationary manipulators suggest that current, successful, model-based manipulator control algorithms may be applied to WMRs. Special characteristics of WMRs including higher-pairs, closed-chains, friction and unactuated and unsensed joints require innovative modeling methodologies. The WMR modeling challenge has been recently overcome, thus enabling the application of manipulator control algorithms to WMRs. This realization lays the foundation for significant technology transfer from manipulator control to WMR control. We apply two Cartesian-space manipulator control algorithms: resolved motion rate (kinematics-based) and resolved acceleration (dynamics-based) control to WMR servo-control. We evaluate simulation studies of two exemplary WMRs: Uranus (a three degree-of-freedom WMR constructed at Carnegie Mellon University), and Bicsun-Bicas (a two degree-of-freedom WMR being constructed at Sandia National Laboratories) under the control of these algorithms. Although resolved motion rate servo-control is adequate for the control of Uranus, resolved acceleration servo-control is required for the control of the mechanically simpler Bicsun-Bicas because it exhibits more dynamic coupling and nonlinearities. Successful accurate motion control of these WMRs in simulation is driving current experimental research studies. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Atomically resolved images of lithium purple bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinke, Melanie; Bienert, Robert; Waelsch, Michael; Podlich, Tatjana; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Jin, Rongying [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lousiana State University (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The lithium molybdenum purple bronze Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} is a quasi 1D metal at room temperature showing Luttinger liquid physics. The highly anisotropic conductivity runs along the crystallographic b axis where Mo-O chains, formed by the shared edges of the MoO{sub 6} octahedra, provide the electrical transport. Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} samples were investigated with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. By cleaving the samples at low temperatures (60 K) we obtained atomically resolved images of the surface. In these images the Mo-O chains are visible, which are covered by layers of MoO{sub 6} octahedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  2. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Johanna

    2009-02-20

    Cleared edge overgrowth (CEO) nanostructures are identified and studied by 1D und 2D {mu}PL mapping scans and by time-resolved and power-dependent measurements. Distinct excitonic ground states of 2fold CEO QDs with large localization energies are achieved. The deeper localization reached as compared to the only other report on 2fold CEO QDs in literature is attributed to a new strain-free fabrication process and changed QW thickness in [001] growth. In order to achieve controlled manipulation of 2fold CEO QDs the concept of a CEO structure with three top gates and one back gate is presented. Due to the complexity of this device, a simpler test structure is realized. Measurements on this test structure confirm the necessity to either grow significantly thicker overgrowth layers or to provide separate top gates in all three spatial direction to controllably manipulate 2fold CEO QDs with an external electric field. (orig.)

  3. Spatially Resolved Images and Solar Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2008-03-01

    The Sun is the primary source of energy that governs both the terrestrial climate and near-earth space environment. Variations in UV irradiances seen at earth are the sum of global (solar dynamo) to regional (active region, plage, network, bright points and background) solar magnetic activities that can be identified through spatially resolved photospheric, chromospheric and coronal features. In this research, the images of CaII K-line (NSO/Sac Peak) have been analysed to segregate the various chromospheric features.We derived the different indices and estimated their contribution from the time series data to total CaII K emission flux and UV irradiance variability. A part of the important results from this research is discussed in this paper.

  4. Resolving coastal conflicts using marine spatial planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuda, Arthur O; Stevens, Tim F; Rodwell, Lynda D

    2014-01-15

    We applied marine spatial planning (MSP) to manage conflicts in a multi-use coastal area of Kenya. MSP involves several steps which were supported by using geographical information systems (GISs), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and optimization. GIS was used in identifying overlapping coastal uses and mapping conflict hotspots. MCDA was used to incorporate the preferences of user groups and managers into a formal decision analysis procedure. Optimization was applied in generating optimal allocation alternatives to competing uses. Through this analysis three important objectives that build a foundation for future planning of Kenya's coastal waters were achieved: 1) engaging competing stakeholders; 2) illustrating how MSP can be adapted to aid decision-making in multi-use coastal regions; and 3) developing a draft coastal use allocation plan. The successful application of MSP to resolve conflicts in coastal regions depends on the level of stakeholder involvement, data availability and the existing knowledge base.

  5. Resolved Host Studies of Stellar Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts offer an excellent means of probing the environments and populations that produce these events' varied massive progenitors. These same young stellar progenitors make LGRBs and SNe valuable and potentially powerful tracers of star formation, metallicity, the IMF, and the end phases of stellar evolution. However, properly utilizing these progenitors as tools requires a thorough understanding of their formation and, consequently, the physical properties of their parent host environments. This review looks at some of the recent work on LGRB and SN hosts with resolved environments that allows us to probe the precise explosion sites and surrounding environments of these events in incredible detail.

  6. Resolving mixing in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Agertz, O

    2009-01-01

    Standard formulations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are unable to resolve mixing at fluid boundaries. We use an error and stability analysis of the generalised SPH equations of motion to prove that this is due to two distinct problems. The first is a leading order error in the momentum equation. This should decrease with increasing neighbour number, but does not because numerical instabilities cause the kernel to be irregularly sampled. We identify two important instabilities: the clumping instability and the banding instability, and we show that both are cured by a suitable choice of kernel. The second problem is the local mixing instability (LMI). This occurs as particles attempt to mix on the kernel scale, but are unable to due to entropy conservation. The result is a pressure discontinuity at boundaries that pushes fluids of different entropy apart. We cure the LMI by using a temperature weighted density estimate that both reduces errors in the continuity equation and allows individual particle...

  7. Resolving Implementation Ambiguity and Improving SURF

    CERN Document Server

    Abeles, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) has emerged as one of the more popular feature descriptors and detectors in recent years. Due to SURF's complexity and ambiguities found in its description, performance and algorithmic details between these implementations vary widely. To resolve these ambiguities a set of general techniques for feature stability is defined based on the smoothness rule and applied to SURF. Additional new improvements to SURF are proposed for speed and stability. To illustrate the importance of these implementation details, a performance study of popular SURF implementations is done. By utilizing all the suggested improvements it is possible to create a SURF implementation which is several times faster and/or more stable.

  8. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  9. Resolved CCD Photometry of Pluto and Charon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.H.; Waddell, P.; Christian, C.A.

    1988-04-01

    Highly resolved CCD images of Pluto and Charon near maximum separation are measured with point spread function fitting techniques to determine independent magnitudes and an accurate separation for Pluto and Charon. A measured separation of 0.923 + or - 0.005 arcsec at a position angle of 173.3 + or - 0.3 deg on June 18, 1987 UT produced a value of 19558.0 + or - 153.0 km for the radius of Charon's orbit. An apparent B magnitude of 14.877 + or - 0.009 and (B-I) color of 1.770 + or - 0.015 are determined for Pluto, while Charon is fainter with B = 18.826 + or - 0.011 and slightly bluer with (B-I) = 1.632 + or - 0.018. 18 references.

  10. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of 5-methoxyindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Oeltermann, Olivia; Pratt, David; Weinkauf, Rainer; Meerts, W Leo; van der Zande, Wim; Kleinermanns, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2010-07-14

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the vibrationless origin and of eight vibronic bands of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) have been measured and analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. The experimental results are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. All vibronic bands can be explained by absorption of a single conformer, which unambiguously has been shown to be the anti-conformer from its rotational constants and excitation energy. For both anti- and syn-conformers, a (1)L(a)/(1)L(b) gap larger than 4000 cm(-1) is calculated, making the vibronic coupling between both states very small, thereby explaining why the spectrum of 5MOI is very different from that of the parent molecule, indole.

  11. Fermions in a warped resolved conifold

    CERN Document Server

    Dantas, D M; Almeida, C A S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the localization of the spinorial field in a braneworld built as a warped product between a 3-brane and a 2-cycle of the resolved conifold. This scenario provides a geometric flow that controls the singularity at the origin and changes the properties of the fermion in this background. Furthermore, due the cylindrical symmetry according to the 3-brane and a smoothed warp factor, this geometry can be regarded as a near brane correction of the string-like branes. This geometry allows a normalizable and well-defined massless mode whose decay and value on the brane depend on the resolution parameter. For the Kaluza-Klein modes, resolution parameter also controls the height of the barrier of the volcano potential.

  12. Lipoxins: nature's way to resolve inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharan JA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jayashree A Chandrasekharan, Neelam Sharma-Walia HM Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: An effective host defense mechanism involves inflammation to eliminate pathogens from the site of infection, followed by the resolution of inflammation and the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Lipoxins are endogenous anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving molecules that play a vital role in reducing excessive tissue injury and chronic inflammation. In this review, the mechanisms of action of lipoxins at the site of inflammation and their interaction with other cellular signaling molecules and transcription factors are discussed. Emphasis has also been placed on immune modulatory role(s of lipoxins. Lipoxins regulate components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems including neutrophils, macrophages, T-, and B-cells. Lipoxins also modulate levels of various transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB, activator protein-1, nerve growth factor-regulated factor 1A binding protein 1, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ and control the expression of many inflammatory genes. Since lipoxins and aspirin-triggered lipoxins have clinical relevance, we discuss their important role in clinical research to treat a wide range of diseases like inflammatory disorders, renal fibrosis, cerebral ischemia, and cancer. A brief overview of lipoxins in viral malignancies and viral pathogenesis especially the unexplored role of lipoxins in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus biology is also presented. Keywords: lipoxins, epi-lipoxins, inflammation, pro-resolving, aspirin-triggered lipoxins, cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, therapeutic potential, transcription factors, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus

  13. Resolving local ambiguity using semantics of shape.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegert, Carl F.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate a new semantic method for automatic analysis of wide-area, high-resolution overhead imagery to tip and cue human intelligence analysts to human activity. In the open demonstration, we find and trace cars and rooftops. Our methodology, extended to analysis of voxels, may be applicable to understanding morphology and to automatic tracing of neurons in large-scale, serial-section TEM datasets. We defined an algorithm and software implementation that efficiently finds all combinations of image blobs that satisfy given shape semantics, where image blobs are formed as a general-purpose, first step that 'oversegments' image pixels into blobs of similar pixels. We will demonstrate the remarkable power (ROC) of this combinatorial-based work flow for automatically tracing any automobiles in a scene by applying semantics that require a subset of image blobs to fill out a rectangular shape, with width and height in given intervals. In most applications we find that the new combinatorial-based work flow produces alternative (overlapping) tracings of possible objects (e.g. cars) in a scene. To force an estimation (tracing) of a consistent collection of objects (cars), a quick-and-simple greedy algorithm is often sufficient. We will demonstrate a more powerful resolution method: we produce a weighted graph from the conflicts in all of our enumerated hypotheses, and then solve a maximal independent vertex set problem on this graph to resolve conflicting hypotheses. This graph computation is almost certain to be necessary to adequately resolve multiple, conflicting neuron topologies into a set that is most consistent with a TEM dataset.

  14. Broadband Mid-Infrared Comb-Resolved Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin; Mills, Andrew; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin; Maslowski, Piotr

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comb-resolved, broadband, direct-comb spectroscopy system in the mid-IR and its application to the detection of trace gases and molecular line shape analysis. By coupling an optical parametric oscillator (OPO), a 100 m multipass cell, and a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), sensitive, comb-resolved broadband spectroscopy of dilute gases is possible. The OPO has radiation output at 3.1-3.7 and 4.5-5.5 μm. The laser repetition rate is scanned to arbitrary values with 1 Hz accuracy around 417 MHz. The comb-resolved spectrum is produced with an absolute frequency axis depending only on the RF reference (in this case a GPS disciplined oscillator), stable to 1 part in 10^9. The minimum detectable absorption is 1.6x10-6 wn Hz-1/2. The operating range of the experimental setup enables access to strong fundamental transitions of numerous molecular species for applications based on trace gas detection such as environmental monitoring, industrial gas calibration or medical application of human breath analysis. In addition to these capabilities, we show the application for careful line shape analysis of argon-broadened CO band spectra around 4.7 μm. Fits of the obtained spectra clearly illustrate the discrepancy between the measured spectra and the Voigt profile (VP), indicating the need to include effects such as Dicke narrowing and the speed-dependence of the collisional width and shift in the line shape model, as was shown in previous cw-laser studies. In contrast to cw-laser based experiments, in this case the entire spectrum (˜ 250 wn) covering the whole P and R branches can be measured in 16 s with 417 MHz resolution, decreasing the acquisition time by orders of magnitude. The parallel acquisition allows collection of multiple lines simultaneously, removing the correlation of possible temperature and pressure drifts. While cw-systems are capable of measuring spectra with higher precision, this demonstration opens the door for fast

  15. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process...... of bringing the data from measurement to analysis. Bridging the experimental design and challenges of the experiments from X-ray synchrotrons to the newly available X-ray Free Electron Laser sources (XFEL).LCLS in California is the first XFEL to come online and delivers intense 30fs X-ray pulses, orders...... of magnitude shorter than the 100ps X-ray pulses available from synchroton sources. This increase in time-resolution allows for the use of X-ray techniques in a completely new time-domain, where coherent photo-induced changes in structure can be studied on their intrinsic time-scale. Measurements on Rh2(dimen...

  16. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-06-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth.

  17. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy of para-difluorobenzene·Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, A.; Riehn, C.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Jarzeba, W.; Brutschy, B.

    2002-07-01

    We report on time-resolved rotational spectroscopy experiments of the cluster para-difluorobenzene·Ar ( pDFB·Ar) by picosecond laser pulses in a supersonic expansion. Rotational coherences of pDFB·Ar are generated by resonant electronic excitation and probed by time-resolved fluorescence depletion spectroscopy and time-resolved photoionization ((1+1') PPI) spectroscopy. The former allows the determination of both ground and excited state rotational constants, whereas the latter technique enables the separate study of the excited state with the benefit of mass-selective detection. Since pDFB·Ar represents a near symmetric oblate rotor, persistent J-type transients with tJ≈ n/2( A+ B) could be measured. From their analysis, (A″+B″)=2234.9±2 MHz and (A'+B')=2237.9±2 MHz were obtained. A structural investigation, based on data of the pDFB monomer, is presented resulting in a pDFB·Ar center-of-mass distance of both moieties of R z=3.543±0.017 Å with a change of ΔR z=-0.057±0.009 Å upon electronic excitation. These results are compared to data of former frequency-resolved experiments and ab initio computations.

  18. Rachel's Story: A Transpersonal Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a case study in which a client's transpersonal/religious/spiritual experience facilitated the achievement of her counseling goal. Through the paranormal experience, she resolved several of her conflicts, including a new appreciation of the church from which she had become estranged. (Author)

  19. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  20. Resolving the inner disk of UX Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplin, A.; Madlener, D.; Chen, L.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Kishimoto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The cause of the UX Ori variability in some Herbig Ae/Be stars is still a matter of debate. Detailed studies of the circumstellar environment of UX Ori objects (UXORs) are required to test the hypothesis that the observed drop in photometry might be related to obscuration events. Methods: Using near- and mid-infrared interferometric AMBER and MIDI observations, we resolved the inner circumstellar disk region around UX Ori. Results: We fitted the K-, H-, and N-band visibilities and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of UX Ori with geometric and parametric disk models. The best-fit K-band geometric model consists of an inclined ring and a halo component. We obtained a ring-fit radius of 0.45 ± 0.07 AU (at a distance of 460 pc), an inclination of 55.6 ± 2.4°, a position angle of the system axis of 127.5 ± 24.5°, and a flux contribution of the over-resolved halo component to the total near-infrared excess of 16.8 ± 4.1%. The best-fit N-band model consists of an elongated Gaussian with a HWHM ~ 5 AU of the semi-major axis and an axis ration of a/b ~ 3.4 (corresponding to an inclination of ~72°). With a parametric disk model, we fitted all near- and mid-infrared visibilities and the SED simultaneously. The model disk starts at an inner radius of 0.46 ± 0.06 AU with an inner rim temperature of 1498 ± 70 K. The disk is seen under an nearly edge-on inclination of 70 ± 5°. This supports any theories that require high-inclination angles to explain obscuration events in the line of sight to the observer, for example, in UX Ori objects where orbiting dust clouds in the disk or disk atmosphere can obscure the central star. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs: 090.C-0769, 074.C-0552.

  1. First-principles approach to excitons in time-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, E.; Sangalli, D.; Marini, A.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we put forward a first-principles approach and propose an accurate diagrammatic approximation to calculate the time-resolved (TR) and angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of systems with excitons. We also derive an alternative formula to the TR photocurrent which involves a single time-integral of the lesser Green's function. The diagrammatic approximation applies to the relaxed regime characterized by the presence of quasistationary excitons and vanishing polarization. The nonequilibrium self-energy diagrams are evaluated using excited Green's functions; since this is not standard, the analytic derivation is presented in detail. The final result is an expression for the lesser Green's function in terms of quantities that can all be calculated in a first-principles manner. The validity of the proposed theory is illustrated in a one-dimensional model system with a direct gap. We discuss possible scenarios and highlight some universal features of the exciton peaks. Our results indicate that the exciton dispersion can be observed in TR and angle-resolved photoemission.

  2. Component Resolved Diagnosis in Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsitz, D; Brockow, K

    2017-06-01

    Hymenoptera anaphylaxis is one of the leading causes of severe allergic reactions and can be fatal. Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) can prevent a life-threatening reaction; however, confirmation of an allergy to a Hymenoptera venom is a prerequisite before starting such a treatment. Component resolved diagnostics (CRD) have helped to better identify the responsible allergen. Many new insect venom allergens have been identified within the last few years. Commercially available recombinant allergens offer new diagnostic tools for detecting sensitivity to insect venoms. Additional added sensitivity to nearly 95% was introduced by spiking yellow jacket venom (YJV) extract with Ves v 5. The further value of CRD for sensitivity in YJV and honey bee venom (HBV) allergy is more controversially discussed. Recombinant allergens devoid of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants often help to identify the culprit venom in patients with double sensitivity to YJV and HBV. CRD identified a group of patients with predominant Api m 10 sensitization, which may be less well protected by VIT, as some treatment extracts are lacking this allergen. The diagnostic gap of previously undetected Hymenoptera allergy has been decreased via production of recombinant allergens. Knowledge of analogies in interspecies proteins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants is necessary to distinguish relevant from irrelevant sensitizations.

  3. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Nikhiles

    2016-10-01

    Angle Resolved Photo Emission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a very effective tool to study the electronic states of solids, from simple metals to complex systems like cuprate superconductors. For photon energy in the range of 10 - 100 eV, it is a surface sensitive process as the free path of the photo emitted electrons is of the order of a few lattice parameters. However to interpret the experimental data one needs to have a theoretical foundation for the photoemission process. From the theory of photoemission it may be seen that one can get information about the state from which the electron has been excited. As the translational periodicity is broken normal to the surface, a new type of electron state in the forbidden energy gap can exist localized in the surface region. ARPES can reveal the existence and the property of such surface states. We shall also discuss briefly how the electromagnetic field of the photons are influenced by the presence of the surface and how one can try to take that into account in photoemission theory.

  4. Resolved Multifrequency Radio Observations of GG Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Sean M; Isella, Andrea; Birnstiel, Tilman; Rosenfeld, Katherine A; Wilner, David J; Perez, Laura M; Ricci, Luca; Carpenter, John M; Calvet, Nuria; Corder, Stuartt A; Deller, Adam T; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Greaves, Jane S; Harris, Robert J; Henning, Thomas; Kwon, Woojin; Lazio, Joseph; Linz, Hendrik; Mundy, Lee G; Sargent, Anneila I; Storm, Shaye; Testi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ~60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales of ~0.1". A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present ...

  5. Comparing and Aggregating Partially Resolved Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bansal, Mukul S; Fernández-Baca, David

    2009-01-01

    We define, analyze, and give efficient algorithms for two kinds of distance measures for rooted and unrooted phylogenies. For rooted trees, our measures are based on the topologies the input trees induce on triplets; that is, on three-element subsets of the set of species. For unrooted trees, the measures are based on quartets (four-element subsets). Triplet and quartet-based distances provide a robust and fine-grained measure of the similarities between trees. The distinguishing feature of our distance measures relative to traditional quartet and triplet distances is their ability to deal cleanly with the presence of unresolved nodes, also called polytomies. For rooted trees, these are nodes with more than two children; for unrooted trees, they are nodes of degree greater than three. Our first class of measures are parametric distances, where there is a parameter that weighs the difference between an unresolved triplet/quartet topology and a resolved one. Our second class of measures are based on Hausdorff d...

  6. Resolving the formation of modern Chladni figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P. H.; Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Chiang, P. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-09-01

    The resonant spectrum of a thin plate driven with a mechanical oscillator is precisely measured to distinguish modern Chladni figures (CFs) observed at the resonant frequencies from classical CFs observed at the non-resonant frequencies. Experimental results reveal that modern CFs generally display an important characteristic of avoided crossings of nodal lines, whereas the nodal lines of classical CFs form a regular grid. The formation of modern CFs and the resonant frequency spectrum are resolved with a theoretical model that characterizes the interaction between the plate and the driving source into the inhomogeneous Kirchhoff-Love equation. The derived formula for determining resonant frequencies is shown to be exactly identical to the meromorphic function given in singular billiards that deals with the coupling strength on the transition between integrable and chaotic features. The good agreement between experimental results and theoretical predictions verifies the significant role of the strong-coupling effect in the formation of modern CFs. More importantly, it is confirmed that the apparatus for generating modern CFs can be developed to serve as an expedient system for exploring the nodal domains of chaotic wave functions as well as the physics of the strong coupling with a point scatterer.

  7. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  8. The Resolved Stellar Population of Leo A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    1996-05-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Hα filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an accurate color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We have used the Bavesian inference method described by Tolstoy & Saha to calculate the likelihood of a Monte Carlo simulation of the stellar population of Leo A being a good match to the data within the well understood errors in the data. The magnitude limits on our data are sensitive enough to look back at ~1 Gyr of star formation history at the distance of Leo A. To explain the observed ratio of red to blue stars in the observed CMD, it is necessary to invoke either a steadily decreasing star formation rate toward the present time or gaps in the star formation history. We also compare the properties of the observed stellar population with the known spatial distribution of the H I gas and H II regions to support the conclusions from CMD modeling. We consider the possibility that currently there is a period of diminished star formation in Leo A, as evidenced by the lack of very young stars in the CMD and the faint H II regions. How the chaotic H I distribution, with no observable rotation, fits into our picture of the evolution of Leo A is as yet unclear.

  9. Time-resolved X-ray scattering program at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodricks, B.

    1994-08-01

    The Time-Resolved Scattering Program`s goal is the development of instruments and techniques for time-resolved studies. This entails the development of wide bandpass and focusing optics, high-speed detectors, mechanical choppers, and components for the measurement and creation of changes in samples. Techniques being developed are pump-probe experiments, single-bunch scattering experiments, high-speed white and pink beam Laue scattering, and nanosecond to microsecond synchronization of instruments. This program will be carried out primarily from a white-beam, bend-magnet source, experimental station, 1-BM-B, that immediately follows the first optics enclosure (1-BM-A). This paper will describe the experimental station and instruments under development to carry out the program.

  10. Resolvable cycle criteria for identifying personnel based on clothing and armament variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Steve; Devitt, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    In the urban environment, it may be necessary to identify personnel based on their type of dress. Observing a police officer or soldier might require a different response than observing an armed civilian. This paper reports on the required number of resolvable cycles to identify different personnel based upon the variations of their clothing and armament. Longwave (LWIR), and midwave infrared (MWIR) images of twelve people at twelve aspects were collected. These images were blurred and 11 human observers performed a 12-alternative forced choice visual identification experiment. The results of the human perception experiments were used to measure the required number of resolvable cycles for identifying these personnel. These results are used in modeling sensor performance tasks and improving war-game simulations oriented to the urban environment.

  11. Time-resolved photoresponse of nanometer-thick Nb/NiCu bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, L.; Pepe, G. P.; Latempa, R.; De Lisio, C.; Altucci, C.; D'Acunto, P.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Taneda, T.; Sobolewski, R.

    2005-07-01

    We present femtosecond optical time-resolved pump-probe investigations of superconducting hybrids structures consisting of Nb/NiCu bilayers with various thickness. Measurements performed on pure Nb and NiCu films are also given. The photoresponse experiments provide the quasiparticle relaxation times in bilayers of different thickness ratios. The study of the photoresponse as a function of the temperature reveals the spatial evolution of the superconductor order parameter across the bilayers.

  12. Singular value decomposition as a tool for background corrections in time-resolved XFEL scattering data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    The development of new X-ray light sources, XFELs, with unprecedented time and brilliance characteristics has led to the availability of very large datasets with high time resolution and superior signal strength. The chaotic nature of the emission processes in such sources as well as entirely novel...... on singular-value decomposition of no-signal subsets of acquired datasets in combination with model inputs and appears generally applicable to time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering experiments....

  13. [Badly resolved triad: sexuality, contraception and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliane, A H

    1993-09-01

    Sexuality, contraception, and pregnancy are inseparable, yet they are a taboo subject both for the whole country and for adolescents. The ever-earlier awakening of sexuality requires educational mechanisms that assign fundamental importance to the implementation of social, psychological, and cultural protection strategies. The resolution of pregnancy is dependent on income just as maternity is secondary to financial independence. The majority of rich adolescents get an abortion, while poor adolescents carry to term their undesired pregnancies. Adolescence is a phase of confusion with peculiar psychosocial and cultural aspects. In the low-income population the start of formal education is precarious and delayed, an important factor in the discrepancies between well-to-do and poor social classes. Pregnancy and abortion rates vary according to economic conditions, however, their resolution clearly shows ethical, religious, and moral subjectivity. The media, rural exodus, increasing urbanization, and the economic crisis make maternity a less dominant aspect of women's lives. Young people do not obtain the necessary information for safeguarding their fertility because of the lack of specialized services, thus they are uncertain about what the health care system can provide. Much opportunity is lost because professionals are too busy or too disinterested to listen to these alienated youngsters. Preconceived notions, disinformation, and uncertainty coupled with emotional obstacles and noncooperation of the partner result in the use of contraceptives becoming a complex and difficult problem to resolve. It is necessary to alter our perceptions of adolescent sexual development. In Brazil, where more than half of the population is young, it is indispensable to devise collective programs not restricted to conventional medical practices to reach all adolescents.

  14. Mode resolved density of atmospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aalto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the mode resolved density of ultrafine atmospheric particles measured in boreal forest environment. The method used here enables us to find the distinct density information for each mode in atmospheric fine particle population: the density values for nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode particles are presented. The experimental data was gained during 2 May 2005–19 May 2005 at the boreal forest measurement station "SMEAR II" in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The density values for accumulation mode varied from 1.1 to 2 g/cm3 (average 1.5 g/cm3 and for Aitken mode from 0.4 to 2 g/cm3 (average 0.97 g/cm3. As an overall trend during the two weeks campaign, the density value of Aitken mode was seen to gradually increase. With the present method, the time dependent behaviour of the particle density can be investigated in the time scale of 10 min. This allows us to follow the density evolution of the nucleation mode particles during the particle growth process following the nucleation burst. The density of nucleation mode particles decreased during the growth process. The density values for 15 nm particles were 1.2–1.5 g/cm3 and for grown 30 nm particles 0.5–1 g/cm3. These values are consistent with the present knowledge that the condensing species are semi-volatile organics, emitted from the boreal forest.

  15. Measuring Speed Of Rotation With Two Brushless Resolvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E.

    1995-01-01

    Speed of rotation of shaft measured by use of two brushless shaft-angle resolvers aligned so electrically and mechanically in phase with each other. Resolvers and associated circuits generate voltage proportional to speed of rotation (omega) in both magnitude and sign. Measurement principle exploits simple trigonometric identity.

  16. 48 CFR 2429.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Resolving tax problems. 2429.101 Section 2429.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 2429.101 Resolving tax problems. In order to...

  17. 48 CFR 29.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 29.101 Section 29.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 29.101 Resolving tax problems. (a) Contract tax problems...

  18. 48 CFR 1329.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 1329.101 Section 1329.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 1329.101 Resolving tax problems. Legal questions relating to tax...

  19. 48 CFR 229.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 229.101 Section 229.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 229.101 Resolving tax problems....

  20. 48 CFR 629.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 629.101 Section 629.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 629.101 Resolving tax problems. In certain instances, acquisitions by posts...

  1. 48 CFR 2929.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 2929.101 Section 2929.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 2929.101 Resolving tax problems. Contract tax problems or...

  2. On the generalized resolvents of isometric operators with gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Zagorodnyuk, Sergey M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we obtain some slight correction and generalization of the results of Ryabtseva on the generalized resolvents for isometric operators with a gap in their spectrum. Also, analogs of some McKelvey's results and a short proof of Inin's formula for the generalized resolvents of an isometric operator are obtained.

  3. Deciding to Change OpenURL Link Resolvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Leonard, Andrea; Wiswell, John

    2015-01-01

    This article will be of interest to librarians, particularly those in consortia that are evaluating OpenURL link resolvers. This case study contrasts WebBridge (an Innovative Interface product) and LinkSource (EBSCO's product). This study assisted us in the decision-making process of choosing an OpenURL link resolver that was sustainable to…

  4. Deciding to Change OpenURL Link Resolvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Leonard, Andrea; Wiswell, John

    2015-01-01

    This article will be of interest to librarians, particularly those in consortia that are evaluating OpenURL link resolvers. This case study contrasts WebBridge (an Innovative Interface product) and LinkSource (EBSCO's product). This study assisted us in the decision-making process of choosing an OpenURL link resolver that was sustainable to…

  5. Time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography of spinal vascular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarouche, M; Hart, J L; Siddiqui, A; Hampton, T; Walsh, D C

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of spinal vascular malformations may be challenging on conventional MR imaging because neither the location of the signal abnormality in the spinal cord nor the level of the abnormal flow voids correlates with the level of the fistula. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of the utility of using a time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics sequence in the diagnosis, characterization, and localization of spinal vascular malformations, comparing it with the criterion standard of spinal DSA. Fifty-five consecutive patients with a suspected diagnosis of spinal vascular malformation underwent time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics followed by spinal DSA. All scans were performed on a 1.5T scanner by using a standard 8-channel spine coil and were reported by a neuroradiologist before the DSA was performed. Forty-seven lesions were confirmed on time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics and classified as spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (n = 33, with 1 patient having a type Ib fistula), perimedullary spinal cord arteriovenous fistulas (n = 10), and intramedullary arteriovenous malformations (n = 3). One patient had an extradural spinal vascular malformation. Time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics identified the location of the arterial feeder to within 1 vertebral level in 27/33 patients (81.8%) with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas and correctly predicted the side in 22/33 (66.6%) patients. Perimedullary spinal cord arteriovenous fistulas were erroneously considered to represent spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas before spinal DSA. The anatomy of the arterial supply to intramedullary arteriovenous malformations was also poorly characterized on time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography. It has been our experience that time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics is a useful confirmatory tool when a spinal vascular malformation is suspected on the basis of clinical and conventional MR imaging findings. As experience with the technique

  6. Effective Student Motivation Commences with Resolving "Dissatisfiers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Ann; Simpson, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The evolution in students' expectations based on Maslow's theory of human motivation shows a transition from expectations having an effect upon motivation towards those providing a satisfactory experience. Maslow's argument was that once the lower level needs, such as physiological and safety needs, are met other higher needs emerge. In the…

  7. Further remarks on super-resolving pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, D.; Ranfagni, A.

    2007-08-01

    A way to overcome the usual diffraction limit of an optical instrument was proposed in 1952 by Toraldo di Francia. This theoretical prediction was recently confirmed by recent microwave experiments. Further microwave investigations, using the same kinds of devices, provide the possibility of obtaining a significant concentration of the intensity also along the axial axis.

  8. Time-Resolved Holography with Photoelectrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huismans, Y.; Rouzee, A.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Jungmann, J. H.; Smolkowska, A. S.; Logman, Pswm; Lepine, F.; Cauchy, C.; Zamith, S.; Marchenko, T.; Bakker, J. M.; G. Berden,; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Muller, H. G.; Vermin, W.; Schafer, K. J.; Spanner, M.; Ivanov, M. Y.; Smirnova, O.; Bauer, D.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Ionization is the dominant response of atoms and molecules to intense laser fields and is at the basis of several important techniques, such as the generation of attosecond pulses that allow the measurement of electron motion in real time. We present experiments in which metastable xenon atoms were

  9. Development of ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Asahara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy (TR-DCS has been demonstrated, which enables direct observations of transient responses of complex optical spectra by combining dual-comb spectroscopy with the pump–probe method. TR-DCS achieves two-dimensional spectroscopy with a wide dynamic range for both the temporal and frequency axes. As a demonstration, we investigated the femtosecond relaxation dynamics of a photo-excited InGaAs saturable absorber in the near-infrared frequency region. The transient response of the interferogram was successfully obtained, and both the amplitude and phase spectra of the dynamic complex transmittance were independently deduced without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. A high phase resolution in the order of milliradian was achieved by suppressing the effect from the slow phase drift caused in the experimental system. Our proof-of-principle experiment promotes a pathway to coherent, highly accurate, and multi-dimensional pump–probe spectroscopy using the optical frequency comb technology.

  10. Resolving the Formation of Protogalaxies. II.Central Gravitational Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2007-10-15

    Numerous cosmological hydrodynamic studies have addressed the formation of galaxies. Here we choose to study the first stages of galaxy formation, including non-equilibrium atomic primordial gas cooling, gravity and hydrodynamics. Using initial conditions appropriate for the concordance cosmological model of structure formation, we perform two adaptive mesh refinement simulations of {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} galaxies at high redshift. The calculations resolve the Jeans length at all times with more than 16 cells and capture over 14 orders of magnitude in length scales. In both cases, the dense, 10{sup 5} solar mass, one parsec central regions are found to contract rapidly and have turbulent Mach numbers up to 4. Despite the ever decreasing Jeans length of the isothermal gas, we only find one site of fragmentation during the collapse. However, rotational secular bar instabilities transport angular momentum outwards in the central parsec as the gas continues to collapse and lead to multiple nested unstable fragments with decreasing masses down to sub-Jupiter mass scales. Although these numerical experiments neglect star formation and feedback, they clearly highlight the physics of turbulence in gravitationally collapsing gas. The angular momentum segregation seen in our calculations plays an important role in theories that form supermassive black holes from gaseous collapse.

  11. Femtosecond electron diffraction: heralding the era of atomically resolved dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2011-09-01

    One of the great dream experiments in Science is to directly observe atomic motions as they occur. Femtosecond electron diffraction provided the first 'light' of sufficient intensity to achieve this goal by attaining atomic resolution to structural changes on the relevant timescales. This review covers the technical progress that made this new level of acuity possible and gives a survey of the new insights gained from an atomic level perspective of structural dynamics. Atomic level views of the simplest possible structural transition, melting, are discussed for a number of systems in which both thermal and purely electronically driven atomic displacements can be correlated with the degree of directional bonding. Optical manipulation of charge distributions and effects on interatomic forces/bonding can be directly observed through the ensuing atomic motions. New phenomena involving strongly correlated electron-lattice systems are also discussed in which optically induced changes in the potential energy landscape lead to ballistic structural changes. Concepts such as the structural order parameters are now directly observable at the atomic level of inspection to give a remarkable view of the extraordinary degree of cooperativity involved in strongly correlated electron-lattice systems. These recent examples, in combination with time-resolved real space imaging now possible with electron probes, are truly defining an emerging field that holds great promise to make a significant impact in how we understand structural dynamics. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor David John Hugh Cockayne, a world leader in electron microscopy, who sadly passed away in December.

  12. Resolving photon-shortage mystery in femtosecond magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Si, M S

    2010-01-01

    For nearly a decade, it has been a mystery why the small average number of photons absorbed per atom from an ultrashort laser pulse is able to induce a strong magnetization within a few hundred femtoseconds. Here we resolve this mystery by directly computing the number of photons per atom layer by layer as the light wave propagates inside the sample. We find that for all the 24 experiments considered here, each atom has more than one photon. The so-called photon shortage does not exist. By plotting the relative demagnetization change versus the number of photons absorbed per atom, we show that depending on the experimental condition, 0.1 photon can induce about 4% to 72% spin moment change. Our perturbation theory reveals that the demagnetization depends linearly on the amplitude of laser field. In addition, we find that the transition frequency of a sample may also play a role in magnetization processes. As far as the intensity is not zero, the intensity of the laser field only affects the matching range of ...

  13. Resolving photon-shortage mystery in femtosecond magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, M S; Zhang, G P, E-mail: gpzhang@indstate.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)

    2010-02-24

    For nearly a decade, it has been a mystery why the small average number of photons absorbed per atom from an ultrashort laser pulse is able to induce a strong magnetization within a few hundred femtoseconds. Here we resolve this mystery by directly computing the number of photons per atom layer by layer as the light wave propagates inside the sample. We find that for all the 24 experiments considered here, each atom has more than one photon. The so-called photon shortage does not exist. By plotting the relative demagnetization change versus the number of photons absorbed per atom, we show that, depending on the experimental condition, 0.1 photon can induce about 4%-72% spin moment change. Our perturbation theory reveals that the demagnetization depends linearly on the amplitude of the laser field. In addition, we find that the transition frequency of a sample may also play a role in magnetization processes. As long as the intensity is not zero, the intensity of the laser field only affects the matching range of the transition frequencies, but not whether the demagnetization can happen or not.

  14. RESOLVE (Regolith & Environmental Science Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Captain, Janine; Cryderman, Kate; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The RESOLVE Project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer for the Surge Tank (NIRST), WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of oil spill detected by ocean lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-long; Chen, Yong-hua; Li, Jie; Jiang, Jingbo; Ni, Zuotao; Liu, Zhi-shen

    2016-10-01

    Based on time-resolved fluorescence of oils, an oceanographic fluorescence Lidar was designed to identify oil pollutions. A third harmonic (at 355nm) of Nd:YAG laser is used as the excitation source, and the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of oil fluorescence at wavelength from 380 nm to 580 nm are measured by an intensified CCD (ICCD). In the experiments, time-resolved fluorescence spectra of 20 oil samples, including crude oils, fuel oils, lubricating oil, diesel oils and gasoline, are analyzed to discuss fluorescence spectral characteristics of samples for oil classification. The spectral characteristics of oil fluorescence obtained by ICCD with delay time of 2 ns, 4 ns, and 6 ns were studied by using the principal component analysis (PCA) method. Moreover, an efficient method is used to improve the recognition rate of the oil spill types, through enlarging spectral differences of oil fluorescence at different delay times. Experimental analysis shows that the optimization method can discriminate between crude oil and fuel oil, and a more accurate classification of oils is obtained by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As the result, comparing to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy, a higher recognition rate of oil spill types is achieved by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy which is also a feasibility technology for Ocean Lidar.

  16. Time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy of photolyzed carbonmonoxy cytochrome c oxidase (cytochrome aa3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeck, R A; Dawes, T D; Einarsdóttir, O; Woodruff, W H; Kliger, D S

    1991-07-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism (TRMCD) and time-resolved natural circular dichroism (TRCD) measurements of photolysis products of the CO complex of eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (CcO-CO) are presented. TRMCD spectra obtained at 100 ns and 10 microseconds after photolysis are diagnostic of pentacoordinate cytochrome a3Fe2+, as would be expected for simple photodissociation. Other time-resolved spectroscopies (UV-visible and resonance Raman), however, show evidence for unusual Fea3(2+) coordination after CO photolysis (Woodruff, W. H., O. Einarsdóttir, R. B. Dyer, K. A. Bagley, G. Palmer, S. J. Atherton, R. A. Goldbeck, T. D. Dawes, and D. S. Kliger. 1991. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88:2588-2592). Furthermore, time-resolved IR experiments have shown that photodissociated CO binds to CuB+ prior to recombining with Fea3(2+) (Dyer, R. B., O. Einarsdóttir, P. M. Killough, J. J. López-Garriga, and W. H. Woodruff. 1989. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 111:7657-7659). A model of the CcO-CO photolysis cycle which is consistent with all of the spectroscopic results is presented. A novel feature of this model is the coordination of a ligand endogenous to the protein to the Fe axial site vacated by the photolyzed CO and the simultaneous breaking of the Fe-imidazole(histidine) bond.

  17. Resolving the time when an electron exits a tunnelling barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Dror; Soifer, Hadas; Bruner, Barry D; Dagan, Michal; Mairesse, Yann; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Smirnova, Olga; Dudovich, Nirit

    2012-05-16

    The tunnelling of a particle through a barrier is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous quantum processes. When induced by an intense laser field, electron tunnelling from atoms and molecules initiates a broad range of phenomena such as the generation of attosecond pulses, laser-induced electron diffraction and holography. These processes evolve on the attosecond timescale (1 attosecond ≡ 1 as = 10(-18) seconds) and are well suited to the investigation of a general issue much debated since the early days of quantum mechanics--the link between the tunnelling of an electron through a barrier and its dynamics outside the barrier. Previous experiments have measured tunnelling rates with attosecond time resolution and tunnelling delay times. Here we study laser-induced tunnelling by using a weak probe field to steer the tunnelled electron in the lateral direction and then monitor the effect on the attosecond light bursts emitted when the liberated electron re-encounters the parent ion. We show that this approach allows us to measure the time at which the electron exits from the tunnelling barrier. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of the measurement by detecting subtle delays in ionization times from two orbitals of a carbon dioxide molecule. Measurement of the tunnelling process is essential for all attosecond experiments where strong-field ionization initiates ultrafast dynamics. Our approach provides a general tool for time-resolving multi-electron rearrangements in atoms and molecules--one of the key challenges in ultrafast science.

  18. Characteristic of gravity waves resolved in ECMWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    Gravity waves (GWs) influence the circulation of the atmosphere on global scale. Because of insufficient measurements and the difficulty to involve all relevant scales in a single model run, they are one of the chief uncertainties in climate and weather prediction. More information, in particular on global scale, is required. Can we employ global models such as the ECMWF high-resolution GCM to infer quantities of resolved GWs? Does this give us insight for the characteristics and relative importance of real GW sources? And can we use such data safely for, e.g., planning measurement campaigns on GWs? Also trajectory studies of cloud formation (cirrus in the UTLS, PSCs) and related dehydration and denitrification rely heavily on realistic temperature structures due to GWs. We here apply techniques developed for an ESA study proving the scientifc break-through which could be reached by a novel infrared limb imager. The 3D temperature structure of mesoscale GWs is exploited to determine amplitudes and 3D wave vectors of GWs at different levels (25km, 35km and 45km altitude) in the stratosphere. Similar to real observations, GW momentum flux is largest in the winter polar vortex and exhibits a second maximum in the summer subtropics. Based on the 3D wavevectors backward ray-tracing is employed to characterize specific sources. For instance, we find for the northern winter strong GW momentum flux (GWMF) associated with mountain waves from Norway and Greenland as well as waves emitted in the lower troposphere from a storm approaching Norway. Waves from these sources spread up to several thousand km in the stratosphere. Together these three events form a burst in the total hemispheric GWMF of a factor of 3. Strong mountain wave events are also found e.g. at Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctic Peninsula, regions which are in the focus of observational and modeling studies for a decade. Gravity waves in the tropical region are associated with deep convection in the upper

  19. Vibrationally Resolved Electron Attachment to Oxygen Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Stampfli, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Märk, T. D.

    1996-10-01

    Highly monochromatized electrons (with 30 meV FWHM) are used in a crossed beam experiment to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters \\(O2\\)n at electron energies from approximately 0 to 2 eV. At energies close to zero, the attachment cross section for the reaction \\(O2\\)n+e-->O-2 rises strongly with decreasing electron energy compatible with s-wave electron capture to \\(O2\\)n. Peaks in the attachment cross section present at higher energies can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the oxygen anion. The vibrational spacings observed can be quantitatively accounted for by model calculations.

  20. Modal analysis of a large-mode area photonic crystal fiber amplifier using spectral-resolved imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    We perform modal characterization on an ytterbium-doped large mode area photonic-crystal-fiber (PCF) amplifier using spatial and spectral (S 2) resolved imaging and compare results to conventional cutoff methods. We apply numerical simulations and step-index fiber experiments to calibrate our...

  1. Quantum state-resolved differential cross sections for complex-forming chemical reactions: Asymmetry is the rule, symmetry the exception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrégaray, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.larregaray@u-bordeaux.fr; Bonnet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.bonnet@u-bordeaux.fr [ISM, UMR 5255, CNRS, F-33400 Talence (France); ISM, UMR 5255, Univ. Bordeaux, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2015-10-14

    We argue that statistical theories are generally unable to accurately predict state-resolved differential cross sections for triatomic bimolecular reactions studied in beam experiments, even in the idealized limit where the dynamics are fully chaotic. The basic reason is that quenching of interferences between partial waves is less efficient than intuitively expected, especially around the poles.

  2. Lagrangian and Eulerian pressure field evaluation of rod-airfoil flow from time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Moore, P.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the rod-airfoil air flow by time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV) in thin-light volume configuration. Experiments are performed at the region close to the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil embedded in the von Karman wake of a cylindrical rod. The

  3. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-06-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia.

  4. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-01-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia. PMID:6234395

  5. Resolving Mixed Algal Species in Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrube Mehrubeoglu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a lab-based hyperspectral imaging system’s response from pure (single and mixed (two algal cultures containing known algae types and volumetric combinations to characterize the system’s performance. The spectral response to volumetric changes in single and combinations of algal mixtures with known ratios were tested. Constrained linear spectral unmixing was applied to extract the algal content of the mixtures based on abundances that produced the lowest root mean square error. Percent prediction error was computed as the difference between actual percent volumetric content and abundances at minimum RMS error. Best prediction errors were computed as 0.4%, 0.4% and 6.3% for the mixed spectra from three independent experiments. The worst prediction errors were found as 5.6%, 5.4% and 13.4% for the same order of experiments. Additionally, Beer-Lambert’s law was utilized to relate transmittance to different volumes of pure algal suspensions demonstrating linear logarithmic trends for optical property measurements.

  6. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  7. Triangle orientation discrimination: the alternative to minimum resolvable temperature difference and minimum resolvable contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Piet; Valeton, J. Mathieu

    1998-07-01

    The characterization of electro-optical system performance by means of the minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) or the minimum resolvable contrast (MRC) has at least three serious disadvantages: (1) the bar pattern stimulus is theoretically and practically unsuitable for 1D or 2D spatially sampled systems such as pixel-array cameras, (2) spatial phase is not taken into account, and (3) the results depend on the observer's subjective decision criterion. We propose an adequate and easily applicable alternative: the triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) threshold. The TOD is based on an improved test pattern, a better defined observer task, and a solid psychophysical measurement procedure. The method has a large number of theoretical and practical advantages: it is suitable for pixel-array cameras, scanning systems and other electro-optical and optical imaging system sin both the thermal and visual domains, it has a close relationship to real target acquisition, and the observer task is easy. The results are free from observer bias and allow statistical significance tests. The method lends itself very well to automatic measurements, and can be extended for future sensor systems that include advanced image processing. The TOD curve can be implemented easily in a target acquisition (TA) model such as ACQUIRE. An observer performance study with real targets shows that the TOD curve better predicts TA performance than the mRC does. The method has been implemented successfully in a thermal imager field test apparatus called the thermal imager performance indicator and may be implemented in current MRTD test equipment with little effort.

  8. Resolving the Meat-Paradox: A Motivational Account of Morally Troublesome Behavior and Its Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock; Loughnan, Steve

    2017-08-01

    A majority of people the world over eat meat, yet many of these same people experience discomfort when the meat on their plate is linked to the death of animals. We draw on this common form of moral conflict-the meat-paradox-to develop insights into the ways in which morally troublesome behaviors vanish into the commonplace and every day. Drawing on a motivational analysis, we show how societies may be shaped by attempts to resolve dissonance, in turn protecting their citizens from discomfort associated with their own moral conflicts. To achieve this, we build links between dissonance reduction, habit formation, social influence, and the emergence of social norms and detail how our analysis has implications for understanding immoral behavior and motivations underpinning dehumanization and objectification. Finally, we draw from our motivational analysis to advance new insights into the origins of prejudice and pathways through which prejudice can be maintained and resolved.

  9. Development of a prototype algorithm for the operational retrieval of height-resolved products from GOME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Robert J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) level 2 products of total ozone column amounts have been generated on a routine operational basis since July 1996. These products and the level 1 radiance products are the major outputs from the ERS-2 ground segment GOME data processor (GDP) at DLR in Germany. Off-line scientific work has already shown the feasibility of ozone profile retrieval from GOME. It is demonstrated how the retrievals can be performed in an operational context. Height-resolved retrieval is based on the optimal estimation technique, #and cloud-contaminated scenes are treated in an equivalent reflecting surface approximation. The prototype must be able to handle GOME measurements routinely on a global basis. Requirements for the major components of the algorithm are described: this incorporates an overall strategy for operational height-resolved retrieval from GOME.

  10. Revealing Carrier-Envelope Phase through Frequency Mixing and Interference in Frequency Resolved Optical Gating

    CERN Document Server

    Snedden, Edward W; Jamison, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that full temporal characterisation of few-cycle electromagnetic pulses, including retrieval of the carrier envelope phase (CEP), can be directly obtained from Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) techniques in which the interference between non-linear frequency mixing processes is resolved. We derive a framework for this scheme, defined Real Domain-FROG (ReD-FROG), as applied to the cases of interference between sum and difference frequency components and between fundamental and sum/difference frequency components. A successful numerical demonstration of ReD-FROG as applied to the case of a self-referenced measurement is provided. A proof-of-principle experiment is performed in which the CEP of a single-cycle THz pulse is accurately obtained and demonstrates the possibility for THz detection beyond the bandwidth limitations of electro-optic sampling.

  11. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  12. Simultaneous reference and differential waveform acquisition in time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David; Fujiwara, Masazumi;

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for data acquisition in time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments. Our approach is based on simultaneous collection of reference and differential THz scans. Both the optical THz generation beam and the pump beam are modulated at two different frequencies...... that are not harmonic with respect to each other. Our method allows not only twice as fast data acquisition but also minimization of noise connected to slowly varying laser power fluctuations and timing instabilities. Our use of the nonlinear crystal N-benzyl-2-methyl-4-nitroaniline (BNA) enables time-resolved THz...... spectroscopy to beyond 5 THz, thereby highlighting that the presented method is especially valuable at higher frequencies where phase errors in the data acquisition become increasingly important....

  13. Vibrationally Resolved Electron Attachment to Oxygen Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Stampfli, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D. [Intitut fuer Ionenphysik, Leopold Franzens Universitaet, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    Highly monochromiatized electrons (with 30meV FWHM) are used in a crossed beam experiment to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters (O{sub 2}){sub {ital n}} at electron energies from approximately 0 to 2eV.At energies close to zero, the attachment cross section for the reaction (O{sub 2}){sub {ital n}}+{ital e}{r_arrow}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} rises strongly with decreasing electron energy compatible with {ital s}-wave electron capture to (O{sub 2}){sub {ital n}}. Peaks in the attachment cross section present at higher energies can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the oxygen anion. The vibrational spacings observed can be quantitatively accounted for by model calculations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. A vertically resolved model for phytoplankton aggregation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iris Kriest; Geoffrey T Evans

    2000-12-01

    This work presents models of the vertical distribution and flux of phytoplankton aggregates, including changes with time in the distribution of aggregate sizes and sinking speeds. The distribution of sizes is described by two parameters, the mass and number of aggregates, which greatly reduces the computational cost of the models. Simple experiments demonstrate the effects of aggregation on the timing and depth distribution of primary production and export. A more detailed ecological model is applied to sites in the Arabian Sea; it demonstrates that aggregation can be important for deep sedimentation even when its effect on surface concentrations is small, and it presents the difference in timing between settlement of aggregates and fecal pellets.

  15. SQL level global query resolving for web based GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Huang, Fengru; Huang, Zhou; Sun, Yumei; Fang, Yu

    2007-06-01

    This paper introduced a SQL level approach to resolve global spatial query in Web based heterogeneous distributed spatial database environment. The main prohibit of this SQL level approach was its widespread compatibility and standardization. Firstly, a SQL based Equivalent Distributed Program (EDP) was introduced to express distributed spatial processing transactions. Then global resource directories for virtual global view describing were discussed to organize information that resolving need. The contents of global resource directories included data storage directory, hosts directory and working status directory. With these mechanisms, relational algebra expression equivalence principles were utilized to resolve global spatial queries to EDPs. Finally, several samples were presented to show the process of resolving. This approach was suitable to all sorts of distributed computing environments either centralized such as CORBA or decentralized such as P2P computing platforms.

  16. 78 FR 5251 - National Day of Hope and Resolve, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... resolve to meet the challenges of our age together. And when our grandchildren reflect on the history we leave, let them say we did what was required of us, that our words were true to our Founders' dreams for...

  17. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  18. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopy of photoswitchable systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Steady state en time resolved spectroscopie zijn twee fundamentele methodes voor het bestuderen van fotochemische processen. In dit proefschrift zijn drie zelf-opgezette spectroscopische systemen beschreven, waarmee samen met andere spectroscopische methoden verscheidende met licht schakelbare syste

  19. Elasticity and Anelasticity of Materials from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Smith, J.; Lin, C.; Bai, L.; Rod, E.; Shen, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for studying elasticity and anelasticity of minerals using fast compression and cyclic compression-decompression. A few recent studies will be highlighted. For example, with fast x-ray area detectors having millisecond time resolution, accurate thermal equations of state of materials at temperatures up to 1000K and megabar pressures can be collected in a matter of seconds using membrane-driven diamond anvil cells (DAC), yielding unprecedented time and pressure resolution of true isotherms. Short duration of the experiments eliminates temperature variation during the experiments and in general allows volume measurements at higher pressures and temperatures. Alternatively, high-frequency (kilohertz range) radial diffraction measurements in a panoramic DAC combined with fast, precise cyclic loading/unloading by piezo drive could provide the short time scale necessary for studying rheology of minerals from the elastic response and lattice relaxation as a function of pressure, temperature and strain rate. Finally, we consider some possible future applications for time-resolved high-pressure, high-temperature research of mantle minerals.

  20. Spread spectrum time-resolved diffuse optical measurement system for enhanced sensitivity in detecting human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Hasnain, Ali; Zhou, Xiaowei; Luo, Jianwen; Penney, Trevor B.; Chen, Nanguang

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging methods have been widely applied to noninvasive detection of brain activity. We have designed and implemented a low cost, portable, real-time one-channel time-resolved DOS system for neuroscience studies. Phantom experiments were carried out to test the performance of the system. We further conducted preliminary human experiments and demonstrated that enhanced sensitivity in detecting neural activity in the cortex could be achieved by the use of late arriving photons.

  1. Resolving brain regions using nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Do Yup; Platt, Virginia; Bowen, Ben; Louie, Katherine; Canaria, Christie; McMurray, Cynthia T.; Northen, Trent

    2012-01-01

    Specific cell types are critically implicated in a variety of neuropathologies that exhibit region-specific susceptibility. Neuronal and glial function is impaired in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous reports suggest that mass spectrometry imaging has the potential to resolve cell-specific enrichment in brain regions; however, individual ions cannot resolve glial and neuronal cells within the complex structure of brain tissue. Here, we utilized a matrix-free surface mass spectrom...

  2. A spin- and angle-resolving photoelectron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Berntsen, M H; Leandersson, M; Hahlin, A; hlund, J \\AA; Wannberg, B; nsson, M M\\aa; Tjernberg, O

    2010-01-01

    A new type of hemispherical electron energy analyzer that permits angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy has been developed. The analyzer permits standard angle resolved spectra to be recorded with a two-dimensional detector in parallel with spin detection using a mini-Mott polarimeter. General design considerations as well as technical solutions are discussed and test results from the Au(111) surface state are presented.

  3. Nonlocal Problems for Fractional Differential Equations via Resolvent Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbin Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the continuity of analytic resolvent in the uniform operator topology and then obtain the compactness of Cauchy operator by means of the analytic resolvent method. Based on this result, we derive the existence of mild solutions for nonlocal fractional differential equations when the nonlocal item is assumed to be Lipschitz continuous and neither Lipschitz nor compact, respectively. An example is also given to illustrate our theory.

  4. Super-resolved imaging geometrical and diffraction approaches

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    In this brief we review several approaches that provide super resolved imaging, overcoming the geometrical limitation of the detector as well as the diffraction effects set by the F number of the imaging lens. In order to obtain the super resolved enhancement, we use spatially non-uniform and/or random transmission structures to encode the image or the aperture planes. The desired resolution enhanced images are obtained by post-processing decoding of the captured data.

  5. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, M J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H){sub 2}L (Cp* = (CH{sub 3}){sub 5}C{sub 5}, L = PPh{sub 3}, Ph = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO){sub 2} to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  6. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, Matthew J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H)2L (Cp* = (CH3)5C5, L = PPh3, Ph = C6H5) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO)2 to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  7. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  8. Vibrationally Resolved Electron Transfer Rates in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Kenneth G.

    2002-03-01

    We have re-examined our earlier report of electron transfer in the [Co(Cp)_2|V(CO)_6] radical-pair using ultrafast infrared transient absorption spectroscopy in room temperature solutions. The radical-pair is created from the [Co(Cp)_2^+|V(CO)_6^-] ion-pair by ultrafast visible charge-transfer excitation. Transient absorption experiments with ps time constants. A small ET component with a 75 ps time constant is due to some separation and reformation of the radical-pairs. Transient absorption experiments monitoring the recovery of the ion-pair state shows that both fast components are due to ET rather than some other vibrational relaxation (VR) process in the radical state. We analyze the visible charge-transfer band and assign the two fast ET decay times to two ion-pair contact geometries with absorption origins different by about 1250 ± 350 cm-1. For excitation at 800 and 700 nm the 700 fs ET lifetime depends on the vibrational quantum state of the nontotally symmetric CO stretch in the V(CO)6 radical, where the lifetime decreases by 10% for the first vibrational quantum and 45% for the second quantum. There is no quantum effect for the second ion-pair geometry with a 5 ps ET lifetime. Standard ET rate models cannot explain the rate dependence upon vibrational quantum state for a nontotally symmetric vibration, and it may arise from a breakdown of the Condon approximation. We also report rates for IVR of CO stretching modes and for VR of low frequency vibrations. At excitation wavelengths of 620 and 555 nm there is sufficient internal vibrational energy in low-frequency vibrations to cause geometric inter-conversion between energetically similar Jahn-Teller geometries in the V(CO)6 radical. This process creates a 200 fs rise time for the V(CO)6 radical species to assume a stable geometry, which requires VR of low frequency vibrations to the solvent. These results demonstrate that earlier ET measurements from our group on the same molecule had insufficient time

  9. Using neuroimaging to resolve the psi debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Samuel T; Kosslyn, Stephen M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Parapsychology is the scientific investigation of apparently paranormal mental phenomena (such as telepathy, i.e., "mind reading"), also known as psi. Despite widespread public belief in such phenomena and over 75 years of experimentation, there is no compelling evidence that psi exists. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in an effort to document the existence of psi. If psi exists, it occurs in the brain, and hence, assessing the brain directly should be more sensitive than using indirect behavioral methods (as have been used previously). To increase sensitivity, this experiment was designed to produce positive results if telepathy, clairvoyance (i.e., direct sensing of remote events), or precognition (i.e., knowing future events) exist. Moreover, the study included biologically or emotionally related participants (e.g., twins) and emotional stimuli in an effort to maximize experimental conditions that are purportedly conducive to psi. In spite of these characteristics of the study, psi stimuli and non-psi stimuli evoked indistinguishable neuronal responses-although differences in stimulus arousal values of the same stimuli had the expected effects on patterns of brain activation. These findings are the strongest evidence yet obtained against the existence of paranormal mental phenomena.

  10. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  11. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  12. Valley Carrier Dynamics in Monolayer Molybdenum Disulphide from Helicity Resolved Ultrafast Pump-probe Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qinsheng; Li, Xiao; Qiu, Jun; Ji, Yanxin; Feng, Ji; Sun, Dong

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the valley related carrier dynamics in monolayer MoS2 using helicity resolved non-degenerate ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy at the vicinity of the high-symmetry K point under the temperature down to 78 K. Monolayer MoS2 shows remarkable transient reflection signals, in stark contrast to bilayer and bulk MoS2 due to the enhancement of many-body effect at reduced dimensionality. The helicity resolved ultrafast time-resolved result shows that the valley polarization is preserved for only several ps before scattering process makes it undistinguishable. We suggest that the dynamical degradation of valley polarization is attributable primarily to the exciton trapping by defect states in the exfoliated MoS2 samples. Our experiment and a tight-binding model analysis also show that the perfect valley CD selectivity is fairly robust against disorder at the K point, but quickly decays from the high-symmetry point in the momentum space in the presence of disorder.

  13. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  14. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography with the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yujie; Douraghy, Ali; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Stout, David; Tian, Jie; Herschman, Harvey; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2009-11-01

    Bioluminescence imaging has been extensively applied to in vivo small animal imaging. Quantitative three-dimensional bioluminescent source information obtained by using bioluminescence tomography can directly and much more accurately reflect biological changes as opposed to planar bioluminescence imaging. Preliminary simulated and experimental reconstruction results demonstrate the feasibility and promise of bioluminescence tomography. However, the use of multiple approximations, particularly the diffusion approximation theory, affects the quality of in vivo small animal-based image reconstructions. In the development of new reconstruction algorithms, high-order approximation models of the radiative transfer equation and spectrally resolved data introduce new challenges to the reconstruction algorithm and speed. In this paper, an SP3-based (the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation) spectrally resolved reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The simple linear relationship between the unknown source distribution and the spectrally resolved data is established in this algorithm. A parallel version of this algorithm is realized, making BLT reconstruction feasible for the whole body of small animals especially for fine spatial domain discretization. In simulation validations, the proposed algorithm shows improved reconstruction quality compared with diffusion approximation-based methods when high absorption, superficial sources and detection modes are considered. In addition, comparisons between fine and coarse mesh-based BLT reconstructions show the effects of numerical errors in reconstruction image quality. Finally, BLT reconstructions using in vivo mouse experiments further demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the SP3-based reconstruction algorithm.

  15. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.

  16. Popper's Experiment: A Modern Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Qureshi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Karl Popper had proposed an experiment to test the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. The proposal survived for many year in the midst of no clear consensus on what results it would yield. The experiment was realized by Kim and Shih in 1999, and the apparently surprising result led to lot of debate. We review Popper's proposal and its realization in the light of current era when entanglement has been well studied, both theoretically and experimentally. We show that the "ghost-diffraction" experiment, carried out in a different context, conclusively resolves the controversy surrounding Popper's experiment.Quanta 2012; 1: 19–32.

  17. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice.

  18. Is systems biology a promising approach to resolve controversies in cancer research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto Ana M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At the beginning of the 21st century cancer research has reached an impasse similar to that experienced in developmental biology in the first decades of the 20th century when conflicting results and interpretations co-existed for a long time until these differences were resolved and contradictions were eliminated. In cancer research, instead of this healthy "weeding-out" process, there have been attempts to reach a premature synthesis, while no hypothesis is being rejected. Systems Biology could help cancer research to overcome this stalemate by resolving contradictions and identifying spurious data. First, in silico experiments should allow cancer researchers to be bold and a priori reject sets of data and hypotheses in order to gain a deeper understanding of how each dataset and each hypothesis contributes to the overall picture. In turn, this process should generate novel hypotheses and rules, which could be explored using these in silico approaches. These activities are significantly less costly and much faster than "wet-experiments". Consequently, Systems Biology could be advantageously used both as a heuristic tool to guide "wet-experiments" and to refine hypotheses and test predictions.

  19. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    . As the temperature of the sample is increased, more electrons are removed from the excited state via the non-radiative pathway. This reduction in the number of available electrons leads to both a decrease of the intensity of the luminescence signal and to a simultaneous decrease of the luminescence lifetime. Several...... simulations are carried out of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments, in which the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes in quartz is studied as a function of the stimulation temperature. Good quantitative agreement is found between the simulation results and new...

  20. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G., E-mail: giulia.berti@polimi.it; Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  1. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J R; Krenner, Hubert J; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length).

  2. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  3. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, M.; /SLAC; Pancaldi, M.; /CIC nanoGUNE /Stockholm U.; Bernhard, C.; /Fribourg U.; Driel, T.van; Glownia, J.M.; /SLAC; Marsik, P.; /Fribourg U.; Radovic, M.; Vaz, C.A.F.; /PLS, SLS; Zhu, D.; /SLAC; Bonetti, S.; /Stockholm U.; Staub, U.; /PLS, SLS; Hoffmann, M.C.; /SLAC

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. We find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO3 thin-film sample.

  4. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  5. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  6. The Algol triple system spatially resolved at optical wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, R T; Boboltz, D A; Ojha, R; Shaffer, D B; Tycner, C; Richards, M T; Hutter, D J; 10.1088/2041-8205/715/1/L44

    2010-01-01

    Interacting binaries typically have separations in the milli-arcsecond regime and hence it has been challenging to resolve them at any wavelength. However, recent advances in optical interferometry have improved our ability to discern the components in these systems and have now enabled the direct determination of physical parameters. We used the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer to produce for the first time images resolving all three components in the well-known Algol triple system. Specifically, we have separated the tertiary component from the binary and simultaneously resolved the eclipsing binary pair, which represents the nearest and brightest eclipsing binary in the sky. We present revised orbital elements for the triple system, and we have rectified the 180-degree ambiguity in the position angle of Algol C. Our directly determined magnitude differences and masses for this triple star system are consistent with earlier light curve modeling results.

  7. Self consistent, absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, A; Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Gramegna, M; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Portesi, C; Rajteri, M; Rastello, M L; Taralli, E; Traina, P; White, M

    2011-11-07

    Well characterized photon number resolving detectors are a requirement for many applications ranging from quantum information and quantum metrology to the foundations of quantum mechanics. This prompts the necessity for reliable calibration techniques at the single photon level. In this paper we propose an innovative absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors, using a pulsed heralded photon source based on parametric down conversion. The technique, being absolute, does not require reference standards and is independent upon the performances of the heralding detector. The method provides the results of quantum efficiency for the heralded detector as a function of detected photon numbers. Furthermore, we prove its validity by performing the calibration of a Transition Edge Sensor based detector, a real photon number resolving detector that has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in various quantum information protocols.

  8. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of DBD actuator flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourgostar, Cyrus; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-10-01

    Schlieren imaging methods measure the first derivative of density in the direction of a knife-edge spatial filter. It has been used extensively in aerodynamic research to visualize the structure of flow fields. With a single barrier planer dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator, Schlieren images clearly show the absence of significant vertical air flow normal to the surface, and no more than few millimeters thick induced boundary layer flow. A gated intensified CCD camera along with a Schlieren system can not only visualize the flow field induced by the actuator, but also temporarily resolve the images of the flow and plasma field. Our time resolved images with triangular applied voltage waveforms indicate that several separate discharge regimes occur during positive and negative going half cycles of single and double barrier DBD actuators. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of both single and double barrier DBDs with different applied waveforms, discharge parameters and electrode geometries reveal important information on the induced flow structure.

  9. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids An Experimental Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Renato

    2007-01-01

    Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids introduces current state-of-the-art techniques in the study of complex dynamical problems in liquid phases. With a unique focus on the experimental aspects applied to complex liquids, this volume provides an excellent overview into the quickly emerging field of soft-matter science. Researchers and engineers will find a comprehensive review of current non-linear spectroscopic and optical Kerr effect techniques, in addition to an in-depth look into relaxation dynamics in complex liquids. This volume offers current experimental findings in transient grating spectroscopy and their application to viscoelastic phenomena in glass-formers, dynamics of confined liquid-crystals, and a time-resolved analysis of the host-quest interactions of dye molecules in liquid-crystal matter. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids provides a cohesive introduction suitable for individuals involved in this emerging field, complete with the latest experimental procedures of complex ...

  10. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  11. RESOLVE's Field Demonstration on Mauna Kea, Hawaii 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Quinn, Jacqueline; Moss, Thomas; Weis, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The resulting water could be electrolyzed into oxygen to support exploration and hydrogen, which would be recycled through the process. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted on a Canadian Space Agency mobility chasis and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in February 2010. The RESOLVE unit is the initial prototype of a robotic prospecting mission to the Moon. RESOLVE is designed to go to the poles of the Moon to "ground truth" the form and concentration of the hydrogen/water/hydroxyl that has been seen from orbit (M3, Lunar Prospector and LRO) and to test technologies to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith. RESOLVE has the ability to capture a one-meter core sample of lunar regolith and heat it to determine the volatiles that may be released and then demonstrate the production of oxygen from minerals found in the regolith. The RESOLVE project, which is led by KSC, is a multi-center and multi-organizational effort that includes representatives from KSC, JSC, GRC, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Center for Advanced Technology (NORCAT). This paper details the results obtained from four days of lunar analog testing that included gas chromatograph analysis for volatile components, remote control of chemistry and drilling operations via satalite communications, and real-time water quantification using a novel capacitance measurement technique.

  12. The role of mediation in resolving workplace relationship conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Donna Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Stress triggered by workplace-based interpersonal conflict can result in damaged relationships, loss of productivity, diminished job satisfaction and increasingly, workers' compensation claims for psychological injury. This paper examined the literature on the role and effectiveness of mediation, as the most common method of Alternative Dispute Resolution, in resolving workplace relationship conflict. Available evidence suggests that mediation is most effective when supported by organisational commitment to ADR strategies, policies and processes, and conducted by independent, experienced and qualified mediators. The United States Postal Service program REDRESS™ is described as an illustration of the successful use of mediation to resolve conflict in the workplace.

  13. Adaptive Subchip Multipath Resolving for Wireless Location Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Nabil R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable positioning of cellular users in a mobile environment requires accurate resolving of overlapping multipath components. However, this task is difficult due to fast channel fading conditions and data ill-conditioning, which limit the performance of least-squares-based techniques. This paper develops two overlapping multipath resolving methods (adaptive and nonadaptive, and shows how the adaptive solution can be made robust to the above limitations by extracting and exploiting a priori information about the fading channel. Also the proposed techniques are extended when there are antenna arrays at the base station. Simulation results illustrate the performance of the proposed techniques.

  14. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hielscher, A.H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Liu, H.; Chance, B. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, D501 Richards Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6089 (United States); Tittel, F.K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Jacques, S.L. [Laser Biology Research Laboratory, Box 17, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze {ital in} {ital vivo} measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  15. RESOLVE OVEN Field Demonstration Unit for Lunar Resource Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Aaron; Oryshchyn, Lara; Jensen, Scott; Sanders, Gerald B.; Lee, Kris; Reddington, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) is a subsystem within the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) project. The purpose of the OVEN subsystem is to release volatiles from lunar regolith and extract oxygen by means of a hydrogen reduction reaction. The complete process includes receiving, weighing, sealing, heating, and disposing of core sample segments while transferring all gaseous contents to the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. This document will discuss the design and performance of the OVEN Field Demonstration Unit (FDU), which participated in the 2012 RESOLVE field demonstration.

  16. Direct vs. resolved photon an exercise in factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Chyla, J

    1994-01-01

    Direct and resolved photon interactions are shown to be intimately related through the factorization mechanism. It is argued that in theoretically consistent analysis of jet production in $\\gamma$p and ep collisions the LO resolved $\\gamma$ contribution must be considered together with the NLO direct $\\gamma$ component. Recent data from HERA therefore do not provide a direct evidence for the former component, but should rather be interpreted as a manifestation of the $O(\\alpha\\alpha_s^2)$ term in $\\gamma$p and, via the Weizs\\"acker-Williams approximation, in ep interactions.

  17. Local resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of PEFC single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Gulzow, E. [German Aerospace Center, Inst. of Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Experimental data on a spatial resolved level is needed to understand the integral behaviour of fuel cells as well as to validate models describing fuel cell behaviour. This paper described a new tool developed to increase the accuracy of current density measurements. Based on a printed circuit board, the tool integrated local electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in order to determine local membrane resistance, electrochemical reactions, and transport processes. Solutions for locally resolved impedance spectroscopy measurements were presented. It was concluded that the tool will help to provide a more detailed understanding of fuel cell behaviour.

  18. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with

  20. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  1. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    show a good agreement. Up to now the measurements of impinging spectra with a Timepix detector have been performed in radiation fields with a relatively high fluence. To cope with the requirement of measuring in radiation fields with a low fluence, there had to be changes in the method of analysis compared to those performed formerly. An important improvement in this context was the employment of the Bayesian deconvolution method. The spectra reconstructed with this method were then compared to the results of two different and established detection systems. Firstly, the shape of the deconvolved spectrum was compared to the one measured with a hpGe detector. Secondly, the calculated value of the kerma rate was compared to the one measured with an ionization chamber. This gave an estimate on the correctness of the absolute number of photons. Both comparisons have shown a good agreement and thus I was able to validate that the method delivers precise results. Compared to the formerly used spectrum-stripping method the Bayesian deconvolution turned out to be very stable and reliable. This robustness of the deconvolution method and the development of a pixel-by-pixel energy calibration were the keys towards position-resolved spectrometry. With such a precise energy calibration the energy resolution was enhanced by up to 45%. This improved accuracy in the measurement has been very demanding on the improvements of the simulation of the response matrix needed for deconvolution. Both this enhanced simulation and a pixel-by-pixel calibrated detector opened the possibility of measuring the anode heel effect. Not only the relative angular dependency of the spectrum emitted but also the change in the absolute photon fluence were measured. Furthermore, it is possible to even use small ROIs down to 4x4 pixels to evaluate a spectrum. This was then applied for the spectrometry of small focal spots of a miniature X-ray source used in therapeutics. Furthermore, the robustness and the

  2. Time-Resolved 2PPE and Time-Resolved PEEM as a Probe of LSP's in Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bayer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique (TR-2PPE has been applied to study static and dynamic properties of localized surface plasmons (LSP in silver nanoparticles. Laterally, integrated measurements show the difference between LSP excitation and nonresonant single electron-hole pair creation. Studies below the optical diffraction limit were performed with the detection method of time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM. This microscopy technique with a resolution down to 40 nm enables a systematic study of retardation effects across single nanoparticles. In addition, as will be shown in this paper, it is a highly sensitive sensor for coupling effects between nanoparticles.

  3. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, M.R.; Bodis, P.; Shaw, D.J.; Bakker, B.H.; Newton, A.C.; Kay, E.R.; Leigh, D.A.; Buma, W.J.; Brouwer, A.M.; Woutersen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid

  4. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of black silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2010-01-01

    The ultrafast photoconductivity dynamics of black silicon is measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Black silicon is produced by laser annealing of an a-Si:H film. We show that the decay time of the photoconductivity depends on the annealing method and fluence used in the production...

  5. Resolvent kernel for the Kohn Laplacian on Heisenberg groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neur Eddine Askour

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a formula that relates the Kohn Laplacian on Heisenberg groups and the magnetic Laplacian. Then we obtain the resolvent kernel for the Kohn Laplacian and find its spectral density. We conclude by obtaining the Green kernel for fractional powers of the Kohn Laplacian.

  6. Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si were measured under an N_2 laser excitation. The luminescence shows a nonexponential decay with an initial time constant of less than 5 ns and more than 200 ns for the secondary decay. The luminescence is considered to be associated with localized states, which are probably conduction and valence sublevels in Si microstructures.

  7. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Spatially Resolved NMR Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference covers materials science applications as well as microfluidic, biomedical and dental applications and the monitoring of physicochemical processes. It includes the latest in hardware, methodology and applications of spatially resolved magnetic resonance, such as portable imaging and single-sided spectroscopy. For materials scientists, spectroscopists, chemists, physicists, and medicinal chemists.

  9. An Initial Investigation of Active Galaxies in RESOLVE and ECO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Dara J.; Kannappan, Sheila; Bittner, Ashley; Yarber, Aara'L.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The volume-limited REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey and its complementary Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog are dominated by low mass, gas-rich galaxies, as is typical of the bulk of large-scale structure in the local universe. These surveys, therefore, provide an excellent opportunity to investigate the complete large-scale environments of low-redshift AGN and nuclear starbursts in such galaxies, in order to search for external triggering, examine activity in relation to gas supply, and investigate the role of feedback. By data-mining multi-wavelength catalogs that use varied techniques, we identify known AGN in RESOLVE and ECO, including a population of gas-dominated low-mass galaxies. We take advantage of these surveys' multi-wavelength supporting data to investigate triggering, feedback, and the roles of environment and gas supply in this initial sample of active galaxies. Because biases in standard AGN candidate selection techniques (e.g. BPT, X-ray luminosity) make them individually poor selectors of AGN activity in star-forming and low mass (<10^10 Msun) host galaxies, we also seek to improve the identification of nuclear activity in such galaxies via combined analysis of star formation and AGN signatures. RESOLVE is supported by NSF grant AST-0955368

  10. Music Education Preservice Teachers' Confidence in Resolving Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Debra G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there would be a change in preservice teachers' (a) confidence concerning the resolution of behavior problems, (b) tactics for resolving them, (c) anticipation of problems, (d) fears about management issues, and (e) confidence in methodology and pedagogy over the time period of a one-semester…

  11. Nested Genetic Algorithm for Resolving Overlapped Spectral Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A nested genetic algorithm, including genetic parameter level and genetic implemented level for peak parameters, was proposed and applied for resolving overlapped spectral bands. By the genetic parameter level, parameters of genetic algorithm were optimized; moreover, the number of overlapped peaks was determined simultaneously. Then parameters of individual peaks were computed with the genetic implemented level.

  12. Resolving Signals to Cohesion: Two Models of Bridging Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Mary; Revlin, Russell

    1999-01-01

    Suggests two models of how readers create bridging inferences to resolve signals to textual cohesion. Evaluates reading times, verification accuracy, verification latency, and regressive eye fixations to support the model which views bridges as the result of a form of deduction in which the reader tacitly establishes premises that provide rational…

  13. 30 CFR 705.19 - Resolving prohibited interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the employee's statement and any other information pertinent to the Director's determination... INTERIOR GENERAL RESTRICTION ON FINANCIAL INTERESTS OF STATE EMPLOYEES § 705.19 Resolving prohibited... effect resolution. If an employee has a prohibited financial interest, the Head of the State...

  14. 30 CFR 706.19 - Resolving prohibited interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... certified true copy of the employee's statement and any other information pertinent to the Director... INTERIOR GENERAL RESTRICTION ON FINANCIAL INTERESTS OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES § 706.19 Resolving prohibited interests. Actions to be taken by the Director, the heads of other Federal agencies, and the heads of...

  15. TRIZ based Interface Conflict Resolving Strategies for Modular Product Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel W.; Vaneker, Tom H.J.

    2010-01-01

    In product development, the chosen product architecture often possesses characteristics of both modular and integral design. Within a modular architecture, a Function-Behavior-Structure (FBS) model has been applied to describe modules and their interfaces. To resolve emerging interface conflicts, se

  16. The far-infrared properties of spatially resolved AKARI observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeong, Woong-Seob; Nakagawa, Takao; Yamamura, Issei; Pearson, Chris P.; Savage, Richard S.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Shibai, Hiroshi; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter; Clements, Dave; Doi, Yasuo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kawamura, Akiko; Kester, Do; Kwon, Suk Minn; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsuura, Shuji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Oh, Sang Hoon; Oliver, Sebastian; Pak, Soojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Serjeant, Stephen; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Takagi, Toshinobu.; Wang, Lingyu; White, Glenn J.; Yamauchi, Chisato

    2007-01-01

    We present spatially resolved observations of IRAS sources from the Japanese infrared astronomy satellite AKARI All-Sky Survey during the performance verification phase of the mission. We extracted reliable point sources matched with the IRAS point source catalogue. By comparing IRAS and AKARI fluxe

  17. Path-length-resolved optical Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2007-01-01

    We report the first path-length-resolved perfusion measurements on human skin measured with a phase-modulated low-coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer with spatially separated fibers for illumination and detection. Optical path lengths of Doppler shifted and unshifted light and path-length-dependen

  18. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Donald F.; Kiss, Andras; Leach, Franklin E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-07-01

    Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for exact mass elemental formula assignment. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissue was measured with 150 μm spatial resolution (75 μm primary ion spot size) with mass resolving power (m/Δm50%) of 67,500 (at m/z 750) and root-mean-square measurement accuracy less than two parts-per-million for intact phospholipids, small molecules and fragments. For the first time, ultra-high mass resolving power SIMS has been demonstrated, with m/Δm50% > 3,000,000. Higher spatial resolution capabilities of the platform were tested at a spatial resolution of 20 μm. The results represent order of magnitude improvements in mass resolving power and mass measurement accuracy for SIMS imaging and the promise of the platform for ultra-high mass resolving power and high spatial resolution imaging.

  19. An Analysis of Shock-Compression in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Recovery and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    1999-06-01

    The densification and reaction characteristics in the Mo-Si system were investigated utilizing recovery experiments as well as time resolved measurements with in-situ stress gages. The starting sample in all cases consisted of statically pressed Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures ( ~55% TMD). The recovery experiments were performed using the Sandia Momma Bear and Momma Bear A fixtures with baratol and composition B explosives respectively. The instrumented experiments were performed in a capsule design similar to that of the Momma Bear, but modified to incorporate poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gages at the front and rear surfaces of the powder. These experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s. The instrumented experiments allow the crush strength, densification history, and reaction threshold to be mapped at increasing pressure to correlate with reaction observed in the recovery experiments.

  20. Combined influences of chromatic aberration and scattering in depth-resolved two-photon fluorescence endospectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Li, Xingde

    2010-10-27

    The influence of chromatic aberration of an objective lens in two-photon fluorescence (TPF) endospectroscopy of scattering media has been systematically investigated through both experiments and numerical simulations. Experiments were carried out on a uniform 3D scattering gelatin phantom embedded with TiO(2) granules (to mimic tissue scattering) and fluorescein-tagged polystyrene beads. It was found that fluorescence spectral intensity and lineshape varied as a function of depth when measured with a gradient-index (GRIN) lens which has severe chromatic aberration. The spectral distortion caused by the chromatic aberration became diminishing as the imaging depth increased. Ray tracing analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to study the interplay of chromatic aberration and scattering in the depth-resolved TPF spectra. The simulation results suggest that the collected fluorescence signals from deeper layers included more out-of-focus photons that experienced a few or multiple scatterings, which diminish the influence of chromatic aberration on the measured TPF spectra. The simulated collection efficiencies of TPF at different wavelengths and depths can be used to properly recover the true depth-resolved TPF spectra of a relatively uniform scattering medium.

  1. Use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate diagnostic value of collagen degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Cyrankiewicz, Michał; Wybranowski, Tomasz; Ziomkowska, Blanka; Ośmiałowski, Borys; Obońska, Ewa; Augustyńska, Beata; Kruszewski, Stefan; Kubica, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of collagen degradation products (CDPs) may reflect the process of left ventricular remodeling (LVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) in assessment of CDPs. The preliminary experiment was designed to establish if CDPs’ characteristics might be visible by mean fluorescence lifetime (FLT) in determined conditions. The in vitro model of CDPs was prepared by conducting the hydrolysis of type III collagen. The FLT of samples was measured by the time-resolved spectrometer Life Spec II with the subnanosecond pulsed 360-nm EPLED diode. The FLTs were obtained by deconvolution analysis of the data using a multiexponential model of fluorescence decay. In order to determine the limit of traceability of CDPs, a comparison of different collagen/plasma ratio in samples was performed. The results of our study showed that the increase of added plasma to hydrolyzed collagen extended the mean FLT. Thus, the diagnosis of LVR based on measurements using TRFS is possible. However, it is important to point out the experiment was preliminary and further investigation in this field of research is crucial.

  2. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  3. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  4. Demonstration of Resolving Urban Problems by Applying Smart Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, movements to seek various alternatives are becoming more active around the world to resolve urban problems related to energy, water, a greenhouse gas, and disaster by utilizing smart technology system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate service verification aimed at demonstration region applied with actual smart technology in order to raise the efficiency of the service and explore solutions for urban problems. This process must be required for resolving urban problems in the future and establishing `integration platform' for sustainable development. The demonstration region selected in this study to evaluate service verification is `Busan' in Korea. Busan adopted 16 services in 4 sections last year and begun demonstration to improve quality of life and resolve urban environment problems. In addition, Busan participated officially in `Global City Teams Challenge (GCTC)' held by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in USA last year and can be regarded as representative demonstration region in Korea. The result of survey showed that there were practical difficulties as explained below in the demonstration for resolving urban problems by applying smart technology. First, the participation for demonstration was low because citizens were either not aware or did not realize the demonstration. Second, after demonstrating various services at low cost, it resulted in less effect of service demonstration. Third, as functions get fused, it was found that management department, application criteria of technology and its process were ambiguous. In order to increase the efficiency of the demonstration for the rest of period through the result of this study, it is required to draw demand that citizens requires in order to raise public participation. In addition, it needs to focus more on services which are wanted to demonstrate rather than various service demonstrations. Lastly, it is necessary to build integration platform through cooperation

  5. Electron-hole recombination on ZnO(0001) single-crystal surface studied by time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, R.; Yamamoto, S.; Ogawa, M.; Yamamoto, Sh.; Fujikawa, K.; Hobara, R.; Matsuda, I., E-mail: imatsuda@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Ozawa, K. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Emori, M.; Sakama, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kitagawa, S.; Daimon, H. [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    Time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments were performed with time scales from picoseconds to nanoseconds to trace relaxation of surface photovoltage on the ZnO(0001) single crystal surface in real time. The band diagram of the surface has been obtained numerically using PES data, showing a depletion layer which extends to 1 μm. Temporal evolution of the photovoltage effect is well explained by a recombination process of a thermionic model, giving the photoexcited carrier lifetime of about 1 ps at the surface under the flat band condition. This lifetime agrees with a temporal range reported by the previous time-resolved optical experiments.

  6. Identifying Coherent Structures in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet Flow using Time-Resolved Schlieren Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Andrew; Coleman, Thomas; Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andy; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Shock cells and large scale structures present in a three-stream non-axisymmetric jet are studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. Large Eddy Simulation is utilized first to gain an understanding of the underlying physics of the flow and direct the focus of the physical experiment. The flow in the experiment is visualized using long exposure Schlieren photography, with time resolved Schlieren photography also a possibility. Velocity derivative diagnostics are calculated from the grey-scale Schlieren images are analyzed using continuous wavelet transforms. Pressure signals are also captured in the near-field of the jet to correlate with the velocity derivative diagnostics and assist in unraveling this complex flow. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  7. Compton polarimetry with position-resolving X-ray detectors; Compton-Polarimetrie mit ortsaufloesenden Roentgendetektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Sebastian

    2010-02-15

    In the present thesis the prototype of a novel position-resolving and multi-hit able 2D Si(Li) strip detector is characterized, the planar detector crystal of which is simultaneously applied both as scatterer and as absorber. In the framework of this thesis the Si(Li) polarimeter could be applied in different experiments on the radiative electron capture and on the characteristic radiation at the experimental storage ring of the GSI. The characterization of the detector pursued by means of the highly polarized radiation of the electron capture into the K shell of naked xenon. In the following in two further experiments new values on the polarization of the electron capture into the K shell both of the naked and of the hydrogen-like uranium were performed.

  8. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-03-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%) electron spectrometer with a time resolution of 50 ns. Variable-magnification optics allow the spectrometer to view single-macropulse spectra with widths in the range of 0.2%-7%; wider spectra are taken with several momentum settings. Design criteria for the spectrometer are presented, and experience of operating with the diagnostics over a range of FEL physics experiments is summarized. The spectrometer is used, in conjunction with optical diagnostics, in studies at FELIX of efficiency enhancement, pulse chirping, and stepped-undulator operation.

  9. Mode-resolved Fabry-Perot experiment in low-loss Bragg-reflection waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressl, B; Günthner, T; Laiho, K; Geßler, J; Kamp, M; Höfling, S; Schneider, C; Weihs, G

    2015-12-28

    Based on the interaction between different spatial modes, semiconductor Bragg-reflection waveguides (BRWs) provide a highly functional platform for non-linear optics. For achieving any desired quantum optical functionality, we must control and engineer the properties of each spatial mode. To reach this purpose we extend the Fabry-Perot technique and achieve a detailed linear optical characterization of dispersive multimode semiconductor waveguides. With this efficient broadband spectral method we gain direct experimental access to the relevant modes of our BRWs and determine their group velocities. Furthermore, we show that our waveguides have lower than expected loss coefficients. This renders them suitable for integrated quantum optics applications.

  10. Resolving regional conflicts and public opinion: The Nigerian experience in Liberian crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salami, B.O.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria played an important role which led to the resolution of the Liberian crisis between 1990 and 1997. But between 1990 and 1993 towards the end of General Ibrahim Babangida’s regime (1985-1993, Nigeria’s role in the Liberian peace process became a major issue which preoccupied Nigeria’s external relations within the West African Sub-region. This paper examines in how public opinion influences government attitude and posture towards the Liberian situation.

  11. Resolving Issues in Innovative Graduate Degree Programs: The Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business Administration Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Applied Master's Degree and doctoral programs have been criticized widely for their lack of relevance, rigor and quality. New graduate degree programs have responded to these criticisms by implementing innovative academic policies, program curriculum, and student services. A case study of the Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business…

  12. SIR-B experiments in Japan. I - Sensor calibration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Masaru; Echizenya, Yoshimatsu; Kamata, Mitsuhiro; Kawai, Eiji; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    1988-03-01

    A sensor calibration experiment was proposed as part of SIR-B experiments in Japan, together with the rice crop experiment and the ocean oil-pollution detection experiment. This sensor calibration experiment was intended (1) to establish a transfer function from image data to radar backscattering characteristics, (2) to evaluate 3-dB resolutions, (3) to verify the ability to resolve two closely-spaced targets, and (4) to clarify sidelobe structures due to range and azimuth compressions. The disused Akita Airport was chosen as the main test site for the calibration experiment on the first three objectives. This paper describes the test site, the design of the corner reflectors, and briefly predicts the results.

  13. Time-resolved cell culture assay analyser (TReCCA Analyser) for the analysis of on-line data: data integration--sensor correction--time-resolved IC50 determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochead, Julia; Schessner, Julia; Werner, Tobias; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved cell culture assays circumvent the need to set arbitrary end-points and reveal the dynamics of quality controlled experiments. However, they lead to the generation of large data sets, which can represent a complexity barrier to their use. We therefore developed the Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay (TReCCA) Analyser program to perform standard cell assay analyses efficiently and make sophisticated in-depth analyses easily available. The functions of the program include data normalising and averaging, as well as smoothing and slope calculation, pin-pointing exact change time points. A time-resolved IC50/EC50 calculation provides a better understanding of drug toxicity over time and a more accurate drug to drug comparison. Finally the logarithmic sensor recalibration function, for sensors with an exponential calibration curve, homogenises the sensor output and enables the detection of low-scale changes. To illustrate the capabilities of the TReCCA Analyser, we performed on-line monitoring of dissolved oxygen in the culture media of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 treated with different concentrations of the anti-cancer drug Cisplatin. The TReCCA Analyser is freely available at www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/biowissenschaften/ipmb/biologie/woelfl/Research.html. By introducing the program, we hope to encourage more systematic use of time-resolved assays and lead researchers to fully exploit their data.

  14. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  15. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    show a good agreement. Up to now the measurements of impinging spectra with a Timepix detector have been performed in radiation fields with a relatively high fluence. To cope with the requirement of measuring in radiation fields with a low fluence, there had to be changes in the method of analysis compared to those performed formerly. An important improvement in this context was the employment of the Bayesian deconvolution method. The spectra reconstructed with this method were then compared to the results of two different and established detection systems. Firstly, the shape of the deconvolved spectrum was compared to the one measured with a hpGe detector. Secondly, the calculated value of the kerma rate was compared to the one measured with an ionization chamber. This gave an estimate on the correctness of the absolute number of photons. Both comparisons have shown a good agreement and thus I was able to validate that the method delivers precise results. Compared to the formerly used spectrum-stripping method the Bayesian deconvolution turned out to be very stable and reliable. This robustness of the deconvolution method and the development of a pixel-by-pixel energy calibration were the keys towards position-resolved spectrometry. With such a precise energy calibration the energy resolution was enhanced by up to 45%. This improved accuracy in the measurement has been very demanding on the improvements of the simulation of the response matrix needed for deconvolution. Both this enhanced simulation and a pixel-by-pixel calibrated detector opened the possibility of measuring the anode heel effect. Not only the relative angular dependency of the spectrum emitted but also the change in the absolute photon fluence were measured. Furthermore, it is possible to even use small ROIs down to 4x4 pixels to evaluate a spectrum. This was then applied for the spectrometry of small focal spots of a miniature X-ray source used in therapeutics. Furthermore, the robustness and the

  16. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-15

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to {sigma} <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at

  17. Vegetation Use for Resolving Electromagnetic Compatibility and Ecology Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvezdina, M. Yu; Shokova, Yu A.; Cherckesova, L. V.; Golovko, T. M.; Cherskaya, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The wide spread of Information and Communication Technologies and the development of Internet-enabled mobile applications have aggravated electromagnetic compatibility and ecology problems. Inability to excite electromagnetic field of a desired structure and strength with traditional approaches actualizes additional actions, including providing diffraction on propagation path, to resolve these issues. Diffraction on a stand-alone obstacle along the propagation path and the one on set of obstacles near receive antenna location can be considered as the additional actions in ultrashort band. The accomplished studies have shown that one the most effective means to lower electromagnetic field strength is to shield the receive antenna with vegetation from jamming radio equipment. Moreover, vegetation resolves electromagnetic ecology issues, for the energy flux density can be lowered by about two orders of magnitude.

  18. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  19. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB 030501 using INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.;

    2003-01-01

    The gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst...... Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F20-200 keV similar or equal to 3.5x10(-6) erg cm(-2)) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20-400 keV range which is consistent...

  20. Polarization-resolved microscopy through scattering media via wavefront shaping

    CERN Document Server

    de Aguiar, Hilton B; Brasselet, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Wavefront shaping has revolutionized imaging deep in scattering media, being able to spatially and temporally refocus light through or inside the medium. However, wavefront shaping is not compatible yet with polarization-resolved microscopy given the need of polarizing optics to refocus light with a controlled polarization state. Here, we show that wavefront shaping is not only able to restore a focus, but it can also recover the injected polarization state without using any polarizing optics at the detection. This counter-intuitive effect occurs up to several transport mean free path thick samples, which exhibit a speckle with a completely scrambled state. Remarkably, an arbitrary rotation of the input polarization does not degrade the quality of the focus. This unsupervised re-polarization - out of the originally scrambled polarization state - paves the way for polarization-resolved structural microscopy at unprecedented depths. We exploit this phenomenon and demonstrate second harmonic generation (SHG) str...

  1. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  2. How Many Genes are Needed to Resolve Phylogenetic Incongruence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Kang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The question how many genes are needed to resolve phylogenetic incongruence has been investigated at various taxonomic levels, yet few studies have investigated the minimum required numbers of selected genes based on single-gene tree performance at the genus level or lower. We conducted resampling analyses by compiling transcriptome-based single-copy nuclear gene sequences of 11 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae) to investigate the minimum numbers of both random and selected genes needed to resolve the phylogeny. Only 8 of the 26 selected genes were sufficient for full resolution, while 175 genes were needed if all 830 random genes were used. Our results provided a baseline for future sampling strategies of gene numbers in molecular phylogenetic studies of speciose taxa. The gene selection strategies based on single-gene tree performance are strongly recommended in phylogenic analyses.

  3. Spatially resolved remote measurement of temperature by neutron resonance absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kockelmann, W.; Pooley, D.E. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Deep penetration of neutrons into most engineering materials enables non-destructive studies of their bulk properties. The existence of sharp resonances in neutron absorption spectra enables isotopically-resolved imaging of elements present in a sample, as demonstrated by previous studies. At the same time the Doppler broadening of resonance peaks provides a method of remote measurement of temperature distributions within the same sample. This technique can be implemented at a pulsed neutron source with a short initial pulse allowing for the measurement of the energy of each registered neutron by the time of flight technique. A neutron counting detector with relatively high timing and spatial resolution is used to demonstrate the possibility to obtain temperature distributions across a 100 µm Ta foil with ~millimeter spatial resolution. Moreover, a neutron transmission measurement over a wide energy range can provide spatially resolved sample information such as temperature, elemental composition and microstructure properties simultaneously.

  4. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  5. Resolving flows around black holes: numerical technique and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Black holes are believed to be one of the key ingredients of galaxy formation models, but it has been notoriously challenging to simulate them due to the very complex physics and large dynamical range of spatial scales involved. Here we address significant shortcomings of a Bondi-Hoyle-like prescription commonly invoked to estimate black hole accretion in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. We describe and implement a novel super-Lagrangian refinement scheme to increase, adaptively and 'on the fly', the mass and spatial resolution in targeted regions around the accreting black holes at limited computational cost. While our refinement scheme is generically applicable and flexible, for the purpose of this paper we select the smallest resolvable scales to match black holes' instantaneous Bondi radii, thus effectively resolving Bondi-Hoyle-like accretion in full galaxy formation simulations. This permits us to not only estimate gas properties close to the Bondi radius much more accurately, ...

  6. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cheung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  7. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  8. Resolving Rapid Variation in Energy for Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haut, Terry Scot [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Ahrens, Cory Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Jonko, Alexandra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Till, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division; Lowrie, Robert Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    2016-08-23

    Resolving the rapid variation in energy in neutron and thermal radiation transport is needed for the predictive simulation capability in high-energy density physics applications. Energy variation is difficult to resolve due to rapid variations in cross sections and opacities caused by quantized energy levels in the nuclei and electron clouds. In recent work, we have developed a new technique to simultaneously capture slow and rapid variations in the opacities and the solution using homogenization theory, which is similar to multiband (MB) and to the finite-element with discontiguous support (FEDS) method, but does not require closure information. We demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the method for a variety of problems. We are researching how to extend the method to problems with multiple materials and the same material but with different temperatures and densities. In this highlight, we briefly describe homogenization theory and some results.

  9. Time-resolved CT angiography in aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, Felix G., E-mail: felix.meinel@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.nikolaou@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Weidenhagen, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.weidenhagen@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hellbach, Katharina, E-mail: katharina.hellbach@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Helck, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.helck@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian, E-mail: fabian.bamberg@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Sommer, Wieland H., E-mail: wieland.sommer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We performed this study to assess feasibility and additional diagnostic value of time-resolved CT angiography of the entire aorta in patients with aortic dissection. Materials and methods: 14 consecutive patients with known or suspected aortic dissection (aged 60 {+-} 9 years) referred for aortic CT angiography were scanned on a dual-source CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a shuttle mode for multiphasic image acquisition (range 48 cm, time resolution 6 s, 6 phases, 100 kV, 110 mAs/rot). Effective radiation doses were calculated from recorded dose length products. For all phases, CT densities were measured in the aortic lumen and renal parenchyma. From the multiphasic data, 3 phases corresponding to a triphasic standard CT protocol, served as a reference and were compared against findings from the time-resolved datasets. Results: Mean effective radiation dose was 27.7 {+-} 3.5 mSv. CT density of the true lumen peaked at 355 {+-} 53 HU. Compared to the simulated triphasic protocol, time-resolved CT angiography added diagnostic information regarding a number of important findings: the enhancement delay between true and false lumen (n = 14); the degree of membrane oscillation (n = 14); the perfusion delay in arteries originating from the false lumen (n = 9). Other additional information included true lumen collapse (n = 4), quantitative assessment of renal perfusion asymmetry (n = 2), and dynamic occlusion of aortic branches (n = 2). In 3/14 patients (21%), these additional findings of the multiphasic protocol altered patient management. Conclusions: Multiphasic, time-resolved CT angiography covering the entire aorta is feasible at a reasonable effective radiation dose and adds significant diagnostic information with therapeutic consequences in patients with aortic dissection.

  10. Time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-yun; ZHANG Wei-jun; WANG Zhen-ya; HAO Li-qing; HUANG Ming-qiang; ZHAO Wen-wu; LONG Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-01-01

    We develop a system to measure the elemental composition of unprepared samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in our laboratory, which can be used for the determination of elements in solids, liquids and aerosols. A description of the instrumentation, including laser, sample chamber and detection, is followed by a brief discussion. The time-resolved LIBS of aluminum at atmospheric pressure is presented. At the end, the possibilities and later uses of this technique are briefly discussed.

  11. Resolving the wave vector in negative refractive index media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, S Anantha; Martin, Olivier J F

    2005-10-01

    We address the general issue of resolving the wave vector in complex electromagnetic media including negative refractive media. This requires us to make a physical choice of the sign of a square root imposed merely by conditions of causality. By considering the analytic behavior of the wave vector in the complex plane, it is shown that there are a total of eight physically distinct cases in the four quadrants of two Riemann sheets.

  12. Identification of Novel Chondroprotective Mediators in Resolving Inflammatory Exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneva, Magdalena K; Greco, Karin V; Headland, Sarah E; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Mori, Prashant; Greenslade, Kevin; Pitzalis, Costantino; Moore, Adrian; Perretti, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesized that exudates collected at the beginning of the resolution phase of inflammation might be enriched for tissue protective molecules; thus an integrated cellular and molecular approach was applied to identify novel chondroprotective bioactions. Exudates were collected 6 h (inflammatory) and 24 h (resolving) following carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats. The resolving exudate was subjected to gel filtration chromatography followed by proteomics, identifying 61 proteins. Fractions were added to C28/I2 chondrocytes, grown in micromasses, ions with or without IL-1β or osteoarthritic synovial fluids for 48 h. Three proteins were selected from the proteomic analysis, α1-antitrypsin (AAT), hemopexin (HX), and gelsolin (GSN), and tested against catabolic stimulation for their effects on glycosaminoglycan deposition as assessed by Alcian blue staining, and gene expression of key anabolic proteins by real-time PCR. In an in vivo model of inflammatory arthritis, cartilage integrity was determined histologically 48 h after intra-articular injection of AAT or GSN. The resolving exudate displayed protective activities on chondrocytes, using multiple readouts: these effects were retained in low m.w. fractions of the exudate (46.7% increase in glycosaminoglycan deposition; ∼20% upregulation of COL2A1 and aggrecan mRNA expression), which reversed the effect of IL-1β. Exogenous administration of HX, GSN, or AAT abrogated the effects of IL-1β and osteoarthritic synovial fluids on anabolic gene expression and increased glycosaminoglycan deposition. Intra-articular injection of AAT or GSN protected cartilage integrity in mice with inflammatory arthritis. In summary, the strategy for identification of novel chondroprotective activities in resolving exudates identified HX, GSN and AAT as potential leads for new drug discovery programs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Ultrafast time resolved vibrational spectroscopy in liquid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, G.; Hofmann, M.; Weidlich, K.; Graener, H. [Physics Institute, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of small molecules in the liquid phase can successfully be studied tracing the relaxation pathways of vibrational excess energy. Two complementing experimental techniques, picosecond IR double resonance spectroscopy and time resolved incoherent Anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, are very powerful tools for such studies. The capabilities of investigations combining these methods are discussed on the example of new experimental data on liquid dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Resolving Conflicts between Agriculture and the Natural Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Tanentzap

    Full Text Available Agriculture dominates the planet. Yet it has many environmental costs that are unsustainable, especially as global food demand rises. Here, we evaluate ways in which different parts of the world are succeeding in their attempts to resolve conflict between agriculture and wild nature. We envision that coordinated global action in conserving land most sensitive to agricultural activities and policies that internalise the environmental costs of agriculture are needed to deliver a more sustainable future.

  15. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.;

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  16. Time-resolved THz spectroscopy in a parallel plate waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy inside a novel parallel plate waveguide where one of the metallic plates is replaced by a transparent conducting oxide. Considerable improvements to the waveguide loss coefficient are shown, with a power absorption coefficient of 4cm-1 at 0.5 THz....... The time resolution of the technique is shown to be limited by the spatial excitation profile, which for sharply focused beams can approach ~1 ps time scales....

  17. A guide to resolving disputes over defective specifications

    OpenAIRE

    Wirsching, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    CIVINS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This thesis investigated the legal criteria involved in resolving defective specification disputes. Appellate case law was researched to discover the rules used by the court systems to decide cases involving defective specifications. These rules were organized in flowchart form to provide a guide for construction contract administrators. Separate flow charts were prepared for method and performance specifications, and the di...

  18. Existence of Almost Resolvable Directed 7-Cycle Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Let ARDkCS(v) denote an almost resolvable directed k-cycle system of order v. It is clear that a necessary condition for the existence of an ARDkCS(v) is v≡1(mod k). For k= 3,4,5 and 6, the existence of an ARDkCS(v) had been completely solved. This paper shows that there exists an ARD7CS(v) if and only if v≡1(mod 7) and v≥8.

  19. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Maria J; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-07-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed.

  20. Studying the Stereochemistry of Naproxen Using Rotationally Resolved Electronic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin W.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.

    2009-06-01

    Many biochemical processes are stereospecific. An example is the physiological response to a drug that depends on its enantiomeric form. Naproxen is a drug which shows this stereo-specific physiological response. To better understand the stereo specificity of chiral substances, we observed the S_1←S_0 transitions of R- and S-naproxen in the gas phase using rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy. The results will be discussed.

  1. Improving Earthquake Stress Drop Measurements - What can we Really Resolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Ruhl, C. J.; Kozlowska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake stress drop is fundamental to understanding the physics of the rupture process. Although it is superficially simple to calculate an estimate of stress drop from the corner frequency of the radiated spectrum, it is much harder to be certain that measurements are reliable and accurate. The same is true of other measurements of stress drop and radiated energy. The large number of studies of earthquake stress drop, the high variability in results (~0.1-100 MPa), the large uncertainties, and the ongoing scaling controversy are evidence for this. We investigate the resolution and uncertainties of stress drops calculated using an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach. Earthquakes in 3 sequences at Parkfield, California are recorded by multiple borehole stations and have abundant smaller earthquakes to use as EGFs (Abercrombie, 2014). The earthquakes in the largest magnitude cluster (M~2.1) exhibit clear temporal variation of stress drop. Independent studies obtained a similar pattern implying that it is resolvable for these well-recorded, simple sources. The borehole data reveal a similar temporal pattern for another sequence, not resolvable in an earlier study using surface recordings. The earthquakes in the third sequence have complex sources; corner frequency measurements for this sequence are highly variable and poorly resolved. We use the earthquakes in the first cluster to quantify the uncertainties likely to arise in less optimal settings. The limited signal bandwidth and the quality of the EGF assumption are major sources of error. Averaging across multiple stations improves the resolution, as does using multiple good EGFs (Abercrombie, 2015). We adapt the approach to apply to larger data sets. We focus on New Zealand, with the aim of resolving stress drop variability in a variety of tectonic settings. We investigate stacking over stations and multiple EGFs, and compare earthquakes (M~3-6) from both the overlying and the subducting plates.

  2. Introductory lecture: Time-resolved chemistry at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Philip; Novozhilova, Irina V

    2003-01-01

    Though time-resolved studies are still at an early stage, the field is rapidly being developed and applied to an increasingly broad spectrum of problems with timescales varying from seconds or more down to femtoseconds. In this overview a number of different techniques are discussed, with emphasis on chemical applications in which information is obtained at the atomic level. The need to correlate with theory, both for calibration of theoretical methods and to obtain related information not accessible experimentally, is stressed.

  3. How Many Genes are Needed to Resolve Phylogenetic Incongruence?

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Ai; Ming Kang

    2015-01-01

    The question how many genes are needed to resolve phylogenetic incongruence has been investigated at various taxonomic levels, yet few studies have investigated the minimum required numbers of selected genes based on single-gene tree performance at the genus level or lower. We conducted resampling analyses by compiling transcriptome-based single-copy nuclear gene sequences of 11 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae) to investigate the minimum numbers of both random and selected genes needed to ...

  4. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  5. Resolving Standard Essential Patents Issues through Competition Law (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAHAMA Noboru

    2015-01-01

    The number of disputes relating to standard essential patents (SEPs), in which patent holders submit statements to commit to granting licenses on a fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) basis, have increased. The exercise of SEPs tends to cause problems such as hold-ups and royalty stacking and needs to be constrained somehow. Despite wide recognition of the need to address these problems, devising measures to resolve the issue has not been an easy task since various laws and princi...

  6. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  7. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinemann@tu-berlin.de; Klapp, Sabine H. L., E-mail: klapp@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Palczynski, Karol, E-mail: karol.palczynski@helmholtz-berlin.de; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Institute of Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  8. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-08-11

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techniques can detect specific structures at an increased resolution, but the narrow spacing between neuronal microtubules poses challenges because most existing labelling strategies increase the effective microtubule diameter by 20-40 nm and will thereby blend neighbouring microtubules into one structure. Here we develop single-chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) against tubulin to achieve super-resolution imaging of microtubules with a decreased apparent diameter. To test the resolving power of these novel probes, we generate microtubule bundles with a known spacing of 50-70 nm and successfully resolve individual microtubules. Individual bundled microtubules can also be resolved in different mammalian cells, including hippocampal neurons, allowing novel insights into fundamental mechanisms of microtubule organization in cell- and neurobiology.

  9. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  10. Fixed Points of Averages of Resolvents: Geometry and Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bauschke, Heinz H; Wylie, Calvin J S

    2011-01-01

    To provide generalized solutions if a given problem admits no actual solution is an important task in mathematics and the natural sciences. It has a rich history dating back to the early 19th century when Carl Friedrich Gauss developed the method of least squares of a system of linear equations - its solutions can be viewed as fixed points of averaged projections onto hyperplanes. A powerful generalization of this problem is to find fixed points of averaged resolvents (i.e., firmly nonexpansive mappings). This paper concerns the relationship between the set of fixed points of averaged resolvents and certain fixed point sets of compositions of resolvents. It partially extends recent work for two mappings on a question of C. Byrne. The analysis suggests a reformulation in a product space. Furthermore, two new algorithms are presented. A complete convergence proof that is based on averaged mappings is provided for the first algorithm. The second algorithm, which currently has no convergence proof, iterates a map...

  11. Time-resolved MR angiography with limited projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuexi; Wright, Graham A

    2007-08-01

    A method for reconstruction of time-resolved MRI called highly-constrained backprojection (HYPR) has been developed. To evaluate the HYPR reconstruction in relation to data sparsity and temporal dynamics, computer simulations were performed, investigating signal modulations under different situations that reflect dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). In vivo studies were also performed with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) for abdominal MRA in a canine model to demonstrate the application of HYPR for three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved MRA. When contrast dynamics vary over space, large vessels (e.g., veins) tend to introduce signal interference to small vessels (e.g., arteries) in HYPR, particularly when the vessels are in close proximity. The enhancement of background tissue signals may also alter the arterial and venous temporal profiles in HYPR. However, the artifacts are manifest as intensity modulation rather than structural interference, and therefore have little impact on structural diagnosis. Increasing the number of projections per time point increases temporal blur while reducing corruption of temporal behavior from adjacent tissues. Uniformly interleaved acquisition order, such as the bit-reversed order, is important to reduce artifacts. With high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limited artifacts, HYPR reconstruction has potential to greatly improve time-resolved MRA in clinical practice.

  12. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  13. Resolving Isomeric Glycopeptide Glycoforms with Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Nie, Yongxin; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron

    2016-09-01

    The ability to resolve glycans while attached to tryptic peptides would greatly facilitate glycoproteomics, as this would enable site-specific glycan characterization. Peptide/glycopeptide separations are typically performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), where retention is driven by hydrophobic interaction. As the hydrophilic glycans do not interact significantly with the RPLC stationary phase, it is difficult to resolve glycopeptides that differ only in their glycan structure, even when these differences are large. Alternatively, glycans interact extensively with the stationary phases used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and consequently, differences in glycan structure have profound chromatographic shifts in this chromatographic mode. Here, we evaluate HILIC for the separation of isomeric glycopeptide mixtures that have the same peptide backbone but isomeric glycans. Hydrophilic functional groups on both the peptide and the glycan interact with the HILIC stationary phase, and thus, changes to either of these moieties can alter the chromatographic behavior of a glycopeptide. The interactive processes permit glycopeptides to be resolved from each other based on differences in their amino acid sequences and/or their attached glycans. The separations of glycans in HILIC are sufficient to permit resolution of isomeric N-glycan structures, such as sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages, while these glycans remain attached to peptides.

  14. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  15. Advances and challenges in resolving the angiosperm phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiosperm phylogenetics investigates the evolutionary history and relationships of angiosperms based on the construction of phylogenetic trees. Since the 1990s, nucleotide or amino acid sequences have been widely used for this and angiosperm phylogenetic analysis has advanced from using single or a combination of a few organellar genes to whole plastid genome sequences, resulting in the widely accepted modern molecular systematics of angiosperms. The current framework of the angiosperm phylogeny includes highly supported basal angiosperm relationships, five major clades (eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthales, and Ceratophyllales, orders grouped within these clades, and core groups in the monocots or eudicots. However, organellar genes have some limitations; these involve uniparental inheritance in most instances and a relatively low percentage of phylogenetic informative sites. Thus, they are unable to resolve some relationships even when whole plastid genome sequences are used. Therefore, the utility of biparentally inherited nuclear genes with more information about evolutionary history, has gradually received more attention. Nevertheless, there are still some plant groups that are difficult to place in the angiosperm phylogeny, such as those involving the relative positions of the five major groups as well as those of several orders of eudicots. In this review, we discuss the applications, advantages and disadvantages of marker genes, the deep relationships that have been resolved in angiosperm phylogeny, groups with uncertain positions, and the challenges that remain in resolving an accurate phylogeny for angiosperms.

  16. Spatially resolved information on karst conduit flow from in-cave dye tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, U.; Ufrecht, W.; Goldscheider, N.

    2014-02-01

    Artificial tracers are powerful tools for investigating karst systems. Tracers are commonly injected into sinking streams or dolines, while springs serve as monitoring sites. The obtained flow and transport parameters represent mixed information from the vadose, epiphreatic and phreatic zones (that is, the aquifer remains a black box). Accessible active caves constitute valuable but underexploited natural laboratories to gain detailed insights into the hydrologic functioning of the aquifer. Two multi-tracer tests in the catchment of a major karst spring (Blautopf, Germany) with injections and monitoring in two associated water caves aimed at obtaining spatially and temporally resolved information on groundwater flow in different compartments of the system. Two tracers were injected into the caves to characterize the hydraulic connections between them and with the spring. Two injections at the land surface, far from the spring, aimed at resolving the aquifer's internal drainage structure. Tracer breakthrough curves were monitored by field fluorimeters in caves and at the spring. Results demonstrate the dendritic drainage structure of the aquifer. It was possible to obtain relevant flow and transport parameters for different sections of this system. The highest mean flow velocities (275 m h-1) were observed in the near-spring epiphreatic section (open-channel flow), while velocities in the phreatic zone (pressurized flow) were one order of magnitude lower. Determined conduit water volumes confirm results of water balances and hydrograph analyses. In conclusion, experiments and monitoring in caves can deliver spatially resolved information on karst aquifer heterogeneity and dynamics that cannot be obtained by traditional investigative methods.

  17. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M.; Pardal, Goncalo R.; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al–steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption. PMID:27504075

  18. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M; Pardal, Goncalo R; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W Bruce

    2016-08-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al-steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption.

  19. Thermal dependence of time-resolved blue light stimulated luminescence in α-Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments in the important dosimetric material Al2O 3:C. During these experiments short pulses (0.5 s) of light from blue LEDs (470 nm) are followed by relaxation periods (2.5 s) of the charge carriers at different......-dependent phosphorescence signal, the delayed-OSL described previously for this material. The temperature dependent luminescence lifetimes obtained from analysis of the optical stimulation period are identical to those obtained from the corresponding relaxation period. However, the values of these luminescence lifetimes...

  20. Laser-induced electron emission from a tungsten nanotip: identifying above threshold photoemission using energy-resolved laser power dependencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bionta, M R; Champeaux, J P; Faure, S; Masseboeuf, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Chatel, B

    2013-01-01

    We present an experiment studying the interaction of a strongly focused 25 fs laser pulse with a tungsten nanotip, investigating the different regimes of laser-induced electron emission. We study the dependence of the electron yield with respect to the static electric field applied to the tip. Photoelectron spectra are recorded using a retarding field spectrometer and peaks separated by the photon energy are observed with a 45 % contrast. They are a clear signature of above threshold photoemission (ATP), and are confirmed by extensive spectrally resolved studies of the laser power dependence. Understanding these mechanisms opens the route to control experiment in the strong-field regime on nanoscale objects.

  1. Magnetic dichroism in angular resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy from buried magnetic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ViolBarbosa, Carlos E.; Ouardi, Siham [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Fecher, Gerhard H., E-mail: fecher@cpfs.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Ebke, Daniel; Felser, Claudia [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We show the feasibility of angular resolved MCD in photospectroscopy. ► Wide-acceptance lens system allows a fixed incident light angle in the experiment. ► Bulk-sensitive HAXPES-MCDAD was used to study buried layers. ► Performance tools as Scalasca and Paraver are used to debug the applications. -- Abstract: This work reports on the measurement of magnetic dichroism in angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from in-plane magnetized buried thin films. The high bulk sensitivity of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in combination with circularly polarized radiation enables the investigation of the magnetic properties of buried layers. Angular distributions of high kinetic energy (7–8 keV) photoelectrons in a range of about 60° were recorded in parallel to the energy distribution. Depending on purpose, energy and angular resolutions of 150–250 meV and 0.17–2° can be accomplished simultaneously in such experiments. Experiments were performed on exchange-biased magnetic layers covered by thin oxide films. More specifically, the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the ferromagnetic layer Co{sub 2}FeAl layer grown on MnIr exchange-biasing layer was investigated where the magnetic structure is buried beneath a MgO layer. Pronounced magnetic dichroism is found in the Co and Fe 2p states for all angles of emission. A slightly increased magnetic dichroism was observed for normal emission in agreement with theoretical considerations.

  2. Mode resolved bend-loss analysis in few-mode fibers using spatially and spectrally resolved imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leandro, Lorenzo; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars Erik; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of few-mode fibers for high-speed optical communication systems in space division multiplexing has created a need for mode resolved characterization of few-mode fibers. In this Letter, we present a new method to characterize the bend loss of the individual modes in a few-mode...... fiber. This procedure uses a simple setup for spatially and spectrally resolved imaging and allows the measurement of the bend loss of each and every guided mode at once. It does not require the use of mode converters in contrast to other methods. Results for graded-index two-and four-mode fibers...... are presented, together with comparisons against direct bend-loss measurements for the four-mode and standard single-mode fibers. (C) 2015 Optical Society of America...

  3. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  4. Range resolved measurements of atmospheric ozone and water vapour; Misure `range resolved` di ozono e vapor d`acqua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S.

    1992-12-31

    The ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) ground based lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) station, equipped with two TEA CO/sub 2/ laser transmitters, allows for range resolved measurements of minor atmospheric constituents or pollutants, using the DIAL differential absorption technique. This paper provides brief notes on the lidar station`s design characteristics and reports on the application of the instruments to obtain water vapour and ozone concentration profiles with a useful investigated range , R = 6 Km.

  5. Radioisotope identification method for poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum of nuclear security concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninh, Giang Nguyen; Phongphaeth, Pengvanich, E-mail: phongphaeth.p@chula.ac.th; Nares, Chankow [Nuclear Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Hao, Quang Nguyen [Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute, Ministry of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-01-22

    Gamma-ray signal can be used as a fingerprint for radioisotope identification. In the context of radioactive and nuclear materials security at the border control point, the detection task can present a significant challenge due to various constraints such as the limited measurement time, the shielding conditions, and the noise interference. This study proposes a novel method to identify the signal of one or several radioisotopes from a poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum. In this method, the noise component in the raw spectrum is reduced by the wavelet decomposition approach, and the removal of the continuum background is performed using the baseline determination algorithm. Finally, the identification of radioisotope is completed using the matrix linear regression method. The proposed method has been verified by experiments using the poorly resolved gamma-ray signals from various scenarios including single source, mixing of natural uranium with five of the most common industrial radioactive sources (57Co, 60Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, and 241Am). The preliminary results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable with the commercial method.

  6. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  7. Theory of spin dynamics of magnetic adatoms traced by time-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schüler, Michael; Berakdar, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been shown recently (Loth et al. Science 329, 1628 (2010)) to be extendable as to access the nanosecond, spin-resolved dynamics of magnetic adatoms and molecules. Here we analyze theoretically this novel tool by considering the time-resolved spin dynamics of a single adsorbed Fe atom excited by a tunneling current pulse from a spin-polarized STM tip. The adatom spin-configuration can be controlled and probed by applying voltage pulses between the substrate and the spin-polarized STM tip. We demonstrate how, in a pump-probe manner, the relaxation dynamics of the sample spin is manifested in the spin-dependent tunneling current. Our model calculations are based on the scattering theory in a wave-packet formulation. The scheme is nonpertubative and hence, is valid for all voltages. The numerical results for the tunneling probability and the conductance are contrasted with the prediction of simple analytical models and compared with experiments.

  8. Time-Resolved Phonons as a Microscopic Probe for Solid State Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckold, Götz

    Phonons reflect most directly the chemical interactions in solids. Hence, time-resolved, lattice-dynamical experiments yield detailed information about the trajectories and mechanisms of solid state reactions on a microscopic scale. The experimental determination of phonons in a wide range of wave vectors and frequencies is a domain of inelastic neutron scattering and requires usually rather long counting times. Real-time investigations therefore need sophisticated techniques in order to access the time regime down to microseconds. In the present contribution, the state of the art of time-resolved inelastic neutrons scattering (TRINS) is reviewed and its capability for the exploration of microscopic mechanisms of chemical processes and phase transitions in solids is demonstrated using two different examples. Demixing processes in model systems are used to show that the evolution of lattice dynamics allows one to distinguish clearly between the mechanisms of nucleation and growth on the one hand, and spinodal decomposition, on the other hand. In the latter case, the interatomic interactions and, hence, the phonon spectra, vary on a time scale of seconds while the average structure of the product phases as reflected by Bragg diffraction needs much longer times to evolve.

  9. Radioisotope identification method for poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum of nuclear security concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninh, Giang Nguyen; Phongphaeth, Pengvanich; Nares, Chankow; Hao, Quang Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray signal can be used as a fingerprint for radioisotope identification. In the context of radioactive and nuclear materials security at the border control point, the detection task can present a significant challenge due to various constraints such as the limited measurement time, the shielding conditions, and the noise interference. This study proposes a novel method to identify the signal of one or several radioisotopes from a poorly resolved gamma-ray spectrum. In this method, the noise component in the raw spectrum is reduced by the wavelet decomposition approach, and the removal of the continuum background is performed using the baseline determination algorithm. Finally, the identification of radioisotope is completed using the matrix linear regression method. The proposed method has been verified by experiments using the poorly resolved gamma-ray signals from various scenarios including single source, mixing of natural uranium with five of the most common industrial radioactive sources (57Co, 60Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, and 241Am). The preliminary results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable with the commercial method.

  10. Time-Resolved Luminescence Nanothermometry with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Liu, Hsiou-Yuan; Chen, Oliver Y; Hsu, Hsiang; Yee, Fu-Goul; Chang, Ming-Shien; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-06-10

    Measuring temperature in nanoscale spatial resolution either at or far from equilibrium is of importance in many scientific and technological applications. Although negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers in diamond have recently emerged as a promising nanometric temperature sensor, the technique has been applied only under steady state conditions so far. Here, we present a three-point sampling method that allows real-time monitoring of the temperature changes over ±100 K and a pump-probe-type experiment that enables the study of nanoscale heat transfer with a temporal resolution of better than 10 μs. The utility of the time-resolved luminescence nanothermometry was demonstrated with 100 nm fluorescent nanodiamonds spin-coated on a glass substrate and submerged in gold nanorod solution heated by a near-infrared laser, and the validity of the measurements was verified with finite-element numerical simulations. The combined theoretical and experimental approaches will be useful to implement time-resolved temperature sensing in laser processing of materials and even for devices in operation at the nanometer scale.

  11. 2JHH-resolved HSQC: Exclusive determination of geminal proton-proton coupling constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcó, Núria; Nolis, Pau; Gil, Roberto R.; Parella, Teodor

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of two-bond proton-proton coupling constants (2JHH) in prochiral CH2 groups from the F2 dimension of 2D spectra is not easy due to the usual presence of complex multiplet J patterns, line broadening effects and strong coupling artifacts. These drawbacks are particularly pronounced and frequent in AB spin systems, as those normally exhibited by the pair of diastereotopic CH2 protons. Here, a novel 2JHH-resolved HSQC experiment for the exclusive and accurate determination of the magnitude of 2JHH from the doublet displayed along the highly-resolved indirect F1 dimension is described. A pragmatic 2JHH NMR profile affords a fast overview of the full range of existing 2JHH values. In addition, a 2JHH/δ(13C)-scaled version proves to be an efficient solution when severe signal overlapping complicate a rigorous analysis. The performance of the method is compared with other current techniques and illustrated by the determination of challenging residual dipolar 2DHH coupling constants of small molecules dissolved in weakly orienting media.

  12. Investigation of valley-resolved transmission through gate defined graphene carrier guiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi-Min; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Wei, Xuan; Cheng, Shu-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Massless charge carriers in gate potentials modulate graphene quantum well transport in the same way that a electromagnetic wave propagates in optical fibers. A recent experiment by Kim et al (2016 Nat. Phys. 12 1022) reports valley symmetry preserved transport in a graphene carrier guider. Based on a tight-binding model, the valley-resolved transport coefficients are calculated with the method of scattering matrix theory. For a straight potential well, valley-resolved conductance is quantized with a value of 2n  +  1 and multiplied by 2e 2/h with integer n. In the absence of disorder, intervalley scattering, only occurring at both ends of the potential well, is weak. The propagating modes inside the potential well are analyzed with the help of band structure and wave function distribution. The conductance is better preserved for a longer carrier guider. The quantized conductance is barely affected by the boundaries of different types or slightly changing the orientation of the carrier guider. For a curved model, the state with momentum closes to the neutral point is more fragile to boundary scattering and the quantized conductance is ruined as well.

  13. Atlantic near-term climate variability and the role of a resolved Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Leo; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2016-04-01

    There is a continually increasing demand for near-term (i.e., lead times up to a couple of decades) climate information. This demand is partly driven by the need to have robust forecasts and is partly driven by the need to assess how much of the ongoing climate change is due to natural variability and how much is due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases or other external factors. Here we discuss results from a set of state-of-the-art climate model experiments in comparison with observational estimates that show that an assessment of predictability requires models that capture the variability of major oceanic fronts, which are, at best, poorly resolved and may even be absent in the near-term prediction of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change class models. This is the first time that air-sea interactions associated with resolved Gulf Stream sea surface temperature have been identified in the context of a state-of-the-art global coupled climate model with inferred near-term predictability.

  14. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysical Parameterizations in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations using the ARM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds modulate the distribution of energy and water within the atmosphere and regulate the hydrological cycle. Cloud microphysical parameterizations are critical for the representation of cloud microphysical properties in both cloud-resolving and climate models. In this study, we analyze the capabilities of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with advanced bulk microphysics schemes to simulate the microphysical properties and evolution of convective clouds and anvil cirrus over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in the mid-latitudes and Kwajalein Atoll in the tropics. For evaluating simulated cloud properties, we use observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program 1997 summer Intensive Observations Period at the SGP site and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) field campaign. The CRM simulations are evaluated with the ARM and KWAJEX observations, in particular using precipitation records, radiative fluxes, and radar reflectivity values observed by the ARM millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) and the Kwajalein precipitation radar. Preliminary analysis of the ARM SGP case shows that although the precipitation events during this period are well captured by the model, the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) is considerably underestimated and the model generates too much high cloud, which is inconsistent with the MMCR observations. In our study we especially focus on the causes of the overproduction of ice and high clouds in the CRM simulations. Improvements of the ice microphysics scheme and resulting impacts on the simulation are presented.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of nucleotide flipping by restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Robert K; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Chen, Kai; Kubala, Marta; Siksnys, Virginijus; Jones, Anita C

    2009-11-01

    Restriction enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C, specific for interrupted 5-bp target sequences, flip the central base pair of these sequences into their protein pockets to facilitate sequence recognition and adjust the DNA cleavage pattern. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-aminopurine-labelled DNA in complex with each of these enzymes in solution to explore the nucleotide flipping mechanism and to obtain a detailed picture of the molecular environment of the extrahelical bases. We also report the first study of the 7-bp cutter, PfoI, whose recognition sequence (T/CCNGGA) overlaps with that of the Ecl18kI-type enzymes, and for which the crystal structure is unknown. The time-resolved fluorescence experiments reveal that PfoI also uses base flipping as part of its DNA recognition mechanism and that the extrahelical bases are captured by PfoI in binding pockets whose structures are quite different to those of the structurally characterized enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C. The fluorescence decay parameters of all the enzyme-DNA complexes are interpreted to provide insight into the mechanisms used by these four restriction enzymes to flip and recognize bases and the relationship between nucleotide flipping and DNA cleavage.

  16. Time-resolved visible/near-infrared spectrometric observations of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Donald; Wade, Gregg A.

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved spectrometric measurements of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite were collected on three consecutive nights in July 2014 with the 1.6-m telescope at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic in Québec, Canada. Approximately 300 low-resolution spectra (R ≈ 700 , where R = λ / Δλ) of the satellite were collected each night, covering a spectral range between 425 and 850 nm. The two objectives of the experiment were to conduct material-type identification from the spectra and to study how the spectral energy distribution inferred from these measurements varied as the illumination and observation geometry changed on nightly timescales. We present results that indicate the presence of a highly reflective aluminized surface corresponding to the solar concentrator arrays of the Galaxy 11 spacecraft. Although other material types could not be identified using the spectra, the results showed that the spectral energy distribution of the reflected sunlight from the Galaxy 11 spacecraft varied significantly, in a systematic manner, over each night of observation. The variations were quantified using colour indices calculated from the time-resolved spectrometric measurements.

  17. Quantifying the size-resolved dynamics of indoor bioaerosol transport and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, S A; Azimi, P; Zhao, H; Stark, B C; Stephens, B

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the bioaerosol dynamics of droplets and droplet nuclei emitted during respiratory activities is important for understanding how infectious diseases are transmitted and potentially controlled. To this end, we conducted experiments to quantify the size-resolved dynamics of indoor bioaerosol transport and control in an unoccupied apartment unit operating under four different HVAC particle filtration conditions. Two model organisms (Escherichia coli K12 and bacteriophage T4) were aerosolized under alternating low and high flow rates to roughly represent constant breathing and periodic coughing. Size-resolved aerosol sampling and settle plate swabbing were conducted in multiple locations. Samples were analyzed by DNA extraction and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). DNA from both organisms was detected during all test conditions in all air samples up to 7 m away from the source, but decreased in magnitude with the distance from the source. A greater fraction of T4 DNA was recovered from the aerosol size fractions smaller than 1 μm than E. coli K12 at all air sampling locations. Higher efficiency HVAC filtration also reduced the amount of DNA recovered in air samples and on settle plates located 3-7 m from the source. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modeling of time-resolved laser-induced incandescence transients for particle sizing in high-pressure spray combustion environments : a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreier, T.; Bougie, B.; Dam, N.J.; Gerber, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this study experimental single-pulse, time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TIRE-LII) signal intensity profiles acquired during transient Diesel combustion events at high pressure were processed. Experiments were performed between 0.6 and 7 MPa using a high-temperature high-pressure constant

  19. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-09-01

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115-54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201-41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651-9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237-51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5-20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242-6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445-50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725-9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We also outline

  20. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-08-22

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115–54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201–41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651–9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237–51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5–20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242–6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445–50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725–9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We

  1. Enzyme transient state kinetics in crystal and solution from the perspective of a time-resolved crystallographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marius; Saldin, Dilano K

    2014-03-01

    With recent technological advances at synchrotrons [Graber et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 18, 658-670 (2011)], it is feasible to rapidly collect time-resolved crystallographic data at multiple temperature settings [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534-2542 (2013)], from which barriers of activation can be extracted. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources, new opportunities emerge to investigate structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules in real time [M. Schmidt, Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 1-10] in crystals and potentially from single molecules in random orientation in solution [Poon et al., Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 750371]. Kinetic data from time-resolved experiments on short time-scales must be interpreted in terms of chemical kinetics [Steinfeld et al., Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Prentience Hall, 1985)] and tied to existing time-resolved experiments on longer time-scales [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534-2542 (2013); Jung et al., Nat. Chem. 5, 212-220 (2013)]. With this article, we will review and outline steps that are required to routinely determine the energetics of reactions in biomolecules in crystal and solution with newest X-ray sources. In eight sections, we aim to describe concepts and experimental details that may help to inspire new approaches to collect and interpret these data.

  2. Improved differentiation between luminescence decay components by use of time-resolved optical activity measurements and selective lifetime modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerte, J A; Gafni, A; Steel, D G

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of luminescence decay experiments from proteins is typically modeled as a combination of independent first-order decay functions. However, Poisson noise in the photon counting experiment limits the ability of this approach to resolve decay components from separate lumiphores with similar lifetimes. To provide further differentiation, we incorporate time-resolved circular polarization of luminescence, an additional independent observable, into the analysis. In the simplest case, for example, each lumiphore's chirality is assumed to be time independent and is determined by the position of the lumiphore with respect to the surrounding chiral environment within the protein. In this paper, we describe the analysis of simultaneously recorded time-resolved luminescence and circularly polarized luminescence data to obtain improved temporal resolution. When combined with selective dynamic luminescence quenching, in a model system comprising a mixture of Tb/transferrin and Tb/conalbumin, we demonstrate resolution between two decay components with a lifetime difference of 7% and a difference in emission anisotropy of 5 X 10(-2). Evidence for the improved discrimination is further demonstrated by the increase in curvature of the chi 2 surface that results from the additional information. PMID:8785358

  3. Generation of optical Schr\\"odinger cat states by number-resolved photon subtraction from squeezed vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrits, Thomas; Clement, Tracy S; Calkins, Brice; Lita, Adriana E; Miller, Aaron J; Migdall, Alan L; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P; Knill, Emanuel

    2010-01-01

    Optical Schr\\"odinger cat states will have many applications in the fields of quantum information and high precision metrology in the future. Also, quantum states that cannot be characterized or measured by means of coincidence measurements require characterization with high efficiency and real photon-number resolving detectors. Here we report results from experiments creating heralded photonic cat states by subtracting up to three photons from a squeezed vacuum light pulse. We utilized our photon-number-resolving transition edge sensor with a quantum efficiency of 85% to detect the number of heralding photons. This is the first experiment utilizing the full photon-number-resolving capabilities of this photon detector. The optical cat state that was produced when subtracting three photons had a mean photon number of 2.75 and a fidelity of 0.59 +0.04/-0.14 compared to an ideal cat state consisting of an equal superposition of two optical coherent states. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the cat states si...

  4. High-pressure-low-temperature cryostat designed for use with fourier transform infrared spectrometers and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calladine, James A; Love, Ashley; Fields, Peter A; Wilson, Richard G M; George, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The design for a new high-pressure-low-temperature infrared (IR) cell for performing experiments using conventional Fourier transform infrared or fast laser-based time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, in a range of solvents, is described. The design builds upon a commercially available compressor and cold end (Polycold PCC(®) and CryoTiger(®)), which enables almost vibration-free operation, ideal for use with sensitive instrumentation. The design of our cell and cryostat allows for the study of systems at temperatures from 77 to 310 K and at pressures up to 250 bar. The CaF2 windows pass light from the mid-IR to the ultraviolet (UV), enabling a number of experiments to be performed, such as Raman, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and time-resolved techniques where sample excitation/probing using continuous wave or pulsed lasers is required. We demonstrate the capabilities of this cell by detailing two different applications: (i) the reactivity of a range of Group V-VII organometallic alkane complexes using time-resolved spectroscopy on the millisecond timescale and (ii) the gas-to-liquid phase transition of CO2 at low temperature, which is applicable to measurements associated with transportation issues related to carbon capture and storage.

  5. Spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet light pulses from high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötzing, M.; Adam, R.; Weier, C.; Plucinski, L.; Eich, S.; Emmerich, S.; Rollinger, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Mathias, S.; Schneider, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism responsible for optically induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films has been under intense debate since almost two decades. Currently, numerous competing theoretical models are in strong need for a decisive experimental confirmation such as monitoring the triggered changes in the spin-dependent band structure on ultrashort time scales. Our approach explores the possibility of observing femtosecond band structure dynamics by giving access to extended parts of the Brillouin zone in a simultaneously time-, energy- and spin-resolved photoemission experiment. For this purpose, our setup uses a state-of-the-art, highly efficient spin detector and ultrashort, extreme ultraviolet light pulses created by laser-based high-order harmonic generation. In this paper, we present the setup and first spin-resolved spectra obtained with our experiment within an acquisition time short enough to allow pump-probe studies. Further, we characterize the influence of the excitation with femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by comparing the results with data acquired using a continuous wave light source with similar photon energy. In addition, changes in the spectra induced by vacuum space-charge effects due to both the extreme ultraviolet probe- and near-infrared pump-pulses are studied by analyzing the resulting spectral distortions. The combination of energy resolution and electron count rate achieved in our setup confirms its suitability for spin-resolved studies of the band structure on ultrashort time scales.

  6. A 100 kHz Time-Resolved Multiple-Probe Femtosecond to Second Infrared Absorption Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greetham, Gregory M; Donaldson, Paul M; Nation, Charlie; Sazanovich, Igor V; Clark, Ian P; Shaw, Daniel J; Parker, Anthony W; Towrie, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We present a dual-amplifier laser system for time-resolved multiple-probe infrared (IR) spectroscopy based on the ytterbium potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) laser medium. Comparisons are made between the ytterbium-based technology and titanium sapphire laser systems for time-resolved IR spectroscopy measurements. The 100 kHz probing system provides new capability in time-resolved multiple-probe experiments, as more information is obtained from samples in a single experiment through multiple-probing. This method uses the high repetition-rate probe pulses to repeatedly measure spectra at 10 µs intervals following excitation allowing extended timescales to be measured routinely along with ultrafast data. Results are presented showing the measurement of molecular dynamics over >10 orders of magnitude in timescale, out to 20 ms, with an experimental time response of <200 fs. The power of multiple-probing is explored through principal component analysis of repeating probe measurements as a novel method for removing noise and measurement artifacts.

  7. Enzyme transient state kinetics in crystal and solution from the perspective of a time-resolved crystallographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent technological advances at synchrotrons [Graber et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 18, 658–670 (2011], it is feasible to rapidly collect time-resolved crystallographic data at multiple temperature settings [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013], from which barriers of activation can be extracted. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources, new opportunities emerge to investigate structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules in real time [M. Schmidt, Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 1–10] in crystals and potentially from single molecules in random orientation in solution [Poon et al., Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 750371]. Kinetic data from time-resolved experiments on short time-scales must be interpreted in terms of chemical kinetics [Steinfeld et al., Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Prentience Hall, 1985] and tied to existing time-resolved experiments on longer time-scales [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013; Jung et al., Nat. Chem. 5, 212–220 (2013]. With this article, we will review and outline steps that are required to routinely determine the energetics of reactions in biomolecules in crystal and solution with newest X-ray sources. In eight sections, we aim to describe concepts and experimental details that may help to inspire new approaches to collect and interpret these data.

  8. Time-resolved phosphorous magnetization transfer of the human calf muscle at 3 T and 7 T: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkovič, Ladislav, E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Dúbravska cesta 9 (Slovakia); Chmelík, Marek, E-mail: marek.chmelik@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Just Kukurova, Ivica, E-mail: ivica.kukurova@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Krššák, Martin, E-mail: martin.krssak@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Gruber, Stephan, E-mail: stephan@nmr.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Frollo, Ivan, E-mail: umerollo@savba.sk [Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Dúbravska cesta 9 (Slovakia); Trattnig, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Bogner, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang@nmr.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Phosphorous ({sup 31}P) magnetization transfer (MT) experiments enable the non-invasive investigation of human muscle metabolism in various physiological and pathological conditions. The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of time-resolved MT, and to compare the results of MT experiments at 3 T and 7 T. Six healthy volunteers were examined on a 3 T and a 7 T MR scanner using the same setup and identical measurement protocols. In the calf muscle of all volunteers, four separate MT experiments (each ∼10 min duration) were performed in one session. The forward rate constant of the ATP synthesis reaction (k{sub ATP}) and creatine kinase reaction (k{sub CK}), as well as corresponding metabolic fluxes (F{sub ATP}, F{sub CK}), were estimated. A comparison of these exchange parameters, apparent T{sub 1}s, data quality, quantification precision, and reproducibility was performed. The data quality and reproducibility of the same MT experiments at 7 T was significantly higher (i.e., k{sub ATP} 2.7 times higher and k{sub CK} 3.4 times higher) than at 3 T (p < 0.05). The values for k{sub ATP} (p = 0.35) and k{sub CK} (p = 0.09) at both field strengths were indistinguishable. Even a single MT experiment at 7 T provided better data quality than did a 4 times-longer MT experiment at 3 T. The minimal time-resolution to reliably quantify both F{sub ATP} and F{sub CK} at 7 T was ∼6 min. Our results show that MT experiments at 7 T can be at least 4 times faster than 3 T MT experiments and still provide significantly better quantification. This enables time-resolved MT experiments for the observation of slow metabolic changes in the human calf muscle at 7 T.

  9. RESOLVE: Bridge between early lunar ISRU and science objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G.; Sanders, G.; Larson, W.; Johnson, K.

    2007-08-01

    and make direct measurements. With this in mind, NASA initiated development of a payload named RESOLVE (Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction) that could be flown to the lunar poles and answer the questions surrounding the hydrogen: what's its form? how much is there? how deep or distributed is it? To do this, RESOLVE will use a drill to take a 1-2 meter core sample, crush and heat sample segments of the core in an oven and monitor the amount and type of volatile gases that evolve with a gas chromatograph (GC). RESOLVE will also selectively capture both hydrogen gas and water as a secondary method of quantification. A specialized camera that is coupled with a Raman spectrometer will allow core samples to be microscopically examined while also determining its mineral composition and possible water content before heating. Because RESOLVE is aimed at demonstrating capabilities and techniques that might be later used for ISRU, a multi-use oven is utilized with the ability to produce oxygen using the hydrogen reduction method. SCIENCE BENEFITS: In the process of answering the hydrogen question, the RESOLVE instrument suite will provide data that can address a number of other scientific questions and debate issues, especially the sources of volatiles and reactions that might take place in cold traps. It should be noted that the original instrument suite for RESOLVE was selected to accomplish the largest number of ISRU and science objectives as possible within the limited funding available. Complementary instruments are noted when additional science objectives can be accomplished. Incorporation of these new instruments into RESOLVE and potential partnerships is an area of near-term interest. Sources of Volatiles: The main proposed sources are episodic comet impacts, moreor- less continuous micrometeorite (both comet and asteroidal) impacts, solar wind bombardment, occasional volcanic emissions from the interior, and episodic delivery of

  10. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Donald F; Leach, Franklin E; Robinson, Errol W; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01

    Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the sub-micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for elemental formula assignment based on exact mass measurement. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissu...

  11. Time-resolved microscopy studies of laser damage dynamics at 0.5-1ps, 1030nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, L.; Ollé, A.; Sozet, M.; Berthelot, J.; Monneret, S.; Néauport, J.; Lamaignère, L.

    2016-12-01

    Based on an experimental system that can be used for simultaneous laser damage testing and time-resolved acquisition of intensity and phase images, we describe different experiments related to the study of laser damage process in the sub-picosecond regime. We report firstly on quantitative measurement of the Kerr effect in a fused silica substrate at fluences closed to the Laser Induced Damage Threshold. Then we study the damage initiation process in optical coatings, linked to intrinsic properties of the materials, and the dynamics of free electron generation and relaxation. At last, damage growth sequences are analyzed with time-resolved microscopy in order to understand laser damage growth in the case of High Reflective mirrors.

  12. Molecular orbital imaging of the acetone S2 excited state using time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Keiya; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-13

    We report a time-resolved (e, 2e) experiment on the deuterated acetone molecule in the S2 Rydberg state with a lifetime of 13.5 ps. The acetone S2 state was prepared by a 195 nm pump laser and probed with electron momentum spectroscopy using a 1.2 keV incident electron beam of 1 ps temporal width. In spite of the low data statistics as well as of the limited time resolution (±35  ps) due to velocity mismatch, the experimental results clearly demonstrate that electron momentum spectroscopy measurements of short-lived transient species are feasible, opening the door to time-resolved orbital imaging in momentum space.

  13. Parameterization of Frontal Symmetric Instabilities. I: Theory for Resolved Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Taylor, J. R.; Thomas, L. N.

    2017-01-01

    A parameterization is proposed for the effects of symmetric instability (SI) on a resolved front. The parameterization is dependent on external forcing by surface buoyancy loss and/or down-front winds, which reduce potential vorticity (PV) and lead to conditions favorable for SI. The parameterization consists of three parts. The first part is a specification for the vertical eddy viscosity, which is derived from a specified ageostrophic circulation resulting from the balance of the Coriolis force and a Reynolds momentum flux (a turbulent Ekman balance), with a previously proposed vertical structure function for the geostrophic shear production. The vertical structure of the eddy viscosity is constructed to extract the mean kinetic energy of the front at a rate consistent with resolved SI. The second part of the parameterization represents a near-surface convective layer whose depth is determined by a previously proposed polynomial equation. The third part of the parameterization represents diffusive tracer mixing through small-scale shear instabilities and SI. The diabatic, vertical component of this diffusivity is set to be proportional to the eddy viscosity using a turbulent Prandtl number, and the along-isopycnal tracer mixing is represented by an anisotropic diffusivity tensor. Preliminary testing of the parameterization using a set of idealized models shows that the extraction of total energy of the front is consistent with that from SI-resolving LES, while yielding mixed layer stratification, momentum, and potential vorticity profiles that compare favorably to those from an extant boundary layer parameterization (Large et al., 1994). The new parameterization is also shown to improve the vertical mixing of a passive tracer in the LES.

  14. Lucas-Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas-Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169-82). The so-called Lucas-Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1-16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27-71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  15. Thin film growth studies using time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Thin-film growth is important for novel functional materials and new generations of devices. The non-equilibrium growth physics involved is very challenging, because the energy landscape for atomic scale processes is determined by many parameters, such as the diffusion and Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers. We review the in situ real-time techniques of x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray growth oscillations and diffuse x-ray scattering (GISAXS) for the determination of structure and morphology on length scales from Å to µm. We give examples of time resolved growth experiments mainly from molecular thin film growth, but also highlight growth of inorganic materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and electrochemical deposition from liquids. We discuss how scaling parameters of rate equation models and fundamental energy barriers in kinetic Monte Carlo methods can be determined from fits of the real-time x-ray data.

  16. Can Point Defects in Surfaces in Solution be Atomically Resolved by Atomic Force Microscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.; Rohl, Andrew L.

    2016-11-01

    While the atomic force microscope (AFM) is able to image mineral surfaces in solution with atomic resolution, so far, it has been a matter of debate whether imaging point defects is also possible under these conditions. The difficulties stem from the limited knowledge of what types of defects may be stable in the presence of an AFM tip, as well as from the complicated imaging mechanism involving interactions between hydration layers over the surface and around the tip apex. Here, we present atomistic molecular dynamics and free energy calculations of the AFM imaging of vacancies and ionic substitutions in the calcite (10 1 ¯ 4 ) surface in water, using a new silica AFM tip model. Our results indicate that both calcium and carbonate vacancies, as well as a magnesium substitution, could be resolved in an AFM experiment, albeit with different imaging mechanisms.

  17. Reaction of CH radical with O2 by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of CH radical with O2 has been experimentally investigated by time-resolved Fourier transform IR emission spectroscopy. CH radicals were generated by multi-photon UV laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) in gaseous phase. Highly vibrationally excited product CO (v =1-12) with a near Boltzmann distribution was observed after the reaction. The vibrational temperature of CO is estimated as high as 14400(1400 K and the averaged vibrational energy is about 25.8 kcal(mol-1. The emission intensity of CO is not sensitive to the quenching gas, which indicates that there is no early barrier in the reaction of CH+O2. However, the theoretically predicted product CO2 has not been found in the experiment.

  18. Simulations on time-resolved structure determination of uncrystallized biomolecules in the presence of shot noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K; Schmidt, M; Schwander, P; Saldin, D K

    2015-03-01

    Determination of fast structural changes of biomolecules is usually performed on crystalline samples in a time-resolved pump-probe experiment. Changes in the structure are found by the difference Fourier method using phases of a known reference structure. As we showed recently, such changes can also be determined from diffraction of uncrystallized molecules in random orientations. In this case, the difference in the angular correlations of the diffraction patterns is used to find structural changes. Similar to the difference Fourier method, there is no need for iterative phasing. We validated this approach previously with simulations in the absence of noise. In this paper, we show that the effects of noise can be adequately suppressed by averaging over a sufficiently large ensemble as they can be obtained using an X-ray free electron laser.

  19. Simulations on time-resolved structure determination of uncrystallized biomolecules in the presence of shot noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pande

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of fast structural changes of biomolecules is usually performed on crystalline samples in a time-resolved pump-probe experiment. Changes in the structure are found by the difference Fourier method using phases of a known reference structure. As we showed recently, such changes can also be determined from diffraction of uncrystallized molecules in random orientations. In this case, the difference in the angular correlations of the diffraction patterns is used to find structural changes. Similar to the difference Fourier method, there is no need for iterative phasing. We validated this approach previously with simulations in the absence of noise. In this paper, we show that the effects of noise can be adequately suppressed by averaging over a sufficiently large ensemble as they can be obtained using an X-ray free electron laser.

  20. Resolved-particle simulation by the Physalis method: Enhancements and new capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierakowski, Adam J., E-mail: sierakowski@jhu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prosperetti, Andrea [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Faculty of Science and Technology and J.M. Burgers Centre for Fluid Dynamics, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    We present enhancements and new capabilities of the Physalis method for simulating disperse multiphase flows using particle-resolved simulation. The current work enhances the previous method by incorporating a new type of pressure-Poisson solver that couples with a new Physalis particle pressure boundary condition scheme and a new particle interior treatment to significantly improve overall numerical efficiency. Further, we implement a more efficient method of calculating the Physalis scalar products and incorporate short-range particle interaction models. We provide validation and benchmarking for the Physalis method against experiments of a sedimenting particle and of normal wall collisions. We conclude with an illustrative simulation of 2048 particles sedimenting in a duct. In the appendix, we present a complete and self-consistent description of the analytical development and numerical methods.

  1. Resolved-particle simulation by the Physalis method: Enhancements and new capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Adam J.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We present enhancements and new capabilities of the Physalis method for simulating disperse multiphase flows using particle-resolved simulation. The current work enhances the previous method by incorporating a new type of pressure-Poisson solver that couples with a new Physalis particle pressure boundary condition scheme and a new particle interior treatment to significantly improve overall numerical efficiency. Further, we implement a more efficient method of calculating the Physalis scalar products and incorporate short-range particle interaction models. We provide validation and benchmarking for the Physalis method against experiments of a sedimenting particle and of normal wall collisions. We conclude with an illustrative simulation of 2048 particles sedimenting in a duct. In the appendix, we present a complete and self-consistent description of the analytical development and numerical methods.

  2. Time-, Frequency-, and Wavevector-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction from Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broad-band X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and ...

  3. Simulation and Measurement of Angle Resolved Reflectance from Black Si Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Wu, Kaiyu; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    reflectance below 0.1% at incident angles below 70o is seen. In both simulation and experiment the specular reflectance is below 10% at incident angles below 65o and below 1% at incident angles below 45o in the case of non-linear graded refractive index. From the simulation results the non-linear graded...... refractive index yields lower reflectance than the linearly graded refractive index.......In this work angle-resolved reflectance from nanostructured Si surfaces realized by maskless RIE texturing has been simulated and measured. The simulation and experimental measurement data show the same trend. Experimentally a total reflectance below 1% for incident angles below 30o and specular...

  4. Momentum-resolved electronic structure of the superconductor parent compound BaBiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, N. C.; Ristic, Z.; Park, J.; Wang, Z.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Lv, B. Q.; Gawryluk, D.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Wang, Y.; Johnston, S.; Mesot, J.; Shi, M.; Radovic, M.

    We use in situ angle-resolved photoemission to study thin films of BaBiO3, a parent compound of bismuthate superconductors with Tc up to 30 K. By simple electron counting, BaBiO3 should be metallic. However, in analogy with many unconventional and high-Tc superconductor families, it is instead insulating, and superconductivity emerges with doping. Our experiments reveal a folded band structure consistent with known BiO6 breathing distortions. However, charge ordering often thought to accompany the distortions is virtually nonexistent. The data combined with DFT calculations indicate that states near EF are primarily oxygen-derived. Hence BaBiO3 appears to be characterized by negative charge transfer energy. This can account for the seeming discrepancy between the atomic structure and ''missing'' charge order. It should also be relevant for understanding the doping evolution and superconductivity in bismuthates.

  5. Time-resolved spectra of dense plasma focus using spectrometer, streak camera, and CCD combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, F. J. [Livermore Operations, National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [North Las Vegas Facility, National Security Technologies, LLC, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilkins, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny-Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  6. Time-Resolved Spectra of Dense Plasma Focus Using Spectrometer, Streak Camera, CCD Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Goldin, B. T. Meehan, E. C. Hagen, P. R. Wilkins

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny–Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  7. Time-resolved homodyne characterization of individual quadrature-entangled pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wenger, J; Tualle-Brouri, R; Grangier, P; Wenger, Jerome; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple and efficient setup to generate and characterize femtosecond quadrature-entangled pulses. Quantum correlations equivalent to about 2.5 dB squeezing are efficiently and easily reached using the non-degenerate parametric amplification of femtosecond pulses through a single-pass in a thin (0.1 mm) potassium niobate crystal. The entangled pulses are then individually sampled to characterize the non-separability and the entropy of formation of the states. The complete experiment is analysed in the time-domain, from the pulsed source of quadrature entanglement to the time-resolved homodyne detection. This particularity allows for applications in quantum communication protocols using continuous-variable entanglement.

  8. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, P; Kacprzak, M; Weigl, W; Borowska-Solonynko, A; Krajewski, P; Zolek, N; Ciszek, B; Maniewski, R; Liebert, A

    2012-12-07

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  9. Temporal and Spectral Resolved Measurement of Soft X-ray From Ultrashort Pulse Laser Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Theobald; L.Veisz; H.Schwoerer; R.Sauerbrey; X.Z.Tang

    2001-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse produced plasmas are powerful sources of incoherent XUV/soft X-ray radiation and have important applications range from microscopy to lithography. Adding a prepulse is one possible way to enhance soft X-ray emission. The experiment is performed on the Jena 10 TW laser system in IOQ, Germany. The main purpose is to measure the time-resolved soft X-ray spectrum, and study how a prepulse play an important role and enhance the X-ray emission as well as and pulse duration. We clarified the temporal behavior of X-ray emission from quartz plasma produced by intensive femtosecond 800 nm laser pulse, and obtained a quantitative pictures of the

  10. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of excitonic relaxation in one-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, H.; Rühle, W. W.; Takahashi, K.

    1988-12-01

    Self-trapped exciton luminescence of quasi-one-dimensional (1D) halogen-bridged mixed-valence platinum complexes [Pt(II) (EA)4][Pt(IV)Cl2(EA)4] Cl4.4H2O (EA=ethylamine) and [Pt(II)(en)2] [Pt(IV)Cl2(en)2](ClO4)4 (en=1,2-diaminoethane) are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. The lifetimes of the luminescence of self-trapped exciton are exceptionally short, of the order of 100 psec. We interpret the short lifetime by a ``giant oscillator strength'' caused by a strong coupling between the electron and hole of the 1D charge transfer exciton and an extended polaronlike character of the 1D state. The lifetimes of the broad luminescence and of the resonant Raman lines during the barrier-free relaxation process are both faster than 7 psec.

  11. Angular resolved XPS applied to V 2O 5-based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, K.; Poelman, H.; Fiermans, L.; Creten, G.; Froment, G. F.

    1996-05-01

    Two applications of angular dependent XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) experiments, performed with a Perkin Elmer Phi 5500 ESCA system in the framework of a monolayer catalyst research project, are illustrated. XPFS (X-ray photoelectron forward scattering) measurements were used to show the oxygen removal at the surface of catalytically reduced V 2O 5(001) pellets, in comparison with pure V 2O 5. ARXPS (angle resolved XPS) polar scans were taken from a model catalyst system (TiO 2 anatase supported V 2O 5 layers) in order to determine their components and the chemical state of the system. With the use of the statistical technique MLCFA (maximum likelihood common factor analysis), different overlapping components in the V and Ti photoemission peaks were separated, pointing towards the existence of a VTiO bonding at the {V2O5}/{TiO2} interface.

  12. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鑫; 江舟亚; 陈龙; 陈黎明; 辛建国; 陈洁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal.

  13. Time resolved bovine host reponse to virulence factors mapped in milk by selected reaction monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    in food production. Rapid diagnostic methods are still not available, and particularly pathogen-specific biomarkers would be highly valuable, as these may allow correct antibiotic treatment to be applied shortly after an udder infection has been observed. Moreover, with automatic milking systems and on-line....... Furthermore, this SRM approach provides a strong tool for investigating these proteins in very large scale experiments, particularly with the scope to investigate whether these candidate biomarkers are suited for monitoring animal health in milk production.......TIME RESOLVED BOVINE HOST RESPONSE TO VIRULENCE FACTORS, MAPPED IN MILK BY SELECTED REACTION MONITORING S.L. Bislev1, U. Kusebauch2, M.C. Codrea1, R. Moritz2, C.M. Røntved1, E. Bendixen1 1 Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark; 2...

  14. Noise-free high-efficiency photon-number-resolving detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, D; Miller, A J; Nam, S W; Rosenberg, Danna; Lita, Adriana E.; Miller, Aaron J.; Nam, Sae Woo

    2005-01-01

    High-efficiency optical detectors that can determine the number of photons in a pulse of monochromatic light have applications in a variety of physics studies, including post-selection-based entanglement protocols for linear optics quantum computing and experiments that simultaneously close the detection and communication loopholes of Bell's inequalities. Here we report on our demonstration of fiber-coupled, noise-free, photon-number-resolving transition-edge sensors with 88% efficiency at 1550 nm. The efficiency of these sensors could be made even higher at any wavelength in the visible and near-infrared spectrum without resulting in a higher dark-count rate or degraded photon-number resolution.

  15. Time-Resolved Photoemission of Correlated Electrons Driven Out of Equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, B.; /SLAC, SIMES; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Freericks, J.K.; /Georgetown U.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the temporal evolution of the time-resolved photoemission response of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model driven out of equilibrium by strong, applied fields. The model is one of the few possessing a metal-insulator transition and admitting an exact solution in the time domain. The nonequilibrium dynamics, evaluated using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory, show how the driven system differs from two common viewpoints - a quasi-equilibrium system at an elevated, effective temperature (the 'hot' electron model) or a rapid interaction quench ('melting' of the Mott gap) - due to the rearrangement of electronic states and redistribution of spectral weight. The results demonstrate the inherent trade-off between energy and time resolution accompanying the finite width probe-pulses, characteristic of those employed in pump-probe, time-domain experiments, which can be used to focus attention on different aspects of the dynamics near the transition.

  16. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  17. Theme Article - Time-Resolved X-Ray Scattering from Coherent Excitations in Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David (SLAC)

    2010-10-22

    Recent advances in pulsed x-ray sources have opened up new opportunities to study the dynamics of matter directly in the time domain with picosecond to femtosecond resolution. In this article, we present recent results from a variety of ultrafast sources on time-resolved x-ray scattering from elementary excitations in periodic solids. A few representative examples are given on folded acoustic phonons, coherent optical phonons, squeezed phonons, and polaritons excited by femtosecond lasers. Next-generation light sources, such as the x-ray-free electron laser, will lead to improvements in coherence, flux, and pulse duration. These experiments demonstrate potential opportunities for studying matter far from equilibrium on the fastest time scales and shortest distances that will be available in the coming years.

  18. Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Patricia M; Gustowski, Sharon M

    2012-07-01

    Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction.

  19. Sensitivity studies of developing convection in a cloud-resolving model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petch, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) remain an important tool for providing detailed process information about convection. In this short paper I focus on the development of deep convection and consider what can be considered a minimum expense benchmark simulation for comparison with a numerical weather-prediction model. To decide this a range of sensitivity studies are presented to aspects of the experimental set-up which strongly impact the computational expense. Many of the sensitivities shown in these CRM experiments are quite different to those seen in previous papers which have tended to focus more on deep active convection. Here it is shown that for the case-study presented a minimum expense benchmark simulation must be a 3D simulation. A 200 m horizontal grid length and a domain of 25 km are also required to capture the most important processes.

  20. Drift mobility measurements in a-C:H films by time-resolved electroluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulani, A

    2002-12-30

    Carrier transport mechanism has been studied in thin insulating hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films. The layers were prepared by plasma polymerization of methane (CH{sub 4}) at a frequency of 20 kHz. Electron mobility was derived from time-resolved luminescence experiments. Between the application of a rectangular voltage pulse and the first appearance of electroluminescence (EL) a time lag exists, which depends on the pulse height. Transit times are in the order of 10{sup -3} to {approx}10{sup -6} s in a voltage rabetween 10 and 25 V. And the estimated electron mobility varies accordingly from 8x10{sup -8} to {approx}10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/(V s). The field dependence of the carriers mobility is characteristic of Poole-Frenkel-detrapping conduction model, and thus confirms the results obtained by dc experimental data.

  1. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  2. Time-resolved photoacoustic measurement for evaluation of viscoelastic properties of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Conggui; Liu, Hongwei; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, we proposed a method for viscoelastic characterization of biological tissues based on time-resolved photoacoustic measurement. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscoelasticity effects on photoacoustic generation. Taking the time delay between the photoacoustic signal and the exciting laser, the viscoelasticity distribution of biological tissues can be mapped. To validate our method, gelatin phantoms with different densities were measured. We also applied this method in discrimination between fat and liver to confirm the usefulness of the viscoelastic evaluation. Furthermore, pilot experiments were performed on atherosclerosis artery from an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse to show the viscoelastic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque. Our results demonstrate that this technique has the potential for visualizing the biomechanical properties and lesions of biological tissues.

  3. Application of POD on time-resolved schlieren in supersonic multi-stream rectangular jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. G.; Magstadt, A. S.; Glauser, M. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of a supersonic rectangular nozzle with aft deck used for three-stream engines. The jet utilizes a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) configuration along with multiple streams, operating at a bulk flow Mj,1 = 1.6 and bypass stream Mj,3 = 1.0. This idealized representation consists of two canonical flows: a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) jet and a sonic wall jet. Time-resolved schlieren experiments were performed up to 100 kHz. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), as suggested by Lumley for structure identification in turbulent flows, is applied to the schlieren images and the spatial eigenfunctions and time-dependent coefficients are related to the flow structures. This research seeks to lay a foundation for fundamental testing of multi-stream SERNs and the identification of the flow physics that dominate these modern military nozzles.

  4. Introduction to the theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-02-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher energy regions.

  5. Introduction to theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-07-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: first, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics; second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular technique used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  6. Introduction to the Theory and Analysis of Resolved (and Unresolved) Neutron Resonances via SAMMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, N.

    2000-03-13

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, increasing our understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, or for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this report, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  7. Angle and Spin Resolved Auger Emission Theory and Applications to Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The Auger effect must be interpreted as the radiationless counterpart of photoionization and is usually described within a two-step model. Angle and spin resolved Auger emission physics deals with the theoretical and numerical description, analysis and interpretation of such types of experiments on free atoms and molecules. This monograph derives the general theory applying the density matrix formalism and, in terms of irreducible tensorial sets, so called state multipoles and order parameters, for parameterizing the atomic and molecular systems, respectively. Propensity rules and non-linear dependencies between the angular distribution and spin polarization parameters are included in the discussion. The numerical approaches utilizing relativistic distorted wave (RDWA), multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock (MCDF), and Greens operator methods are described. These methods are discussed and applied to theoretical predictions, numerical results and experimental data for a variety of atomic systems, especially the rare...

  8. In-situ determination of dispersion and resolving power in simultaneous multiple-angle XUV spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrau, U; Hilbert, V; Foerster, E [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik (IOQ), Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Post Office Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Dziarzhytski, S; Harmand, M; Laarmann, T; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Schulz, M; Tavella, F [HASYLAB, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Goede, S; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Skruszewicz, S [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Hochhaus, D; Neumayer, P [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Lee, H J, E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We report on the simultaneous determination of non-linear dispersion functions and resolving power of three flat-field XUV grating spectrometers. A moderate-intense short-pulse infrared laser is focused onto technical aluminum which is commonly present as part of the experimental setup. In the XUV wavelength range of 10-19 nm, the spectrometers are calibrated using Al-Mg plasma emission lines. This cross-calibration is performed in-situ in the very same setup as the actual main experiment. The results are in excellent agreement with ray-tracing simulations. We show that our method allows for precise relative and absolute calibration of three different XUV spectrometers.

  9. Time-resolved studies of the interactions between pulsed lasers and aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Cindy L; Qian, Jun; Miller, Roger E

    2002-09-20

    Studies of the interaction between a pulsed CO2 laser and micrometer-sized aqueous and organic particles by use of light-scattering methods and step-scan Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy are reported. Visible two-color extinction experiments indicate primary particle shattering, accompanied by a high fraction of vaporization, followed by secondary particle evaporation. The extent of the latter depends on the pulse intensity and particle composition. Angle-resolved light-scattering investigations provide insight into the aerosol size distribution and temperature following the pulsed heating event. The time dependence of the vapor plume, monitored with step-scan FTIR spectroscopy, confirms that a large fraction of the initial particle is quickly evaporated during the shattering event, followed by secondary fragment evaporation and thermal expansion.

  10. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2004-08-20

    We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on velocity-resolved atomic desorption (VRAD). Using this new method, we predict the surface exciton energies for K1, KBr, KC1, and NaC1 within +0.15 eV. Our data, combined with the available EELS data for alkali fluorides, demonstrate a universal linear correlation with the inverse inter-atomic distance in these materials. The results suggest that surface excitons exist in all alkali halides and their excitation energies can be predicted from the known bulk exciton energies and the obtained correlation plot.

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Fiutowski, Jacek

    We study the optical properties of organic thin films and crystalline organic nanofibers as well as their interaction with plasmonic materials by means of laser-scanning fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TR-PLS). The aim of our......-carrier dynamics in such systems. In this contribution we will show how the interaction of organic nanofibers placed on top of regular arrays of nanostructures leads to a significantly enhanced second-harmonic response and, at the same time, an increased decay rate of the photoluminescence lifetime....

  12. Resolving the EPR Paradox for the Case of entangled Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Muchowski, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    A system of two polarized photons in singlet state appears as being in one of two product states independent of any measurement. These states depend on the selected polarization angles. With the polarizers on either side perpendicular to each other, both photons pass the polarizers without any disturbance. Action at a distance is therefore not needed to explain the results of the measurements. In general, the elements of physical reality demanded by EPR are the polarization states of the two photons of the entangled pair. As these are local elements in the regions of space of the polarizers the EPR paradox for the case of entangled photons can be regarded as resolved.

  13. Coherence Time Resolvable Diffraction and New Tunnelling Electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易林

    2002-01-01

    With the help of the perturbation method and the Feynman path integral technique, we analytically demonstrate that, when the electronic spectrum of a mesoscopic box is measured through two connecting leads, there exists a class of new diffraction phenomena in the coherence time domain, based on the new coherent tunnelling model.It is shown that the new diffraction effect determines the minimal resolvable coherence time to the Heisenberg limit. In particular, Fraunhofer optical phenomena, such as missing order and grating effects, can be reproduced in the meso-systems. The predicted periodic oscillations as a function of voltage are in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Full-Circle Resolver-to-Linear-Analog Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Smith, Dennis A.; Howard, David E.

    2005-01-01

    A circuit generates sinusoidal excitation signals for a shaft-angle resolver and, like the arctangent circuit described in the preceding article, generates an analog voltage proportional to the shaft angle. The disadvantages of the circuit described in the preceding article arise from the fact that it must be made from precise analog subcircuits, including a functional block capable of implementing some trigonometric identities; this circuitry tends to be expensive, sensitive to noise, and susceptible to errors caused by temperature-induced drifts and imprecise matching of gains and phases. These disadvantages are overcome by the design of the present circuit. The present circuit (see figure) includes an excitation circuit, which generates signals Ksin(Omega(t)) and Kcos(Omega(t)) [where K is an amplitude, Omega denotes 2(pi)x a carrier frequency (the design value of which is 10 kHz), and t denotes time]. These signals are applied to the excitation terminals of a shaft-angle resolver, causing the resolver to put out signals C sin(Omega(t)-Theta) and C cos(Omega(t)-Theta). The cosine excitation signal and the cosine resolver output signal are processed through inverting comparator circuits, which are configured to function as inverting squarers, to obtain logic-level or square-wave signals .-LL[cos(Omega(t)] and -LL[cos(Omega(t)-Theta)], respectively. These signals are fed as inputs to a block containing digital logic circuits that effectively measure the phase difference (which equals Theta between the two logic-level signals). The output of this block is a pulse-width-modulated signal, PWM(Theta), the time-averaged value of which ranges from 0 to 5 VDC as Theta ranges from .180 to +180deg. PWM(Theta) is fed to a block of amplifying and level-shifting circuitry, which converts the input PWM waveform to an output waveform that switches between precise reference voltage levels of +10 and -10 V. This waveform is processed by a two-pole, low-pass filter, which removes

  15. Fully resolved simulations of 2,000 fluidized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Computational capabilities have matured sufficiently to render possible the dynamic simulation of thousands of resolved particles in fluid flows, generating an unprecendented amount of data. In this work we present a simulation of 2,000 fluidized particles generated with the Physalis method, and focus on probing the data with tools from statistical physics. In particular, the study of particle triads and tetrads has been used to study the dispersion of passive scalars in turbulence. Knowledge of the average shape and size of these structures over time provides insight into particle diffusion and the persistence of clusters. Supported by NSF award No CBET 1335965.

  16. Continuity waves in fully resolved simulations of settling particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of 500 to 2,000 particles settling in a fluid have been conducted with the Physalis method. A new approach to the reconstruction of pseudo-continuum fields is described and is used to examine the results with the purpose of identifying concentration waves. The velocity of concentration waves is successfully deduced from the simulations. A comparison of the results with continuity wave theory shows good agreement. Several new insights about the particle microstructure conditionally averaged on volume fraction and velocity are also described. This work is supported by NSF award CBET1335965.

  17. Mode-resolved Photon Counting via Cascaded Quantum Frequency Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Resources for the manipulation and measurements of high-dimensional photonic signals are crucial for implementing qu$d$it-based applications. Here we propose potentially high-performance, chip-compatible devices for such purposes by exploiting quantum-frequency conversion in nonlinear optical media. Specifically, by using sum-frequency generation in a $\\chi^{(2)}$ waveguide we show how mode-resolved photon counting can be accomplished for telecom-band photonic signals subtending multiple temporal modes. Our method is generally applicable to any nonlinear medium with arbitrary dispersion property.

  18. Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy, Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-22

    TRPS code was developed for the project "Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy". Routines contained in this piece of software were specially created to model phonon generation and tracking within materials that interact with ionizing radiation, particularly applicable to the modeling of cryogenic radiation detectors for dark matter and neutrino research. These routines were created to link seamlessly with the open source Geant4 framework for the modeling of radiation transport in matter, with the explicit intent of open sourcing them for eventual integration into that code base.

  19. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity assay with time-resolved fluorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建中; 章竹君; 金伯泉; 田方

    1996-01-01

    A new time-resolved fluorimetric method for the measurement of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been developed by labelling the target cell K562 with a new synthesized fluorescence marker KLUK. The method has advantages of higher sensitivity, time-saving, good reproducibility and has no radioactivity problems. A satisfactory result is obtained by comparing it with 51Cr release method. It demonstrates that the new marker provides an alternative to currently used radioactive markers for the assessment of in vitro cellular cytotoxicity.

  20. Can non-commutativity resolve the big-bang singularity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maceda, M.; Madore, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Paris-Sud, Batiment 211, 91405, Orsay (France); Manousselis, P. [Department of Engineering Sciences, University of Patras, 26110, Patras (Greece); Physics Department, National Technical University, Zografou Campus, 157 80, Zografou, Athens (Greece); Zoupanos, G. [Physics Department, National Technical University, Zografou Campus, 157 80, Zografou, Athens (Greece); Theory Division, CERN, 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2004-08-01

    A possible way to resolve the singularities of general relativity is proposed based on the assumption that the description of space-time using commuting coordinates is not valid above a certain fundamental scale. Beyond that scale it is assumed that the space-time has non-commutative structure leading in turn to a resolution of the singularity. As a first attempt towards realizing the above programme a modification of the Kasner metric is constructed which is commutative only at large time scales. At small time scales, near the singularity, the commutation relations among the space coordinates diverge. We interpret this result as meaning that the singularity has been completely delocalized. (orig.)

  1. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Franco V A; Hall, Christopher R; Anderson, Harry L; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral) angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  2. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco V. A. Camargo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  3. Spatially: resolved heterogeneous dynamics in a strong colloidal gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Alaimo, Matteo David; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    We re-examine the classical problem of irreversible colloid aggregation, showing that the application of Digital Fourier Imaging (DFI), a class of optical correlation methods that combine the power of light scattering and imaging, allows one to pick out novel useful evidence concerning the restructuring processes taking place in a strong colloidal gel. In particular, the spatially-resolved displacement fields provided by DFI strongly suggest that the temporally-intermittent local rearrangements taking place in the course of gel ageing are characterized by very long-ranged spatial correlations.

  4. Time resolved cryogenic cooling analysis of the Cornell Injector Cryomodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, R.; Markham, S.; Smith, E.; Quigley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Managing parallel cryogenic flows has become a key challenge in designing efficient and smart cryo-modules for particle accelerators. In analysing the heating dynamics of the Cornell high current injector module a computational tool has been set-up allowing time resolved analysis and optimization. We describe the computational methods and data sets we have used, report the results and compare them to measured data from the module being in good agreement. Mitigation strategies developed on basis of this model have helped us in pushing the operational limitations.

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission study of Ag(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edamoto, K.; Miyazaki, E.; Shimokoshi, K.; Kato, H.

    1990-01-01

    The (1 1 1) face of Ag has been studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation as the excitation source (25 FIRO method. The peak positions thus determined are used to map the dispersion curves along the lang1 1 1rang (Γ-L) direction. The results show general agreement with calculated band structure, so far as the energy levels and symmetries are concerned. However, it is found that the density of state effect is dominant in the spectra obtained in the present photon energy region. The emission from the Ag 5s, p bands is observed to be broadened due to the indirect transition process.

  6. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  7. Spatially resolved voltage, current and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerteisen, D.; Kurz, T.; Schwager, M.; Hebling, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Merida, W. [Clean Energy Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lupotto, P. [Materials Mates Italia, Milano (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    In this work a 50-channel characterisation system for PEMFCs is presented. The system is capable of traditional electrochemical measurements (e.g. staircase voltammetry, chronoamperometry and cyclic voltammetry), and concurrent EIS measurements. Unlike previous implementations, this system relies on dedicated potentiostats for current and voltage control, and independent frequency response analysers (FRAs) at each channel. Segmented fuel cell hardware is used to illustrate the system's flexibility and capabilities. The results here include steady-state data for cell characterisation under galvanostatic and potentiostatic control as well as spatially resolved impedance spectra. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Multichannel Anomaly of the Resonance Pole Parameters Resolved

    CERN Document Server

    Ceci, S; Svarc, A; Watson, S; Zauner, B; Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Watson, Shon; Zauner, Branimir

    2006-01-01

    Inspired by anomalies which the standard scattering matrix pole-extraction procedures have produced in a mathematically well defined coupled-channel model, we have developed a new method based solely on the assumption of partial-wave analyticity. The new method is simple and applicable not only to theoretical predictions but to the empirical partial-wave data as well. Since the standard pole-extraction procedures turn out to be the lowest-order term of the proposed method the anomalies are understood and resolved.

  9. TIME—RESOLVED X—RAY SPECTRA AND ATOMIC PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TakakoKATO

    1990-01-01

    In this article we will discuss time-resolved He-like X-ray spectra of titanium ions from a TFTR tokamak plasma[1] and of iron ions from solar flares[2] in particular attention to a presence of high energy electrons which affect the spectra and ionization balances.We consider a model that a hot component interacts with a bulk plasma.With this model,the time evolution of the spectra and ionization balaces derived therefrom can be described consistently.

  10. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for resolved stellar populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetto, Bruno M. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santiago, Basílio X. [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Girardi, Léo [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Osservatorio Astronomica di Padova-INAF, Padova (Italy); Camargo, Julio I. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Balbinot, Eduardo [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Porto Alegre (Brazil); da Costa, Luiz N. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Maia, Marcio A. G. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Makler, Martin [Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ogando, Ricardo L. C. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pellegrini, Paulo S. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ramos, Beatriz [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); de Simoni, Fernando [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lab. Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Armstrong, R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Bertin, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Desai, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kuropatkin, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lin, H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mohr, J. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Tucker, D. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 108 stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo of the Galaxy.

  11. Deficiencia en la habilidad de resolver problemas matematicos

    OpenAIRE

    Valdiviezo, Janet Patricia; Flores Herrera, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Este trabajo de investigación pretende sistematizar el Proceso Docente Educativo de la asignatura matemáticas del curso de ingreso para las ingenierías básicas de la ESPOL de manera que sea un proceso desarrollador de habilidades generales y específicas de la asignatura. Se validó el problema mediante un sistema de expertos, los que coincidieron en lo importante que es desarrollar la habilidad de resolver problemas, la que requiere del desarrollo de habilidades del pensamiento lógico. ...

  12. Time-resolved in situ Studies of Apatite Formation in Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkiewicz, O.; Rakovan, J; Cahill, C

    2010-01-01

    Formation of hydroxylapatite through the precipitation and evolution of calcium phosphate precursor phases under varying conditions of temperature (25-90 C), pH (6.5-9.0), and calcium to phosphorus ratio (1.0, 1.33, 1.5, and 1.67) comparable to those found in many sediments and soils were studied. The products of low-temperature precipitation were analyzed by ex situ X-ray diffraction and SEM, as well as time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Rietveld refinement was used for quantitative evaluation of relative abundances during phase evolution. The results of ex situ investigations conducted at ambient temperature and near-neutral pH indicate formation of amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of experiments transforms to brushite and ultimately hydroxylapatite. The results of in situ X-ray diffraction experiments suggest a more complex pathway of phase development under the same conditions. Some of the initially formed amorphous calcium phosphate and/or crystalline brushite transformed to octacalcium phosphate. In the later stage of the reactions, octacalcium phosphate transforms quite rapidly to hydroxylapatite. This is accompanied or followed by the transformation of the remaining brushite to monetite. Hydroxylapatite and monetite coexist in the sample throughout the remainder of the experiments. In contrast to the near-neutral pH experiments, the results from ex situ and in situ diffraction investigations performed at higher pH yield similar results. The precipitate formed in the initial stages in both types of experiments was identified as amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of the reaction quite rapidly transformed to hydroxylapatite without any apparent intermediate phases. This is the first application of time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to precipitation reactions in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system. The results indicate that precursors are likely to occur during the natural or

  13. Report on Experiment AD-4/ACE

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H

    2014-01-01

    After 7 years running the AD-4 Experiment at antiproton momentum of 502 MeV/c we have now assembled a complete data set and are preparing to combine all years into a single analysis of RBE vs. Depth for an antiproton beam stopping in water. We describe experimental challenges and computational issues which need to be resolved to achieve this final step.

  14. Time structure measurement of the storage ring with the time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence method at SSRF

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaohong, Zhang; Zheng, Jiang; Song, Xue; Lifang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the time structure of the storage ring on the sample spot inside the experimental hutch is a foundational step during the time-resolved experiments using the pulsed synchrotron X-rays with the time structure defined by the storage ring. In this work, the method of time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence was designed and implemented to do the measurement. This method is based on the principle of time-correlated single photon counting techniques. The measurement system consis...

  15. The OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, R.; Hasell, D.K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kohl, M. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Collaboration: The OLYMPUS Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-15

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, {mu}{sub p}G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M}, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately 25 -75 . Symmetric Moeller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29 and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at 12 served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5 fb{sup -1} was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  16. ECO and RESOLVE: Galaxy Disk Growth in Environmental Context

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Berlind, Andreas A; Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Hendel, David; Norris, Mark A; Grogin, Norman A

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationships between galaxy environments and galaxy properties related to disk (re)growth, considering two highly complete samples that are approximately baryonic mass limited into the high-mass dwarf galaxy regime, the Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (data release herein) and the B-semester region of the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey. We quantify galaxy environments using both group identification and smoothed galaxy density field methods. We use by-eye and quantitative morphological classifications plus atomic gas content measurements and estimates. We find that blue early-type (E/S0) galaxies, gas-dominated galaxies, and UV-bright disk host galaxies all become distinctly more common below group halo mass ~10^11.5 Msun, implying that this low group halo mass regime may be a preferred regime for significant disk growth activity. We also find that blue early-type and blue late-type galaxies inhabit environments of similar group halo mass at fixed baryonic mass, con...

  17. Resolved Imaging of the HD191089 Debris Disc

    CERN Document Server

    Churcher, Laura J; Smith, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Two thirds of the F star members of the 12 Myr old Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG) show significant excess emission in the mid-infrared, several million years after the expected dispersal of the protoplanetary disc. Theoretical models of planet formation suggest that this peak in the mid-infrared emission could be due to the formation of Pluto-sized bodies in the disc, which ignite the collisional cascade and enhance the production of small dust. Here we present resolved mid-infrared imaging of the disc of HD191089 (F5V in the BPMG) and consider its implications for the state of planet formation in this system. HD191089 was observed at 18.3 microns using T-ReCS on Gemini South and the images were compared to models of the disc to constrain the radial distribution of the dust. The emission observed at $18.3\\umu m$ is shown to be significantly extended beyond the PSF at a position angle of 80 degrees. This is the first time dust emission has been resolved around HD191089. Modelling indicates that the emission...

  18. Scrounging by foragers can resolve the paradox of enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokawa, Wataru

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical models of predator-prey systems predict that sufficient enrichment of prey can generate large amplitude limit cycles, paradoxically causing a high risk of extinction (the paradox of enrichment). Although real ecological communities contain many gregarious species, whose foraging behaviour should be influenced by socially transmitted information, few theoretical studies have examined the possibility that social foraging might resolve this paradox. I considered a predator population in which individuals play the producer-scrounger foraging game in one-prey-one-predator and two-prey-one-predator systems. I analysed the stability of a coexisting equilibrium point in the one-prey system and that of non-equilibrium dynamics in the two-prey system. The results revealed that social foraging could stabilize both systems, and thereby resolve the paradox of enrichment when scrounging behaviour (i.e. kleptoparasitism) is prevalent in predators. This suggests a previously neglected mechanism underlying a powerful effect of group-living animals on the sustainability of ecological communities.

  19. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  20. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.