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Sample records for double shell waste

  1. Double shell tank waste analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations

  2. Double-shell tank system dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This Double-Shell Tank System Dangerous Waste Permit Application should be read in conjunction with the 242-A Evaporator Dangerous Waste Permit Application and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, also submitted on June 28, 1991. Information contained in the Double-Shell Tank System permit application is referenced in the other two permit applications. The Double-Shell Tank System stores and treats mixed waste received from a variety of sources on the Hanford Site. The 242-A Evaporator treats liquid mixed waste received from the double-shell tanks. The 242-A Evaporator returns a mixed-waste slurry to the double-shell tanks and generates the dilute mixed-waste stream stored in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility. This report contains information on the following topics: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report; Waste Minimization Plan; Closure and Postclosure Requirements; Reporting and Recordkeeping; other Relevant Laws; and Certification. 150 refs., 141 figs., 118 tabs

  3. Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Definition Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    This report defines the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem (PWSS). This subsystem definition report fully describes and identifies the system boundaries of the PWSS. This definition provides a basis for developing functional, performance, and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the PWSS. The resultant PWSS specification will include the sampling requirements to support the transfer of waste from the DSTs to the Privatization Contractor during Phase 1 of Waste Feed Delivery

  4. Double-shell tank waste transfer facilities integrity assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the integrity assessment plan for the existing double-shell tank waste transfer facilities system in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of Hanford Site. This plan identifies and proposes the integrity assessment elements and techniques to be performed for each facility. The integrity assessments of existing tank systems that stores or treats dangerous waste is required to be performed to be in compliance with the Washington State Department of Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303-640 requirements

  5. Double-shell tank waste system assessment status and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    The integrated program for completing the integrity assessments of the dangerous waste tank systems managed by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company is presented in the Tank Waste Remediation System Tank System Integrity Assessments Program Plan, WHC-SD-AP017, Rev. 1. The program plan identified the assessment requirements and the general scope to which these requirements applied. Some of these assessment requirements have been met and others are either in process of completion or scheduled to be worked. To define the boundary of the double-shell tank (DST) system and the boundaries of the DST system components (or system parts) for the purpose of performing integrity assessment activities; To identify the planned activities to meet the assessment requirements for each component; Provide the status of the assessment activities; and Project a five year assessment activity schedule

  6. Preventing Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Hanford Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the predictive methods used to ensure that waste transfer operations in Hanford waste tanks do not create waste configurations that lead to unsafe gas release events. The gas release behavior of the waste in existing double-shell tanks has been well characterized, and the flammable gas safety issues associated with safe storage of waste in the current configuration are being formally resolved. However, waste is also being transferred between double-shell tanks and from single-shell tanks into double-shell tanks by saltwell pumping and sluicing that create new wastes and waste configurations that have not been studied as well. Additionally, planning is underway for various waste transfer scenarios to support waste feed delivery to the proposed vitrification plant. It is critical that such waste transfers do not create waste conditions with the potential for dangerous gas release events.

  7. DOUBLE SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT HIGH LEVEL WASTE CHEMISTRY OPTIMIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WASHENFELDER DJ

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of River Protection (ORP) has a continuing program for chemical optimization to better characterize corrosion behavior of High-Level Waste (HLW). The DOE controls the chemistry in its HLW to minimize the propensity of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitrate-containing solutions. By improving the control of localized corrosion and SCC, the ORP can increase the life of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) carbon steel structural components and reduce overall mission costs. The carbon steel tanks at the Hanford Site are critical to the mission of safely managing stored HLW until it can be treated for disposal. The DOE has historically used additions of sodium hydroxide to retard corrosion processes in HLW tanks. This also increases the amount of waste to be treated. The reactions with carbon dioxide from the air and solid chemical species in the tank continually deplete the hydroxide ion concentration, which then requires continued additions. The DOE can reduce overall costs for caustic addition and treatment of waste, and more effectively utilize waste storage capacity by minimizing these chemical additions. Hydroxide addition is a means to control localized and stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel by providing a passive environment. The exact mechanism that causes nitrate to drive the corrosion process is not yet clear. The SCC is less of a concern in the newer stress relieved double shell tanks due to reduced residual stress. The optimization of waste chemistry will further reduce the propensity for SCC. The corrosion testing performed to optimize waste chemistry included cyclic potentiodynamic volarization studies. slow strain rate tests. and stress intensity factor/crack growth rate determinations. Laboratory experimental evidence suggests that nitrite is a highly effective:inhibitor for pitting and SCC in alkaline nitrate environments. Revision of the corrosion control

  8. Double-shell tank system dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This appendix contains the engineering design drawings for the double-shell tank system. Included are drawings of the electrical systems, structural members, piping systems, instrumentation and the many auxiliary systems. (JL)

  9. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program

  10. Derived Requirements for Double Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste (HLW) Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI, A.R.

    2000-02-28

    The potential need for auxiliary double-shell tank waste mixing and solids mobilization requires an evaluation of optional technologies. This document formalizes those operating and design requirements needed for further engineering evaluations.

  11. Derived Requirements for Double-Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste (HLW) Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEDESCHI, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    The potential need for auxiliary double-shell tank waste mixing and solids mobilization requires an evaluation of optional technologies. This document formalizes those operating and design requirements needed for further engineering evaluations

  12. Heat transfer analyses for grout disposal of radioactive double-shell slurry and customer wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.M.; Gilliam, T.M.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1987-04-01

    Grout immobilization is being considered by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell Hanford) as a permanent disposal method for several radioactive waste streams. These include disposal of customer and double-shell slurry wastes in earthen trenches and in single-shell underground waste storage tanks. Heat transfer studies have previously been made to determine the maximum heat loading for grout disposal of various wastes under similar conditions, but a sensitivity analysis of temperature profiles to input parameters was needed. This document presents the results of heat transfer calculations for trenches containing grouted customer and double-shell slurry wastes and for in situ disposal of double-shell wastes in single-shell, domed concrete storage tanks. It discusses the conditions that lead to maximum grout temperatures of 250 0 F during the curing stage and 350 0 F thereafter and shows the dependence of these temperatures on input parameters such as soil and grout thermal conductivity, grout specific heat, waste loading, and disposal geometries. Transient heat transfer calculations were made using the HEATING6 computer code to predict temperature profiles in solidified low-level radioactive waste disposal scenarios at the Rockwell Hanford site. The calculations provide guidance for the development of safe, environmentally acceptable grout formulas for the Transportable Grout Facility. 11 refs

  13. Material Balance Assessment for Double-Shell Tank Waste Pipeline Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E; Hartley, Stacey A; Enderlin, Carl W

    2001-01-01

    PNNL developed a material balance assessment methodology based on conservation of mass for detecting leaks and mis-routings in pipeline transfer of double-shell tank waste at Hanford. The main factors causing uncertainty in these transfers are variable property and tank conditions of density, existence of crust, and surface disturbance due to mixer pump operation during the waste transfer. The methodology was applied to three waste transfers from Tanks AN-105 and AZ-102

  14. Double Shell Tanks (DST) and Waste Feed Delivery Project Management Quality Affecting Procedures Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUND, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) and Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Management Assessment Plan is to define how management assessments within DST h WFD will be conducted. The plan as written currently includes only WFD Project assessment topics. Other DST and WFD group assessment topics will be added in future revisions

  15. DOUBLE-SHELL TANK WASTE TRANSFER LINE ENCASEMENT INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGY STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOWER, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    The report provides various alternative methods of performing integrity assessment inspections of buried Hanford Double Shell Tank waste transfer line encasements, and provides method recommendations as an alternative to costly encasement pneumatic leak testing. A schedule for future encasement integrity assessments is also included

  16. Evaluation of remaining life of the double-shell tank waste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, E.B.

    1995-01-01

    A remaining life assessment of the DSTs (double-shell tanks) and their associated waste transfer lines, for continued operation over the next 10 years, was favorable. The DST assessment was based on definition of significant loads, evaluation of data for possible material degradation and geometric changes and evaluation of structural analyses. The piping assessment was based primarily on service experience

  17. Evaluation of remaining life of the double-shell tank waste systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenk, E.B.

    1995-05-04

    A remaining life assessment of the DSTs (double-shell tanks) and their associated waste transfer lines, for continued operation over the next 10 years, was favorable. The DST assessment was based on definition of significant loads, evaluation of data for possible material degradation and geometric changes and evaluation of structural analyses. The piping assessment was based primarily on service experience.

  18. Cost analysis for final disposal of double-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, T.W.; Markillie, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Cost Analysis For Final Disposal of Double-Shell Tank Waste provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors with a better understanding of costs associated with the transfer, storage, and treatment of liquid mixed wasted within the Double-Shell Tank System (DST). In order to evaluate waste minimization/pollution prevention ideas, it is necessary to have reliable cost data that can be used in cost/benefit analyses; preparation of funding requests and/or proposals; and provide a way for prioritizing and allocating limited resources. This cost per gallon rate will be used by DST waste generators to assess the feasibility of Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P20A) and to determine the cost avoidances or savings associated with the implementation of those P20As

  19. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SENSITIVITY OF DOUBLE SHELL DYNAMIC RESPONSE TO THE WASTE ELASTIC PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; ABATT FG; JOHNSON KI

    2009-01-16

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) to the assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the contained waste. In all cases, the waste was modeled as a uniform linearly elastic material. The focus of the study was on the changes in the modal response of the tank and waste system as the extensional modulus (elastic modulus in tension and compression) and shear modulus of the waste were varied through six orders of magnitude. Time-history analyses were also performed for selected cases and peak horizontal reaction forces and axial stresses at the bottom of the primary tank were evaluated. Because the analysis focused on the differences in the responses between solid-filled and liquid-filled tanks, it is a comparative analysis rather than an analysis of record for a specific tank or set of tanks. The shear modulus was varied between 4 x 10{sup 3} Pa and 4.135 x 10{sup 9} Pa. The lowest value of shear modulus was sufficient to simulate the modal response of a liquid-containing tank, while the higher values are several orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of expected properties for tank contents. The range of elastic properties used was sufficient to show liquid-like response at the lower values, followed by a transition range of semi-solid-like response to a clearly identifiable solid-like response. It was assumed that the mechanical properties of the tank contents were spatially uniform. Because sludge-like materials are expected only to exist in the lower part of the tanks, this assumption leads to an exaggeration of the effects of sludge-like materials in the tanks. The results of the study show that up to a waste shear modulus of at least 40,000 Pa, the modal properties of the tank and waste system are very nearly the same as for the equivalent liquid-containing tank. This suggests that the differences in critical tank responses between liquid-containing tanks

  20. Public involvement in the Hanford Double-Shell Tank waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-06-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal program was redefined following serious challenges to the viability of the previous strategy due to increased regulatory requirements and operating expectations. Redefinition of the DST waste disposal program involved a far-reaching set of decisions and actions. A formal stakeholder involvement process was used to bring the concerns of outside groups into the definition and evaluation of altemative tank waste disposal strategies, broadening the participation and ownership of the revised pregrain. Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year-old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHCP) sought input from outside stakeholder groups (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) through a formal stakeholder involvement and multi-attribute utility (MAU) analysis process. This paper describes that process and its results

  1. A risk management approach to double-shell tank waste volume versus storage capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Thurkow, T.J.; Fritz, R.L.; Nuhlestein, L.O.; Allen, M.R.; Stuart, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    A risk-based assessment of the overall waste volume versus double-shell tank storage capacity was conducted to develop fallback positions for projections where the waste volume was at a high risk of exceeding capacity. This study was initiated to provide that assessment. A working simulation model was the primary deliverable of this study. The model validates the approach and demonstrates that simulation analysis can provide a method of tracking uncertainties in available data, assessing probabilities, and serves as a tool to be used by management to determine the consequences of various off-normal occurrences

  2. A risk management approach to double-shell tank waste volume versus storage capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thurkow, T.J.; Fritz, R.L.; Nuhlestein, L.O.; Allen, M.R.; Stuart, R.J. [ARES Corp. (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A risk-based assessment of the overall waste volume versus double-shell tank storage capacity was conducted to develop fallback positions for projections where the waste volume was at a high risk of exceeding capacity. This study was initiated to provide that assessment. A working simulation model was the primary deliverable of this study. The model validates the approach and demonstrates that simulation analysis can provide a method of tracking uncertainties in available data, assessing probabilities, and serves as a tool to be used by management to determine the consequences of various off-normal occurrences.

  3. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, S.E.; Haass, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through out the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  4. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Kelly, S.E.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  5. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  6. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  7. Ammonia in simulated Hanford double-shell tank wastes: Solubility and effects on surface tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Radioactive and wastes left from defense materials production activities are temporarily stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State (Tank Waste Science Panel 1991). Some of these wastes are in the form of a thick slurry (''double-shell slurry'') containing sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, organic complexants and buffering agents, complexant fragments and other minor components (Herting et al. 1992a; Herting et al. 1992b; Campbell et al. 1994). As a result of thermal and radiolytic processes, a number of gases are known to be produced by some of these stored wastes, including ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, hydrogen, and methane (Babad et al. 1991; Ashby et al. 1992; Meisel et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1994; Bryan et al. 1993; US Department of Energy 1994). Before the emplacement of a mixer pump, these gases were retained in and periodically released from Tank 241-SY-101, a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site (Babad et al. 1992; US Department of Energy 1994). Gases are believed to be retained primarily in the form of bubbles attached to solid particles (Bryan, Pederson, and Scheele 1992), with very little actually dissolved in the liquid. Ammonia is an exception. The relation between the concentration of aqueous ammonia in such concentrated, caustic mixtures and the ammonia partial pressure is not well known, however

  8. Evaluation of Flygt Propeller Xixers for Double Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-07-20

    The River Protection Project (RPP) is planning to retrieve radioactive waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) underground at the Hanford Site. This waste will then be transferred to a waste treatment plant to be immobilized (vitrified) in a stable glass form. Over the years, the waste solids in many of the tanks have settled to form a layer of sludge at the bottom. The thickness of the sludge layer varies from tank to tank, from no sludge or a few inches of sludge to about 15 ft of sludge. The purpose of this technology and engineering case study is to evaluate the Flygt{trademark} submersible propeller mixer as a potential technology for auxiliary mobilization of DST HLW solids. Considering the usage and development to date by other sites in the development of this technology, this study also has the objective of expanding the knowledge base of the Flygt{trademark} mixer concept with the broader perspective of Hanford Site tank waste retrieval. More specifically, the objectives of this study delineated from the work plan are described.

  9. Analysis of Induced Gas Releases During Retrieval of Hanford Double-Shell Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Beric E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste is scheduled to be retrieved from Hanford double-shell tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, and AW-101 to the vitrification plant beginning about 2009. Retrieval may involve decanting the supernatant liquid and/or mixing the waste with jet pumps. In these four tanks, which contain relatively large volumes of retained gas, both of these operations are expected to induce buoyant displacement gas releases that can potentially raise the tank headspace hydrogen concentration to very near the lower flammability limit. This report describes the theory and detailed physical models for both the supernatant decant and jet mixing processes and presents the results from applying the models to these operations in the four tanks. The technical bases for input parameter distributions are elucidated

  10. Hanford Double Shell Waste Tank Corrosion Studies - Final Report FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    During FY15, SRNL performed corrosion testing that supported Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) with their double shell tank (DST) integrity program. The testing investigated six concerns including, 1) the possibility of corrosion of the exterior of the secondary tank wall; 2) the effect of ammonia on vapor space corrosion (VSC) above waste simulants; 3) the determination of the minimum required nitrite and hydroxide concentrations that prevent pitting in concentrated nitrate solutions (i.e., waste buffering); 4) the susceptibility to liquid air interface (LAI) corrosion at proposed stress corrosion cracking (SCC) inhibitor concentrations; 5) the susceptibility of carbon steel to pitting in dilute solutions that contain significant quantities of chloride and sulfate; and 6) the effect of different heats of A537 carbon steel on the corrosion response. For task 1, 2, and 4, the effect of heat treating and/ or welding of the materials was also investigated.

  11. Stakeholder involvement in redefining Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company, (WHC) and sought input from outside stakeholder (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) groups through a formal stakeholder involvement and multiattribute utility (MAU) analysis process

  12. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A. [and others

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior.

  13. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior

  14. ESTIMATING HIGH LEVEL WASTE MIXING PERFORMANCE IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thien, M.G.; Greer, D.A.; Townson, P.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of high level waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tank Operations Contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is currently demonstrating mixing, sampling, and batch transfer performance in two different sizes of small-scale DSTs. The results of these demonstrations will be used to estimate full-scale DST mixing performance and provide the key input to a programmatic decision on the need to build a dedicated feed certification facility. This paper discusses the results from initial mixing demonstration activities and presents data evaluation techniques that allow insight into the performance relationships of the two small tanks. The next steps, sampling and batch transfers, of the small scale demonstration activities are introduced. A discussion of the integration of results from the mixing, sampling, and batch transfer tests to allow estimating full-scale DST performance is presented.

  15. Analysis Bounding Double Shell Tank (DST) Performance for the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator Case 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the latest Tank Farm Contractor Operation and Utilization Plan (HNF-SD-WM-SP-012, Rev. 3) ''Case 2'' operating scenarios with a previous bounding analysis for the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System in order to provide a technical assessment against the current set of DST System performance requirements. A later update to HNF-SD-WM-SP-012 (i.e., Rev. 3A), released in late December 2001, did not impact the results of this analysis. This analysis provides technical support for revising the Performance Requirements for the Double-Shell Tank System, HNF-2168, Rev. 3, used as the basis for defining performance requirements noted in System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007. Rev. 1

  16. Evaluation of scaling correlations for mobilization of double-shell tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekarriz, A.; Hammad, K.J.; Powell, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    In this report, we have examined some of the fundamental mechanisms expected to be at work during mobilization of the waste within the double-shell tanks at Hanford. The motivation stems from the idea that in order to properly apply correlations derived from scaled tests, one would have to ensure that appropriate scaling laws are utilized. Further, in the process of delineating the controlling mechanisms during mobilization, the currently used computational codes are being validated and strengthened based on these findings. Experiments were performed at 1/50-scale, different from what had been performed in the previous fiscal years (i.e., 1/12- and 1/25-scale). It was anticipated that if the current empirical correlations are to work, they should be scale invariant. The current results showed that linear scaling between the 1/25-scale and 1/50-scale correlations do not work well. Several mechanisms were examined in the scaled tests which might have contributed to the discrepancies between the results at these two scales. No deficiencies in the experimental approach and the data were found. Cognizant of these results, it was concluded that the use of the current empirical correlations for ECR should be done cautiously taking into account the appropriate properties of the material for yielding.

  17. Evaluation of scaling correlations for mobilization of double-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekarriz, A.; Hammad, K.J.; Powell, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    In this report, we have examined some of the fundamental mechanisms expected to be at work during mobilization of the waste within the double-shell tanks at Hanford. The motivation stems from the idea that in order to properly apply correlations derived from scaled tests, one would have to ensure that appropriate scaling laws are utilized. Further, in the process of delineating the controlling mechanisms during mobilization, the currently used computational codes are being validated and strengthened based on these findings. Experiments were performed at 1/50-scale, different from what had been performed in the previous fiscal years (i.e., 1/12- and 1/25-scale). It was anticipated that if the current empirical correlations are to work, they should be scale invariant. The current results showed that linear scaling between the 1/25-scale and 1/50-scale correlations do not work well. Several mechanisms were examined in the scaled tests which might have contributed to the discrepancies between the results at these two scales. No deficiencies in the experimental approach and the data were found. Cognizant of these results, it was concluded that the use of the current empirical correlations for ECR should be done cautiously taking into account the appropriate properties of the material for yielding

  18. The Remotely Operated Nondestructive Examination System for Examining the Knuckle Region of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Donald Thompson and Dale Chimenti

    2005-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed a technology to address the examination requirements associated with the knuckle region of Hanford's double shell waste tanks. This examination poses a significant technical challenge because the area that requires examination is in a confined space, high radiation region and is not accessible using conventional measurement techniques. This paper describes the development, deployment, and modification of the remotely operated nondestructive examination (RONDE) system that utilizes a technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing (SAFT). The system detects stress corrosion cracking in the high stress region of the knuckle and characterizes the crack with tandem SAFT. PNNL has qualified the system to perform inspections on the entire knuckle region of Hanford's double shell waste tanks

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF CARBON STEEL CORROSION IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, J.B.; WINDISCH, C.F.

    2006-10-13

    This paper reports on the electrochemical scans for the supernatant of Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-SY-102 and the electrochemical scans for the bottom saltcake layer for Hanford DST 241-AZ-102. It further reports on the development of electrochemical test cells adapted to both sample volume and hot cell constraints.

  20. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report

  1. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT-SENSITIVITY OF DOUBLE-SHELL DYNAMIC RESPONSE TO THE WASTE ELASTIC PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, T.C.; Abatt, F.G.; Johnson, K.I.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) to the assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the contained waste. In all cases, the waste was modeled as a uniform linearly elastic material. The focus of the study was on the changes in the modal response of the tank and waste system as the extensional modulus (elastic modulus in tension and compression) and shear modulus of the waste were varied through six orders of magnitude. Time-history analyses were also performed for selected cases and peak horizontal reaction forces and axial stresses at the bottom of the primary tank were evaluated. Because the analysis focused on the differences in the responses between solid-filled and liquid-filled tanks, it is a comparative analysis rather than an analysis of record for a specific tank or set of tanks. The shear modulus was varied between 4 x 10 3 Pa and 4.135 x 10 9 Pa. The lowest value of shear modulus was sufficient to simulate the modal response of a liquid-containing tank, while the higher values are several orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of expected properties for tank contents. The range of elastic properties used was sufficient to show liquid-like response at the lower values, followed by a transition range of semi-solid-like response to a clearly identifiable solid-like response. It was assumed that the mechanical properties of the tank contents were spatially uniform. Because sludge-like materials are expected only to exist in the lower part of the tanks, this assumption leads to an exaggeration of the effects of sludge-like materials in the tanks. The results of the study show that up to a waste shear modulus of at least 40,000 Pa, the modal properties of the tank and waste system are very nearly the same as for the equivalent liquid-containing tank. This suggests that the differences in critical tank responses between liquid-containing tanks and tanks

  2. Evaluation of Flygt Propeller Mixers for Double-Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    The River Protection Project (RPP) is planning to retrieve radioactive waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) underground at the Hanford Site. This waste will then be transferred to a waste treatment plant to be immobilized (vitrified) in a stable glass form. Over the years, the waste solids in many of the tanks have settled to form a layer of sludge at the bottom. The thickness of the sludge layer varies from tank to tank, from no sludge or a few inches of sludge to about 15 ft of sludge. The purpose of this technology and engineering case study is to evaluate the Flygt(trademark) submersible propeller mixer as a potential technology for auxiliary mobilization of DST HLW solids. Considering the usage and development to date by other sites in the development of this technology, this study also has the objective of expanding the knowledge base of the Flygt(trademark) mixer concept with the broader perspective of Hanford Site tank waste retrieval. More specifically, the objectives of this study delineated from the work plan are described

  3. Interface Control Document Between the Double-Shell Tank (DST) system and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFFERBER, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) describes interfaces between the Double-Shell Tanks (DST) System and Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) (figure 1). WESF is currently operational as a storage facility for cesium and strontium capsules. This ICD covers current operational interfaces and those envisioned during Terminal Clean Out (TCO) activities in the future. WESF and the DST System do not have a direct physical interface. The waste will be moved by tank trailer to the 204-AR waste unloading facility. The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the River Protection Project (RPP) DST System and systems/facilities operated by organizations or companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  4. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings

  5. A methodology to predict the uniformity of double-shell waste slurries based on mixer pump operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljegren, L.M.; Bamberger, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    Dimensional analysis is used to determine the similarity parameters that describe the uniformity of radioactive slurry wastes to be suspended by mixer pumps. The results of this analysis are applied to the design of scaled experiments that will determine the operating parameters that will ensure an adequately uniform feed stream during waste retrieval from Hanford double-shell tanks. Ten dimensionless parameters describing the slurry mixing process were identified. Of these, three describe purely geometric features, three describe slurry properties only, one is a dimensionless time scale, and three describe important dynamic factors. The three parameters describing the dynamic features are the Reynolds number, which describes the degree of turbulence in the tank; the Froude number, which describes the effects of stratification on the circulation patterns; and the gravitational settling number, which describes the balance between the work done by gravity to cause settling and the work done by the pump to resuspend particles

  6. Double shell tanks emergency pumping plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangen, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a formal plan for the emergency transfer of waste from a leaking double shell tank to a designated receiver tank has been developed. This plan is in response to the priority 2 safety issue ''Response to a leaking double-shell tank'' in the DOE Report to Congress, 1991. The plan includes the tanks in four of the east tank farms and one of the west farms. The background information and supporting calculations used for the creation of the emergency plan are discussed in this document. The scope of this document is all of the double shell tanks in the AN, AP, AW, AY, and SY farms. The transfer lines, flush pits, and valve pits involved in the transfer of waste between these farms are also included in the scope. Due to the storage of high heat waste, AZ farm is excluded at this time

  7. Characterization of the first core sample of neutralized current acid waste from double-shell tank 101-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, M.E.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In FY 1989, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) successfully obtained four core samples (totaling seven segments) of neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) from double-shell tanks (DSTs) 101-AZ and 102-AZ. A segment was a 19-in.-long and 1-in.-diameter cylindrical sample of waste. A core sample consisted of enough 19-in.-long segments to obtain the waste of interest. Three core samples were obtained from DST 101-AZ and one core sample from DST 102-AZ. Two DST 101-AZ core samples consisted of two segments per core, and the third core sample consisted of only one segment. The third core consisted of the solids from the bottom of the tank and was used to determine the relative abrasiveness of this NCAW. The DST 102-AZ core sample consisted of two segments. The core samples were transported to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), where the waste was extruded from its sampler and extensively characterized. A characterization plan was followed that simulated the processing of the NCAW samples through retrieval, pretreatment and vitrification process steps. Physical, rheological, chemical and radiochemical properties were measured throughout the process steps. The characterization of the first core sample from DST 101-AZ was completed, and the results are provided in this report. The results for the other core characterizations will be reported in future reports. 3 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Double-shell tank emergency pumping guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    This Double-Shell Tank Emergency Pumping Guide provides the preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanfords 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified

  9. Double-shell tank emergency pumping guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    This Double-Shell Tank Emergency Pumping Guide provides the preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTS. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified

  10. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping

  11. Hanford Double-Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation outline is: Briefly review leak integrity status of tank AY-102 and current leak behavior; Summarize recent initiatives to understand leak mechanism and to verify integrity of remaining waste confinement structures; describe planned waste recovery activities; and, introduce other papers on tank AY-102 topics.

  12. Hanford Double-Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    The presentation outline is: Briefly review leak integrity status of tank AY-102 and current leak behavior; Summarize recent initiatives to understand leak mechanism and to verify integrity of remaining waste confinement structures; describe planned waste recovery activities; and, introduce other papers on tank AY-102 topics.

  13. A methodology to define the flow rate and pressure requirements for transfer of double-shell tank waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-04-01

    This document presents an analysis of the pressure drop and flow rate double-shell tank slurries. Experiments to requirements for transport of characterize the transport of double-shell tank slurries through piping networks and to resuspend materials that settle during pump outages are proposed. Reported values of physical properties of double-shell tank slurries were analyzed to evaluate the flow regimes that are likely to occur during transport. The results of these evaluations indicate that the slurry will be pseudohomogeneous during transport and that the slurry rheology is sufficiently non-Newtonian to affect both the pressure drop achieved during transport and the critical Reynolds number. The transport data collected in the non-Newtonian experiment will be used to determine whether a non-Newtonian correlation developed by Hanks (1978) adequately describes the experimental results

  14. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180 0 C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50 0 C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140 0 C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs

  15. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the 'hazard signature' of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior

  16. River Protection Double-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Authorization Basis Amendment Task Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARRIS, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This task plan is a documented agreement between Nuclear Safety and Licensing and Retrieval Engineering. The purpose of this task plan is to identify the scope of work, tasks and deliverables, responsibilities, manpower, and schedules associated with an authorization basis amendment as a result of the Waste Feed Delivery Program, Project W-211, Project W-521, and Project W-522

  17. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUSIENE, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  18. Hanford double shell tank corrosion monitoring instrument tree prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    High-level nuclear wastes at the Hanford site are stored underground in carbon steel double-shell and single-shell tanks (DSTs and SSTs). The installation of a prototype corrosion monitoring instrument tree into DST 241-A-101 was completed in December 1995. The instrument tree has the ability to detect and discriminate between uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) through the use of electrochemical noise measurements and a unique stressed element, three-electrode probe. The tree itself is constructed of AISI 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), with probes in the vapor space, vapor/liquid interface and liquid. Successful development of these trees will allow their application to single shell tanks and the transfer of technology to other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Keywords: Hanford, radioactive waste, high-level waste tanks, electrochemical noise, probes, double-shell tanks, single-shell tanks, corrosion

  19. NIF Double Shell outer/inner shell collision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, E. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Cardenas, T.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Dodd, E. S.; Desjardins, T.; Renner, D. B.; Palaniyappan, S.; Batha, S. H.; Khan, S. F.; Smalyuk, V.; Ping, Y.; Amendt, P.; Schoff, M.; Hoppe, M.

    2017-10-01

    Double shell capsules are a potential low convergence path to substantial alpha-heating and ignition on NIF, since they are predicted to ignite and burn at relatively low temperatures via volume ignition. Current LANL NIF double shell designs consist of a low-Z ablator, low-density foam cushion, and high-Z inner shell with liquid DT fill. Central to the Double Shell concept is kinetic energy transfer from the outer to inner shell via collision. The collision determines maximum energy available for compression and implosion shape of the fuel. We present results of a NIF shape-transfer study: two experiments comparing shape and trajectory of the outer and inner shells at post-collision times. An outer-shell-only target shot measured the no-impact shell conditions, while an `imaging' double shell shot measured shell conditions with impact. The `imaging' target uses a low-Z inner shell and is designed to perform in similar collision physics space to a high-Z double shell but can be radiographed at 16keV, near the viable 2DConA BL energy limit. Work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Performance testing of a system for remote ultrasonic examination of the Hanford double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, D.C.; Somers, T.; Berger, A.D.

    1995-02-01

    A mobile robotic inspection system is being developed for remote ultrasonic examination of the double wall waste storage tanks at Hanford. Performance testing of the system includes demonstrating robot mobility within the tank annulus, evaluating the accuracy of the vision based navigation process, and verifying ultrasonic and video system performance. This paper briefly describes the system and presents a summary of the plan for performance testing of the ultrasonic testing system. Performance test results will be presented at the conference

  1. Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only

  2. Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mixer pump systems have been chosen as the method for retrieval of tank wastes contained in double shell tanks at Hanford. This document describes the plan for testing and demonstrating the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps to mobilize waste in tank AZ-101. The mixer pumps, equipment and instrumentation to monitor the test were installed by Project W-151

  3. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Definition Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    The system description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem establishes the system boundaries and describes the interface of the DST Monitor and Control Subsystem with new and existing systems that are required to accomplish the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission

  4. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of waste feed delivery. This subsystem transfers waste between transfer-associated structures (pits) and to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor Facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  5. Retrieval technology development for Hanford double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Wise, B.M.; Miller, W.C.

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes the combined analytical, computational, and experimental program developed for identifying operating strategies for mobilization and retrieval of radioactive waste stored in double-shell tanks at Hanford. Sludge mobilization, slurry uniformity, and slurry retrieval investigations will produce guidelines for mixer pump and retrieval pump operation based on the physical properties of the waste and the geometric properties of the system (number of operating pumps and pump design and placement)

  6. Double containment shell for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1977-01-01

    A double containment shell is proposed for nuclear power plants, especially those equipped with pressurized water reactors. The shell offers increased environmental protection from primary circuit accidents. The inner shell is built of steel or concrete while the outer shell is always built of concrete. The space between the two shells is filled with water and is provided with several manholes and with stiffeners designed for compensation for load due to the water hydrostatic pressure. Water serves the airtight separation of the containment shell inside from the environment and the absorption of heat released in a primary circuit accident. In case the inner shell is made of concrete, it is provided with heat-removal tubes in-built in its walls ensuring rapid heat transfer from the inside of the containment to the water in the interwall space. (Z.M.)

  7. Technology Review of Nondestructive Methods for Examination of Water Intrusion Areas on Hanford’s Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2008-05-09

    Under a contract with CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., PNNL has performed a review of the NDE technology and methods for examination of the concrete dome structure of Hanford’s double-shell tanks. The objective was to provide a matrix of methodologies that could be evaluated based on applicability, ease of deployment, and results that could provide information that could be used in the ongoing structural analysis of the tank dome. PNNL performed a technology evaluation with the objective of providing a critical literature review for all applicable technologies based on constraints provided by CH2M HILL. These constraints were not mandatory, but were desired. These constraints included performing the evaluation without removing any soil from the top of the tank, or if necessary, requesting that the hole diameter needed to gain access to evaluate the top of the tank structure to be no greater than approximately 12-in. in diameter. PNNL did not address the details of statistical sampling requirements as they depend on an unspecified risk tolerance. PNNL considered these during the technology evaluation and have reported the results in the remainder of this document. Many of the basic approaches to concrete inspection that were reviewed in previous efforts are still in use. These include electromagnetic, acoustic, radiographic, etc. The primary improvements in these tools have focused on providing quantitative image reconstruction, thus providing inspectors and analysts with three-dimensional data sets that allow for operator visualization of relevant abnormalities and analytical integration into structural performance models. Available instruments, such as radar used for bridge deck inspections, rely on post-processing algorithms and do not provide real-time visualization. Commercially available equipment only provides qualitative indications of relative concrete damage. It cannot be used as direct input for structural analysis to assess fitness for use and if

  8. EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAQ MA

    2009-05-12

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

  9. Industrial mixing techniques for Hanford double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daymo, E.A.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps are currently the baseline technology for sludge mobilization and mixing in one-million gallon double-shell tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. Improvements to the baseline jet mixer pump technology are sought because jet mixer pumps have moving parts that may fail or require maintenance. Moreover, jet mixers are relatively expensive, they heat the waste, and, in some cases, may not mobilize enough of the sludge. This report documents a thorough literature search for commercially available applicable mixing technologies that could be used for double-shell tank sludge mobilization and mixing. Textbooks, research articles, conference proceedings, mixing experts, and the Thomas Register were consulted to identify applicable technologies. While there are many commercial methods that could be used to mobilize sludge or mix the contents of a one-million gallon tank, few will work given the geometrical constraints (e.g., the mixer must fit through a 1.07-m-diameter riser) or the tank waste properties (e.g., the sludge has such a high yield stress that it generally does not flow under its own weight). Pulsed fluid jets and submersible Flygt mixers have already been identified at Hanford and Savannah River Sites for double-shell tank mixing applications. While these mixing technologies may not be applicable for double-shell tanks that have a thick sludge layer at the bottom (since too many of these mixers would need to be installed to mobilize most of the sludge), they may have applications in tanks that do not have a settled solids layer. Retrieval projects at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy sites are currently evaluating the effectiveness of these mixing techniques for tank waste applications. The literature search did not reveal any previously unknown technologies that should be considered for sludge mobilization and mixing in one-million gallon double-shell tanks

  10. Nonradioactive Environmental Emissions Chemical Source Term for the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Vapor Space During Waste Retrieval Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAY, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    A nonradioactive chemical vapor space source term for tanks on the Phase 1 and the extended Phase 1 delivery, storage, and disposal mission was determined. Operations modeled included mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers. Concentrations of ammonia, specific volatile organic compounds, and quantitative volumes of aerosols were estimated

  11. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks

  12. 241-AN Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AN double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks

  13. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  14. 241-SY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-SY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks

  15. 241-AZ Double-Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks

  16. 241-AW Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AW double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks

  17. Double shell planar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H.; Ping, Y.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Amendt, P. A.

    2017-10-01

    The double shell project is aimed at fielding neutron-producing capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in which an outer low-Z ablator collides with an inner high-Z shell to compress the fuel. However, understanding these targets experimentally can be challenging when compared with conventional single shell targets. Halfraum-driven planar targets at OMEGA are being used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions outside of a convergent geometry. Both VISAR and radiography through a tube have advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. A number physics issues are being studied with this platform that include 1-d and higher dimensional effects such as defect-driven hydrodynamic instabilities from engineering features. Additionally, the use of novel materials with controlled density gradients require study in easily diagnosed 1-d systems. This work ultimately feeds back into the NIF capsule platform through manufacturing tolerances set using data from OMEGA. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-17-25386.

  18. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2001-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem that supports the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Transfer Pump Subsystem consists of a pump for supernatant and/or slurry transfer for the DSTs that will be retrieved during the Phase 1 WFD operations. This system is used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. It also will deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Waste Treatment Plant where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  19. Project management plan double-shell tank system specification development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) members have been tasked by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support removal of wastes from the Hanford Site 200 Area tanks in two phases. The schedule for these phases allows focusing on requirements for the first phase of providing feed to the privatized vitrification plants. The Tank Waste Retrieval Division near-term goal is to focus on the activities to support Phase 1. These include developing an integrated (technical, schedule, and cost) baseline and, with regard to private contractors, establishing interface agreements, constructing infrastructure systems, retrieving and delivering waste feed, and accepting immobilized waste products for interim onsite storage. This document describes the process for developing an approach to designing a system for retrieving waste from double-shell tanks. It includes a schedule and cost account for the work breakdown structure task

  20. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary

  1. Tank waste processing analysis: Database development, tank-by-tank processing requirements, and examples of pretreatment sequences and schedules as applied to Hanford Double-Shell Tank Supernatant Waste - FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.; Orth, R.J.; Aitken, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report gives the results of work conducted in FY 1993 by the Tank Waste Processing Analysis Task for the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration. The main purpose of this task, led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is to demonstrate a methodology to identify processing sequences, i.e., the order in which a tank should be processed. In turn, these sequences may be used to assist in the development of time-phased deployment schedules. Time-phased deployment is implementation of pretreatment technologies over a period of time as technologies are required and/or developed. The work discussed here illustrates how tank-by-tank databases and processing requirements have been used to generate processing sequences and time-phased deployment schedules. The processing sequences take into account requirements such as the amount and types of data available for the tanks, tank waste form and composition, required decontamination factors, and types of compact processing units (CPUS) required and technology availability. These sequences were developed from processing requirements for the tanks, which were determined from spreadsheet analyses. The spreadsheet analysis program was generated by this task in FY 1993. Efforts conducted for this task have focused on the processing requirements for Hanford double-shell tank (DST) supernatant wastes (pumpable liquid) because this waste type is easier to retrieve than the other types (saltcake and sludge), and more tank space would become available for future processing needs. The processing requirements were based on Class A criteria set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Clean Option goals provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  2. Performance requirements for the double-shell tank system: Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claghorn, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document establishes performance requirements for the double-shell tank system. These requirements, in turn, will be incorporated in the System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System (Grenard and Claghorn 1998). This version of the document establishes requirements that are applicable to the first phase (Phase 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission described in the TWRS Mission Analysis Report (Acree 1998). It does not specify requirements for either the Phase 2 mission or the double-shell tank system closure period

  3. Double standards with radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, A.

    2002-01-01

    The author claims that whether it is short-lived waste from Commonwealth facilities, long-lived plutonium waste from an atomic bomb test site on Aboriginal land, or reactor waste from Lucas Heights, the Australian government applies double standards to suit its own agenda

  4. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This subsystem specification establishes the interface and performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem. The DST Monitor and Control Subsystem consists of the new and existing equipment that will be used to provide tank farm operators with integrated local monitoring and control of the DST systems to support Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). New equipment will provide automatic control and safety interlocks where required and provide operators with visibility into the status of DST subsystem operations (e.g., DST mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers) and the ability to manually control specified DST functions as necessary. This specification is intended to be the basis for new project/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  5. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem is intended to support Waste Feed Delivery. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem specification describes the relationship of this system with the DST System, describes the functions that must be performed by the system, and establishes the performance requirements to be applied to the design of the system. It also provides references for the requisite codes and standards. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem will treat the waste for a more favorable waste transfer. This will be accomplished by diluting the waste, dissolving the soluble portion of the waste, and flushing waste residuals from the transfer line. The Diluent and Flush Subsystem will consist of the following: The Diluent and Flush Station(s) where chemicals will be off-loaded, temporarily stored, mixed as necessary, heated, and metered to the delivery system; and A piping delivery system to deliver the chemicals to the appropriate valve or pump pit Associated support structures. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  6. Expert Panel Recommendations for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Life Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Charles W; Bush, Spencer H; Berman, Herbert Stanton; Czajkowski, Carl J; Divine, James R; Posakony, Gerald J; Johnson, A B; Elmore, Monte R; Reynolds, D A; Anantatmula, Ramamohan P; Sindelar, Robert L; Zapp, Philip E

    2001-06-29

    Expert workshops were held in Richland in May 2001 to review the Hanford Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project and make recommendations to extend the life of Hanford's double-shell waste tanks. The workshop scope was limited to corrosion of the primary tank liner, and the main areas for review were waste chemistry control, tank inspection, and corrosion monitoring. Participants were corrosion experts from Hanford, Savannah River Site, Brookhaven National Lab., Pacific Northwest National Lab., and several consultants. This report describes the current state of the three areas of the program, the final recommendations of the workshop, and the rationale for their selection.

  7. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues

  8. Hanford double shell tank corrosion monitoring instrument trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    High-level nuclear wastes at the Hanford site are stored underground in carbon steel double-shell and single-shell tanks - (DSTs and SSTS). Westinghouse Hanford Company is considering installation of a prototype corrosion monitoring instrument tree in at least one DST in the summer of 1995. The instrument tree will have the ability to detect and discriminate between uniform corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and pitting. Additional instrument trees will follow in later years. Proof-of-technology testing is currently underway for the use of commercially available electric field pattern (EFP) analysis and electrochemical noise (EN) corrosion monitoring equipment. Creative use and combinations of other existing technologies is also being considered. Successful demonstration of these technologies will be followed by the development of a Hanford specific instrument tree. The first instrument tree will incorporate one of these technologies. Subsequent trees may include both technologies, as well as a more standard assembly of corrosion coupons. Successful development of these trees will allow their application to single shell tanks and the transfer of technology to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites

  9. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures

  10. Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

  11. Double-shell tank ultrasonic inspection plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The waste tank systems managed by the Tank Waste Remediation System Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company includes 28 large underground double-shell tanks (DST) used for storing hazardous radioactive waste. The ultrasonic (UT) inspection of these tanks is part of their required integrity assessment (WAC 1993) as described in the tank systems integrity assessment program plan (IAPP) (Pfluger 1994a) submitted to the Ecology Department of the State of Washington. Because these tanks hold radioactive waste and are located underground examinations and inspections must be done remotely from the tank annuli with specially designed equipment. This document describes the UT inspection system (DSTI system), the qualification of the equipment and procedures, field inspection readiness, DST inspections, and post-inspection activities. Although some of the equipment required development, the UT inspection technology itself is the commercially proven and available projection image scanning technique (P-scan). The final design verification of the DSTI system will be a performance test in the Hanford DST annulus mockup that includes the demonstration of detecting and sizing corrosion-induced flaws

  12. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LESHIKAR, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the DST Transfer Pump Subsystem that supports the first phase of (WFD). The DST Transfer Pump Subsystem consists of a pump for supernatant and or slurry transfer for the DSTs that will be retrieved during the Phase 1 WFD operations. This system is used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. It also will deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  13. Mixer pump test plan for double-shell tank AZ-101. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has undertaken the task to develop and demonstrate a method of retrieval for double-shell tank waste. Mixer pumps were chosen as the planned method of retrieval for DSTs, based on engineering technology studies, past experience with hydraulic sluicing at the Hanford Site, and experience with mixer pumps at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site

  14. Mixer pump test plan for double-shell tank AZ-101. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has undertaken the task to develop and demonstrate a method of retrieval for double-shell tank waste. Mixer pumps were chosen as the planned method of retrieval for DSTs, based on engineering technology studies, past experience with hydraulic sluicing at the Hanford Site, and experience with mixer pumps at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site.

  15. System Description for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSSI, H.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System. This description will provide a basis for developing functional, performance and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the DST Confinement System

  16. Double Shell Tank (DST) Human Factors Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHAFFEE, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the data collection and analyses that were performed in development of material to be used in the Human Factors chapter for the upgrade to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Double-Shell Tank Farms (DSTF). This study was conducted to collect the data that is necessary to prepare the Human Factors chapter for the upgrade of the SAR for the DSTF. Requirements for the HF chapter of the SAR generally dictate that the facility management describe how the consideration of operator capabilities and limitations and operating experience are used in ensuring the safe and effective operation of the facility. Additionally, analysis to indicate the contribution of human error to the safety basis accidents or events must be reported. Since the DSTF is a mature operating facility and the requirement to prepare a HF chapter is new, it was not expected that the consideration of HF principles would be an explicit part of DSTF operations. It can be expected, however, that the programs that guide the daily operations at the DSTF contain provisions for the consideration of the needs of their operating personnel and lessons learned from prior experience. Consideration of both the SAR requirements and the nature of the DSTF operations led to the following objectives being defined for the study: (1) to identify the programs at the OSTF where human performance may be considered; (2) to describe how HF principles and operating experience are used to ensure safe and reliable human performance at the DSTF; (3) to describe how HF principles and operating experience are considered as modifications or improvements are made at the DSTF; and (4) to perform task analysis sufficient to understand the potential for human error in OSTF operations

  17. Analysis and characterization of double shell tank 241-AP-108

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the first part of a three-part report describing the analysis and characterization of double shell tank 241-AP-108 which is located at the Hanford Reservation.This document is the analytical laboratory data package entitled 'Analysis and Characterization of Double Shell Tank 241-AP-108' which contains a case sampling history, the sampling protocols, the analytical procedures, sampling and analysis quality assurance and quality control measures, and chemical analysis results for samples obtained from the tank

  18. Production of hydroxyapatite from waste mussel shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Mark I; Barakat, Haneen; Patterson, Darrell Alec, E-mail: mark.jones@auckland.ac.nz [Department Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, New Zealand Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand)

    2011-10-29

    This work describes the formation of Hydroxyaptite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, from waste mussel shells from the New Zealand aquaculture industry. The raw shells are first calcined to produce lime (CaO) and then reacted in a purpose built reactor to form the Hydroxyapatite (HA) in a low temperature batch process. The calcination was studied in terms of the effects of temperature, heating rate, holding time, nitrogen flow rate and particle size. The crystals formed in the batch reactor were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Optimised conditions in the calcination stage resulted in powder with around 95% conversion to lime. The as-produced HA showed poor crystallinity and the presence of impurities, although both of these features were improved by a suitable post heat treatment process. The post treated material showed good crystallinity and was comparable to commercially produced material. Preliminary biocompatibility experiments showed that the HA stimulated cell growth and promoted mineralization. The production of HA from mussel shells in a room temperature, ambient pressure process is not only a sustainable use of waste material, but also from an industrial point of view the process has considerable potential for reducing costs associated with both starting materials and energy.

  19. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

    2009-01-15

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al

  20. Constraints for system specifications for the double-shell and single-shell tank systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHAW, C.P.

    1999-05-18

    This is a supporting document for the Level 1 Double-Shell and Single-Shell System Specifications. The rationale for selection of specific regulatory constraining documents cited in the two system specifications is provided. many of the regulations have been implemented by the Project Hanford Management Contract procedures (HNF-PROs) and as such noted and traced back to their origins in State and Federal regulations.

  1. Constraints for system specifications for the double-shell and single-shell tank systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHAW, C.P.

    1999-01-01

    This is a supporting document for the Level 1 Double-Shell and Single-Shell System Specifications. The rationale for selection of specific regulatory constraining documents cited in the two system specifications is provided. many of the regulations have been implemented by the Project Hanford Management Contract procedures (HNF-PROs) and as such noted and traced back to their origins in State and Federal regulations

  2. Analyses and characterization of double shell tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-04

    Evaporator candidate feed from tank 241-AP-108 (108-AP) was sampled under prescribed protocol. Physical, inorganic, and radiochemical analyses were performed on tank 108-AP. Characterization of evaporator feed tank waste is needed primarily for an evaluation of its suitability to be safely processed through the evaporator. Such analyses should provide sufficient information regarding the waste composition to confidently determine whether constituent concentrations are within not only safe operating limits, but should also be relevant to functional limits for operation of the evaporator. Characterization of tank constituent concentrations should provide data which enable a prediction of where the types and amounts of environmentally hazardous waste are likely to occur in the evaporator product streams.

  3. Analyses and characterization of double shell tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Evaporator candidate feed from tank 241-AP-108 (108-AP) was sampled under prescribed protocol. Physical, inorganic, and radiochemical analyses were performed on tank 108-AP. Characterization of evaporator feed tank waste is needed primarily for an evaluation of its suitability to be safely processed through the evaporator. Such analyses should provide sufficient information regarding the waste composition to confidently determine whether constituent concentrations are within not only safe operating limits, but should also be relevant to functional limits for operation of the evaporator. Characterization of tank constituent concentrations should provide data which enable a prediction of where the types and amounts of environmentally hazardous waste are likely to occur in the evaporator product streams

  4. DOUBLE SHELL TANK EMERGENCY PUMPING GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified

  5. Performance Requirements for the Double Shell Tank (DST) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    This document identifies the upper-level Double-Shell Tank (DST) System functions and bounds the associated performance requirements. The functions and requirements are provided along with supporting bases. These functions and requirements, in turn, will be incorporated into specifications for the DST System

  6. Direct double photoionization of the valence shell of Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrini, F.; Malegat, L.; Selles, P.; Kazansky, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The hyperspherical R-matrix method with semiclassical outgoing waves is used to study the direct double photoionization (DPI) of the valence shell of the lightest alkaline earth-metal Be. The absolute fully integrated, singly, doubly, and triply differential cross sections obtained are compared with the single set of measurements available and with recent calculations based on the convergent close coupling and time-dependent close coupling methods. The level of agreement between all these data is very encouraging. A comparison is also made between the DPI of He and the direct DPI of the valence shell of Be. It confirms that the electron-electron correlations are stronger in the valence 2s shell of Be than in the 1s shell of He, thus contributing to a desirable clarification

  7. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AW-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Lambie, R.W.; Stephens, R.H.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    In May 1990, double-shell Tank 241-AW-105 was sampled to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also addresses expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background tank information. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AW-105, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this waste tank. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are given based on safety issues and further characterization needs

  8. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-105 is a radioactive waste tank most recently sampled in March of 1993. Sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-105 contributes toward the fulfillment of Milestone M-44-05 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology, EPA, and DOE, 1993). Characterization is also needed tot evaluate the waste's fitness for safe processing through an evaporator as part of an overall waste volume reduction program. Tank 241-AP-105, located in the 200 East Area AP Tank Farm, was constructed and went into service in 1986 as a dilute waste receiver tank; Tank 241AP-1 05 was considered as a candidate tank for the Grout Treatment Facility. With the cancellation of the Grout Program, the final disposal of the waste in will be as high- and low-level glass fractions. The tank has an operational capacity of 1,140,000 gallons, and currently contains 821,000 gallons of double-shell slurry feed. The waste is heterogeneous, although distinct layers do not exist. Waste has been removed periodically for processing and concentration through the 242-A Evaporator. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank and is considered to be sound. There are no Unreviewed Safety Questions associated with Tank 241-AP-105 at this time. The waste in Tank 241-AP-105 exists as an aqueous solution of metallic salts and radionuclides, with limited amounts of organic complexants. The most prevalent soluble analytes include aluminum, potassium, sodium, hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate, and nitrite. The calculated pH is greater than the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act established limit of 12.5 for corrosivity. In addition, cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations were found at levels greater than their regulatory thresholds. The major radionuclide constituent is 137 Cs, while the few organic complexants present include glycolate and oxalate. Approximately 60% of the waste by weight is water

  9. Double shell tanks plutonium inventory assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation that establishes plutonium inventory estimates for all DSTs based on known tank history information, the DST plutonium inventory tracking system, tank characterization measurements, tank transfer records, and estimated average concentration values for the various types of waste. These estimates use data through December 31, 1994, and give plutonium estimates as of January 1, 1995. The plutonium inventory values for the DSTs are given in Section 31. The plutonium inventory estimate is 224 kg for the DSTs and 854 kg for the SSTs for a total of 1078 kg. This value compares favorably with the total plutonium inventory value of 981 kg obtained from the total plutonium production minus plutonium recovery analysis estimates

  10. Molecular single photon double K-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penent, F.; Nakano, M.; Tashiro, M.; Grozdanov, T.P.; Žitnik, M.; Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Shigemasa, E.; Iwayama, H.; Hikosaka, Y.; Soejima, K.; Suzuki, I.H.; Kouchi, N.; Ito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied single photon double K-shell ionization of small molecules (N 2 , CO, C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3), …) and the Auger decay of the resulting double core hole (DCH) molecular ions thanks to multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The relative cross-sections for single-site (K −2 ) and two-site (K −1 K −1 ) double K-shell ionization with respect to single K-shell (K −1 ) ionization have been measured that gives important information on the mechanisms of single photon double ionization. The spectroscopy of two-site (K −1 K −1 ) DCH states in the C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3) series shows important chemical shifts due to a strong dependence on the C-C bond length. In addition, the complete cascade Auger decay following single site (K −2 ) ionization has been obtained

  11. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, J.

    1996-01-01

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists

  12. Description of double-shell tank selection criteria for inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, E.B.; Scott, K.V.

    1996-01-01

    Technical criteria for selecting double-shelf tanks's (DST's) for inspection are presented. Inspection of DST's is planned to non-destructively determine the general condition of their inner wall and bottom knuckle. Inspection of representative tanks will provide a basis for evaluating the integrity of all the DST's and provide a basis for estimating remaining life. The selection criteria recommended are tank age based on date-of-first fluid entry, waste temperature, corrosion inhibitor levels, deviations from normal behavior - involving sludge levels, hydrogen release and waste transfers - least waste depth fluctuation, tank steel type, other chemical species that could activate stress-corrosion cracking, and waste types

  13. Double-shell target fabrication workshop-2016 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. Morris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oertel, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrell, Michael [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baumann, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huang, Haibo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, Abbas [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-10

    On June 30, 2016, over 40 representatives from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), General Atomics (GA), Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Schafer Corporation, and NNSA headquarter attended a double-shell (DS) target fabrication workshop at Livermore, California. Pushered-single-shell (PSS) and DS metalgas platforms potentially have a large impact on programmatic applications. The goal of this focused workshop is to bring together target fabrication scientists, physicists, and designers to brainstorm future PSS and DS target fabrication needs and strategies. This one-day workshop intends to give an overall view of historical information, recent approaches, and future research activities at each participating organization. Five topical areas have been discussed that are vital to the success of future DS target fabrications, including inner metal shells, foam spheres, outer ablators, fill tube assembly, and metrology.

  14. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  15. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AP-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this tank characterization report is to describe and characterize the waste in Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-107 based on information gathered from various sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AP-107, and arranges it in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this particular waste tank. In addition, conclusion and recommendations based on safety and further characterization needs are given. Specific objectives reached by the sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-107 are: Contribute toward the fulfillment of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05 concerning the characterization of Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks; Complete safety screening of the contents of Tank 241-AP-107 to meet the characterization requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5; and Provide tank waste characterization to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program Elements in accordance with the TWRS Tank Waste Analysis Plan

  16. Functions and requirements for subsurface barriers used in support of single-shell tank waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    The mission of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Program includes project and program activities for receiving, storing, maintaining, treating, and disposing onsite, or packaging for offsite disposal, all Hanford tank waste. Hanford tank waste includes the contents of 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), plus any new waste added to these facilities, and all encapsulated cesium and strontium stored onsite and returned from offsite users. A key element of the TWRS Program is retrieval of the waste in the SSTs. The waste stored in these underground tanks must be removed in order to minimize environmental, safety, and health risks associated with continuing waste storage. Subsurface barriers are being considered as a means to mitigate the effects of tank leaks including those occurring during SST waste retrieval. The functions to be performed by subsurface barriers based on their role in retrieving waste from the SSTs are described, and the requirements which constrain their application are identified. These functions and requirements together define the functional baseline for subsurface barriers

  17. On buckling of double-shell-stiffened cylindrical steel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.J.; Chiu, K.D.; Odar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Buckling analysis methods and acceptance criteria for single shells of various configurations are well documented and adequately covered by many codes. There are, however, no guidelines or criteria for large Double-Shell-Stiffened (DSS) structures, which have been used recently in nuclear power plant applications. The existing codes for buckling analysis cannot be directly utilized because of the uniqueness of structural configuration and complexity of loading. This paper discusses a method for determining the critical buckling loads for this type of structure under a multitude load and suggests buckling criteria for the design of DSS structures. The method commonly used to determine the critical buckling loads for a single shell with or without stiffeners applies reduction factors to the theoretical results. The capacity reduction factors, which are often obtained from experimental results, include plasticity corrections and account for the difference between actual and theoretical buckling loads resulting from the effects of imperfections and nonlinearities. The interaction formulas derived from experimental results can be used to compute the interaction effects of three stress components. This paper extends these concepts and discusses their applicability to a DSS cylindrical structure. (orig./HP)

  18. Application of microwaves for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Granat

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, investigation results of microwave heating application for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores made of moulding sands with thermosetting resins are presented. It was found that waste shell cores or shell moulds left after casting, separated from moulding sand, can be effectively incinerated. It was evidenced that microwave heating allows effective control of this process and its results. Incineration of waste moulds and cores made of commercial grades of resin-coated moulding sand using microwave heating was found to be an effective way of their utilisation. It was determined that the optimum burning time of these wastes (except those insufficiently disintegrated and not mixed with an activating agent is maximum 240 s at the used magnetron power of 650 W. It was noticed that proper disintegration of the wastes and use of suitable additives to intensify the microwave heating process guarantee significant reduction of the process time and its full stabilisation. Application of microwave heating for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores ensure substantial and measurable economic profits due to shorter process time and lower energy consumption.

  19. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  20. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program

  1. Structural qualification of the multifunctional instrument tree for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohlow, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the technical basis and methodology for qualifying the multifunctional instrument tree (MIT) structure for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks. Structural qualification for MIT installations in specific tanks are also contained in this document

  2. Functions and Requirements for Automated Liquid Level Gauge Instruments in Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This functions and requirements document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of automated liquid level gauge instruments in the Tank Farms. This document is intended to become the technical baseline for current and future installation, operation and maintenance of automated liquid level gauges in single-shell and double-shell tank farms

  3. Evaluation of alternatives for upgrading double shell tank corrosion monitoring at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent discovery of low hydroxide conditions in Double Shell Tanks have demonstrated that the current corrosion control system of waste sampling and analysis is inadequate to monitor and maintain specified chemistries for dilute and low volume waste tanks. Moreover, waste sampling alone cannot provide adequate information to resolve the questions raised regarding tank corrosion. This report evaluates available technologies which could be used to improve on the existing corrosion control system. The evaluation concludes that a multi-technique corrosion monitoring system is necessary, utilizing ultrasonic and visual examinations for direct evaluation of tank liner condition, probes for rapid detection (alarm) of corrosive conditions, and waste sampling and analysis for determination of corrective action. The probes would incorporate electrochemical noise and linear polarization resistance techniques. When removed from the waste tank, the probe electrodes would be physically examined as corrosion coupons. The probes would be used in addition to a modified regimen of waste sampling and the existing schedule for ultrasonic examination of the tank liners. Supporting information would be obtained by examination of in-tank equipment as it is removed

  4. Oyster Shell Recycling and Bone Waste Treatment Using Plasma Pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Jae Ou; Knak, S P; Knak, A N; Koo, H J; Ravi, V

    2006-01-01

    Investigations on the recycling of oyster shells and bone waste treatment using the plasma pyrolysis technique are presented in this paper. A arc based plasma torch operated at 25 kW was employed for the experiments. Fresh oyster shells were recycled using the plasma torch to convert them to a useful product such as CaO. Bone waste was treated to remove the infectious organic part and to vitrify the inorganic part. The time required for treatment in both cases was significantly short. Significant reduction in the weight of the samples was observed in both cases

  5. Oyster Shell Recycling and Bone Waste Treatment Using Plasma Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Ou Chae; Knak, S. P.; Knak, A. N.; Koo, H. J.; Ravi, V.

    2006-11-01

    Investigations on the recycling of oyster shells and bone waste treatment using the plasma pyrolysis technique are presented in this paper. A arc based plasma torch operated at 25 kW was employed for the experiments. Fresh oyster shells were recycled using the plasma torch to convert them to a useful product such as CaO. Bone waste was treated to remove the infectious organic part and to vitrify the inorganic part. The time required for treatment in both cases was significantly short. Significant reduction in the weight of the samples was observed in both cases.

  6. Decision analysis for mobilizing and retrieving sludge from double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, A.J.; Williams, N.C.; Dukelow, J.S.; Hansen, R.I.

    1997-09-01

    This decision analysis evaluates alternative technologies for the initial mobilization and retrieval of sludges in double-shell tanks (DSTs). The analysis is from the perspective of the need to move sludges from one DST to another for interim retrieval. It supports the more general decision of which technologies to use to retreive various types of DST waste. The initial analysis is from the perspective of a typical DST with 2 ft of sludge to mobilize. During the course of the analysis, it became clear that it was important to also consider sludge mobilization in support of the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification demonstration plant, and in particular the risks associated with failing to meeting the minimum order requirements for the vendor, as well as the cost of mobilization and retrieval from the HLW vitrification source tanks

  7. Study Added of Waste Chicken Egg Shell in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng Wong Irwan Lie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil is the foundation of structure or construction that will receive the load transfer through to foundation. If the soil has a carrying capacity of small and cannot withstand the load transfer can result in the failure of construction. If the soil has a carrying capacity of small ground it is necessary to stabilize or improve the soil so that an increase in the carrying capacity of the land so that it can be used for construction. One material is commonly used for soil stabilization with the addition of lime. Waste chicken egg shell is waste that is still rarely used, the results of research [1], states that composition egg shell broadly consists of water (1,6% and dry material (98,4%. The total dry ingredients are there, in shell eggs contained mineral elements (95,1% and protein (3,3%. Based on the existing mineral composition, then the egg shells are composed of crystalline CaCO3 (98,43%, MgCO3 (0,84% and Ca3(PO42 (0,75%. This research was done by adding powdered chicken egg shell waste in clay with a composition of 5%, 7,5%, 10% and 14% with physical properties test and soil compaction test.

  8. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  9. Shell and Double Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger Calculations and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Abbas Abdulmajeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns a new type of heat exchangers, which is that of shell-and-double concentric tube heat exchangers. The case studies include both design calculations and performance calculations. The new heat exchanger design was conducted according to Kern method. The volumetric flow rates were 3.6 m3/h and 7.63 m3/h for the hot oil and water respectively. The experimental parameters studied were: temperature, flow rate of hot oil, flow rate of cold water and pressure drop. A comparison was made for the theoretical and experimental results and it was found that the percentage error for the hot oil outlet temperature was (- 1.6%. The percentage errors for the pressure drop in the shell and in the concentric tubes were (17.2% and (- 39% respectively. For cold water outlet temperature, the percentage error was (- 3.3%, while it was (18% considering the pressure drop in the annulus formed. The percentage error for the total power consumed was (-10.8% A theoretical comparison was made between the new design and the conventional heat exchanger from the point of view of, length, mass, pressure drop and total power consumed.

  10. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, J.

    1997-01-01

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AN-105. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AN-105 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1996) milestone M-44-10

  11. Durability of double-shell slurry feed grouts: FY-90 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1992-12-01

    Plans for disposal of the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank wastes at Hanford include grouting. Grout disposal is the process of mixing low-level liquid waste with cementitious powders and pumping the slurry to near-surface, underground concrete vaults; hydration results in the formation of a solid product that binds/encapsulates the radioactive/hazardous constituents. In this durability program, previous studies have indicated a strong impact from curing temperature/time on strength and leach resistance of DSSF grouts. The current studies were expanded to determine whether these impacts could be attributed to other factors, such as dry blend composition and waste concentration. Major conclusions: grouts from dry blends with 40 wt% limestone had lower strengths; compressive strengths and leach resistance decreased with increased curing temperature/time; leach resistance increased for grouts prepared with dilute DSSF; nitrate leach resistance increased with high slag/cement ratios, dilute DSSF, and low curing temperatures; amount of drainable liquids for grouts using diluted DSSF was lowest when slag content was high; the 2 most significant factors affecting grout properties were the slag/cement ratio and waste dilution (slag-waste reactions appear to dominate the properties of DSSF grouts)

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL & OPERATING LOADS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TOLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs).

  13. Entropy Generation of Shell and Double Concentric Tubes Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    basma abbas abdulmajeed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation was studied for new type of heat exchanger (shell and double concentric tubes heat exchanger. Parameters of hot oil flow rate, temperature of inlet hot oil and pressure drop were investigated with the concept of entropy generation. The results showed that the value of entropy generation increased with increasing the flow rate of hot oil and when cold water flow rate was doubled from 20 to 40 l/min, these values were larger. On the other hand, entropy generation increased with increasing the hot oil inlet temperature at a certain flow rate of hot oil. Furthermore, at a certain hot oil inlet temperature, the entropy generation increased with the pressure drop at different hot oil inlet flow rates. Finally, in order to keep up with modern technology, infrared thermography camera was used in order to measure the temperatures. The entropy generation was determined with lower values when infrared thermography camera was used to measure the temperatures, compared with the values obtained by using thermocouples.

  14. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2007-02-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global

  15. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Construction Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Barnes, Travis J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2013-01-01

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. The formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793,Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure. To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records were performed for the first three DST tank farms constructed, which included tanks 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101, 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The review for these six tanks involved research and review of dozens of boxes of historical project documentation. These reviews form a basis to better understand the current condition of the three oldest Hanford DST farms. They provide a basis for changes to the current tank inspection program and also provide valuable insight into future tank use decisions. If new tanks are constructed in the future, these reviews provide valuable 'lessons-learned' information about expected difficulties as well as construction practices and techniques that are likely to be successful

  16. Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Stephanie J.; Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    A routine video inspection of the annulus space between the primary tank and secondary liner of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 was performed in August 2012. During the inspection, unexpected material was discovered. A subsequent video inspection revealed additional unexpected material on the opposite side of the tank, none of which had been observed during inspections performed in December 2006 and January 2007. A formal leak assessment team was established to review the tank's construction and operating histories, and preparations for sampling and analysis began to determine the material's origin. A new sampling device was required to collect material from locations that were inaccessible to the available sampler. Following its design and fabrication, a mock-up test was performed for the new sampling tool to ensure its functionality and capability of performing the required tasks. Within three months of the discovery of the unexpected material, sampling tools were deployed, material was collected, and analyses were performed. Results indicated that some of the unknown material was indicative of soil, whereas the remainder was consistent with tank waste. This, along with the analyses performed by the leak assessment team on the tank's construction history, lead to the conclusion that the primary tank was leaking into the annulus. Several issues were encountered during the deployment of the samplers into the annulus. As this was the first time samples had been required from the annulus of a double-shell tank, a formal lessons learned was created concerning designing equipment for unique purposes under time constraints

  17. Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release. Progress report, November 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

  18. Pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, G.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste performed in November 1988, and the subsequent thermal behavior of the grout as it cured in a large, insulated vessel. The report was issued in draft form in April 1989 and comments were subsequently received; however, the report was not finalized until 1994. In finalizing this report, references or information gained after the report was drafted in April 1989 have not been incorporated to preserve the report`s historical perspective. This report makes use of criteria from Ridelle (1987) to establish formulation criteria. This document has since been superseded by a document prepared by Reibling and Fadeef (1991). However, the reference to Riddelle (1987) and any analysis based on its content have been maintained within this report. In addition, grout is no longer being considered as the waste form for disposal of Hanford`s low-level waste. However, grout disposal is being maintained as an option in case there is an emergency need to provide additional tank space. Current plans are to vitrify low-level wastes into a glass matrix.

  19. Metallic double shell hollow nanocages: the challenges of their synthetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, M A; El-Sayed, M A

    2012-03-06

    Hollow metallic nanoparticles have been attracting the attention of many researchers in the past five years due to their new properties and potential applications. The unique structure of the hollow nanoparticles; presence of two surfaces (internal and external), and the presence of both cavities and pores in the wall surfaces of these nanoparticles are responsible for their unique properties and applications. Here the galvanic replacement technique is used to prepare nanocages made of gold, platinum, and palladium. In addition, hollow double shell nanoparticles are made of two metal shells like Au-Pt, Pt-Au, Au-Pd, Pd-Au, Pd-Pt, and Pt-Pd. Silver nanocubes are used as templates during the synthesis of hollow nanoparticles with single metal shell or double shell nanocages. Most of the problems that could affect the synthesis of solid Silver nanocubes used as template as well as the double shell nanocages and their possible solutions are discussed in a detail. The sizes and shapes of the single-shell and double-shell nanocages were characterized by a regular and high-resolution TEM. A SEM mapping technique is also used to image the surface atoms for the double shell hollow nanoparticles in order to determine the thickness of the two metal shells. In addition, optical studies are used to monitor the effect of the dielectric properties of the other metals on the plasmonic properties of the gold nanoshell in these mixed nanoparticles.

  20. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  1. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large (∼100 m 3 ) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given

  2. Double-shell tank integrity assessments ultrasonic test equipment performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1996-09-26

    A double-shell tank (DST) inspection (DSTI) system was performance tested over three months until August 1995 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, completing a contract initiated in February 1993 to design, fabricate, and test an ultrasonic inspection system intended to provide ultrasonic test (UT) and visual data to determine the integrity of 28 DSTs at Hanford. The DSTs are approximately one-million-gallon underground radioactive-waste storage tanks. The test was performed in accordance with a procedure (Jensen 1995) that included requirements described in the contract specification (Pfluger 1995). This report documents the results of tests conducted to evaluate the performance of the DSTI system against the requirements of the contract specification. The test of the DSTI system also reflects the performance of qualified personnel and operating procedures.

  3. A generic double-curvature piezoelectric shell energy harvester: Linear/nonlinear theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. F.; Hu, S. D.; Tzou, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Converting vibration energy to useful electric energy has attracted much attention in recent years. Based on the electromechanical coupling of piezoelectricity, distributed piezoelectric zero-curvature type (e.g., beams and plates) energy harvesters have been proposed and evaluated. The objective of this study is to develop a generic linear and nonlinear piezoelectric shell energy harvesting theory based on a double-curvature shell. The generic piezoelectric shell energy harvester consists of an elastic double-curvature shell and piezoelectric patches laminated on its surface(s). With a current model in the closed-circuit condition, output voltages and energies across a resistive load are evaluated when the shell is subjected to harmonic excitations. Steady-state voltage and power outputs across the resistive load are calculated at resonance for each shell mode. The piezoelectric shell energy harvesting mechanism can be simplified to shell (e.g., cylindrical, conical, spherical, paraboloidal, etc.) and non-shell (beam, plate, ring, arch, etc.) distributed harvesters using two Lamé parameters and two curvature radii of the selected harvester geometry. To demonstrate the utility and simplification procedures, the generic linear/nonlinear shell energy harvester mechanism is simplified to three specific structures, i.e., a cantilever beam case, a circular ring case and a conical shell case. Results show the versatility of the generic linear/nonlinear shell energy harvesting mechanism and the validity of the simplification procedures.

  4. Restoration of Secondary Containment in Double Shell Tank (DST) Pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHEN, E.J.

    2000-10-05

    Cracks found in many of the double-shell tank (DST) pump and valve pits bring into question the ability of the pits to provide secondary containment and remain in compliance with State and Federal regulations. This study was commissioned to identify viable options for maintain/restoring secondary containment capability in these pits. The basis for this study is the decision analysis process which identifies the requirements to be met and the desired goals (decision criteria) that each option will be weighed against. A facilitated workshop was convened with individuals knowledgeable of Tank Farms Operations, engineering practices, and safety/environmental requirements. The outcome of this workshop was the validation or identification of the critical requirements, definition of the current problem, identification and weighting of the desired goals, baselining of the current repair methods, and identification of potential alternate solutions. The workshop was followed up with further investigations into the potential solutions that were identified in the workshop and through other efforts. These solutions are identified in the body of this report. Each of the potential solutions were screened against the list of requirements and only those meeting the requirements were considered viable options. To expand the field of viable options, hybrid concepts that combine the strongest features of different individual approaches were also examined. Several were identified. The decision analysis process then ranked each of the viable options against the weighted decision criteria, which resulted in a recommended solution. The recommended approach is based upon installing a sprayed on coating system.

  5. Restoration of Secondary Containment in Double Shell Tank (DST) Pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHEN, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Cracks found in many of the double-shell tank (DST) pump and valve pits bring into question the ability of the pits to provide secondary containment and remain in compliance with State and Federal regulations. This study was commissioned to identify viable options for maintain/restoring secondary containment capability in these pits. The basis for this study is the decision analysis process which identifies the requirements to be met and the desired goals (decision criteria) that each option will be weighed against. A facilitated workshop was convened with individuals knowledgeable of Tank Farms Operations, engineering practices, and safety/environmental requirements. The outcome of this workshop was the validation or identification of the critical requirements, definition of the current problem, identification and weighting of the desired goals, baselining of the current repair methods, and identification of potential alternate solutions. The workshop was followed up with further investigations into the potential solutions that were identified in the workshop and through other efforts. These solutions are identified in the body of this report. Each of the potential solutions were screened against the list of requirements and only those meeting the requirements were considered viable options. To expand the field of viable options, hybrid concepts that combine the strongest features of different individual approaches were also examined. Several were identified. The decision analysis process then ranked each of the viable options against the weighted decision criteria, which resulted in a recommended solution. The recommended approach is based upon installing a sprayed on coating system

  6. Interface Control Document Between the Double Shell Tanks (DST) System and the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAY, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies the requirements and responsibilities for all parties to support waste transfer from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System of the River Protection Project (RPP). This Interface Control Document (ICD) will not attempt to control the physical portion of this interface because the physical equipment making up this interface, and any associated interface requirements, are already in place, operational and governed by existing operating specifications and other documentation. The PFP and DST Systems have a direct physical interface (the waste transfer pipeline) that travels between the 241-2 Building (TK-D5) and DST SY-102 via 244-TX double-contained receiver tank (DCRT). The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the RPP DST System and organization/companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  7. Semiclassical shell structure and nuclear double-humped fission barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Magner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We derived the semiclassical trace formulas for the level density as sums over periodic-orbit families and isolated orbits within the improved stationary phase method. Averaged level-density shell corrections and shell-structure energies are continuous through all symmetry-breaking (bifurcation points with the correct asymptotics of the standard stationary phase approach accounting for continuous symmetries. We found enhancement of the nuclear shell structure near bifurcations in the superdeformed region. Our semiclassical results for the averaged level densities with the gross-shell and more thin-shell structures and the energy shell corrections for critical deformations are in good agreement with the quantum calculations for several single-particle Hamiltonians, in particular for the potentials with a sharp spheroidal shape. Enhancement of the shell structure owing to bifurcations of the shortest 3-dimensional orbits from equatorial orbits is responsible for the second well of fission barrier in a superdeformation region.

  8. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT. DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    M and D Professional Services, Inc. (M and D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh

  9. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-101. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes m support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AP-101. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AP-101 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 provides the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report supported the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-05. The characterization information in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. Appendix A provides historical information for tank 241-AP-101 including surveillance, information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a model based upon process knowledge. Appendix B summarizes recent sampling events and historical sampling information. Tank 241-AP-101 was grab sampled in November 1995, when the tank contained 2,790 kL (737 kgal) of waste. An addition1034al 1,438 kL (380 kgal) of waste was received from tank 241-AW-106 in transfers on March 1996 and January 1997. This waste was the product of the 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1. Characterization information for the additional 1,438 kL (380 kgal) was obtained using grab sampling data from tank 241-AW-106 and a slurry sample from the evaporator. Appendix C reports on the statistical analysis and numerical manipulation of data used in

  10. Double-shell target designs for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory eight-beam laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindel, J.M.; Stroscio, M.A.

    1978-03-01

    We investigate two double-pusher laser fusion targets, one that incorporates an outer exploding pusher shell and another that uses velocity multiplication. Specific designs are presented for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Eight-Beam Laser System

  11. Flammable gas project expert elicitation results for Hanford Site double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the second phase of parameter quantification by the flammable gas expert panel. This second phase is focused on the analysis of flammable gas accidents in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks. The first phase of parameter quantification, performed in 1997 was focused on the analysis of Hanford single-shell tanks

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    M and D Professional Services, Inc. (M and D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS

  13. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  14. Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions

  15. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AW-105. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AW-105 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone Characterization. information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. While only the results of a recent sampling event will be used to fulfill the requirements of the data quality objectives (DQOs), other information can be used to support or question conclusions derived from these results. Historical information for tank 241-AW-105 is provided in Appendix A, including surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. The recent sampling event listed, as well as pertinent sample data obtained before 1996, are summarized in Appendix B along with the sampling results. The results of the 1996 grab sampling event satisfied the data requirements specified in the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for this tank. In addition, the tank headspace flammability was measured, which addresses

  16. Organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Heasler, P.G.; Whitney, P.D.

    1994-04-01

    Safety of Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing organic carbon is a concern because the carbon in the presence of oxidizers (NO 3 or NO 2 ) is combustible when sufficiently concentrated and exposed to elevated temperatures. A propagating chemical reaction could potentially occur at high temperature (above 200 C). The rapid increase in temperature and pressure within a tank might result in the release of radioactive waste constituents to the environment. The purpose of this study is to gather available laboratory information about the organic carbon waste inventories stored in the Hanford SSTs. Specifically, the major objectives of this investigation are: Review laboratory analytical data and measurements for SST composite core and supernatant samples for available organic data; Assess the correlation of organic carbon estimated utilizing the TRAC computer code compared to laboratory measurements; and From the laboratory analytical data, estimate the TOC content with confidence levels for each of the 149 SSTs

  17. Double-shell tank annulus pumping alternative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIESENWEBER, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This engineering evaluation compares five alternative schemes for maintaining emergency annulus pumping equipment in a reliable condition. The five schemes are: (1) continue status quo; (2) periodic pump removal and run-in; (3) periodic in-place limited maintenance; (4) uninstalled ready spares; and (5) expanded mission of Single-Shell Tank Emergency Pumping Trailer. Each alternative is described, the pros and cons identified, and rough order of magnitude life-cycle costs computed. The alternatives are compared using weighted evaluation criteria. The evaluation concludes that staging adjustable length submersible pumps in the Single-Shell Tank Emergency Pumping Trailer has the best cost-benefit characteristics

  18. Surface energy effect on free vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Chang-Song; Liu, Jin-Xi; Liu, Xiang-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Combining Goldenveizer-Novozhilov shell theory, thin plate theory and electro-elastic surface theory, the size-dependent vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures under simply supported boundary condition is presented, and the surface energy effect on the natural frequencies is discussed. The displacement components of the cylindrical nano-shells and annular nano-plates are expanded as the superposition of standard Fourier series based on Hamilton's principle. The total stresses with consideration of surface energy effect are derived, and the total energy function is obtained by using Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The free vibration equation is solved, and the natural frequency is analyzed. In numerical examples, it is found that the surface elastic constant, piezoelectric constant and surface residual stress show different effects on the natural frequencies. The effect of surface piezoelectric constant is the maximum. The effect of dimensions of the double-shell under different surface material properties is also examined.

  19. Sound transmission through double cylindrical shells lined with porous material under turbulent boundary layer excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shell lined with poroelastic material in the core, excited by pressure fluctuations due to the exterior turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Biot's model is used to describe the sound wave propagating in the porous material. Three types of constructions, bonded-bonded, bonded-unbonded and unbonded-unbonded, are considered in this study. The power spectral density (PSD) of the inner shell kinetic energy is predicted for two turbulent boundary layer models, different air gap depths and three types of polyimide foams, respectively. The peaks of the inner shell kinetic energy due to shell resonance, hydrodynamic coincidence and acoustic coincidence are discussed. The results show that if the frequency band over the ring frequency is of interest, an air gap, even if very thin, should exist between the two elastic shells for better sound insulation. And if small density foam has a high flow resistance, a superior sound insulation can still be maintained.

  20. Arsenic, chromium and mercury removal using mussel shell ash or a sludge/ashes waste mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco-Reigosa, Natalia; Peña-Rodríguez, Susana; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2013-04-01

    Different batches of valued mussel shell and waste mussel shell ash are characterised. Shell ash has pH > 12 and high electrical conductivities (between 16.01 and 27.27 dS m(-1)), while calcined shell shows pH values up to 10.7 and electrical conductivities between 1.19 and 3.55 dS m(-1). X-ray fluorescence, nitric acid digestion and water extractions show higher concentrations in shell ash for most parameters. Calcite is the dominant crystalline compound in this ash (95.6%), followed by aragonite. Adsorption/desorption trials were performed for mussel shell ash and for a waste mixture including shell ash, sewage sludge and wood ash, showing the following percentage adsorptions: Hg(II) >94%, As(V) >96% and Cr(VI) between 11 and 30% for shell ash; Hg(II) >98%, As(V) >88% and Cr(VI) between 30 and 88% for the waste mixture. Hg and As desorption was ash and the waste mixture, while Cr desorption was between 92 and 45% for shell ash, and between 19 and 0% for the mixture. In view of that, mussel shell ash and the mixture including shell ash, sewage sludge and wood ash could be useful for Hg(II) and As(V) removal.

  1. Effect of perforation on the sound transmission through a double-walled cylindrical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunlin; Mao, Yijun; Qi, Datong

    2017-12-01

    An analytical model is developed to study the sound transmission loss through a general double-walled cylindrical shell system with one or two walls perforated, which is excited by a plane wave in the presence of external mean flow. The shell motion is governed by the classical Donnell's thin shell theory, and the mean particle velocity model is employed to describe boundary conditions at interfaces between the shells and fluid media. In contrast to the conventional solid double-walled shell system, numerical results show that perforating the inner shell in the transmission side improves sound insulation performance over a wide frequency band, and removes fluctuation of sound transmission loss with frequency at mid-frequencies in the absence of external flow. Both the incidence and azimuthal angles have nearly negligible effect on the sound transmission loss over the low and middle frequency range when perforating the inner shell. Width of the frequency band with continuous sound transmission loss can be tuned by the perforation ratio.

  2. Evaluating Feed Delivery Performance in Scaled Double-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kearn P.; Thien, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOCs' ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP WAC Data Quality Objectives must be demonstrated. The tank mixing and feed delivery must support both TOC and WTP operations. The tank mixing method must be able to remove settled solids from the tank and provide consistent feed to the WTP to facilitate waste treatment operations. Two geometrically scaled tanks were used with a broad spectrum of tank waste simulants to demonstrate that mixing using two rotating mixer jet pumps yields consistent slurry compositions as the tank is emptied in a series of sequential batch transfers. Testing showed that the concentration of slow settling solids in each transfer batch was consistent over a wide range of tank operating conditions. Although testing demonstrated that the concentration of fast settling solids decreased by up to 25% as the tank was emptied, batch-to-batch consistency improved as mixer jet nozzle velocity in the scaled tanks increased

  3. Structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P.; Baliga, R.

    1993-01-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 is a 1,000,000 gallon tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With time the waste has formed two layers of sludge, a convective and a nonconvective layer. In addition, a crust has formed over the surface of the waste, isolating the convective layer from the vapor space. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer and under the crust. Over time, this hydrogen buildup increases pressure on the crust from beneath. Every 100 to 140 days, the pressure is released when the crust lifts upward in what is called a waste rollover. To prevent the release of a large volume of hydrogen to the vapor space, a mixer pump has been designed to be installed in the tank to circulate the waste and reduce or prevent the hydrogen buildup. The structural analysis and evaluation designed as part of the hydrogen mitigation test process and presented herein addresses the response of the mixer pump and the tank dome resulting from expected operational and design loads. The loads include deadweight, waste rollover, asymmetric thrust, and pump vibration, as well as seismic loads. The seismically induced loads take into consideration both the convective and the impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank. The structural evaluations were performed in accordance with applicable national codes and standards. The qualification of the mixer pump required the design of a unique mounting assembly to transfer the loads from the pump to the surrounding soil without overstressing the structural components such as the dome penetration riser. Also, special consideration was given to minimize the additional stresses in the already stressed concrete tank dome

  4. Double Systems in Collection of Sorted Waste

    OpenAIRE

    白須賀, 公平

    1995-01-01

    Primary, middle and high schools, vocational schools, colleges and universities are enterprises whose principal purpose is to provide educations. Of these, colleges and universities are usually large enterprises frequently involved medical activies. Waste discharged by these enterprises fits the description of the general waste and the industrial (or business) waste rather than the combustible waste and noncombustible waste as proposed by local goverments. Classification as the combustible wa...

  5. Double-shell inertial confinement fusion target fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, C.W.; Lorensen, L.E.; Weinstein, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    First generation hemishells, from which spherical shells are constructed, were fabricated by micromachining coated mandrels and by molding. The remachining of coated mandrels are described in detail. Techniques were developed for coating the microsized mandrels with polymeric and metallic materials by methods including conformal coating, vapor deposition, plasma polymerization and thermoforming. Micropositioning equipment and bonding techniques have also been developed to assemble the hemishells about a fuel pellet maintaining a spherical concentricity of better than 2 μm and voids in the hemishell bonding line of a few hundred angstroms or less

  6. A double copy for N=2 supergravity: a linearised tale told on-shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, G.L.; Nagy, S.; Nampuri, S.

    2016-01-01

    We construct the on-shell double copy dictionary for linearised four-dimensional N=2 supergravity coupled to one vector multiplet with a quadratic prepotential. We apply this dictionary to the weak-field approximation of dyonic BPS black holes in this theory.

  7. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found

  8. Preliminary Heat Transfer Studies for the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Transfer Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HECHT, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer studies were made to determine the thermal characteristics of double-shell tank transfer piping under both transient and steady-state conditions. A number of design and operation options were evaluated for this piping system which is in its early design phase

  9. A double copy for N=2 supergravity: a linearised tale told on-shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, G.L.; Nagy, S.; Nampuri, S. [Center for Mathematical Analysis, Geometry and Dynamical Systems, Department of Mathematics, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-10-24

    We construct the on-shell double copy dictionary for linearised four-dimensional N=2 supergravity coupled to one vector multiplet with a quadratic prepotential. We apply this dictionary to the weak-field approximation of dyonic BPS black holes in this theory.

  10. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) FY2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria be discovered

  11. Organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Heasler, P.G.; Whitney, P.D.

    1994-07-01

    This report documents an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) involving the organic carbon laboratory measurement data for Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTS) obtained from a review of the laboratory analytical data. This activity was undertaken at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The objective of this study is to provide a best estimate, including confidence levels, of total organic carbon (TOC) in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford. The TOC analyte information presented in this report is useful as part of the criteria to identify SSTs for additional measurements or monitoring for the organic safety program. This report is a precursor to an investigation of TOC and moisture in Hanford SSTS, in order to provide best estimates for each together in one report. Measured laboratory data were obtained for 75 of the 149 SSTS. The data represent a thorough investigation of data from 224 tank characterization datasets, including core-sampling and process laboratory data. Liquid and solid phase TOC values were investigated by examining selected tanks with both reported TOC values in solid and liquid phases. Some relationships were noted, but there was no clustering of data or significance between the solid and liquid phases. A methodology was developed for estimating the distribution and levels of TOC in SSTs using a logarithmic scale and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique. The methodology grouped tanks according to waste type using the Sort On Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) grouping method. The SORWT model categorizes Hanford SSTs into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar characteristics based on major waste types and processing histories. The methodology makes use of laboratory data for the particular tank and information about the SORWT group of which the tank is a member. Recommendations for a simpler tank grouping strategy based on organic transfer records were made

  12. Study of shrimp shell derivatives for treating of low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayeripour, S. [Tonkabon Islamic Azad Univ., Tonkabon (Iran, Islamic Republic of). College of the Environment; Malmasi, S. [North Tehran Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). College of the Environment

    2006-07-01

    Chitin derivatives can be used to treat liquid wastes that include heavy metals of radionuclides. In this study, 4 types of chitin derivatives from shrimp shell waste were investigated for their potential in decontaminating and treating low-level radioactive liquid waste (LLW). The adsorption of caesium (Cs); cobalt (Co); and manganese (Mn) isotopes on chitin derivatives were investigated using a batch and column system with variations in diameter, pH, and length of treatment. Chitin derivatives included shrimp shells; de-mineralized shrimp shells; chitin extracted from shrimp shells; and chitosan extracted from shrimp shell waste. Three types of simulated solutions were prepared to study and compare adsorption performance: (1) a mono cationic solution consisting of stable isotopes; (2) a solution containing 3 stable cations; and (3) a simulated radioactive waste containing Cs-137, Co-60, and Mn-54. Results of the experiments showed that all 4 chitin derivatives were capable of adsorbing the isotopes. Despite its low pH, chitosan showed the highest adsorption efficiency. It was concluded that shrimps shells provided unreliable results under different operating conditions. The demineralized shells were suitable for removing Co from solutions. Row shells were not recommended as a suitable adsorbent for radionuclides removal. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. Double-Shell Tanks System Maintenance and Recovery Needs Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    This report represents an initial effort to identify maintenance equipment needed to support critical components used for delivery of waste feed to the Waste Isolation and Treatment Plant (WTP). Rough estimates of cost benefits for selected maintenance capabilities are provided. A follow-on to this report should include a detailed cost analysis showing cost benefits and tradeoffs in selection and development of specific maintenance capabilities. Critical component failures during delivery of waste feed from the DSTs to the WTP have the potential to idle WTP facilities if the duration of the recovery operations are long enough to allow the WTP to exhaust a planned 60-day lag storage capacity for waste feed. If a critical component within the transfer route fails, current planning does not provide for an alternative HLW feed source. Critical components with relatively high failure frequencies and recovery times are identified, along with a summary of documentation regarding historical maintenance and recovery operations and planning. Components, such as mixer pumps and transfer pumps, are estimated to have relatively long recovery times due, in part, to the current practice of sending spare pumps, when needed, off-site to a remote location, for vendor refurbishment and testing prior to installation in a tank. No capability is provided on-site for pump ''run-in''. As neither the spare pumps in storage, installed pumps, or other critical components are subjected to periodic preventive maintenance, and these critical components are planned to be operated intermittently over a long period of time, component failures are to be expected. Recommendations are made for further analysis to identify specific equipment cost benefits, development costs, and tradeoffs in selection of alternatives. This new equipment will provide capabilities for component storage and maintenance in line with vendor recommendations, reduce the duration of recovery operations, and support personnel

  14. Pion-nucleus double charge exchange and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The pion-nucleus double charge exchange reaction is studied with special emphasis on nuclear structure. The reaction mechanism and nuclear structure aspects of the process are separated using both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. Predictions are made employing both the seniority model and a full shell model (with a single active orbit). Transitions to the double analog state and to the ground state of the residual nucleus are computed. The seniority model yields particularly simple relations among double charge exchange cross sections for nuclei within the same shell. Limitations of the seniority model and of the plane-wave impulse approximation are discussed as well as extensions to the generalized seniority scheme. Applications of the foregoing ideas to single charge exchange are also presented

  15. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS and RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, T.C.; Johnson, K.I.; Deibler, J.E.; Pilli, S.P.; Rinker, M.W.; Karri, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to

  16. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiere, S.

    2006-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  17. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor's controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first

  18. Adsorption of violet B by agricultural waste of soft pistachio shells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, inexpensive agricultural waste pistachio sells was used for adsorption of violet B. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to characterize the pistachio shells. The morphology of pistachio shell was studied by SEM and it showed the porous structure of ...

  19. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program

  20. Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1.78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford are forcing the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter shall be chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks

  1. On calculating double logarithmical asymptotics of vertex functions defined on the mass shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokurov, V.V.; Usyukina, N.I.

    1981-01-01

    The essence of the calculation method of double logarithmical asymptotics of vertex functions defined on the mass shell is presented. Using the method the asymptotics of the form-factor of electron is calculated. The ladder and cross-ladder diagrams are asymptotically considerable in every order of the perturbation theory. The way in which the asymptotics of the 4-order diagrams is calculated has been shown. The diagrams of this order and reduction procedures for them are given in a graphic form. The photon mass μ 2 not equal to 0 plays the role of a regulator, removing infrared divergencies. The double logarithmical asymptotics of the form-factor of electron on the mass shell is calculated rigorously in an arbitrary order of the perturbation theory [ru

  2. Development and Deployment of the Extended Reach Sluicing System (ERSS) for Retrieval of Hanford Single Shell Tank Waste. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Roger E.; Figley, Reed R.; Innes, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    A history of the evolution and the design development of Extended Reach Sluicer System (ERSS) is presented. Several challenges are described that had to be overcome to create a machine that went beyond the capabilities of prior generation sluicers to mobilize waste in Single Shell Tanks for pumping into Double Shell Tank receiver tanks. Off-the-shelf technology and traditional hydraulic fluid power systems were combined with the custom-engineered components to create the additional functionality of the ERSS, while still enabling it to fit within very tight entry envelope into the SST. Problems and challenges inevitably were encountered and overcome in ways that enhance the state of the art of fluid power applications in such constrained environments. Future enhancements to the ERSS design are explored for retrieval of tanks with different dimensions and internal obstacles

  3. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AZ-101. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found one reportable indication of thinning and no reportable pitting, corrosion, or cracking

  4. Acceptance criteria for non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    This supporting document provides requirements for acceptance of relevant indications found during non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford 200 areas. Requirements for evaluation of relevant indications are provided to determine acceptability of continued safe operation of the DSTs. Areas of the DSTs considered include the tank wall vapor space, liquid-vapor interface, wetted tank wall, sludge-liquid interface, and the knuckle region

  5. Criticality safety evaluation of disposing of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank AW-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROGERS, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation is made of the disposal of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank (DST) AW-105 located in the 200 east area of Hanford Site. The technical basis is provided for limits and controls to be used in the development of a criticality prevention specification (CPS). A model of K Basin sludge is developed to account for fuel burnup. The iron/uranium mass ration required to ensure an acceptable magrin of subcriticality is determined

  6. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-04-17

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop {number_sign}2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages.

  7. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem Definition Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    The description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem presented in this document was developed to establish its boundaries. The DST Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem consists of new and existing equipment and facilities used to provide tank farm operators logistic support and problem resolution for the DST System during operations. This support will include evaluating equipment status, performing preventive and corrective maintenance, developing work packages, managing spares and consumables, supplying tooling, and training maintenance and operations personnel

  8. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AY-102. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found some indication of insignificant general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected

  9. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AN-105 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AN-105. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AN-105 primary tank wall primary knuckle, and secondary tank bottom. The inspection found some indication of general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected

  10. Structures of $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei studied with microscopic cluster models

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2018-01-01

    $0s$-orbit $\\Lambda$ states in $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei ($^{\\ \\,A}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}Z$), $^{\\ \\,8}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{\\ \\,9}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{10,11,12}_{\\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Be}$, $^{12,13}_{\\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{B}$, and $^{\\,14}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{C}$ are investigated. Microscopic cluster models are applied to core nuclear part and a potential model is adopted for $\\Lambda$ particles. The $\\Lambda$-core potential is a folding ...

  11. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop number-sign 2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages

  12. Impacts and Compliance Implementation Plans and Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required

  13. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt

  14. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT-BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, T.C.; Johnson, K.I.; Deibler, J.E.; Pilli, S.P.; Rinker, M.W.; Karri, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor

  15. Neutrinoless double-β decay matrix elements in large shell-model spaces with the generator-coordinate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, C. F.; Engel, J.; Holt, J. D.

    2017-11-01

    We use the generator-coordinate method (GCM) with realistic shell-model interactions to closely approximate full shell-model calculations of the matrix elements for the neutrinoless double-β decay of 48Ca, 76Ge, and 82Se. We work in one major shell for the first isotope, in the f5 /2p g9 /2 space for the second and third, and finally in two major shells for all three. Our coordinates include not only the usual axial deformation parameter β , but also the triaxiality angle γ and neutron-proton pairing amplitudes. In the smaller model spaces our matrix elements agree well with those of full shell-model diagonalization, suggesting that our Hamiltonian-based GCM captures most of the important valence-space correlations. In two major shells, where exact diagonalization is not currently possible, our matrix elements are only slightly different from those in a single shell.

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs). The bases of the analytical work presented herein are two ANSYS{reg_sign} finite element models that were developed to represent a bounding-case tank. The TaLA model includes the effects of temperature on material properties, creep, concrete cracking, and various waste and annulus pressure-loading conditions. The seismic model considers the interaction of the tanks with the surrounding soil including a range of soil properties, and the effects of the waste contents during a seismic event. The structural evaluations completed with the representative tank models do not reveal any structural deficiencies with the integrity of the DSTs. The analyses represent 60 years of use, which extends well beyond the current date. In addition, the temperature loads imposed on the model are significantly more severe than any service to date or proposed for the future. Bounding material properties were also selected to provide the most severe combinations. While the focus of the analyses was a bounding-case tank, it was necessary during various evaluations to conduct tank-specific analyses. The primary tank buckling evaluation was carried out on a tank-specific basis because of the sensitivity to waste height, specific gravity, tank wall thickness, and primary tank vapor space vacuum limit. For this analysis, the occurrence of maximum tank vacuum was classified as a service level C, emergency load condition. The only area of potential concern in the analysis was with the buckling evaluation of the AP tank, which showed the current limit on demand of l2-inch water gauge vacuum to exceed the allowable of 10.4 inches. This determination was based on analysis at the

  17. Corrections to the neutrinoless double-β-decay operator in the shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jonathan; Hagen, Gaute

    2009-06-01

    We use diagrammatic perturbation theory to construct an effective shell-model operator for the neutrinoless double-β decay of Se82. The starting point is the same Bonn-C nucleon-nucleon interaction that is used to generate the Hamiltonian for recent shell-model calculations of double-β decay. After first summing high-energy ladder diagrams that account for short-range correlations and then adding diagrams of low order in the G matrix to account for longer-range correlations, we fold the two-body matrix elements of the resulting effective operator with transition densities from the recent shell-model calculation to obtain the overall nuclear matrix element that governs the decay. Although the high-energy ladder diagrams suppress this matrix element at very short distances as expected, they enhance it at distances between one and two fermis, so that their overall effect is small. The corrections due to longer-range physics are large, but cancel one another so that the fully corrected matrix element is comparable to that produced by the bare operator. This cancellation between large and physically distinct low-order terms indicates the importance of a reliable nonperturbative calculation.

  18. Hollow Pd/MOF Nanosphere with Double Shells as Multifunctional Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mingming; Zhang, Xinlu; Li, Meiyan; Chen, Bo; Yin, Jie; Jin, Haichao; Lin, Lin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ning

    2017-10-01

    A new type of hollow nanostructure featured double metal-organic frameworks shells with metal nanoparticles (MNPs) is designed and fabricated by the methods of ship in a bottle and bottle around the ship. The nanostructure material, hereinafter denoted as Void@HKUST-1/Pd@ZIF-8, is confirmed by the analyses of photograph, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma, and N 2 sorption. It possesses various multifunctionally structural characteristics such as hollow cavity which can improve mass transfer, the adjacent of the inner HKUST-1 shell to the void which enables the matrix of the shell to host and well disperse MNPs, and an outer ZIF-8 shell which acts as protective layer against the leaching of MNPs and a sieve to guarantee molecular-size selectivity. This makes the material eligible candidates for the heterogeneous catalyst. As a proof of concept, the liquid-phase hydrogenation of olefins with different molecular sizes as a model reaction is employed. It demonstrates the efficient catalytic activity and size-selectivity of Void@HKUST-1/Pd@ZIF-8. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Contaminant Release from Residual Waste in Closed Single-Shell Tanks and Other Waste Forms Associated with the Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the release of contaminants from the various waste forms that are anticipated to be associated with closure of the single-shell tanks. These waste forms include residual sludge or saltcake that will remain in the tanks after waste retrieval. Other waste forms include engineered glass and cementitious materials as well as contaminated soil impacted by previous tank leaks. This chapter also describes laboratory testing to quantify contaminant release and how the release data are used in performance/risk assessments for the tank waste management units and the onsite waste disposal facilities. The chapter ends with a discussion of the surprises and lessons learned to date from the testing of waste materials and the development of contaminant release models

  20. The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel reg sign polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5 reg sign, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90 degree C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs

  1. Mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene (PP) composites filled with modified shell waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Z.T., E-mail: sxyzt@126.com [College of Materials Science and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, T. [Department of Ocean Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, H.Y. [Zhoushan Ocean Research Institute, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan 316021 (China); Xia, M.S., E-mail: msxia@zju.edu.cn [Department of Ocean Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Ye, Y.; Zheng, H. [Department of Ocean Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Adding modified shell powder could significantly increase the properties of PP. • The modified shell powder could act as a nucleating agent in PP matrix. • The modified shell powder has a potential to be used as a bio-filler. -- Abstract: Shell waste, with its high content of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) plus organic matrix, has a potential to be used as a bio-filler. In this work, shell waste was modified by furfural and then incorporated to reinforce polypropylene (PP). The shell waste and modified powder were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The mechanical and thermal properties of neat PP and PP composites were investigated as well. Thermal gravimetric (TG) analyses confirmed the reinforcing role of modified powder in PP composites. The mechanical properties studied showed that adding modified powder could significantly increase the impact strength, elongation at break point and flexural modulus of composites. The maximum incorporation content could reach 15 wt.% with a good balance between toughness and stiffness of PP composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed that the modified powder could act as a nucleating agent and thus increase the crystallization temperature of PP. Polarized optical microscopy (POM) observation also indicated that the introduction of modified powder could promote the heterogeneous nucleation of PP matrix.

  2. Synthesis of double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe3O4/TiO2/Au microspheres and their catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Tan, Li; Wang, Ge; Yang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres were successfully synthesized through loading Au nanoparticles on the Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 support by a in situ reduction of HAuCl 4 with NaBH 4 aqueous solution. These microspheres possess tunable cavity size, adjustable shell layers, high structural stability and large specific surface area. The Au nanoparticles of approximately 5 nm in diameter were loaded both on the TiO 2 nanofibers and inside the cavities of sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 microspheres. The sea urchin-like structure composed of TiO 2 nanofibers ensure the good distribution of the Au nanoparticles, while the novel double-shelled yolk-shell structure guarantees the high stability of the Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Fe 3 O 4 magnetic core facilitates the convenient recovery of the catalyst by applying an external magnetic field. The Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres display excellent activities and recycling properties in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP): the rate constant is 1.84 min −1 and turnover frequency is 5457 h −1 . (paper)

  3. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40{+-}20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the {open_quotes}plasma shell{close_quotes} regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.

  4. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A.

    1997-11-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40±20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the 'plasma shell' regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array

  5. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases Z-accelerator X-ray power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40 ± 20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the plasma shell regime, where the plasma generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array

  6. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases Z-accelerator X-ray power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40 {+-} 20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the plasma shell regime, where the plasma generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.

  7. Green Biodiesel Synthesis Using Waste Shells as Sustainable Catalysts with Camelina sativa Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Hangun-Balkir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste utilization is an essential component of sustainable development and waste shells are rarely used to generate practical products and processes. Most waste shells are CaCO3 rich, which are converted to CaO once calcined and can be employed as inexpensive and green catalysts for the synthesis of biodiesel. Herein, we utilized lobster and eggshells as green catalysts for the transesterification of Camelina sativa oil as feedstock into biodiesel. Camelina sativa oil is an appealing crop option as feedstock for biodiesel production because it has high tolerance of cold weather, drought, and low-quality soils and contains approximately 40% oil content. The catalysts from waste shells were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscope. The product, biodiesel, was studied by 1H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of methanol to oil ratio, reaction time, reaction temperature, and catalyst concentration were investigated. Optimum biodiesel yields were attained at a 12 : 1 (alcohol : oil molar ratio with 1 wt.% heterogeneous catalysts in 3 hours at 65°C. The experimental results exhibited a first-order kinetics and rate constants and activation energy were calculated for the transesterification reaction at different temperatures. The fuel properties of the biodiesel produced from Camelina sativa oil and waste shells were compared with those of the petroleum-based diesel by using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards.

  8. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite from waste egg-shell by Precipitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the samples. At optimal conditions, calculated stoichiometric ratio of Ca/P of the synthesized HAp powder (74 - 0565) of 1.65 closed to the theoretical value of Ca/P ratio (1.67) and amenable to biomedical applications, was obtained. Keywords: Hydroxyapatite; Egg-shell; Precipitation Method, Ca/P Stoichiometric Ratio.

  9. The use of waste mussel shells for the adsorption of dyes and heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Chrysi A.; Krey, Grigorios; Stamatis, Nikolaos; Kallaniotis, Argyris

    2016-04-01

    Mussel culture is very important sector of the Greek agricultural economy. The majority of mussel culture activities take place in the area of Central Macedonia, Greece, 60% of total mussel production in Greece producing almost 12 tons of waste mussels shells on a daily basis. Currently there is no legislation concerning the disposal of mussel shells. In the present study the waste shells were used for the removal of dyes and heavy metals from aqueous solutions while powdered mussel shells were added in activated sludge processes for the removal of hexavalent chromium. Mussel shells were cleaned, dried and then crushed in order to form a powder. Powdered mussels shells were used in standard adsorption experiments for the removal of methylene blue and methyl red as well as for the removal of Cr (VI), Cd and Cu. Moreover the powdered mussel shells were added in laboratory scale activated sludge reactors treating synthetic wastewater with hexavalent chromium, in order investigate the effects in activated sludge processes and their potential attribution to the removal of hexavalent chromium. Adsorption experiments indicated almost 100% color removal, while adsorption was directly proportional to the amount of powdered mussel shells added in each case. The isotherms calculated for the case of methylene blue indicated similar adsorption capacity and properties to those of the commercially available activated carbon SAE 2, Norit. High removal efficiencies were observed for the metals, especially in the case of chromium and copper. The addition of powdered mussel shells in the activated sludge processes enhanced the removal of chromium and phosphorus, while enabled the formation of heavier activated sludge flocs and thus enhanced the settling properties of the activated sludge.

  10. X-ray backlighting requirements for the double-shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    We have analyzed one specific NOVA double-shell target design and have determined the x-ray energies required for probing the performance of the implosion. It is virtually impossible to study the compression of the fuel or the motion of the inner pusher. An x-ray energy of about 9 keV appears to be ideal for measuring the behavior of the outer TaCOH shell for the majority of its travel. However, it would be advantageous to have an x-ray source of about 25 keV to measure the contact between the two shells. Development of narrowband x-ray line sources are more desirable than broadband continuum sources since the intensity per keV is many times greater in the line. Intensities of the probes are determined by the self-emission levels of the target capsule. For the 9 keV line source, an intensity of upwards to 10 15 keV/keV/sh/cm 2 /sr is required with a source area of about 0.01 cm 2

  11. Mathematical Modeling and Kinematics Analysis of Double Spherical Shell Rotary Docking Skirt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Haixia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of large trim and heel angles of the wrecked submarine, the double spherical shell rotating docking skirt is studied. According to the working principle of the rotating docking skirt, and the fixed skirt, the directional skirt, the angle skirt are simplified as the connecting rod. Therefore, the posture equation and kinematics model of the docking skirt are deduced, and according to the kinematics model, the angle of rotation of the directional skirt and the angle skirt is obtained when the wrecked submarine is in different trim and heel angles. Through the directional skirt and angle skirt with the matching rotation can make docking skirt interface in the 0°~2γ range within the rotation, to complete the docking skirt and the wrecked submarine docking. The MATLAB software is used to visualize the rotation angle of fixed skirt and directional skirt, which lays a good foundation for the development of the control of the double spherical shell rotating docking skirt in future.

  12. Composite adhesive bonds reinforced with microparticle filler based on egg shell waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2018-05-01

    A research on composite adhesive bonds reinforced with waste from hen eggs processing, i.e. egg shell waste (ESW) is based on an assumption of the utilization of agricultural/food production waste. The aim of the research is to gain new pieces of knowledge about the material utilization of ESW, i.e. to evaluate possibilities of the use of various concentrations of ESW microparticles smaller than 100 µm based on hen egg shells as the filler in a structural resin used for a creation of adhesive bonds from bearing metal elements. An adhesive bond strength, an elongation at break and a fracture surface were evaluated within the research on adhesive bonds. The experiment results proved the efficiency of ESW filler in the area of composite adhesive bonds. The adhesive bond strength was increased up of more than 17 % by adding 40 wt.% of ESW microparticles.

  13. Effect of Treated Coconut Shell and Fiber on the Resilient Modulus of Double-layer Porous Asphalt at Different Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, T. L.; Ramadhansyah, P. J.; Norhidayah, A. H.; Yaacob, H.; Hainin, M. R.; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Jayanti, D. S.; Abdullahi, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Coconut shell (CS) and coconut fiber (CF) are new waste products that have been of growing interest recently in the highway asphalt pavement industry. This study investigated the effect of CS and CF on the resilient modulus of double-layer porous asphalt (DLPA). CS aggregate 5 mm in size was substituted for the DLPA at 5%, 10%, and 15% by weight, while CF was added to the asphalt at 0.3% and 0.5% by weight. Before mixing with other aggregates, the CS and CF were treated with 5%wt Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to reduce their water absorption ability. The samples were prepared via the Marshall method. The result shows that DLPA with 10% CS aggregate has better resilient modulus under 25 °C for unaged and aged samples compared with the other substitution percentages. However, the sample with CF has a lower resilient modulus because the amount of CF has increased. In general, the substitution of 10% CS provided better resilient modulus among the other percentages.

  14. Controlled-release and preserved bioactivity of proteins from (self-assembled core-shell double-walled microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In order to address preserved protein bioactivities and protein sustained-release problems, a method for preparing double-walled microspheres with a core (protein-loaded nanoparticles with a polymer-suspended granule system-formed core and a second shell (a polymer-formed shell for controlled drug release and preserved protein bioactivities has been developed using (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W phases. The method, based on our previous microsphere preparation method (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W, employs different concentric poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide, poly(D,L-lactide, and protein-loaded nanoparticles to produce a suspended liquid which then self-assembles to form shell-core microspheres in the hydrophilic oil phase, which are then solidified in the water phase. Variations in the preparation parameters allowed complete encapsulation by the shell phase, including the efficient formation of a poly(D,L-lactide shell encapsulating a protein-loaded nanoparticle-based poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide core. This method produces core-shell double-walled microspheres that show controlled protein release and preserved protein bioactivities for 60 days. Based upon these results, we concluded that the core-shell double-walled microspheres might be applied for tissue engineering and therapy for chronic diseases, etc.Keywords: protein delivery, protein stability, core-shell microspheres, dextran nanoparticles

  15. Shape evolution of new-phased lepidocrocite VOOH from single-shelled to double-shelled hollow nanospheres on the basis of programmed reaction-temperature strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changzheng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ning, Bo; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2009-07-06

    Solid templates have been long regarded as one of the most promising ways to achieve single-shelled hollow nanostructures; however, few effective methods for the construction of multishelled hollow objects from their solid template counterparts have been developed. We report here, for the first time, a novel and convenient route to synthesizing double-shelled hollow spheres from the solid templates via programming the reaction-temperature procedures. The programmed temperature strategy developed in this work then provides an essential and general access to multishelled hollow nanostructures based on the designed extension of single-shelled hollow objects, independent of their outside contours, such as tubes, hollow spheres, and cubes. Starting from the V(OH)(2)NH(2) solid templates, we show that the relationship between the hollowing rate and the reaction temperature obey the Van't Hoff rule and Arrhenius activation-energy equation, revealing that it is the chemical reaction rather than the diffusion process that guided the whole hollowing process, despite the fact that the coupled reaction/diffusion process is involved in the hollowing process. Using the double-shelled hollow spheres as the PCM (CaCl(2).6H(2)O) matrix grants much better thermal-storage stability than that for the nanoparticles counterpart, revealing that the designed nanostructures can give rise to significant improvements for the energy-saving performance in future "smart house" systems.

  16. Preliminary performance assessment strategy for single-shell tank waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

    1991-10-01

    The disposal of the waste stored in single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site is recognized as a major environmental concern. A comprehensive program has been initiated to evaluate the various alternatives available for disposal of these wastes. Theses wastes will be disposed of in a manner consistent with applicable laws and regulations. Long-term waste isolation is one measure of performance that will be used for purposes of selection. The performance of each disposal alternative will be simulated using numerical models. Contained herein is a discussion of the strategy that has and continues to evolve to establish a general analytical framework to evaluate this performance. This general framework will be used to construct individual models of each waste disposal alternative selected for purposes of evaluation. 30 refs., 3 figs

  17. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-07-19

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability.

  18. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability

  19. Impacts of biochar and oyster shells waste on the immobilization of arsenic in highly contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongshan; Xu, Jinghua; Lv, Zhengyong; Xie, Ruijia; Huang, Liumei; Jiang, Jinping

    2018-07-01

    Soil contamination is a serious problem with deleterious impacts on global sustainability. Readily available, economic, and highly effective technologies are therefore urgently needed for the rehabilitation of contaminated sites. In this study, two readily available materials prepared from bio-wastes, namely biochar and oyster shell waste, were evaluated as soil amendments to immobilize arsenic in a highly As-contaminated soil (up to 15,000 mgAs/kg). Both biochar and oyster shell waste can effectively reduce arsenic leachability in acid soils. After application of the amendments (2-4% addition, w/w), the exchangeable arsenic fraction decreased from 105.8 to 54.0 mg/kg. The application of 2%biochar +2% oyster shell waste most effectively reduced As levels in the column leaching test by reducing the arsenic concentration in the porewater by 62.3% compared with the treatment without amendments. Biochar and oyster shell waste also reduced soluble As(III) from 374.9 ± 18.8 μg/L to 185.9 ± 16.8 μg/L and As(V) from 119.8 ± 13.0 μg/L to 56.4 ± 2.6 μg/L at a pH value of 4-5. The treatment using 4% (w/w) amendments did not result in sufficient As immobilization in highly contaminated soils; high soluble arsenic concentrations (upto193.0 μg/L)were found in the soil leachate, particularly in the form of As(III), indicating a significant potential to pollute shallow groundwater aquifers. This study provides valuable insights into the use of cost-effective and readily available materials for soil remediation and investigates the mechanisms underlying arsenic immobilization in acidic soils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport

  1. The Hidden Burden of Food Waste: The Double Energy Waste in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vittuari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The energy intensity of modern food systems represents a major issue in a scenario of decreasing oil resources and increasing population. Beside the use of renewable energy, an increased efficiency in food systems could contribute to reduce fossil fuels dependence. In this sense, food losses and waste (FLW have crucial consequences on the energy balance. Based on the concept of “embodied energy”, food wastage can be framed as a double waste of energy, both in terms of non-consumed food energy and the inputs used for production. Secondary data regarding direct and indirect energy inputs and FLW have been collected for the Italian food chain to estimate the embodied energy of food waste. Since in 2011 the production and distribution of food implied the use of 822 PJ and 18 Mt of food was discarded, 67 PJ of food energy and 100 PJ of embodied energy were wasted. These figures are equivalent to 12.2% of the total nutritional energy output and to 1.3% of the final energy use in Italy, respectively. The concept of double energy waste sheds new light on the intertwined relationship between energy and food security, suggesting that appropriate food waste reduction policies could result in a higher food production level and relevant energy savings.

  2. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTES. A MODELING APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt, mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site closure consent order entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to the proposed treatment process where a high curie (primarily 137 Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high level waste, or low level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase

  3. Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using calcined scallop shell as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirisomboonchai, Suchada; Abuduwayiti, Maidinamu; Guan, Guoqing; Samart, Chanatip; Abliz, Shawket; Hao, Xiaogang; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Abudula, Abuliti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Calcined scallop shell was used as low-cost and effective catalyst for biodiesel production. • BDF yield from waste cooking oil reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt%. • Calcined scallop shell showed good reusability. • Calcium glyceroxide played an important role on the reusability of calcined scallop shell. • Water in the waste cooking oil had negative effect on the catalytic activity of calcined scallop shell. - Abstract: Transesterification of waste cooking oil (WCO) and methanol by using calcined scallop shell (CSS) as catalyst was carried out in a closed system for biodiesel fuel (BDF) production. It is found that the optimum calcination temperature for the preparation of CSS was 1000 °C. The effects of transesterification temperature, reaction time, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst loading amount on the BDF yield were investigated. Compared with the commercial CaO, CSS showed higher catalytic activity and the BDF yield reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt% (WCO basis) and a reaction time of 2 h. The catalyst was reused for 5 cycles whilst the BDF yield decreased 23%. It is found that CaO in CSS was transferred to calcium glyceroxide after the transesterification reaction, and calcium glyceroxide also showed good catalytic activity and reusability. Furthermore, Water content in WCO had negative effect on BDF yield. It is found that BDF yield reduced 15% due to the occurring of saponification when the water content was increased from 0.64% to 2.48%. It is expected that CCS can be used as an alternative and cheap catalyst for the biodiesel production

  4. Lead sorption by waste biomass of hazelnut and almond shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Erol; Altun, Türkan; Cetin, Serpil; Iqbal Bhanger, M

    2009-08-15

    The potential to remove Pb(2+) ion from aqueous solutions using the shells of hazelnut (HNS) (Corylus avellana) and almond (AS) (Prunus dulcis) through biosorption was investigated in batch experiments. The main parameters influencing Pb(2+) ion sorption on HNS and AS were: initial metal ion concentration, amount of adsorbent, contact time and pH value of solution. The influences of initial Pb(2+) ion concentration (0.1-1.0mM), pH (2-9), contact time (10-240 min) and adsorbent amount (0.1-1.0 g) have been investigated. Equilibrium isotherms have been measured and modelled. Adsorption of Pb(2+) ions was in all cases pH-dependent showing a maximum at equilibrium pH values between 6.0 and 7.0, depending on the biomaterial, that corresponded to equilibrium pH values of 6.0 for HNS and 7.0 for AS. The equilibrium sorption capacities of HNS and AS were 28.18 and 8.08 mg/g for lead, respectively after equilibrium time of 2h. The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the experimental result inferred that adsorption, chelation and ion exchange are major adsorption mechanisms for binding Pb(2+) ion to the sorbents.

  5. Physico-chemical characterization studies of activated carbon derived from Sterculia Quadrifida seed shell waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shanthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from the Sterculia Quadrifida shell by various activation process, viz., Acid process, Chloride process, Carbonate process and Sulphate process are successfully reported. It shows excellent improvement in the surface characteristics. Their physico-chemical characterization studies such as bulk density, moisture content, ash content, fixed carbon content, matter, soluble in water, matter soluble in acid, pH, decolourizing power, porosity and specific gravity have been carried out to assess the suitability of these carbons as potential adsorbent for waste water treatment. The present study undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of a carbon adsorbent prepared from Sterculia Quadrifida seed shell waste for removal of dyes in aqueous solution.

  6. The Hidden Burden of Food Waste: The Double Energy Waste in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Vittuari; Fabio De Menna; Marco Pagani

    2016-01-01

    The energy intensity of modern food systems represents a major issue in a scenario of decreasing oil resources and increasing population. Beside the use of renewable energy, an increased efficiency in food systems could contribute to reduce fossil fuels dependence. In this sense, food losses and waste (FLW) have crucial consequences on the energy balance. Based on the concept of “embodied energy”, food wastage can be framed as a double waste of energy, both in terms of non-consumed food energ...

  7. Potential of Waste Oyster Shells as a Novel Biofiller for Hot-Mix Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Nciri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of waste oyster shells as a novel biofiller for hot-mix asphalt (HMA pavement applications. The effects of different fractions (e.g., 0, 5, 10, 15 wt % of oyster shell powder (OSP on the bitumen performance were investigated. The chemical properties of unfilled and OSP-filled asphalts were characterized by means of thin layer chromatography-ionization detection (TLC-FID, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Thermal characteristics were examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Physical and rheological properties were assessed through penetration, softening point, ductility, and dynamic shear rheometer (DSR tests. Results showed that OSP addition increased the resins content, as well as the stiffness of blends. No obvious reactions have occurred between the filler and the asphalt. A higher dose of OSP altered the morphology of the binder, whereas lower and intermediate doses improved its thermal stability and enhanced its low-temperature, rutting, and fatigue performances with respect to the plain asphalt. Overall, the waste oyster shells could be used as filler substitute, not only to improve the quality of road pavements but also to reduce the cost of their construction and solve the waste disposal problems.

  8. Co-firing option of palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends in a circulating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Hussain; Farid Nasir Ani

    2010-01-01

    Palm oil shell waste is one of the main agriculture wastes in Malaysia. In order to utilize these wastes efficiently, pyrolysis of oil-palm shell waste was first carried out using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effects of heating rate on the pyrolytic properties were investigated to evaluate its suitability for co-firing. The TGA analyses of oil palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends suggests that there is an obvious lateral shift in the thermo grams for different heating rate. Kinetics calculations were also done using integral method. For palm shell waste powder it was found that the activation energies ranged from 112-119 kJ/mole and for the Mukah coal blends it ranged from 93.3 -100.8 kJ/mole. Combustion studies for palm shell wastes and coal blends were done in a hot circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) test rig. This is the first practical experience of using this type of rig in Malaysia. The temperature dependence on the combustion and emission behaviour were identified. The effects of variation of primary air and feed rate have also been analyzed and their influence on emissions has been established. The combustion studies of palm shell wastes were done and it was found that the emission of NO x ranged from 20-164 ppm while the CO emissions were high for some operating conditions. For the co-firing studies, the NO x and CO deceased with the percentage increase in the blending ratio of coal with palm shell waste.. The optimum blending ratio was found to be in a ratio of 40 percent coal and 60 percent Mukah coal. It was also found that Mukah coal show agglomeration behaviour with when it is blended in 80% ratio. (author)

  9. Maximum credibly yield for deuteriuim-filled double shell imaging targets meeting requirements for yield bin Category A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Douglas Carl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Loomis, Eric Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-17

    We are anticipating our first NIF double shell shot using an aluminum ablator and a glass inner shell filled with deuterium shown in figure 1. The expected yield is between a few 1010 to a few 1011 dd neutrons. The maximum credible yield is 5e+13. This memo describes why, and what would be expected with variations on the target. This memo evaluates the maximum credible yield for deuterium filled double shell capsule targets with an aluminum ablator shell and a glass inner shell in yield Category A (< 1014 neutrons). It also pertains to fills of gas diluted with hydrogen, helium (3He or 4He), or any other fuel except tritium. This memo does not apply to lower z ablator dopants, such as beryllium, as this would increase the ablation efficiency. This evaluation is for 5.75 scale hohlraum targets of either gold or uranium with helium gas fills with density between 0 and 1.6 mg/cc. It could be extended to other hohlraum sizes and shapes with slight modifications. At present only laser pulse energies up to 1.5 MJ were considered with a single step laser pulse of arbitrary shape. Since yield decreases with laser energy for this target, the memo could be extended to higher laser energies if desired. These maximum laser parameters of pulses addressed here are near the edge of NIF’s capability, and constitute the operating envelope for experiments covered by this memo. We have not considered multiple step pulses, would probably create no advantages in performance, and are not planned for double shell capsules. The main target variables are summarized in Table 1 and explained in detail in the memo. Predicted neutron yields are based on 1D and 2D clean simulations.

  10. Physical and Liquid Chemical Simulant Formulations for Transuranic Waste in Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2003-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is in the process of identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the tank waste cleanup mission. A range of technologies is being evaluated to allow disposal of Hanford waste types, including transuranic (TRU) process wastes. Ten Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) have been identified whose contents may meet the criteria for designation as TRU waste: the B-200 series (241-B-201, -B-202, -B 203, and B 204), the T-200 series (241-T-201, T 202, -T-203, and -T-204), and Tanks 241-T-110 and -T-111. CH2M HILL has requested vendor proposals to develop a system to transfer and package the contact-handled TRU (CH-TRU) waste retrieved from the SSTs for subsequent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Current plans call for a modified ''dry'' retrieval process in which a liquid stream is used to help mobilize the waste for retrieval and transfer through lines and vessels. This retrieval approach requires that a significant portion of the liquid be removed from the mobilized waste sludge in a ''dewatering'' process such as centrifugation prior to transferring to waste packages in a form suitable for acceptance at WIPP. In support of CH2M HILL's effort to procure a TRU waste handling and packaging process, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed waste simulant formulations to be used in evaluating the vendor's system. For the SST CH-TRU wastes, the suite of simulants includes (1) nonradioactive chemical simulants of the liquid fraction of the waste, (2) physical simulants that reproduce the important dewatering properties of the waste, and (3) physical simulants that can be used to mimic important rheological properties of the waste at different points in the TRU waste handling and packaging process. To validate the simulant formulations, their measured properties were compared with the limited data for actual TRU waste samples. PNNL developed the final simulant formulations

  11. Reducing the effects of X-ray pre-heat in double shell NIF capsules by over-coating the high Z shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Douglas; Milovich, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Loomis, E. N.; Sauppe, J. P.; Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Renner, D. B.; Haines, B. M.; Cardenas, T.; Desjardins, T.; Palaniyappan, S.; Batha, S. H.

    2017-10-01

    Hohlraum generated X-rays will penetrate the ablator of a double shell capsule and be absorbed in the outer surface of the inner capsule. The ablative pressure this generates drives a shock into the central fuel, and a reflected shock that reaches the inner high-Z shell surface before the main shock even enters the fuel. With a beryllium over-coat preheat X-rays deposit just inside the beryllium/high z interface. The beryllium tamps the preheat expansion, eliminating ablation, and dramatically reducing pressure. The slow shock or pressure wave it generates is then overtaken by the main shock, avoiding an early shock in the fuel and increasing capsule yield.

  12. Reactive turbulent flow CFD study in supercritical water oxidation process: application to a stirred double shell reactor; Etude par simulation numerique des ecoulements turbulents reactifs dans les reacteurs d'oxydation hydrothermale: application a un reacteur agite double enveloppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussiere, S

    2006-12-15

    Supercritical water oxidation is an innovative process to treat organic liquid waste which uses supercritical water properties to mix efficiency the oxidant and the organic compounds. The reactor is a stirred double shell reactor. In the step of adaptation to nuclear constraints, the computational fluid dynamic modeling is a good tool to know required temperature field in the reactor for safety analysis. Firstly, the CFD modeling of tubular reactor confirms the hypothesis of an incompressible fluid and the use of k-w turbulence model to represent the hydrodynamic. Moreover, the EDC model is as efficiency as the kinetic to compute the reaction rate in this reactor. Secondly, the study of turbulent flow in the double shell reactor confirms the use of 2D axisymmetric geometry instead of 3D geometry to compute heat transfer. Moreover, this study reports that water-air mixing is not in single phase. The reactive turbulent flow is well represented by EDC model after adaptation of initial conditions. The reaction rate in supercritical water oxidation reactor is mainly controlled by the mixing. (author)

  13. From harmful Microcystis blooms to multi-functional core-double-shell microsphere bio-hydrochar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Pan, Gang

    2017-11-13

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) induced by eutrophication is becoming a serious global environmental problem affecting public health and aquatic ecological sustainability. A novel strategy for the utilization of biomass from HABs was developed by converting the algae cells into hollow mesoporous bio-hydrochar microspheres via hydrothermal carbonization method. The hollow microspheres were used as microreactors and carriers for constructing CaO 2 core-mesoporous shell-CaO 2 shell microspheres (OCRMs). The CaO 2 shells could quickly increase dissolved oxygen to extremely anaerobic water in the initial 40 min until the CaO 2 shells were consumed. The mesoporous shells continued to act as regulators restricting the release of oxygen from CaO 2 cores. The oxygen-release time using OCRMs was 7 times longer than when directly using CaO 2 . More interestingly, OCRMs presented a high phosphate removal efficiency (95.6%) and prevented the pH of the solution from rising to high levels in comparison with directly adding CaO 2 due to the OH - controlled-release effect of OCRMs. The distinct core-double-shell micro/nanostructure endowed the OCRMs with triple functions for oxygen controlled-release, phosphorus removal and less impact on water pH. The study is to explore the possibility to prepare smarter bio-hydrochar materials by utilizing algal blooms.

  14. Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Stephanie J.; Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Full text - Long Abstract. A routine video inspection of the annulus region of double-shell tank 241-A Y-102 in August of 2012 indicated the presence material in the annulus space between the primary and secondary liners. A comparison was made to previous inspections performed in 2006 and 2007. which indicated that a change had occurred. The material was observed at two locations on the floor of the annulus and one location at the top of the annulus region where the primary and secondary top knuckles meet (RPP-ASMT-53793). Subsequent inspections were performed. leading to additional material observed on the floor of the annulus space in a region that had not previously been inspected (WRPS-PER-2012-1363). The annulus Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) was still operational and was not indicating elevated radiation levels in the annulus region. When the camera from the inspections was recovered. it also did not indicate increased radiation above minimum contamination levels (WRPS-PER-2012-1363). A formal leak assessment team was established August 10, 2012 to review tank 241-AY-102 construction and operating histories and to determine whether the material observed in the annulus had resulted from a leak in the primary tank. The team consisted of individuals from Engineering. Base Operations and Environmental Protection. As this was a first-of-its-kind task. a method for obtaining a sample of the material in the annulus was needed. The consistency of the material was unknown.and the location of a majority of the material was not conducive to using the sampling devices that were currently available at Hanford. A subcontractor was tasked with the development fabrication.and testing of a sampling device that would be able to obtain multiple samples from the material on the annulus floor. as well as the material originating from a refractory air-slot near the floor of the annulus space. This sampler would need to be able to collect and dispense the material it collected into a

  15. Modeling of Sulfate Double-Salt in Nuclear Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghiani, B.; Lindner, J.S.; Weber, C.F.; Hunt, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) continues to adequately predict the solubility of most key chemical systems in the Hanford tank waste. For example, the ESP predictions were in fair agreement with the solubility experiments for the fluoride-phosphate system, although ESP probably underestimates the aqueous amounts. Due to the importance of this system in the formation of pipeline plugs, additional experiments have been made at elevated temperatures, and improvements to the ESP database will be made. ESP encountered problems with sulfate systems because the Public database for ESP does not include anhydrous sodium sulfate in mixed solutions below 32.4 C. This limitation leads to convergence problems and to spurious predictions of solubility near the transition point with sodium sulfate decahydrate when other salts such as sodium nitrate are present. However, ESP was able to make reasonable solubility predictions with a corrected database, demonstrating the need to validate and document the various databases that can be used by ESP. Even though ESP does not include the sulfate-nitrate double salt, this omission does not appear to be a major problem. The solubility predictions with and without the sulfate-nitrate double salt are comparable. In sharp contrast, the sulfate-fluoride double salt is included, but ESP still underestimates solubility in some cases. This problem can misrepresent the ionic strength of the solution, which is an important factor in the formation of pipeline plugs. Solubility tests on the sulfate-fluoride system are planned to provide additional data at higher temperatures and in caustic solutions. These results will be used to improve the range and accuracy of ESP predictions. ESP will continue to provide important predictions for waste processing operations while being evaluated and improved. For example, ESP will be used to determine the amount of water for the saltcake dissolution efforts at Hanford. When ESP underestimates the

  16. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTES FROM CONCEPT TO PILOT PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GENIESSE, D.J.; NELSON, E.A.; HAMILTON, D.W.; MAJORS, J.H.; NORDAHL, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site-closure consent order entered into by the US Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to a proposed pretreatment process where a high-curie (primarily 137 Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high-level waste, or low-level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase. The aforementioned parameters, along with evaporation rate, proper agitation, and residence time, determine nucleation and growth kinetics and the resulting habit and size distribution of the product crystals. These crystals properties are important considerations for designing the crystallizer and solid/liquid separation equipment. A structured program was developed to (a) demonstrate that fractional crystallization could be used to pre-treat Hanford tank wastes and (b) provide data to develop a pilot plant design

  17. Core-Shell Double Gyroid Structure Formed by Linear ABC Terpolymer Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Ségolène; Aissou, Karim; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Telitel, Siham; Pécastaings, Gilles; Wirotius, Anne-Laure; Brochon, Cyril; Cloutet, Eric; Fleury, Guillaume; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2018-05-01

    The synthesis and self-assembly in thin-film configuration of linear ABC triblock terpolymer chains consisting of polystyrene (PS), poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP), and polyisoprene (PI) are described. For that purpose, a hydroxyl-terminated PS-b-P2VP (45 kg mol -1 ) building block and a carboxyl-terminated PI (9 kg mol -1 ) are first separately prepared by anionic polymerization, and then are coupled via a Steglich esterification reaction. This quantitative and metal-free catalyst synthesis route reveals to be very interesting since functionalization and purification steps are straightforward, and well-defined terpolymers are produced. A solvent vapor annealing (SVA) process is used to promote the self-assembly of frustrated PS-b-P2VP-b-PI chains into a thin-film core-shell double gyroid (Q 230 , space group: Ia3¯d) structure. As terraces are formed within PS-b-P2VP-b-PI thin films during the SVA process under a CHCl 3 vapor, different plane orientations of the Q 230 structure ((211), (110), (111), and (100)) are observed at the polymer-air interface depending on the film thickness. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AY-101 Examination Completed August 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the secondary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning or pitting that might be present in the wall of the secondary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP--11832 (Jensen 2002) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  19. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AY-101. Examination completed October 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    AREVA NC Inc., under contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group, has performed an ultrasonic examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AY-101. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report(s) that describes the results of the AREVA ultrasonic examinations. This report is Revision 1 - more data has been added to the original report. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan, RPP-Plan-27202 (Jensen 2005) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are to be reported to CH2M Hill Hanford Group and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill Hanford Group, all data is to be recorded on electronic media and paper copies of all measurements are provided to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for third-party evaluation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is responsible for preparing a report(s) that describes the results of the AREVA NC Inc. ultrasonic examinations.

  20. Facile synthesis of hierarchical double-shell WO{sub 3} microspheres with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenfeng [College of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); State Key Laboratory of Hollow-Fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, Tianjin 300387 (China); Chu, Deqing, E-mail: dqingchu@163.com [College of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); State Key Laboratory of Hollow-Fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wang, Limin, E-mail: wanglimin@tjpu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); State Key Laboratory of Hollow-Fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wang, Lipeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Hu, Wenhui; Chen, Xiangyu; Yang, Huifang [College of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Sun, Jingjing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • HDS-WO{sub 3} were fabricated via mild process. • A possible growth mechanism for HDS-WO{sub 3} is proposed. • The excellent photocatalytic activity is attributed to the larger surface area of the HDS-WO{sub 3} nanostructures. - Abstract: Hierarchical double-shell WO{sub 3} microspheres (HDS-WO{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained through the thermal decomposition of WO{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O formed by metal salts as the templates. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, the HDS-WO{sub 3} microspheres were analyzed by the Thermogravimetric (TG) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The synthetic mechanism of the products with hierarchical structures was proposed. The obtained HDS-WO{sub 3} exhibits excellent photocatalytic efficiency (84.9%), which is much higher than other WO{sub 3} sample under visible light illumination.

  1. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-104. Examination Completed August 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-104. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AP-104 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  2. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-103. Examination completed February 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-103. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-103 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  3. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 214-AW-102 Knuckle Region. Examination completed February 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic examination of the knuckle region of Double-Shell Tank 241-AW-102 utilizing the Remotely Operated Nondestructive Examination (RONDE) system. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the knuckle region of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AW-102 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any circumferentially oriented cracks that might be present in the knuckle area of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-7869, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided t o PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report(s) that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  4. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AZ-102 Examination Completed August 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AZ-102. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AZ-102 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plat (ETP), RPP-11832 (Jensen 2002) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  5. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102. Examination Completed June 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-102 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and/SUMmarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA

  6. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R.; Ramteke, D.S.; Wate, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl 2 under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l -1 ), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l -1 ) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l -1 and initial concentration of 100 mg l -1 , GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal

  7. Performance Evaluation of the Effect of waste paper on Groundnut Shell Briquette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde A Oyelaran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current energy shortage and environmental issues resulting from the use of fossil fuels have lead to exploitation of renewable energy resources that includes municipal waste and agricultural residues. These residues are available, indigenous and are environmental friendly but some can not be used directly in combustion process due high moisture content and low volumetric energy unless by briquetting. The study was undertaken to assess the combustion characteristic of binderless briquettes produced from waste paper and groundnut shell. Combustion characteristics investigated were ignition time, burning time, calorific values, burning rate, specific fuel consumption, fuel efficiency and water boiling time. The calorific values of the briquettes ranged from 19.51 - 19.92 MJ/kg, while the thermal efficiency ranges between 13.75 – 21.64%, other results shows that the average burning rate between 0.511 and 1.133 kg/hr and the specific fuel consumption ranges between 0.087 and 0.131 J/g. The recorded boiling time values were between 17.5 and 30.0 minutes for cold start and 15.0 and 20.0 minutes for hot start. The results shows that waste paper and groundnut shell up to 25% in composition composite briquettes were found to have good combustion characteristics which qualify them as alternative to firewood for domestic and industrial energy. However, production of briquettes from waste paper and groundnut shell at mixing ratio of 85:15 was found to comparatively better from all experiment conducted.

  8. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendt, Peter; Cerjan, C.; Hamza, A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)] has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) targets as a complementary path to the cryogenic baseline approach. Expected benefits of DS ignition targets include noncryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures (≅4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances, and minimal (two-) shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several formidable challenges, encompassing room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT (≅790 atm) in the inner shell, strict concentricity requirements on the two shells ( 2 nanoporous aerogels with suspended Cu particles. A prototype demonstration of an ignition DS is planned for 2008, incorporating the needed novel nanomaterials science developments and the required fabrication tolerances for a realistic ignition attempt after 2010

  9. Contaminant Release from Residual Waste in Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Determinations of elemental and solid-phase compositions, and contaminant release studies have been applied in an ongoing study of residual tank wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from five of 149 underground single-shell storage tanks (241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This work is being conducted to support performance assessments that will be required to evaluate long-term health and safety risks associated with tank site closure. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions, solid phase properties, and contaminant release characteristics from these residual tank wastes. This variability is the result of differences in waste chemistry/composition of wastes produced from several different spent fuel reprocessing schemes, subsequent waste reprocessing to remove certain target constituents, tank farm operations that concentrated wastes and mixed wastes between tanks, and differences in retrieval processes used to remove the wastes from the tanks. Release models were developed based upon results of chemical characterization of the bulk residual waste, solid-phase characterization (see companion paper 9277 by Krupka et al.), leaching and extraction experiments, and geochemical modeling. In most cases empirical release models were required to describe contaminant release from these wastes. Release of contaminants from residual waste was frequently found to be controlled by the solubility of phases that could not be identified and/or for which thermodynamic data and/or dissolution rates have not been measured. For example, significant fractions of Tc-99, I-129, and Cr appear to be coprecipitated at trace concentrations in metal oxide phases that could not be identified unambiguously. In the case of U release from tank 241-C-103 residual waste, geochemical calculations indicated that leachate

  10. Developing a scarifier to retrieve radioactive waste from Hanford single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Steele, D.E.

    1993-08-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in 149 3,785 m 3 (million gal) single-shell tanks on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in eastern Washington. To minimize leakage as the tanks age, the free liquid has been pumped out, leaving concentrated solidified salt cake and sludge deposits. Now methods to dislodge and remove this waste are being developed so that the waste can be retrieved and processed for permanent storage. This paper presents research and development on ultrahigh-pressure water-jet technology to fracture and dislodge the wastes in these tanks. A water-based prototype scarifier with an integral conveyance system is being developed, and its performance demonstrated in a coupled analytical and experimental investigation. This paper describes experimental objectives and approach and results of the single jet experiments. Previous testing indicates that the method can be readily applied to salt cake waste forms; retrieval and conveyance of sludge and viscous fluid waste forms may present additional challenges

  11. Trade study of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies to support Hanford single-shell waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System to safely manage and dispose of low-level, high-level, and transuranic wastes currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Eastern Washington. This report supports the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone No. M-45-08-T01 and addresses additional issues regarding single-shell tank leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies and provide an indication of the scope of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation activities necessary to support the Tank Waste Remedial System Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System project

  12. Enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yancai, E-mail: liyancai@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Yayun; Zhong, Yanmei [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile method was designed to synthesize Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites. • Carbon nanomaterials at the outermost layer could protect Au and Ag nanoparticles from oxidation and aggregation. • The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites showed high sensitivity and selectivity to electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide. • The hydrogen peroxide sensor has a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection as low as 0.14 μM. - Abstract: The well-designed Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites were synthesized via a facile method, and were used to fabricate an enzyme-free amperometric hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor. The size, shape, elementary composition and structure of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersed spectrum (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The outermost layer of the nanocomposites was amorphous carbon, the second layer was Ag and the core was Au. The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites exhibit attractive activity for electrocatalytic reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} according to the electrochemical experiments. It also demonstrates the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor possess well performance with a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.14 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the interference from the common interfering species, such as glucose, ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid can be effectively avoided. In a word, the Au@Ag@C nanocomposites are promising candidates for enzyme-free H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor.

  13. Use of almond endocarp shell in sorption of radioactive 152+154Europium from waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, G.A.; Khalil, T.; Abou El-Nour, F.H.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to remove radioactive ( 152 + 154 )Eu from waste solutions, the present study was tried to explore the possibility of using a natural by-product. Almond endocarp (AEC) shell produced from Sinai (El-Arish area) was selected as agricultural by-product in treatment of waste solutions containing ( 152 + 154 )Eu through a batch technique. The different physico-chemical characteristics of AEC such as specific surface area, total pore volume, average pore diameter, apparent density, porosity and pore size distribution were calculated. The adsorption process was described by a Freundlich type isotherm. The uptake percent of the metal ion was determined for the sorbent material as a function of contact time, pH-value, mass of the sorbent material, metal ion concentration and the effect of competing ions on the sorption process. The obtained data were analyzed and showed that almond endocarp shell powder can be considered as an efficient natural material to be used for sorption of radioactive ( 152 + 154 )Eu from their radioactive waste solutions

  14. Lake Water Quality Improvement by Using Waste Mussel Shell Powder as an Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukri, N. I.; Khamidun, M. H.; Sapiren, M. S.; Abdullah, S.; Rahman, M. A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Lake water in UTHM was slightly greenish in color indicating the eutrophication process. Eutrophication problem is due to excessive amount of nutrient in the lake water which causes nuisance growth of algae and other aquatic plant. The improvement of lake water quality should be conducted wisely in preventing from eutrophication problem by using a suitable water treatment method. Natural materials, agricultural wastes and industrial wastes are locally available sources can be utilized as low-cost adsorbents. The natural abundant source of waste mussel’s shells is advantages to use as basis material to produce the low cost adsorbent for water treatment. Batch experiments were carried out with the preparation 500 ml volume of lake water sample with the dosage of 2.5g, 7.5g and 12.5g. Then the solution shaking in an incubator with 200 rpm shaking speed. The various dosage of mussel shell greatly affected pollutants removal. Both of NH4+ and PO43- have a higher percentage removal with 31.28% and 21.74% at the 7.5g of sample dosage. Other parameters such as COD and TSS also shown good percentage of removal at 7.5g of dosage sample with 44.45% and 25% respectively. While, dosage at 2.5g was performed as a good adsorption capacity of NH4+, PO43-, COD and TSS as high as 0.142, 0.234, 7.6 and 20 mg/g, respectively. These experimental results suggested that the use of mussel shell powder as good basis material in removing pollutants from lake water.

  15. Stress analysis for shells with double curvature by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.

    1981-08-01

    A simple triangular finite element for plates and shells, is presented. Since the rotation fields are assumed independent of the displacement fields, simple shape functions of second and third degree were used. An implicit penalty method allows one to solve thin shell problems since the Kirchoff-Love hypothesis are automatically satisfied. (Author) [pt

  16. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) [1] targets as a complementary path to the baseline cryogenic single-shell approach [2]. Benefits of DS targets include room-temperature deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures (4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances [3], and loose shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several challenges, including room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT (790 atm) in the inner shell; strict concentricity requirements on the two shells; development of nanoporous, low-density, metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation; and effective control of perturbation growth on the high-Atwood number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition target designs using vacuum hohlraums is described, offering the potential for low levels of laser backscatter from stimulated Raman and Brillouin processes. In addition, vacuum hohlraums have the operational advantages of room temperature fielding and fabrication simplicity, as well as benefiting from extensive benchmarking on the Nova and Omega laser facilities. As an alternative to standard cylindrical hohlraums, a rugby-shaped geometry is also introduced that may provide energetics and symmetry tuning benefits for more robust DS designs with yields exceeding 10 MJ for 2 MJ of 3w laser energy. The recent progress in hohlraum designs and required advanced materials development are scheduled to culminate in a prototype demonstration of a NIF-scale ignition-ready DS in 2007. [1] P. Amendt et al., PoP 9, 2221 (2002). [2] J.D. Lindl et al., PoP 11, 339 (2004). [3] M.N. Chizhkov et al., Laser Part. Beams 23, 261 (2005). In collaboration with C. Cerjan, A. Hamza, J. Milovich and H. Robey.

  17. Calcium Oxide Derived from Waste Shells of Mussel, Cockle, and Scallop as the Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanai Buasri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste shell was utilized as a bioresource of calcium oxide (CaO in catalyzing a transesterification to produce biodiesel (methyl ester. The economic and environmen-friendly catalysts were prepared by a calcination method at 700–1,000°C for 4 h. The heterogeneous catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET method. The effects of reaction variables such as reaction time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio, and catalyst loading on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. Reusability of waste shell catalyst was also examined. The results indicated that the CaO catalysts derived from waste shell showed good reusability and had high potential to be used as biodiesel production catalysts in transesterification of palm oil with methanol.

  18. Analysis of organic carbon and moisture in Hanford single-shell tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, J.J.; Heasler, P.G.; Lerchen, M.E.; Hill, J.G.; Whitney, P.D.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents a revised analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory involving the organic carbon laboratory measurement data for Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) obtained from a review of the laboratory analytical data. This activity has as its objective to provide a best-estimate, including confidence levels, of total organic carbon (TOC) and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford. The TOC and moisture information presented in this report is useful as part of the criteria to identify SSTs for additional measurements, or monitoring for the Organic Safety Program. In April 1994, an initial study of the organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tanks was completed at PNL. That study reflected the estimates of TOC based on tank characterizations datasets that were available at the time. Also in that study, estimation of dry basis TOC was based on generalized assumptions pertaining to the moisture of the tank wastes. The new information pertaining to tank moisture and TOC data that has become available from the current study influences the best estimates of TOC in each of the SSTs. This investigation of tank TOC and moisture has resulted in improved estimates based on waste phase: saltcake, sludge, or liquid. This report details the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the estimates of TOC and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford.

  19. Analysis of organic carbon and moisture in Hanford single-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.J.; Heasler, P.G.; Lerchen, M.E.; Hill, J.G.; Whitney, P.D.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents a revised analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory involving the organic carbon laboratory measurement data for Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) obtained from a review of the laboratory analytical data. This activity has as its objective to provide a best-estimate, including confidence levels, of total organic carbon (TOC) and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford. The TOC and moisture information presented in this report is useful as part of the criteria to identify SSTs for additional measurements, or monitoring for the Organic Safety Program. In April 1994, an initial study of the organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tanks was completed at PNL. That study reflected the estimates of TOC based on tank characterizations datasets that were available at the time. Also in that study, estimation of dry basis TOC was based on generalized assumptions pertaining to the moisture of the tank wastes. The new information pertaining to tank moisture and TOC data that has become available from the current study influences the best estimates of TOC in each of the SSTs. This investigation of tank TOC and moisture has resulted in improved estimates based on waste phase: saltcake, sludge, or liquid. This report details the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the estimates of TOC and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford

  20. Indirect-drive noncryogenic double-shell ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility: Design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendt, Peter; Colvin, J.D.; Tipton, R.E.; Hinkel, D.E.; Edwards, M.J.; Landen, O.L.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Varnum, W.S.; Watt, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis and design of indirect-drive National Ignition Facility double-shell targets with hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV and 250 eV are presented. The analysis of these targets includes the assessment of two-dimensional radiation asymmetry and nonlinear mix. Two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulations indicate that the x-ray illumination can be adjusted to provide adequate symmetry control in hohlraums specially designed to have high laser-coupling efficiency [Suter et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2092 (2000)]. These simulations also reveal the need to diagnose and control localized 10-15 keV x-ray emission from the high-Z hohlraum wall because of strong absorption by the high-Z inner shell. Preliminary estimates of the degree of laser backscatter from an assortment of laser-plasma interactions suggest comparatively benign hohlraum conditions. The application of a variety of nonlinear mix models and phenomenological tools, including buoyancy-drag models, multimode simulations and fall-line optimization, indicates a possibility of achieving ignition, i.e., fusion yields greater than 1 MJ. Planned experiments on the Omega laser will test current understanding of high-energy radiation flux asymmetry and mix-induced yield degradation in double-shell targets

  1. Double-shelled silicon anode nanocomposite materials: A facile approach for stabilizing electrochemical performance via interface construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lulu; Wen, Zhongsheng; Wang, Guanqin; Yang, Yan-E.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid capacity fading induced by volumetric changes is the main issue that hinders the widespread application of silicon anode materials. Thus, double-shelled silicon composite materials where lithium silicate was located between an Nb2O5 coating layer and a silicon active core were configured to overcome the chemical compatibility issues related to silicon and oxides. The proposed composites were prepared via a facile co-precipitation method combined with calcination. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that a transition layer of lithium silicate was constructed successfully, which effectively hindered the thermal inter-diffusion between the silicon and oxide coating layers during heat treatment. The electrochemical performance of the double-shelled silicon composites was enhanced dramatically with a retained specific capacity of 1030 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g-1 compared with 598 mAh g-1 for a core-shell Si@Nb2O5 composite that lacked the interface. The lithium silicate transition layer was shown to play an important role in maintaining the high electrochemical stability.

  2. Hohlraum-driven mid-Z (SiO2) double-shell implosions on the omega laser facility and their scaling to NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Amendt, P A; Milovich, J L; Park, H-S; Hamza, A V; Bono, M J

    2009-10-02

    High-convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions of double-shell capsules using mid-Z (SiO2) inner shells have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These experiments provide an essential extension of the results of previous low-Z (CH) double-shell implosions [P. A. Amendt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005)] to materials of higher density and atomic number. Analytic modeling, supported by highly resolved 2D numerical simulations, is used to account for the yield degradation due to interfacial atomic mixing. This extended experimental database from OMEGA enables a validation of the mix model, and provides a means for quantitatively assessing the prospects for high-Z double-shell implosions on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  3. Degrees of chitosan deacetylation from white shrimp shell waste as dental biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sularsih Sularsih

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chitosan is biomaterial improved for various dentistry applications because it is biocompatible, degradable, nontoxic, and not carcinogenic. The main parameter affecting the characteristics of chitosan is deacetylation degree. Purpose: This study is aimed to determine the degree of deacetylated of chitosan derived from white shrimp shell waste used as dental biomaterial. Methods: White shrimp shells were crushed into powder. Next, deproteination process was conducted with 3.5% NaOH solution, demineralized with 1N HCl solution, and then depigmented with 90% acetone solution into chitin powder. Deacetylation process was then conducted by soaking the chitin powder in 50% NaOH solution for 6 h at 65° C to produce white powder of chitosan. Afterwards, deacetylation degree test was conducted by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer (FTIR to calculate the ratio of the absorption bands between the absorbance peak of amide group about 1655 cm–1 and the absorbance peak of hydroxyl group about 3450 cm–1. Results: The result of the deacetylation degree test on the chitosan powder derived from white shrimp shell waste was high, about 85.165%, and had the eligible form, solubility, and pH. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the deacetylation degree of chitosan from white shrimp shells could reach 85.165%.Latar belakang: Kitosan merupakan biomaterial yang dikembangkan untuk berbagai aplikasi kedokteran gigi karena biokompatibel, dapat didegradasi, tidak toksik dan tidak karsinogenik. Parameter utama yang mempengaruhi karakteristik kitosan adalah derajat deasetilasi. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mengetahui derajat deasetilasi kitosan dari limbah kulit udang putih sebagai biomaterial kedokteran gigi. Metode: Kulit udang putih dihaluskan menjadi serbuk. Setelah itu dilakukan proses deproteinasi dengan larutan NaOH 3,5%, demineralisasi dengan larutan HCl 1N, depigmentasi dengan larutan aseton 90% sehingga menjadi serbuk

  4. Cross sections for double K-shell ionization in slow heavy ion-atom collisions, ch. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogkamer, T.P.; Woerlee, P.H.; Saris, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for Ksub(αα) X-ray production have been measured in collisions of 200 keV N + → NH 3 , N 2 , H 2 O; O + → NH 3 , H 2 O and 200, 400, 600 keV Ne 2+ → Ne. Fluorescence yields for Ksub(αα) two-electron one-photon transitions have been estimated for N and O, whereas for Ne, theoretical values for the fluorescence yield are available. We have used these to obtain double K-shell ionizzation cross sections which are compared to calculated cross section based on the theory for rotational coupling in the transient quasimolecular state

  5. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  6. Blood Cockle Shells Waste as Renewable Source for the Production of Biogenic CaCO3 and Its Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, D.; Zulfia, A.

    2017-11-01

    The prowess to reuse and recycle of blood cockle shells for raw material in bio-ceramics applications is an attractive component of integrated waste management program. In this paper an attempt is made to introduce a simple process to manufacture biogenic CaCO3 powder from blood cockle shells waste. The biogenic CaCO3 powder was produced from rinsing of blood cockle shells waste using deionised water and oxalic acid for cleaning the dirt and stain on the shells, then drying and grinding followed by heat treatment at 500 and 800 °C for 5 h. The powder obtained was characterised by XRF, DTA/TG, SEM, FTIR, and XRD analysis. The amount of 97.1 % CaO was obtained from XRF result. The thermal decomposition of CaCO3 become CaO due to mass loss was observed in the TG curve. The SEM result shows the needle-like aragonite morphology of blood cockle shells powder transformed to cubic-like calcite after heat treated at 500 °C. These results were consistent with FTIR and XRD results.

  7. In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linville, Jessica L; Shen, Yanwen; Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A; Schoene, Robin P; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2017-06-01

    A modified version of an in-situ CO 2 removal process was applied during anaerobic digestion of food waste with two types of walnut shell biochar at bench scale under batch operating mode. Compared with the coarse walnut shell biochar, the fine walnut shell biochar has a higher ash content (43 vs. 36 wt%) and higher concentrations of calcium (31 vs. 19 wt% of ash), magnesium (8.4 vs. 5.6 wt% of ash) and sodium (23.4 vs. 0.3 wt% of ash), but a lower potassium concentration (0.2 vs. 40% wt% of ash). The 0.96-3.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters produced biogas with 77.5%-98.1% CH 4 content by removing 40%-96% of the CO 2 compared with the control digesters at mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions. In a direct comparison at 1.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 , the fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters (85.7% CH 4 content and 61% CO 2 removal) outperformed the coarse walnut shell biochar amended digesters (78.9% CH 4 content and 51% CO 2 removal). Biochar addition also increased alkalinity as CaCO 3 from 2800 mg L -1 in the control digesters to 4800-6800 mg L -1 , providing process stability for food waste anaerobic digestion.

  8. Work Plan for Updating Double Shell Tank (DST) Sub-System Specifications (TBR 120.020)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRENARD, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The DST System stores waste from the processing of nuclear material at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The program to dispose of this waste has been divided into several phases with Phase 1 being the demonstration of the waste disposal technology by a private contractor. Subsystem specifications are being prepared providing requirements for the subsystems that are necessary for the continued safe storage of waste in the DST System and the removal of selected waste for processing by the privatized facility during Phase 1. This document provides the detailed plans for updating subsystem specifications developed during EY99

  9. K-shell ionization and double-ionization of Au atoms with 1.33 MeV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacem, A.; Dauvergne, D.; Feinberg, B.; Ionescu, D.; Maddi, J.; Sorensen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    At relativistic energies, the cross section for the atomic photoelectric effect drops off as does the cross section for liberating any bound electron through Compton scattering. However, when the photon energy exceeds twice the rest mass of the electron, ionization may proceed via electron-positron pair creation. We used 1.33 MeV photons impinging on Au thin foils to study double K-shell ionization and vacuum-assisted photoionization. The preliminary results yield a ratio of vacuum-assisted photoionization and pair creation of 2x10 -3 , a value that is substantially higher than the ratio of photo double ionization to single photoionization that is found to be 0.5-1x10 -4 . Because of the difficulties and large error bars associated with the small cross sections additional measurements are needed to minimize systematic errors

  10. Waste Cooking Oil Conversion To Biodeisel Catalized By Egg Shell Of Purebred Chiken With Ethanol As A Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellna Tehubijuluw

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of biodiesel from the waste cooking oil was carried out using the catalyst from egg shell of purebred chiken with ethanol as a solvent. Synthesis of biodiesel was prepared in two steps, esterification and transesterification. Esterification was conducted in mol ratio of ethanol and waste cooking oil of  9:1 with H2SO4 as a catalyst. Mol ratio of ethanol and used cooking oil in the transesterification of  12:1 with the CaO catalyst of shell eggs. CaO catalyst was yielded by calcinations egg shell of purebred chicken on 1000 for two hours. Calcination product was characterized with XRD to determine of CaO. Result of biodiesel was characterized based on FTIR, H-NMR, dan ASTM (American Standard Testing of Materials. Theoretically,yielded of biodiesel was 58% and experiment was 36.779%.

  11. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted

  12. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  13. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant

  14. Utilization of wasted cockle shell as a natural coagulant and a neutralizer of polluted water in Bangka Belitung islands, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiandho, Y.; Aldila, H.; Mustari; Megiyo; Afriani, F.

    2018-05-01

    Bangka Belitung Islands is the largest tin producer in Indonesia. The high activity of tin mining caused the environmental damage which had an impact on the emergence of clean water crisis in some areas in this province. In this paper, a simple water quality improvement method based on wasted cockle shell was developed. Based on x-ray diffraction analysis it is known that calcination of cockle shell powder at 700°C will decompose the powder into calcium oxide compound. The addition of calcined cockle shell powder into acidic water from Merawang Sub-district will increase the pH of water through the process of forming hydroxide groups in the water. The calcined cockle shell powder can also coagulate pollutants in some polluted water from Koba Sub-district. The coagulation results were analyzed using SEM/EDS.

  15. An experimental study of the combustion characteristics of groundnut shell and waste paper admixture briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Oyelaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to assess the heat released of briquettes produced from waste paper and groundnut shell admixture in five mixing ratios (90:10; 80:20; 70:30; 60:40; and 50:50. The briquettes were prepared on an existing motorized briquetting machine. The suitability of briquetted fuel as domestic fuel was studied in terms of flame propagation, afterglow, calorific value, and utilized heat, after sun drying the prepared briquettes for nineteen (19 days. The results of propagation rate and afterglow obtained for all the six compositions are satisfactory they range between 0.13 to 0.14 and 365 to 380 respectively. These energy values obtained for the whole samples are sufficient enough to produce heat required for household cooking and small scale industrial cottage applications. Finally it was observed that composition variation affects the properties of the briquettes.

  16. Stabilization of Pb and Cd contaminated soils and soil quality improvements using waste oyster shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Yong Sik; Lim, Jung Eun; Moon, Deok Hyun

    2011-02-01

    Large amounts of oyster shells are produced as a by-product of shellfish farming in coastal regions without beneficial use options. Accordingly, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential for the use of waste oyster shells (WOS) containing a high amount of CaCO₃ to improve soil quality and to stabilize heavy metals in soil. To accomplish this, an incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the ability of the addition of 1-5 wt% WOS to stabilize the Pb (total 1,246 mg/kg) and Cd (total 17 mg/kg) in a contaminated soil. The effectiveness of the WOS treatments was evaluated using various single extraction techniques. Soil amended with WOS was cured for 30 days complied with the Korean Standard Test method (0.1 M·HCl extraction). The Pb and Cd concentrations were less than the Korean warning and countermeasure standards following treatment with 5 wt% WOS. Moreover, the concentrations of Cd were greatly reduced in response to WOS treatment following extraction using 0.01 M·CaCl₂, which is strongly associated with phytoavailability. Furthermore, the soil pH and exchangeable Ca increased significantly in response to WOS treatment. Taken together, the results of this study indicated that WOS amendments improved soil quality and stabilized Pb and Cd in contaminated soil. However, extraction with 0.43 M·CH₃ COOH revealed that remobilization of heavy metals can occur when the soil reaches an acidic condition.

  17. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristic groups. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) model presents a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. This model has identified 29 different waste-type groups encompassing 135 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTs. The remaining 14 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. This letter report will detail the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the SORWT model and present the grouping results. Included with this report is a brief description and approximate compositions of the single-shell tank waste types. In the near future, the validity of the predicted groups will be statistically tested using analysis of variance of characterization data obtained from recent (post-1989) core sampling and analysis activities. In addition, the SORWT model will be used to project the nominal waste characteristics of entire waste type groups that have some recent characterization data available. These subsequent activities will be documented along with these initial results in a comprehensive, formal PNL report cleared for public release by September 1994

  18. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of porous double-shelled Mn2O3 hollow microspheres as a superior anode material for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Yu; Yu, Yan; Jin, Yi; Guan, Yi-Biao; Chen, Chun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Double-shelled Mn 2 O 3 hollow microspheres are prepared by a multi-step. • synthesis procedure. • Solid, hollow and yolk-structured Mn 2 O 3 spheres are prepared for comparison. • The double-shelled hollow Mn 2 O 3 is superior in electrochemical properties. - Abstract: By means of a specially designed multi-step synthesis procedure involving steps of precipitation, controlled oxidation, selective etching and calcination, porous double-shelled Mn 2 O 3 hollow microspheres are synthesized. Solid, hollow and yolk-structured Mn 2 O 3 are also similarly synthesized for comparison. X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements are employed to investigate their structures and compositions. Galvanostatic cell cycling and impedance spectroscopy are used to characterize the electrochemical properties of Mn 2 O 3 /Li cells. The results show that the hierarchical hollow structured (double-shelled, hollow and yolk-structured) Mn 2 O 3 anode materials deliver higher reversible capacities and excellent cycling stabilities than the solid Mn 2 O 3 . Moreover, among the three hierarchical hollow structured samples, the double shelled sample possesses the best cycling performance, especially at a high current density

  19. Egg shell waste as heterogeneous nanocatalyst for biodiesel production: Optimized by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Priti R; Fulekar, M H

    2017-08-01

    Worldwide consumption of hen eggs results in availability of large amount of discarded egg waste particularly egg shells. In the present study, the waste shells were utilized for the synthesis of highly active heterogeneous calcium oxide (CaO) nanocatalyst to transesterify dry biomass into methyl esters (biodiesel). The CaO nanocatalyst was synthesied by calcination-hydration-dehydration technique and fully characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), brunauer-emmett-teller (BET) elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. TEM image showed that the nano catalyst had spherical shape with average particle size of 75 nm. BET analysis indicated that the catalyst specific surface area was 16.4 m 2  g -1 with average pore diameter of 5.07 nm. The effect of nano CaO catalyst was investigated by direct transesterification of dry biomass into biodiesel along with other reaction parameters such as catalyst ratio, reaction time and stirring rate. The impact of the transesterification reaction parameters and microalgal biodiesel yield were analyzed by response surface methodology based on a full factorial, central composite design. The significance of the predicted mode was verified and 86.41% microalgal biodiesel yield was reported at optimal parameter conditions 1.7% (w/w), catalyst ratio, 3.6 h reaction time and stirring rate of 140.6 rpm. The biodiesel conversion was determined by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The fuel properties of prepared biodiesel were found to be highly comply with the biodiesel standard ASTMD6751 and EN14214. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Experimental Study on Effect of Palm – Shell Waste Additive to Cement Strenght Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Novriansyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the cement strength through attaching chemical additive has been popular to meet the required condition for a particular well-cementing job. However, due to a low oil-price phenomenon, pouring and additive should be reconsidered because it can raise the cost and make the project become uneconomic. Another additive material in nanocomposite form will be introduced through this experimental study. The nanocomposite material consist of silica nanoparticle, known as “Nanosilica” and a palm-shell-waste, which is abundant in Indonesia. Before making a nanocomposite, the palm-shell should be burned to obtain a charcoal form, ground and sieved to attain a uniform size.   The study focuses on the two parameters, compressive strength and shear bond strength, which can reflect the strength of the cement. These values are obtained by performing a biaxial loading test to the cement sample. Various samples with different concentration of nanocomposite should be prepared and following the mixing, drying, and hardening process before the loading test is carried out. The result from the test shows a positive indication for compressive strength and shear bond strength values, according to the representative well cementing standards. Increasing the nanocomposite concentration on the cement will increase these values. Furthermore, an investigation on the temperature effect confirms that the sample with 700oC burning temperature have highest compressive-strength and shear-bond-strength values. This is a potential opportunity utilizing a waste-based material to produce another product with higher economic value.

  1. SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, Hazard Analysis Database Report. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to: (A) Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), and (B) Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements (TSR). (5) Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition. This safety evaluation is not intended to be a request to authorize the activity. Authorization issues are addressed by the unreviewed safety question (USQ) evaluation process. This report constitutes an accident analysis

  2. Explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles theory: Including exchange for computations on closed-shell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim, E-mail: klopper@kit.edu

    2016-11-10

    Highlights: • Ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach now implemented with exchange terms. • Ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach now implemented with F12 functions. • Szabo–Ostlund scheme (SO2) implemented for use in SAPT. • Fast convergence to the limit of a complete basis. • Implementation in the TURBOMOLE program system. - Abstract: Random-phase-approximation (RPA) methods have proven to be powerful tools in electronic-structure theory, being non-empirical, computationally efficient and broadly applicable to a variety of molecular systems including small-gap systems, transition-metal compounds and dispersion-dominated complexes. Applications are however hindered due to the slow basis-set convergence of the electron-correlation energy with the one-electron basis. As a remedy, we present approximate explicitly-correlated RPA approaches based on the ring-coupled-cluster-doubles formulation including exchange contributions. Test calculations demonstrate that the basis-set convergence of correlation energies is drastically accelerated through the explicitly-correlated approach, reaching 99% of the basis-set limit with triple-zeta basis sets. When implemented in close analogy to early work by Szabo and Ostlund [36], the new explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach including exchange has the perspective to become a valuable tool in the framework of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) for the computation of dispersion energies of molecular complexes of weakly interacting closed-shell systems.

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic performance and degradation pathway of Rhodamine B over hierarchical double-shelled zinc nickel oxide hollow sphere heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Jiabin; Cai, Weiquan; Zhou, Jun; Li, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    In this study, hierarchical double-shelled NiO/ZnO hollow spheres heterojunction were prepared by calcination of the metallic organic frameworks (MOFs) as a sacrificial template in air via a one-step solvothermal method. Additionally, the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under UV-vis light irradiation were also investigated. NiO/ZnO microsphere comprised a core and a shell with unique hierarchically porous structure. The photocatalytic results showed that NiO/ZnO hollow spheres exhibited excellent catalytic activity for RhB degradation, causing complete decomposition of RhB (200 mL of 10 g/L) under UV-vis light irradiation within 3 h. Furthermore, the degradation pathway was proposed on the basis of the intermediates during the photodegradation process using liquid chromatography analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). The improvement in photocatalytic performance could be attributed to the p-n heterojunction in the NiO/ZnO hollow spheres with hierarchically porous structure and the strong double-shell binding interaction, which enhances adsorption of the dye molecules on the catalyst surface and facilitates the electron/hole transfer within the framework. The degradation mechanism of pollutant is ascribed to the hydroxyl radicals (rad OH), which is the main oxidative species for the photocatalytic degradation of RhB. This work provides a facile and effective approach for the fabrication of porous metal oxides heterojunction with high photocatalytic activity and thus can be potentially used in the environmental purification.

  4. Performance and risk assessment of subsurface barriers for single-shell tank waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Cruse, J.M.; Hampsten, K.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Treat, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    Subsurface barriers are among various alternatives under evaluation to mitigate the threat of leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level radioactive waste tanks. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) division of Westinghouse Hanford Company is conducting this evaluation of subsurface barriers and other alternatives, focusing on risk and cost as performance measures. A number of alternative retrieval/closure approaches were evaluated in terms of risks (carcinogenic and toxicological) to a postulated maximally exposed individual. In addition, worker and accident risks were evaluated and factors developed for each alternative on a relative basis. The work performed to date indicates the use of subsurface barriers may potentially reduce public risk by limiting contamination of groundwater below the Hanford Site; however, the cost in terms of actual funding and in elevated worker risk is significant. The analyses also assume certain performance levels for technologies that have not been demonstrated in field conditions similar to Hanford Site tank farms. The evaluations summarized herein are being used to support a decision by representatives of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding potential further development of subsurface barrier technology.

  5. Performance and risk assessment of subsurface barriers for single-shell tank waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Cruse, J.M.; Hampsten, K.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    Subsurface barriers are among various alternatives under evaluation to mitigate the threat of leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level radioactive waste tanks. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) division of Westinghouse Hanford Company is conducting this evaluation of subsurface barriers and other alternatives, focusing on risk and cost as performance measures. A number of alternative retrieval/closure approaches were evaluated in terms of risks (carcinogenic and toxicological) to a postulated maximally exposed individual. In addition, worker and accident risks were evaluated and factors developed for each alternative on a relative basis. The work performed to date indicates the use of subsurface barriers may potentially reduce public risk by limiting contamination of groundwater below the Hanford Site; however, the cost in terms of actual funding and in elevated worker risk is significant. The analyses also assume certain performance levels for technologies that have not been demonstrated in field conditions similar to Hanford Site tank farms. The evaluations summarized herein are being used to support a decision by representatives of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding potential further development of subsurface barrier technology

  6. Effects of bean dregs and crab shell powder additives on the composting of green waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang

    2018-07-01

    Composting is an effective and economic technology for the recycling of organic waste. In this study, bean dregs (BD) (at 0, 35, and 45%) and crab shell powder (CSP) (at 0, 15, and 25%) were evaluated as additives during the two-stage composting of green waste (GW). The GW used in this experiment mainly consisted of branch cuttings collected during the maintenance of the urban green landscape. Combined additions of BD and CSP improved composting conditions and compost quality in terms of composting temperature, specific surface area, average pore diameter, pH and EC values, carbon dioxide release, ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions, E 4 /E 6 ratio, elemental composition and atomic ratios, organic matter degradation, microbial numbers, enzyme activities, compost phytotoxicity, and environmental and economic benefits. The combined addition of 35% BD and 25% CSP to the two-stage composting of GW resulted in the highest quality compost product in only 22 days. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Acoustical Properties of the Polyurethane Concrete Made of Oyster Shell Waste Comparing Other Concretes as Architectural Design Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, Erni; Hardiman, Gagoek; Purwanto

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to determine the acoustical properties of concrete material made of polyurethane and oyster shell waste as both fine aggregate and coarse aggregate comparing to other concrete mortar. Architecture needs aesthetics materials, so the innovation in architectural material should be driven through the efforts of research on materials for building designs. The DOE methods was used by mixing cement, oyster shell, sands, and polyurethane by composition of 160 ml:40 ml:100 ml: 120 ml respectively. Refer to the results of previous research, then cement consumption is reduced up to 20% to keep the concept of green material. This study compared three different compositions of mortars, namely portland cement concrete with gravel (PCG), polyurethane concrete of oyster shell (PCO) and concrete with plastics aggregate (PCP). The methods of acoustical tests were conducted refer to the ASTM E413-04 standard. The research results showed that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell waste aggregate has absorption coefficient 0.52 and STL 63 dB and has a more beautiful appearance when it was pressed into moulding. It can be concluded that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell aggregate (PCO) is well implemented in architectural acoustics-components.

  8. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 -- Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets.

  9. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 - Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Of Scaled Hanford Double Shell Tank Mixing - CFD Modeling Sensitivity Study Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  11. References for HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, ''System specification for the double-shell tank system: HNF-PROs, CFRs, DOE Orders, WACs''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    HNF-SD-WM-TRD-O07, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, (hereafter referred to as DST Specification), defines the requirements of the double-shell tank system at the Hanford Site for Phase 1 privatization. Many of the sections in this document reference other documents for design guidance and requirements. Referenced documents include Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) procedures (HNF-PROS), Codes of Federal Regulation (CFRs), DOE Orders, and Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). This document provides rationale for the selection and inclusion of HNF-PROS, CFRs, DOE Orders and WACs

  12. Technical bases for leak detection surveillance of waste storage tanks. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.G.; Badden, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the technical bases for specification limits, monitoring frequencies and baselines used for leak detection and intrusion (for single shell tanks only) in all single and double shell radioactive waste storage tanks, waste transfer lines, and most catch tanks and receiver tanks in the waste tank farms and associated areas at Hanford

  13. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-SY-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in tank 241-SY-103. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44 09

  14. Production of granular activated carbon from food-processing wastes (walnut shells and jujube seeds) and its adsorptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Jongho; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-08-01

    Commercial activated carbon is a highly effective absorbent that can be used to remove micropollutants from water. As a result, the demand for activated carbon is increasing. In this study, we investigated the optimum manufacturing conditions for producing activated carbon from ligneous wastes generated from food processing. Jujube seeds and walnut shells were selected as raw materials. Carbonization and steam activation were performed in a fixed-bed laboratory electric furnace. To obtain the highest iodine number, the optimum conditions for producing activated carbon from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 2 hr and 1.5 hr (carbonization at 700 degrees C) followed by 1 hr and 0.5 hr (activation at 1000 degrees C), respectively. The surface area and iodine number of activated carbon made from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 1,477 and 1,184 m2/g and 1,450 and 1,200 mg/g, respectively. A pore-distribution analysis revealed that most pores had a pore diameter within or around 30-40 angstroms, and adsorption capacity for surfactants was about 2 times larger than the commercial activated carbon, indicating that waste-based activated carbon can be used as alternative. Implications: Wastes discharged from agricultural and food industries results in a serious environmental problem. A method is proposed to convert food-processing wastes such as jujube seeds and walnut shells into high-grade granular activated carbon. Especially, the performance of jujube seeds as activated carbon is worthy of close attention. There is little research about the application ofjujube seeds. Also, when compared to two commercial carbons (Samchully and Calgon samples), the results show that it is possible to produce high-quality carbon, particularly from jujube seed, using a one-stage, 1,000 degrees C, steam pyrolysis. The preparation of activated carbon from food-processing wastes could increase economic return and reduce pollution.

  15. STRONTIUM & TRANSURANIC (TRU) SEPARATION PROCESS IN THE DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON; SWANSON; BOECHLER

    2005-06-10

    The supernatants stored in tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102) and 241-AN-107 (AN-107) contain soluble strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) and transuranic (TRU) elements that require removal prior to vitrification to comply with the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) specification and with the 1997 agreement with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on incidental waste. A precipitation process has been developed and tested with tank waste samples and simulants using strontium nitrate (Sr(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and sodium permanganate (NaMnO{sub 4}) to separate {sup 90}Sr and TRU from these wastes. This report evaluates removing Sr/TRU from AN-102 and AN-107 supernates in the DST system before delivery to the WTP. The in-tank precipitation is a direct alternative to the baseline WTP process, using the same chemical separations. Implementing the Sr/TRU separation in the DST system beginning in 2012 provides {approx}6 month schedule advantage to the overall mission, without impacting the mission end date or planned SST retrievals.

  16. Protein-assisted synthesis of double-shelled CaCO3 microcapsules and their mineralization with heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan Qi; Feng, Zhiwei; Xia, Yinyan; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2012-02-13

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) is one of the most abundant and important biominerals in nature. Due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and nontoxicity, CaCO(3) has been investigated extensively in recent years for various fundamental properties and technological applications. Inspired by basic wall structures of cells, we report a protein-assisted approach to synthesize CaCO(3) into a double-shelled structural configuration. Due to varying reactivities of outer and inner shells, the CaCO(3) microcapsules exhibit different sorption capacities and various resultant structures toward different kinds of heavy metal ions, analogical to biologically controlled mineralization (BCM) processes. Surprisingly, three mineralization modes resembling those found in BCM were found with these bacterium-like "CaCO(3) cells". Our investigation of the cytotoxicity (MTT assay protocol) also indicates that the CaCO(3) microcapsules have almost no cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells, and they might be useful for future application of detoxifying heavy metal ions after further study. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization of Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9277

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from the underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred in and out each tank and the sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. Our studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; boehmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. Our studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements respectively, may alter the compositions of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Fe oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other transition metals, such Cr, Mn

  18. Adsorption of gold ions from industrial wastewater using activated carbon derived from hard shell of apricot stones - an agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mansooreh; Kaghazchi, Tahereh

    2008-09-01

    In this study, hard shell of apricot stones was selected from agricultural solid wastes to prepare effective and low cost adsorbent for the gold separation from gold-plating wastewater. Different adsorption parameters like adsorbent dose, particle size of activated carbon, pH and agitation speed of mixing on the gold adsorption were studied. The results showed that under the optimum operating conditions, more than 98% of gold was adsorbed onto activated carbon after only 3h. The equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Isotherms have been used to obtain thermodynamic parameters. Gold desorption studies were performed with aqueous solution mixture of sodium hydroxide and organic solvents at ambient temperatures. Quantitative recovery of gold ions is possible by this method. As hard shell of apricot stones is a discarded as waste from agricultural and food industries, the prepared activated carbon is expected to be an economical product for gold ion recovery from wastewater.

  19. Single Shell Tank Waste Characterization Project for Tank B-110, Core 9 - data package and PNL validation summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.N.; Jones, T.E.; McKinley, S.G.; Tingey, J.M.; Longaker, T.M.; Gibson, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This Data Package contains results obtained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff in the characterization and analyses of Core 9 segments taken from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) 110B. The characterization and analysis of Core 9 segments are outlined in the Waste Characterization Plan for Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks and in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Single-Shell Tank Waste Characterization Support FY 89/90 Statement of Work (SOW), Rev. 1 dated March, 1990. Specific analyses for each sub-sample taken from a segment are delineated in Test Instructions prepared by the PNL Single-Shell Tank Waste Characterization Project Management Office (SST Project) in accordance with procedures contained in the SST Waste Characterization Procedure Compendium (PNL-MA-599). Analytical procedures used in the characterization activities are also included in PNL-MA-599. Core 9 included five segments although segment 1 did not have sufficient material for characterization. The five samplers were received from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) on 11/21-22/89. Each segment was contained in a sampler and was enclosed in a shipping cask. The shipping cask was butted up to the 325-A hot cell and the sampler moved into the hot cell. The material in the sampler (i.e., the segment) was extruded from the sampler, limited physical characteristics assessed, and photographed. At this point samples were taken for particle size and volatile organic analyses. Each segment was then homogenized. Sub-samples were taken for required analyses as delineated in the appropriate Test Instruction. Table 1 includes sample numbers assigned to Core 9 segment materials being transferred from 325-A Hot Cell. Sample numbers 90-0298, 90-0299, 90-0302, and 90-0303 were included in Table 1 although no analyses were requested for these samples. Table 2 lists Core 9 sub-sample numbers per sample preparation method

  20. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ESTABLISHMENT OF METHODOLOGY FOR TIME DOMAIN SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DST assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil, and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DST and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste. Soil-structure interaction analyses are traditionally solved in

  1. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, K.E.

    1997-05-29

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AW-102. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  2. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-SY-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-SY-103. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09

  3. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AP-105. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M 44-05

  4. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AW-102. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05

  5. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

    2007-02-16

    The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

  6. Piezo-phototronic effect enhanced UV photodetector based on CuI/ZnO double-shell grown on flexible copper microwire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyu; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Caihong; Peng, Mingzeng; Yu, Aifang; Kou, Jinzong; Liu, Wei; Zhai, Junyi; Liu, Juan

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we present a facile, low-cost, and effective approach to fabricate the UV photodetector with a CuI/ZnO double-shell nanostructure which was grown on common copper microwire. The enhanced performances of Cu/CuI/ZnO core/double-shell microwire photodetector resulted from the formation of heterojunction. Benefiting from the piezo-phototronic effect, the presentation of piezocharges can lower the barrier height and facilitate the charge transport across heterojunction. The photosensing abilities of the Cu/CuI/ZnO core/double-shell microwire detector are investigated under different UV light densities and strain conditions. We demonstrate the I-V characteristic of the as-prepared core/double-shell device; it is quite sensitive to applied strain, which indicates that the piezo-phototronic effect plays an essential role in facilitating charge carrier transport across the CuI/ZnO heterojunction, then the performance of the device is further boosted under external strain.

  7. Synthesis of solid catalyst from egg shell waste and clay for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadji, S.; Sundari, C. D. D.; Munir, M.; Fitriyah, S.

    2018-05-01

    Until now, energy consumption in Indonesia is almost entirely fulfilled by fossil fuels, thus, its availability will be limited and continue to decrease. To overcome these problems, development and utilization of renewable energy are required, one of which is biodiesel. Biodiesel can be prepared through transesterification reaction of vegetable oil using catalyst. In this research, a solid catalyst for biodiesel synthesis was prepared from chicken egg shell waste and clay. Optimization of the transesterification reaction of coconut (Cocos nucifera) oil to obtain biodiesel was also carried out. The formation of CaO/kaolin catalyst was confirmed based on the results of XRD and SEM-EDS. This catalyst is suitable for biodiesel synthesis from vegetable oils with lower FFA (free fatty acid) levels, i.e. coconut oil with FFA level of 0.18%. Based on FTIR result, FFA level and flame tests, it was found that biodiesel was successfully formed. Synthesis of biodiesel has the optimum conditions on reaction time of 16 hours and temperature of 64 °C, with oil: methanol ratio of 1: 15 and CaO/kaolin catalyst concentration of 0.9% in a reflux system.

  8. Microwave-Assisted Hydrolysis of Chitosan from Shrimp Shell Waste for Glucosammine Hydrochlorid Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaeni, Ahmad; Safitri, Endang; Fuadah, Badrotul; Sudiana, I Nyoman

    2017-01-01

    Chitin is the most widespread renewable natural sources following cellulose as the main source of chitosan. Chitin is isolated from crustacean waste and shrimp shells. Chitosan is derived from chitin throuhgt demineralisation, deproteination, decolorisation and deacetylation process using chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, hydrogen chloride and acetone. Glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN-Cl) can be produced by hydrolysis of chitosan by using hydrogen chloride. During deacetylation and hydrolysis the solution is heated by hotplate or furnace. In this paper we use microwave instead of hotplate for production chitosan and GlcN-Cl. The research investigates effect of microwaves to amount of rendemen and their property. The chitosan was characterized its moisture content, solubility, and degree of deacetylation (DDA). Whereas the glucosammine hydrochloride characterized its functional groups using FTIR and crystallization by using X-Ray Difraction (XRD). The experimental results show that the use of microwave energy on deacetilation of chitosan and hydrolisis processes can decrease time consuming and reactant concentration during production. the DDA value obtained was very high from 70 to 85%. The results also show that microwaves meet chitosan and GlcN-Cl standards. (paper)

  9. Microwave-Assisted Hydrolysis of Chitosan from Shrimp Shell Waste for Glucosammine Hydrochlorid Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaeni, Ahmad; Safitri, Endang; Fuadah, Badrotul; Nyoman Sudiana, I.

    2017-05-01

    Chitin is the most widespread renewable natural sources following cellulose as the main source of chitosan. Chitin is isolated from crustacean waste and shrimp shells. Chitosan is derived from chitin throuhgt demineralisation, deproteination, decolorisation and deacetylation process using chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, hydrogen chloride and acetone. Glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN-Cl) can be produced by hydrolysis of chitosan by using hydrogen chloride. During deacetylation and hydrolysis the solution is heated by hotplate or furnace. In this paper we use microwave instead of hotplate for production chitosan and GlcN-Cl. The research investigates effect of microwaves to amount of rendemen and their property. The chitosan was characterized its moisture content, solubility, and degree of deacetylation (DDA). Whereas the glucosammine hydrochloride characterized its functional groups using FTIR and crystallization by using X-Ray Difraction (XRD). The experimental results show that the use of microwave energy on deacetilation of chitosan and hydrolisis processes can decrease time consuming and reactant concentration during production. the DDA value obtained was very high from 70 to 85%. The results also show that microwaves meet chitosan and GlcN-Cl standards.

  10. Filling of double vacancy in the K atomic shell with emission of one single photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, G.

    1978-12-01

    A method was developed to calculate the transition rate for two-electron one-photon K(sub αα) transition (2s 2p → 1s 2 ). The method was tested for Ni with two K-shell vacancies in the initial state. The (sub αα) rate is calculated within the framework of a single system formed by the atom and the radiation. The transition is originated in the interactiion between the parts of that system. In the dipole approximation, the transition rate is obtained from the second order term of the time dependente perturbation theory. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions were used in the calculations for Ni. The results are compared with the available theoretical and experimental information. (Author) [pt

  11. FG Sagittae, a test of the theory of evolution of double shell source stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeyev, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    FG Sge is a unique stellar object possessing a number of unusual properties which are as follows: (1) FG Sge is a core of a planetary nebula, (2) at least since 1894 this star has crossed the HR diagram from the left to the right, (3) the atmosphere of FG Sge was enriched in s-elements, (4) FG Sge is a pulsating variable the period of which progressively increases from 15 days in 1962 to 110 days in 1980. The author estimates the distance and age of FG Sge from the hypothesis that it moves in the HR diagram along the horizontal loop due to a helium shell flash in its interior. (Auth.)

  12. ZIF-67-derived hollow nanocages with layered double oxides shell as high-Efficiency catalysts for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wenpeng; Li, Jing; Chen, Yao; Ren, Yuqing; Guo, Yonghua; Niu, Shengli; Yang, Yanzhao

    2018-04-01

    Constructing non-precious hybrid metal oxides with specific morphology as cost-effective and highly efficient catalysts is a promising way for the automotive exhaust purification. In this work, we report a facile strategy for the fabrication of a unique hollow Co-Ni layered double oxides (HLDO) nanocages by using zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs) as template. The synthesis of intermediate core-shell and hollow Co-Ni layered double hydroxides (HLDH) nanoflakes as well as the corresponding Co-Ni oxides products were successfully controlled, and the formation process was also explained. Among ZIF-67-derived oxides, HLDO exhibits excellent catalytic activities (complete conversion of CO into CO2 at 118 °C) and long-term stability for CO oxidation. The remarkable catalytic activities of HLDO can be attributed to high surface area (258 m2 g-1) inherited from the HLDH, which could provide more active sites for CO oxidation. In addition, active oxygen species indicated by the O 1 s XPS spectrum and improved synergistic effect between NiO and Co3O4 reflected by H2-TPR, further explain the enhanced performance of the HLDO catalysts. The presented strategy for controlled design and synthesis of hollow multicomponent metal oxides will provide prospects in developing highly effective catalysts.

  13. Multi-functional carbon microspheres with double shell layers for flame retardant poly (ethylene terephthalate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baoxia; Niu, Mei; Yang, Yongzhen; Bai, Jie; Song, Yinghao; Peng, Yun; Liu, Xuguang

    2018-03-01

    Carbon microspheres (CMSs) as a core material had been coated by two capsule walls: an inorganic material of magnesium hydroxide (MH) as inner shell layer and an organic material of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as outer shell layer. MH coating CMSs (MCMSs) were fabricated by liquid phase deposition method, then grafted 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to obtain the Si-MCMSs. Microencapsulated Si-MCMSs (PMCMSs) was prepared by in situ polymerization method. Morphology structure, dispersion, flame retardant and other properties of PMCMSs have been investigated. A series of PET blends were prepared by melt compounding. The results showed that MH and PET as two layers were coated on CMSs surface with the optimal thickness of about 70 nm. The PMCMSs owned better dispersion in PET matrix. Compared with MCMSs/PET composites, the mechanical property of PMCMSs/PET composites had significantly increased because of the strong interface binding force between PMCMSs and PET matrix. Moreover, PMCMSs was proved to be an effective flame retardant. For PMCMSs/PET with 2 wt% PMCMSs, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value increased from 21.0% (pristine PET) to 27.2%, and the peak heat release rate (pk-HRR) decreased from 513.22 kW/m2 to 352.14 kW/m2. The decreased smoke production rate (SPR) and total smoke production (TSP) values demonstrated PMCMSs suppressed the smoke production. The increased Fire performance index (FPI) value illustrated PMCMSs significantly reduced the fire risk of PET. Overall, the two capsular walls endowed the PMCMSs/PET composites with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties.

  14. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  15. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed

  16. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type Model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristics groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Anderson, G.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1995-02-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) Model is a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTS) into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. The model has identified 24 different waste-type groups encompassing 133 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTS. The remaining 16 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped. according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. A detailed statistical verification study has been conducted that employs analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the core sample analysis data collected since 1989. These data cover eight tanks and five SORWT groups. The verification study showed that these five SORWT groups are highly statistically significant; they represent approximately 10% of the total waste volume and 26% of the total sludge volume in SSTS. Future sampling recommendations based on the SORWT Model results include 32 core samples from 16 tanks and 18 auger samples from six tanks. Combining these data with the existing body of information will form the basis for characterizing 98 SSTs (66%). These 98 SSTs represent 78% of the total waste volume, 61% of the total sludge volume, and 88 % of the salt cake volume

  17. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) model presents a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) into groups of tank expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. This model has identified 29 different waste-type groups encompassing 135 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTs. The remaining 14 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. This letter report will detail the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the SORWT model and present the grouping results. In the near future, the validity of the predicted groups will be statistically tested using analysis of variance of characterization data obtained from recent (post-1989) core sampling and analysis activities. In addition, the SORWT model will be used to project the nominal waste characteristics of entire waste type groups that have some recent characterization data available. These subsequent activities will be documented along with these initial results in a comprehensive, formal PNL report cleared for public release by September 1994

  18. Transesterification of palm oil to biodiesel by using waste obtuse horn shell-derived CaO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seik Lih; Wong, Yong Chen; Tan, Yen Ping; Yew, Sook Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cost effective CaO catalyst derived from waste obtuse horn shells. • The optimum biodiesel yield, 86.75% can be achieved under mild reaction conditions. • The catalyst can be reused up to 3 times with biodiesel yield more than 70%. • Deactivation of catalyst was due to leaching of CaO and pores-filling. - Abstract: The calcium oxide catalysts derived from waste obtuse horn shells were utilized in the transesterification of palm oil into biodiesel. This environment-friendly catalyst is thermally activated at 800 °C for 3 h. The resulting CaO catalyst was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed desorption of CO 2 (TPD-CO 2 ), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD patterns of calcined catalyst showed intense peaks of calcium oxide, consistent with XRF results that revealed calcium is the major element present in the obtuse horn shells. High calcination temperature (800 °C) tended to promote agglomeration of fine crystals, resulted in a smaller surface area (0.07 m 2 /g) as examined by BET. Catalytic activities in the transesterification process had been investigated using one-variable-at-a-time technique. The optimum palm oil conversion was 86.75% under reaction conditions of 6 h, 5 wt.% of catalyst amount and methanol to oil ratio of 12:1. Reusability of this waste shell derived catalyst was examined and results showed that the prepared catalysts are able to be reused up to 3 times with conversion of more than 70% after the third cycles. Although the reusability may not be excellent at the moment, it is still in the exploratory study. More efforts were done to improve its properties and stability

  19. Feasibility of applying cathodic protection to double-wall waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of applying impressed current cathodic protection to double-wall storage tanks containing terminal waste solutions. Norton Corrosion Limited concluded that such a system could be designed for installation on the tanks. Under their direction, Battelle Northwest Laboratories conducted a laboratory study to develop necessary data for design of the system. A separate study conducted by Battelle Columbus Laboratories indicated that, while terminal waste solutions by themselves do not promote stress corrosion cracking, cathodic protection may promote this type of corrosion under certain conditions. As a result of these findings, the recommendation was made not to install cathodic protection on the double-wall tanks containing terminal waste solutions

  20. Quantitative cellular uptake of double fluorescent core-shelled model submicronic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Lara, E-mail: leclerc@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Boudard, Delphine [LINA (France); Pourchez, Jeremie; Forest, Valerie [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Marmuse, Laurence; Louis, Cedric [NANO-H S.A.S (France); Bin, Valerie [LINA (France); Palle, Sabine [Universite Jean Monnet, Centre de Microscopie Confocale Multiphotonique (France); Grosseau, Philippe; Bernache-Assollant, Didier [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Cottier, Michele [LINA (France)

    2012-11-15

    The relationship between particles' physicochemical parameters, their uptake by cells and their degree of biological toxicity represent a crucial issue, especially for the development of new technologies such as fabrication of micro- and nanoparticles in the promising field of drug delivery systems. This work was aimed at developing a proof-of-concept for a novel model of double fluorescence submicronic particles that could be spotted inside phagolysosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) particles were synthesized and then conjugated with a fluorescent pHrodo Trade-Mark-Sign probe, red fluorescence of which increases in acidic conditions such as within lysosomes. After validation in acellular conditions by spectral analysis with confocal microscopy and dynamic light scattering, quantification of phagocytosis was conducted on a macrophage cell line in vitro. The biological impact of pHrodo functionalization (cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress) was also investigated. Results validate the proof-of-concept of double fluorescent particles (FITC + pHrodo), allowing detection of entirely engulfed pHrodo particles (green and red labeling). Moreover incorporation of pHrodo had no major effects on cytotoxicity compared to particles without pHrodo, making them a powerful tool for micro- and nanotechnologies.

  1. Decay of the double--K-shell-vacancy state in silver atoms created in the decay of 109Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, V.; Ilakovac, K.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of germanium detectors and a three-parameter analyzer were applied in an experimental study of the creation and of the decay of atomic states with a double K-shell vacancy, created in the decay of 109 Cd. Assuming a variable intensity ratio of the Kα 1 and Kα 2 hypersatellite lines, their shift with respect to the diagram lines, Δ/sub K/α/sup h/ = 546 +- 20 eV, and the shift of the Kα satellite lines with an initial L-shell vacancy, Δ/sub K/α/sup s/(L -1 ) = 54 +- 6 eV, were obtained. The former result is in agreement with the previous experimental result of van Eijk et al. and with the theoretical result of Chen et al., but the latter result is significantly lower than the theoretical value of 73 eV. For the I(Kα 1 /sup h/)/I(Kα/sup h/) intensity ratio, a value of 0.54 +- 0.11 was obtained. From the numbers of counts in the hypersatellite-satellite peaks the intensity ratios of the hypersatellite lines I(Kβ/sub 1prime/ /sup h/)/I(Kα/sup h/) = 0.195 +- 0.016, and I(Kβ/sub 2prime/ /sup h/)/I(Kα/sup h/) = 0.055 +- 0.008 were obtained. The former value seems to be larger than the theoretical value 0.168, while the latter value is significantly larger than the theoretical value 0.029

  2. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  3. Operational waste volume projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1995-06-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the tri-party agreement. Assumptions are current as of June 1995

  4. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000

  5. Pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.

    1996-09-01

    This report discusses a methodology developed to depict overall wash and leach factors for the Hanford single-shell tank (SST) inventory. The factors derived from this methodology, which is based on available partitioning data, are applicable to a composite SST inventory rather than only an assumed insoluble portion. The purpose of considering the entire inventory is to provide a more representative picture of the partitioning behavior of the analytes during envisioned waste retrieval and processing activities. The work described in this report was conducted by the Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of analytes, such as sodium, aluminum, phosphate, and other minor components. Wash and leach factors are given for elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW)

  6. Neutrinoless double-β decay of Se82 in the shell model: Beyond the closure approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Brown, B. A.

    2014-05-01

    We recently proposed a method [R. A. Senkov and M. Horoi, Phys. Rev. C 88, 064312 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.064312] to calculate the standard nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-β decay (0νββ) of Ca48 going beyond the closure approximation. Here we extend this analysis to the important case of Se82, which was chosen as the base isotope for the upcoming SuperNEMO experiment. We demonstrate that by using a mixed method that considers information from closure and nonclosure approaches, one can get excellent convergence properties for the nuclear matrix elements, which allows one to avoid unmanageable computational costs. We show that in contrast with the closure approximation the mixed approach has a very weak dependence on the average closure energy. The matrix elements for the heavy neutrino-exchange mechanism that could contribute to the 0νββ decay of Se82 are also presented.

  7. Facile synthesis of mercaptosuccinic acid-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots with improved cell viability on different cancer cells and normal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parani, Sundararajan [University of Madras, Department of Inorganic Chemistry (India); Bupesh, Giridharan [Bharath University, Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital (India); Manikandan, Elayaperumal [Thiruvalluvar University, Department of Physics, TUCAS, Thennangur-604408 (India); Pandian, Kannaiyan [University of Madras, Department of Inorganic Chemistry (India); Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi Samuel, E-mail: oluwafemi.oluwatobi@gmail.com [University of Johannesburg, Department of Applied Chemistry (South Africa)

    2016-11-15

    Water-soluble, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by successive growth of CdS and ZnS shells on the as-synthesized CdTe/CdS{sub thin} core/shell quantum dots. The formation of core/double shell structured QDs was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV–Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, PL decay studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core/double shell QDs exhibited good photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) which is 70% higher than that of the parent core/shell QDs, and they are stable for months. The average particle size of the core/double shell QDs was ∼3 nm as calculated from the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. The cytotoxicity of the QDs was evaluated on a variety of cancer cells such as HeLa, MCF-7, A549, and normal Vero cells by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay. The results showed that core/double shell QDs were less toxic to the cells when compared to the parent core/shell QDs. MCF-7 cells showed proliferation on incubation with QDs, and this is attributed to the metalloestrogenic activity of cadmium ions released from QDs. The core/double shell CdTe/CdS/ZnS (CSS) QDs were conjugated with transferrin and successfully employed for the biolabeling and fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells. These core/double shell QDs are highly promising fluorescent probe for cancer cell labeling and imaging applications.

  8. The Effects of Cocos Nucifera (Coconut Shell on the Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Recycled Waste Aluminium Can Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.O. Agunsoye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The dry sliding wear behaviour and mechanical properties of recycled aluminium metal matrix composite reinforced with 5 and 10 % coconut shell particles (CSp has been investigated. The particle size of Cocosnucifera (coconut shell that were used ranges from 50-300µm. The wear behaviors of developed samples were investigated under varied loads and speed using pin on disc equipment. The samples were also subjected to tensile, impact and hardness test. The result shows that the additions of coconut shell particles improved the wear resistance of the recycled aluminium can/CSp composites at low Speed (2.36 m/s. However, with increase in Speed (4.72 m/s, an increase in the specific wear rates were observed. Increasing the coconut shell particles additions to the recycled waste aluminium cans (RWAlC reduced the impact resistance, hence the toughness of the RWAlC/CSp composite samples. However, the impact resistance of the composites increased as the Cocosnucifera particle size increased. The result of the filler size variation shows that decrease in filler particles size improved the tensile strength and yield strength of the developed aluminium metal matrix /CSp composite. The hardness of the composite increased with increased additions of the filler within the matrix.

  9. Removal of cadmium from aqueous solution using waste shells of golden apple snail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benliang Zhao; Jia-en Zhang; Wenbin Yan; Xiaowu Kang; Chaogang Cheng; Ying Ouyang

    2016-01-01

    Golden apple snail (GAS) is one of the 100 worst invasive alien species. With the application of molluscicides to kill and control the spreading of these snails, a large amount of dead GAS shells are remained in many farms. This study ascertained the characteristics and removal of cadmium (Cd) by the GAS shell (GASS) powders and the associate mechanisms....

  10. Synthesis of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) from waste mussel shells using a rapid microwave method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavandi, Amin, E-mail: amin.shavandi@postgrad.otago.ac.nz [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A. [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Ali, Azam [Department of Applied Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Sun, Zhifa [Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}) was produced from waste mussel shells using a rapid microwave irradiation method. Mussel shells were converted to rod like nano-crystalline HA particles of 30–70 nm long using 0.1 M EDTA as a chelating agent for 30 min after an appropriate pre-treatment and an irradiation step in a microwave with a power of 1.1 kW. The produced HA was characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the morphology, particle size, crystal phases, elemental composition and thermal behaviour. Furthermore, to benchmark the synthesized HA obtained from mussel shells, it was compared with a commercially pure HA (Sigma–Aldrich). The thermal analysis showed that the synthesized HA has remarkable heat stability at 1000 °C, and the XRD and FTIR results showed a high purity of the synthesized HA powders. Compared to the conventional hydrothermal treatment, microwave-assisted method has the advantages of an increased rate of HA formation. The obtained HA have potential engineering applications as materials for bone-tissues. - Highlights: • Waste mussel shells were successfully converted to nano sized hydroxyapatite. • Microwave-assisted technique accelerated the conversion process. • The physicochemical properties of the produced hydroxyapatite are reported. • The prepared hydroxyapatite has nano sized particles of less than 100 nm.

  11. The effect of external mean flow on sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2014-03-01

    Sound transmission through a system of double shells, lined with poroelastic material in the presence of external mean flow, is studied. The porous material is modeled as an equivalent fluid because shear wave contributions are known to be insignificant. This is achieved by accounting for the energetically most dominant wave types in the calculations. The transmission characteristics of the sandwich construction are presented for different incidence angles and Mach numbers over a wide frequency range. It is noted that the transmission loss exhibits three dips on the frequency axis as opposed to flat panels where there are only two such frequencies—results are discussed in the light of these observations. Flow is shown to decrease the transmission loss below the ring frequency, but increase this above the ring frequency due to the negative stiffness and the damping effect added by the flow. In the absence of external mean flow, porous material provides superior insulation for most part of the frequency band of interest. However, in the presence of external flow, this is true only below the ring frequency—above this frequency, the presence of air gap in sandwich constructions is the dominant factor that determines the acoustic performance. In the absence of external flow, an air gap always improves sound insulation.

  12. Development and testing of single-shell tank waste retrieval technologies: Milestone M-45-01 summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken to develop single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval technology and complete scale-model testing. Completion of these activities fulfills the commitment of Milestone M-45-01 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (the Tri-Party Agreement). Initial activities included engineering studies that compiled and evaluated data on all known retrieval technologies. Based on selection criteria incorporating regulatory, safety, and operational issues, several technologies were selected for further evaluation and testing. The testing ranged from small-scale, bench-top evaluations of individual technologies to full-scale integrated tests of multiple subsystems operating concurrently as a system using simulated wastes. The current baseline retrieval method for SSTs is hydraulic sluicing. This method has been used successfully in the past to recover waste from SSTs. Variations of this hydraulic or ''past practice'' sluicing may be used to retrieve the waste from the majority of the SSTs. To minimize the potential for releases to the soil, arm-based retrieval systems may be used to recover waste from tanks that are known or suspected to have leaked. Both hydraulic sluicing and arm-based retrieval will be demonstrated in the first SST. Hydraulic sluicing is expected to retrieve most of the waste, and arm-based retrieval will retrieve wastes that remain after sluicing. Subsequent tanks will be retrieved by either hydraulic sluicing or arm-based methods, but not both. The method will be determined by waste characterization, tank integrity (leak status), and presence of in-tank hardware. Currently, it is assumed that approximately 75% of all SSTs will be retrieved by hydraulic sluicing and the remaining tanks by arm-based methods

  13. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  14. Descriptions and diagrams of the primary and annulus ventilation systems of the double-shell tank farms as of January 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackman, A.E.; Waters, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a compilation of information describing the ventilation systems of the Double-Shell Tank farms (214-AN, -AP, -AW, -AW, -AY, -AZ, and -SY). A general description of the primary tank and annulus ventilation systems is given along with specific information on the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, condensers, preheaters, exhaust fans, and piping. This information is considered to be current as of January 1988. 38 refs, 20 figs, 30 tabs

  15. Self-template synthesis of double shelled ZnS-NiS1.97 hollow spheres for electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengzhen; Ru, Qinglong; Kang, Xiaoting; Hou, Haiyan; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Daojun

    2018-03-01

    In this work, double shelled ZnS-NiS1.97 hollow spheres have been achieved via a simple self-template route, which involves the synthesis of Zn-Ni solid spheres precursors as the self-template and then transformation into double shelled ZnS-NiS1.97 hollow spheres by sulfidation treatment. The as-prepared double shelled ZnS-NiS1.97 hollow spheres possess a high surface area (105.26 m2 g-1) and porous structures. Benefiting from the combined characteristics of novel structures, multi-component, high surface area and porous. When applied as electrode materials for supercapacitors, the double shelled ZnS-NiS1.97hollow spheres deliver a large specific capacitance of 696.8C g-1 at 5.0 A g-1 and a remarkable long lifespan cycling stability (less 5.5% loss after 6000 cycles). Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) was assembled by utilizing ZnS-NiS1.97 (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) as electrode materials. The as-assembled device possesses an energy density of 36 W h kg-1, which can be yet retained 25.6 W h kg-1 even at a power density of 2173.8 W Kg-1, indicating its promising applications in electrochemical energy storage. More importantly, the self-template route is a simple and versatile strategy for the preparation of metal sulfides electrode materials with desired structures, chemical compositions and electrochemical performances.

  16. Double-shell Fe2O3 hollow box-like structure for enhanced photo-Fenton degradation of malachite green dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De Bin; Liu, Xiaoying; Xu, Xuan; Zhang, Yu Xin

    2018-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the synthesis of novel Fe2O3 nanosheets with double-shell hollow morphology by replica molding from diatomite framework. The nanostructures of Fe2O3 nanosheets were examined by focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results reveal that (1) Pure Fe2O3 nanosheets were successfully obtained; (2) The double-shell Fe2O3 hollow structure achieved via the NaOH etching silica method was observed; (3) Fe2O3 nanosheets possessed uniformly distributed porous nanosheets. Such structural features enlarged the specific surface area of Fe2O3 nanosheets and led to more catalytic active sites. In the heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction, the double-shell Fe2O3 hollow morphology exhibited excellent catalytic capability for the degradation of malachite green (MG) at circumneutral pH condition. Under optimum condition, MG solution was almost completely decolorized in 60 min (99.9%). The Fe2O3 nanosheets also showed good stability and recyclability, demonstrating great potential as a promising photo-Fenton catalyst for the effective degradation of MG dye in wastewater.

  17. Formation of NiCo{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} yolk-double shell spheres with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yan; Nai, Jianwei; Lou, Xiong Wen David [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2018-03-05

    Complex nanostructures with multi-components and intricate architectures hold great potential in developing high-performance electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Herein, we demonstrate a facile self-templating strategy for the synthesis of metal vanadate nanomaterials with complex chemical composition of NiCo{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} and a unique yolk-double shell structure. Starting with the Ni-Co glycerate spheres, NiCo{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} yolk-double shell spheres are synthesized through an anion-exchange reaction of Ni-Co glycerate templates with VO{sub 3}{sup -} ions, followed by an annealing treatment. By virtue of compositional and structural advantages, these NiCo{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} yolk-double shell spheres manifest outstanding lithium storage properties when evaluated as anodes for LIBs. Impressively, an extra-high reversible capacity of 1228 mAh g{sup -1} can be retained after 500 cycles at a high current density of 1.0 Ag{sup -1}. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Simulations of Ar gas-puff Z-pinch radiation sources with double shells and central jets on the Z generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Velikovich, A. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Ouart, N. D.; Dasgupta, A.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations using the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Mach2-Tabular Collisional-Radiative Equilibrium code in (r, z) geometry are performed for two pairs of recent Ar gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on the refurbished Z generator with an 8 cm diameter nozzle. One pair of shots had an outer-to-inner shell mass ratio of 1:1.6 and a second pair had a ratio of 1:1. In each pair, one of the shots had a central jet. The experimental trends in the Ar K-shell yield and power are reproduced in the calculations. However, the K-shell yield and power are significantly lower than the other three shots for the case of a double-shell puff of 1:1 mass ratio and no central jet configuration. Further simulations of a hypothetical experiment with the same relative density profile of this configuration, but higher total mass, show that the coupled energy from the generator and the K-shell yield can be increased to levels achieved in the other three configurations, but not the K-shell power. Based on various measures of effective plasma radius, the compression in the 1:1 mass ratio and no central jet case is found to be less because the plasma inside the magnetic piston is hotter and of lower density. Because of the reduced density, and the reduced radiation cooling (which is proportional to the square of the density), the core plasma is hotter. Consequently, for the 1:1 outer-to-inner shell mass ratio, the load mass controls the yield and the center jet controls the power.

  19. Fresh and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete with coarse aggregate replacement using Waste of Oil Palm Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayuda, Hakas; Saleh, Fadillawaty; Ilham Maulana, Taufiq; Monika, Fanny

    2018-05-01

    Self-compacting Concrete (SCC) is a real innovation that can solidify itself without the help of tools to ease field practice. In its implementation, SCC can use alternative materials to reduce waste, such as Oil Palm Shell (OPS). In this research, OPS used as a replacement of crushed stone as the main coarse aggregate. The concrete mixture used consists of cement, sand, crushed stone, OPS as a variation of aggregate substitutes, palm oil fuel ash, and superplasticizer. OPS used were variated with 0%, 5%, 10%, 25% and 50% of crushed stone aggregate weight with age up to 28 days. Tests were conducted on fresh and mechanical properties. From the results, it is known that replacement of aggregate using OPS meets fresh properties criteria and although the compressive strength of OPS concrete mixture is lower than normal SCC, OPS still can be an alternative in making SCC and reducing palm oil industrial waste.

  20. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly

  1. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  2. Performance assessment of grouted double-shell tank waste disposal at Hanford. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W., Kincaid, C.T.; Whyatt, G.A.; Rhoads, K.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Freshley, M.D.; Blanchard, K.A.; Shade, J.W.; Piepho, M.G.; Voogd, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    This document assesses the performance of the Grout Disposal Facility after closure. The facility and disposal environment are modeled to predict the long-term impacts of the disposal action. The document concludes that the disposal system provides reasonable assurance that doses to the public will remain within the performance objectives. This document is required for DOC Order 5820.2A

  3. First generation long-reach manipulator for retrieval of waste from Hanford single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, P.W.; McDaniel, L.B.

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, has established the Tank Waste Remediation System to resolve environmental and safety issues related to underground waste-storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Tank Waste Remediation System has identified the use of an advanced-technology, long-reach manipulator system as a low-water-addition retrieval alternative to past-practice sluicing

  4. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Engeman, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor

  5. The synthesis of Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite and its application in enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yayun; Li, Yuhui; Jiang, Yingying [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Yancai, E-mail: liyancai@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A novel Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite was synthesized and characterized by SEM(*), TEM and EDS, etc. • The synthesized Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite showed high sensitivity and selectivity to electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and can be used to fabricate enzyme-free H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrochemical sensor. • The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor has two linear range of 9.0 μM–1.86 mM and 1.86 mM–7.11 mM, respectively, with a low limit of detection of 0.13 μM. • The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor also displays high anti-interference ability, good stability and reproducibility. - Abstract: A novel Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite was synthesized and used to fabricate enzyme-free electrochemical sensor for rapid and sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The well-designed Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy-dispersed spectrum (EDS). The Au@C@Pt core-double shell nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (Au@C@Pt/GCE) exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction at 0.0 V and can be used as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor. The sensor displays two wide linear ranges towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection. The one is 9.0 μM–1.86 mM with high sensitivity of 144.7 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and the other is 1.86 mM–7.11 mM with sensitivity of 80.1 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. When signal to noise (S/N) is 3, the calculated detection limit (LOD) is 0.13 μM. Furthermore, the interference from the common interfering species such as glucose, ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid can be effectively avoided to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection. Additionally, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor also displays good stability and reproducibility.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of physical and chemical characterization of waste palm oil shell as cool material replaced in asphaltic concrete as fine aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, M. A. M.; Anting, N.; Shahidan, S.; Lee, Y. Y.; Din, M. F. Md; Khalid, F. S.; Nazri, W. M. H. W.

    2017-11-01

    Malaysia is one of the biggest producer of palm oil product and currently as main source of economy for the country. During the production of crude palm oil, a large amount of waste material is generated, such as palm oil fibres, palm oil shells and empty fruit bunches. Palm oil shell aggregate (POSA) is identified as a material that shows good potential to be used as a fine aggregate replacement in asphaltic concrete. On other hand, the chemical compound that exist in the Palm Oil Shell (POS) have shown a good potential as reflective component in cool-material. The purpose of this study is to obtain the physical and chemical properties of palm oil shell. The result shows the apparent particle density of Palm Oil Shell is 1.6 mg/m3. The specific gravity of palm oil shell was obtained with the value 1.6 and the water absorption amount of palm oil shell recorded from this study was 25.1%. The X-Ray Fluorescence study shows that palm oil shell contains the highest amount of SiO2 (46.412 wt%) and the second highest amount of Fe2O3 (34.016 wt%), both is the main output of relectivity compound. As a conclusion, waste palm oil shell has a potential to be used as alternative material for fine aggregate replacement. Besides that, the amount of chemical element that consist in palm oil shell which high in SiO2 and Fe2O3, promising the benefit to mitigate urban heat island as a cooling material agent.

  7. Regulatory requirements important to Hanford single-shell tank waste management decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Woodruff, M.G.

    1989-06-01

    This report provides an initial analysis of the regulations that may be pertinent to SST management activities (e.g., characterization, disposal, retrieval, processing, etc.) and the interrelationships among those regulations. Waste disposal decisions regarding SST waste must consider the regulatory requirements against which technical solutions will be evaluated. Regulatory requirements can also be used as guidelines for management and disposal of waste in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. Also, in cases where waste management regulations do not specifically address a waste form, such as radioactive mixed waste, the SST waste may come under the purview of a number of regulations related to radioactive waste management, hazardous waste management, and water and air quality protection. This report provides a comprehensive review of the environmental pollution control and radioactive waste management statutes and regulations that are relevant to SST waste characterization and management. Also, other statutes and regulations that contain technical standards that may be used in the absence of directly applicable regulations are analyzed. 8 refs., 4 figs

  8. Structural analysis of Hanford's single-shell 241-C-106 tank: A first step toward waste-tank remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.P.; Julyk, L.J.; Marlow, R.S.; Moore, C.J.; Day, J.P.; Dyrness, A.D.; Jagadish, P.; Shulman, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    The buried single-shell waste tank 241-C-106, located at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, has been a repository for various liquid radioactive waste materials since its construction in 1943. A first step toward waste tank remediation is demonstrating that remediation activities can be performed safely. Determination of the current structural capacity of this high-heat tank is an important element in this assessment. A structural finite-element model of tank 241-C-106 has been developed to assess the tank's structural integrity with respect to in situ conditions and additional remediation surface loads. To predict structural integrity realistically, the model appropriately addresses two complex issues: (1) surrounding soil-tank interaction associated with thermal expansion cycling and surcharge load distribution and (2) concrete-property degradation and creep resulting from exposure to high temperatures generated by the waste. This paper describes the development of the 241-C-106 structural model, analysis methodology, and tank-specific structural acceptance criteria

  9. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-01-01

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  10. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  11. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms

  12. Refined 2D and Exact 3D Shell Models for the Free Vibration Analysis of Single- and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Brischetto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper talks about the free vibration analysis of simply supported Single- and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs and DWCNTs. Refined 2D Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ shell methods and an exact 3D shell model are compared. A continuum approach (based on an elastic three-dimensional shell model is used for natural frequency investigation of SWCNTs and DWCNTs. SWCNTs are defined as isotropic cylinders with an equivalent thickness and Young modulus. DWCNTs are defined as two concentric isotropic cylinders (with an equivalent thickness and Young modulus which can be linked by means of the interlaminar continuity conditions or by means of van der Waals interactions. Layer wise approaches are mandatory for the analysis of van der Waals forces in DWCNTs. The effect of van der Waals interaction between the two cylinders is shown for different DWCNT lengths, diameters and vibration modes. The accuracy of beam models and classical 2D shell models in the free vibration analysis of SWCNTs and DWCNTs is also investigated.

  13. Fine tuning of process parameters for improving briquette production from palm kernel shell gasification waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargan, Alireza; Rough, Sarah L; McKay, Gordon

    2018-04-01

    Palm kernel shell biochars (PKSB) ejected as residues from a gasifier have been used for solid fuel briquette production. With this approach, palm kernel shells can be used for energy production twice: first, by producing rich syngas during gasification; second, by compacting the leftover residues from gasification into high calorific value briquettes. Herein, the process parameters for the manufacture of PKSB biomass briquettes via compaction are optimized. Two possible optimum process scenarios are considered. In the first, the compaction speed is increased from 0.5 to 10 mm/s, the compaction pressure is decreased from 80 Pa to 40 MPa, the retention time is reduced from 10 s to zero, and the starch binder content of the briquette is halved from 0.1 to 0.05 kg/kg. With these adjustments, the briquette production rate increases by more than 20-fold; hence capital and operational costs can be reduced and the service life of compaction equipment can be increased. The resulting product satisfactorily passes tensile (compressive) crushing strength and impact resistance tests. The second scenario involves reducing the starch weight content to 0.03 kg/kg, while reducing the compaction pressure to a value no lower than 60 MPa. Overall, in both cases, the PKSB biomass briquettes show excellent potential as a solid fuel with calorific values on par with good-quality coal. CHNS: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur; FFB: fresh fruit bunch(es); HHV: higher heating value [J/kg]; LHV: lower heating value [J/kg]; PKS: palm kernel shell(s); PKSB: palm kernel shell biochar(s); POME: palm oil mill effluent; RDF: refuse-derived fuel; TGA: thermogravimetric analysis.

  14. Evaluating the bio-energy potential of groundnut shell and sugarcane bagasse waste composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde Ajani Oyelaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An assessment has been carried out on bio-coal briquettes from coal with sugarcane bagasse and coal with groundnut shell. Proximate analyses and elemental compositions of the coal and biomasses were determined. Different samples of briquettes were produced by blending varying composition of the coal with the biomasses in the ratio of 100:0; 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60 and 0: 100, using calcium carbonate as a desulfurizing agent and cassava starch as a binder. A manual hydraulically operated briquetting machine was used with the pressure kept at 5MPa. The results of the properties evaluated shows that biomass increases the burning efficiency of briquettes with increase in the biomass material, increasing combustion rate, faster ignition, producing lesser ash and fewer pollutants. Results obtained shows that the calorific value of briquettes produced from coal-groundnut shells and coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 16.94 - 20.81 and 17.31 – 21.03 MJ/kg respectively. The ignition time ranges from 6.9 – 12.5 minutes for coal-groundnut shells briquettes while that of coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 6.5 – 11.1 minutes. The bio-coal blends with sugarcane bagasse were better than that of groundnut shells. However, both sugarcane bagasse and groundnut shells produce bio-coal briquettes that are very efficient, providing sufficient heat as at the time necessary, generating less smoke and gases (e.g sulphur that are harmful to environment, and generating less ash, as these have adverse effect during cooking.

  15. Final report of the systems engineering technical advisory board for the Tank Waste Remediation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, F.P.; Goodlett, C.B.; Beard, S.J.; Duckworth, J.P.; Schneider, A.; Zahn, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is one segment of the environmental restoration program at the Hanford site. The scope is to retrieve the contents of both the single shell and double shell tanks and process the wastes into forms acceptable for long term storage and/or permanent disposal. The quantity of radioactive waste in tanks is significantly larger and substantially more complex in composition than the radioactive waste stored in tanks at other DOE sites. The waste is stored in 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks. The waste was produced over a period from the mid 1940s to the present. The single shell tanks have exceeded their design life and are experiencing failures. The oldest of the double shell tanks are approaching their design life. Spar double shell tank waste volume is limited. The priorities in the Board`s view are to manage safely the waste tank farms, accelerate emptying of waste tanks, provide spare tank capacity and assure a high degree of confidence in performance of the TWRS integrated program. At its present design capacity, the glass vitrification plant (HWVP) will require a period of about 15 years to empty the double shell tanks; the addition of the waste in single shell tanks adds another 100 years. There is an urgent need to initiate now a well focused and centralized development and engineering program on both larger glass melters and advanced separations processes that reduce radioactive constituents in the low-level waste (LLW). The Board presents its conclusions and has other suggestions for the management plan. The Board reviews planning schedules for accelerating the TWRS program.

  16. Final report of the systems engineering technical advisory board for the Tank Waste Remediation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowski, F.P.; Goodlett, C.B.; Beard, S.J.; Duckworth, J.P.; Schneider, A.; Zahn, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is one segment of the environmental restoration program at the Hanford site. The scope is to retrieve the contents of both the single shell and double shell tanks and process the wastes into forms acceptable for long term storage and/or permanent disposal. The quantity of radioactive waste in tanks is significantly larger and substantially more complex in composition than the radioactive waste stored in tanks at other DOE sites. The waste is stored in 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks. The waste was produced over a period from the mid 1940s to the present. The single shell tanks have exceeded their design life and are experiencing failures. The oldest of the double shell tanks are approaching their design life. Spar double shell tank waste volume is limited. The priorities in the Board's view are to manage safely the waste tank farms, accelerate emptying of waste tanks, provide spare tank capacity and assure a high degree of confidence in performance of the TWRS integrated program. At its present design capacity, the glass vitrification plant (HWVP) will require a period of about 15 years to empty the double shell tanks; the addition of the waste in single shell tanks adds another 100 years. There is an urgent need to initiate now a well focused and centralized development and engineering program on both larger glass melters and advanced separations processes that reduce radioactive constituents in the low-level waste (LLW). The Board presents its conclusions and has other suggestions for the management plan. The Board reviews planning schedules for accelerating the TWRS program

  17. On sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material: Comparison with Zhou's results and further effect of external mean flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; He, Chuanbo

    2015-12-01

    In this discussion, the corrections to the errors found in the derivations and the numerical code of a recent analytical study (Zhou et al. Journal of Sound and Vibration 333 (7) (2014) 1972-1990) on sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material are presented and discussed, as well as the further effect of the external mean flow on the transmission loss. After applying the corrections, the locations of the characteristic frequencies of thin shells remain unchanged, as well as the TL results above the ring frequency where BU and UU remain the best configurations in sound insulation performance. In the low-frequency region below the ring frequency, however, the corrections attenuate the TL amplitude significantly for BU and UU, and hence the BB configuration exhibits the best performance which is consistent with previous observations for flat sandwich panels.

  18. Tank waste remediation system dangerous waste training plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POHTO, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units operated by TWRS are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System (including 204-AR Waste Transfer Building), the 600 Area Purgewater Storage and the Effluent Treatment Facility. TSD Units undergoing closure are: the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System, 207-A South Retention Basin, and the 216-B-63 Trench

  19. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist...... of recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating a part of the exhaust gas through the engine combustion chamber to reduce emissions. WHRS combined...... with EGR is a potential way to improve system efficiency while reducing emissions. This paper investigates the feasibility of combining the two systems. EGR dilutes the fuel, lowering the combustion temperature and thereby the formation of NOx, to reach Tier III limitation. A double stage WHRS is set up...

  20. Evaluation of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks Suspected of Water Intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feero, Amie J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Schofield, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusions evaluations for twelve single-shell tanks were completed in 2013. The evaluations consisted of remote visual inspections, data analysis, and calculations of estimated intrusion rates. The observation of an intrusion or the preponderance of evidence confirmed that six of the twelve tanks evaluated had intrusions. These tanks were tanks 241-A-103, BX-101, BX-103, BX-110, BY-102, and SX-106

  1. Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks

  2. Deproteination of shrimp shell wastes using immobilized marine associated pseudomonad Amet1776

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhagat, J.; Venkatramani, M.; Hussain, A. J.; Jayaprakashvel, M.

    in abundance in India in the last few years. The conventional demineralization, deproteination and decoloration method of extraction of chitin from crustacean waste is costly and causes environmental problems. In this study bioconversion of chitinous material...

  3. Hanford tank waste operation simulator operational waste volume projection verification and validation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator is tested to determine if it can replace the FORTRAN-based Operational Waste Volume Projection computer simulation that has traditionally served to project double-shell tank utilization. Three Test Cases are used to compare the results of the two simulators; one incorporates the cleanup schedule of the Tri Party Agreement

  4. Work Plan for Updating Double Shell Tank (DST) Sub-System Specifications ICDS (TBR-120.005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEONARD, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The DST System stores waste from the processing of nuclear material at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The program to dispose of this waste has been divided into several phases with Phase 1 being the demonstration of the waste disposal technology by a private contractor. A DST System specification is being prepared providing the top-level requirements for the continued safe storage of waste in the DST System and the removal of selected waste for processing by the privatized facility during Phase 1. This document provides the detailed plans for finalizing and issuing Rev. 0 of the DST System specification in FY-2000 and for the release of several interface control documents

  5. Performance analysis of double organic Rankine cycle for discontinuous low temperature waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongxiang; Ling Xiang; Peng Hao

    2012-01-01

    This research proposes a double organic Rankine cycle for discontinuous waste heat recovery. The optimal operation conditions of several working fluids have been calculated by a procedure employing MATLAB and REFPROP. The influence of outlet temperature of heat source on the net power output, thermal efficiency, power consumption, mass flow rate, expander outlet temperature, cycle irreversibility and exergy efficiency at a given pinch point temperature difference (PPTD) has been analyzed. Pinch point analysis has also been employed to obtain a thermodynamic understanding of the ORC performance. Of all the working fluids investigated, some performances between each working fluid are rather similar. For a fixed low temperature heat source, the optimal operation condition should be mainly determined by the heat carrier of the heat source, and working fluids have limited influence. Lower outlet temperature of heat source does not always mean more efficient energy use. Acetone exhibits the least exergy destruction, while R245fa possesses the maximal exergy efficiency at a fixed PPTD. Wet fluids exhibit lower thermal efficiency than the others with the increasing of PPTD at a fixed outlet temperature of heat source. Dry and isentropic fluids offer attractive performance. - Highlights: ► We propose a double organic Rankine cycle for discontinuous waste heat recovery. ► Performance of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is analyzed by pinch point analysis. ► The heat carrier of the heat source determines ORC optimal operation condition. ► Design of ORC heat exchangers prefers lower pinch point temperature difference.

  6. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) will provide permanent disposal for approximately 43 Mgal of radioactive liquid waste currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The first step in permanent disposal is accomplished by solidifying the low-level liquid waste with cementitious dry materials. The resulting grout is cast within underground vaults. This report on the GTF contains information on the following: Hanford Site Maps, road evaluation for the grout treatment facility, Department of Ecology certificate of non-designation for centralia fly ash, double-shell tank waste compositional modeling, laboratory analysis reports for double-shell tank waste, stored in tanks 241-AN-103, 241-AN-106, and 241-AW-101, grout vault heat transfer results for M-106 grout formulation, test results for extraction procedure toxicity testing, test results for toxicity testing of double-shell tank grout, pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste, characterization of simulated low-level waste grout produced in a pilot-scale test, description of the procedure for sampling nonaging waste storage tanks, description of laboratory procedures, grout campaign waste composition verification, variability in properties of grouted phosphate/sulfate N-reactor waste, engineering drawings, description of operating procedures, equipment list--transportable grout equipment, grout treatment facility--tank integrity assessment plan, long-term effects of waste solutions on concrete and reinforcing steel, vendor information, grout disposal facilities construction quality assurance plan, and flexible membrane liner/waste compatibility test results

  7. Technical specifications for waste packages conditioned in a durable confining shell, with an hydraulic binder basis, intended to a ground disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this document is to precise the general and particular conditions for the acceptance on a ground disposal site of a low- and middle-level radioactive waste package conditioned in a durable confining shell. This specification concerns the wastes that contain beta and gamma decay radionuclides and/or long life alpha decay radionuclides in higher quantities than accepted for the protective coatings. Physico-chemical and mechanical specifications are given for the wastes, the fixing material, the confining shell and the container. Accepted limits for degassing and dose rates, surface contamination, dimensions and weight are given. The agreement is delivered by the ANDRA after the package has satisfied the different mechanical, chemical, fire, moisture and radiation resistance tests. (J.S.). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 1 glossary

  8. Evaluating the bio-energy potential of groundnut shell and sugarcane bagasse waste composite

    OpenAIRE

    Olatunde Ajani Oyelaran

    2015-01-01

    An assessment has been carried out on bio-coal briquettes from coal with sugarcane bagasse and coal with groundnut shell. Proximate analyses and elemental compositions of the coal and biomasses were determined. Different samples of briquettes were produced by blending varying composition of the coal with the biomasses in the ratio of 100:0; 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60 and 0: 100, using calcium carbonate as a desulfurizing agent and cassava starch as a binder. A manual hydraulical...

  9. Effect of double-shell structure on reduction of field errors in the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.; Masamune, S.; Nagata, A.; Arimoto, H.; Oshiyama, H.; Sato, K.I.

    1988-08-01

    Reversed-field pinch (RFP) operation on STP-3 (M) proved that the adition of a quasistational vertical field B sub(perpendicular) together with large reduction of irregular magnetic field at the shell gap could remarkably improve properties of the plasma confinement. Here, the gaps of a thick shell is wholely covered with the single primary coil having a shell shape. The measured field error at the gap is as small as 7.5 % of the poloidal field. The application of B sub(perpendicular) sets the plasma at a more perfect equilibrium. In this operation, the plasma resistivety much decreased by a factor 2 and the electron temperature rose up to 0.8 keV. (author)

  10. Research and demonstration results for a new "Double-Solution" technology for municipal solid waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erping, Li; Haoyun, Chen; Yanyang, Shang; Jun, Pan; Qing, Hu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the pyrolysis characteristics of six typical components in municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated through a TG-FTIR combined technique and it was concluded that the main pyrolysis process of the biomass components (including food residues, sawdust and paper) occurred at 150-600°C. The main volatiles were multi-component gas including H 2 O, CO 2 , and CO. The main pyrolysis temperatures of three artificial products (PP, PVC and leather) was ranged from 200to 500°C. The wavelength of small molecule gases (CH 4 , CO 2 and CO) and the the chemical bonds (CO and CC) were observed in the infrared spectrum Based on the pyrolysis temperature interval and volatile constituent, a new "double-solution" process of pyrolysis and oxygen-enrichment decomposition MSW was designed. To achieve this process, a double-solution project was built for the direct treatment of MSW (10t/d). The complete setup of equipment and analysis of the byproducts has been reported in this paper to indicate the performance of this process. Energy balance and economic benefits were analysed for the process supporting. It was successfully demonstrated that the double-solution process was the environmentally friendly alternative method for MSW treatment in Chinese rural areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of NiCo2O4 Double-Shelled Hollow Spheres for High-Performance Sodium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiong; Zhou, Yanping; Luo, Bin; Zhu, Huacheng; Chu, Wei; Huang, Kama

    2018-03-01

    The ternary transitional metal oxide NiCo2O4 is a promising anode material for sodium ion batteries due to its high theoretical capacity and superior electrical conductivity. However, its sodium storage capability is severely limited by the sluggish sodiation/desodiation reaction kinetics. Herein, NiCo2O4 double-shelled hollow spheres were synthesized via a microwave-assisted, fast solvothermal synthetic procedure in a mixture of isopropanol and glycerol, followed by annealing. Isopropanol played a vital role in the precipitation of nickel and cobalt, and the shrinkage of the glycerol quasi-emulsion under heat treatment was responsible for the formation of the double-shelled nanostructure. The as-synthesized product was tested as an anode material in a sodium ion battery, was found to exhibit a high reversible specific capacity of 511 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1, and deliver high capacity retention after 100 cycles. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. A novel durable double-conductive core-shell structure applying to the synthesis of silicon anode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Shen, Tong; Guo, Ting; Wang, Xiuli; Xia, Xinhui; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2018-04-01

    Si/C composites are currently the most commercially viable next-generation lithium-ion battery anode materials due to their high specific capacity. However, there are still many obstacles need to be overcome such as short cycle life and poor conductivity. In this work, we design and successfully synthesis an excellent durable double-conductive core-shell structure p-Si-Ag/C composites. Interestingly, this well-designed structure offers remarkable conductivity (both internal and external) due to the introduction of silver particles and carbon layer. The carbon layer acts as a protective layer to maintain the integrity of the structure as well as avoids the direct contact of silicon with electrolyte. As a result, the durable double-conductive core-shell structure p-Si-Ag/C composites exhibit outstanding cycling stability of roughly 1000 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.2 A g-1 and retain 765 mAh g-1 even at a high current density of 2 A g-1, indicating a great improvement in electrochemical performance compared with traditional silicon electrode. Our research results provide a novel pathway for production of high-performance Si-based anodes to extending the cycle life and specific capacity of commercial lithium ion batteries.

  13. REPORT ON QUALITATIVE VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS USING LITHIUM-ALUMINUM LAYERED DOUBLE-HYDROXIDES FOR THE REDUCTION OF ALUMINUM FROM THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT FEEDSTOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.J.; Duncan, J.B.; Cooke, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    A process for removing aluminum from tank waste simulants by adding lithium and precipitating Li-Al-dihydroxide (Lithiumhydrotalcite, (LiAl 2 (OH) 6 ) + X - ) has been verified. The tests involved a double-shell tank (DST) simulant and a single-shell tank (SST) simulant. In the case of the DST simulant, the product was the anticipated Li-hydrotalcite. For the SST simulant, the product formed was primarily Li-phosphate. However, adding excess Li to the solution did result in the formation of traces of Li-hydrotalcite. The Li-hydrotalcite from the DST supernate was an easily filterable solid. After four water washes the filter cake was a fluffy white material made of < 100 (micro)m particles made of smaller spheres. These spheres are agglomerates of ∼ 5 (micro)m diameter platelets with < 1 (micro)m thickness. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of the filtrate, filter cake, and wash waters indicate a removal of 90+ wt% of the dissolved Al for the DST simulant. For the SST simulant, the main competing reaction to the formation of lithium hydrotalcite appears to be the formation of lithium phosphate. In case of the DST simulant, phosphorus co-precipitated with the hydrotalcite. This would imply the added benefit of the removal of phosphorus along with aluminum in the pre-treatment part of the waste treatment and immobilization plant (WTP). For this endeavor to be successful, a serious effort toward process parameter optimization is necessary. Among the major issues to be addressed are the dependency of the reaction yield on the solution chemistry, as well as residence times, temperatures, and an understanding of particle growth.

  14. Hanford Waste Management Plan, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP) is to provide an integrated plan for the safe storage, interim management, and disposal of existing waste sites and current and future waste streams at the Hanford Site. The emphasis of this plan is, however, on the disposal of Hanford Site waste. The plans presented in the HWMP are consistent with the preferred alternative which is based on consideration of comments received from the public and agencies on the draft Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (HDW-EIS). Low-level waste was not included in the draft HDW-EIS whereas it is included in this plan. The preferred alternative includes disposal of double-shell tank waste, retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste, one pre-1970 TRU solid waste site near the Columbia River and encapsulated cesium and strontium waste

  15. 78 FR 75913 - Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... site, including the disposal of Hanford's low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level... would be processed for disposal in Low- Level Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds (LLBGs) Trenches 31 and... treating radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks (149 Single-Shell Tanks [SSTs] and 28 Double...

  16. Waste cockle shell as natural catalyst for biodiesel production from jatropha oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Norulakmal Nor; Idrus, Nur Afini; Ghafar, Faridah; Salleh, Marmy Roshaidah Mohd

    2017-12-01

    Due to the increasing of industrialization and modernization of the world, the demand of petroleum has risen rapidly. The increasing demand for energy and environmental awareness has prompted many researches to embark on alternative fuel platforms that are environmentally acceptable. In this study, jatropha oil was used to produce biodiesel by a new transesterification routine in which cockle shell was used as source of heterogeneous catalyst. The investigation showed the catalyst that was calcined at temperature of 800 °C has the optimum capability to produce high yield. The highest yield of biodiesel production of 93.20 % were obtained by using 1.5 wt% of catalyst. The reaction was conducted at a temperature of 65 °C with the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 6:1. It was found that the physical properties of the biodiesel produced were significant to ASTM standard of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME).

  17. Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.C.; Hamilton, D.W.; Holton, L.K.; Bailey, J.W.

    1991-09-01

    A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs

  18. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications

  19. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  20. Operational waste volume projection. Revision 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of July 1994

  1. Hanford long-term high-level waste management program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reep, I.E.

    1978-05-01

    The objective is the long-term disposition of the defense high-level radioactive waste which will remain upon completion of the interim waste management program in the mid-1980s, plus any additional high-level defense waste resulting from the future operation of N Reactor and the Purex Plant. The high-level radioactive waste which will exist in the mid-1980s and is addressed by this plan consists of approximately 3,300,000 ft 3 of damp salt cake stored in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks, 1,500,000 ft 3 of damp sludge stored in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks, 11,000,000 gallons of residual liquor stored in double-shell waste tanks, 3,000,000 gallons of liquid wastes stored in double-shell waste tanks awaiting solidification, and 2,900 capsules of 90 SR and 137 Cs compounds stored in water basins. Final quantities of waste may be 5 to 10% greater, depending on the future operation of N Reactor and the Purex Plant and the application of waste treatment techniques currently under study to reduce the inventory of residual liquor. In this report, the high-level radioactive waste addressed by this plan is briefly described, the major alternatives and strategies for long-term waste management are discussed, and a description of the long-term high-level waste management program is presented. Separate plans are being prepared for the long-term management of radioactive wastes which exist in other forms. 14 figures

  2. Deproteinization potential and antioxidant property of haloalkalophilic organic solvent tolerant protease from marine Bacillus sp. APCMST-RS3 using marine shell wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirumalai Maruthiah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The current increase in the vast amount of marine crustacean shell waste produced by the fish processing industries has led to the need to find new methods for its disposal. Hence, the present study was carried out via marine shell wastes as substrate for protease production. The maximum production (4000.65 U/ml from Bacillus sp. APCMST-RS3 was noticed in 3:1% shrimp and oyster shell powder (SOSP as substrate. Purified protease showed 53.22% and 22.66% enzyme yield; 3.48 and 8.49 fold purity with 40 kDa molecular weight; whereas, its Km and Vmax values were 0.6666 g/l, 1111.11 U/ml. This enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 9 and 60 °C temperature. Also, it retained maximum protease activity in the presence of NaCl (2.5 M, surfactants (Tween 20, 40, 60, 80 and SDS and metal ions (MnCl2, CaCl2, HgCl2 and BaCl2 and solvents. The candidate bacterium effectively deproteinized (84.35% shrimp shell and its antioxidant potentials.

  3. Preparation of porous carbon sphere from waste sugar solution for electric double-layer capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhi-Qiang; Cao, Jing-Pei; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Zhuang, Qi-Qi; Wang, Xing-Yong; Wei, Xian-Yong

    2017-09-01

    Waste sugar solution (WSS), which contains abundant 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, is harmful to the environment if discharged directly. For value-added utilization of the waste resource, a novel process is developed for preparation of porous carbon spheres by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of WSS followed by KOH activation. Additionally, the possible preparation mechanism of carbon spheres is proposed. The effects of hydrothermal and activation parameters on the properties of the carbon sphere are also investigated. The carbon sphere is applied to electric double-layer capacitor and its electrochemical performance is studied. These results show that the carbon sphere obtained by HTC at 180 °C for 12 h with the WSS/deionized water volume ratio of 2/3 possess the highest specific capacitance under identical activation conditions. The specific capacitance of the carbon spheres can reach 296.1 F g-1 at a current density of 40 mA g-1. Besides, excellent cycle life and good capacitance retention (89.6%) are observed at 1.5 A g-1 after 5000 cycles. This study not only provides a facile and potential method for the WSS treatment, but also achieves the high value-added recycling of WSS for the preparation of porous carbon spheres with superior electrochemical properties.

  4. Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The ''Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Transesterification of Jatropha and Karanja oils by using waste egg shell derived calcium based mixed metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Girdhar; Rawat, Devendra S.; Lamba, Bhawna Y.; Bisht, Kamal K.; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Nayan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Waste chicken eggshell derived CaO(cesp) based mixed metal oxides were prepared. • Transesterification of high free fatty acid containing non-edible oils were achieved using prepared catalysts. • CaO(cesp) based mixed metal oxides have shown better activity in comparison to neat CaO(cesp). • Best Conversions were achieved with ZnO–CaO(cesp). • Catalyst has shown good reusability up to 4 cycles without significant loss in its activity. - Abstract: Solid base heterogeneous catalysts are one of the promising materials for the transesterification of vegetable oils because these catalysts are generally more reactive than solid acid catalysts which require very severe operating conditions. Calcium oxide has shown good catalytic activity due to its high basicity which is required for transesterification of triacylglycerides (TAGs). In the present study, the transesterification of non-edible, high free fatty acid containing Jatropha and Karanja oils was studied by using waste chicken egg shell derived calcium (i.e. CaO(cesp)) based mixed metal oxides (M-CaO; M = ZnO, MnO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 ) as heterogeneous catalyst. A comparison was also made on the catalytic performance of these prepared catalysts. The catalyst characterizations were done by XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and BET techniques. The effectiveness of the catalysts was highly influenced by the calcination temperature. ZnO–CaO(cesp) catalyst was found to be the most efficient catalyst among all. The maximum conversion for the transesterification of Jatropha and Karanja oils were achieved using 5 wt% catalyst, 65 °C temperature and 12:1 methanol/oil ratio. The catalyst could be re-used effectively during four cycles. Use of the CaO(cesp) based mixed oxides made the process more environmental benign and economical. The biodiesel prepared has shown good fuel characteristics as per EN, ASTM and IS standards

  6. Results of phase 1 groundwater quality assessment for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1998-02-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a Phase 1 (or first determination) groundwater quality assessment for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY has impacted groundwater quality. This report will document the evidence demonstrating that the WMA has impacted groundwater quality.

  7. Results of phase 1 groundwater quality assessment for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1998-02-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a Phase 1 (or first determination) groundwater quality assessment for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY has impacted groundwater quality. This report will document the evidence demonstrating that the WMA has impacted groundwater quality

  8. Production of bio-fertilizer from microwave vacuum pyrolysis of waste palm shell for cultivation of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Wai Lun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave vacuum pyrolysis of waste palm shell (WPS was performed to produce biochar, which was then tested as bio-fertilizer in growing Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus. The pyrolysis approach generated a biochar containing a highly porous structure with a high BET surface area (up to 1250 m2/g and a low moisture content (≤ 10 wt%, exhibiting desirable adsorption properties to be used as bio-fertilizer since it can act as a housing that provides many sites on which living microorganisms (mycelium or plant-growth promoting bacteria and organic nutrients can be attached or adsorbed onto. This could in turn stimulate plant growth by increasing the availability and supply of nutrients to the targeted host plant. The results from growing Oyster mushroom using the biochar record an impressive growth rate and a monthly production of up to about 550 g of mushroom. The shorter time for mycelium growth on whole baglog (30 days and the highest yield of Oyster mushroom (550 g was obtained from the cultivation medium added with 20 g of biochar. Our results demonstrate that the biochar-based bio-fertilizer produce from microwave vacuum pyrolysis of WPS show exceptional promise as an alternative growing substrate for mushroom cultivation.

  9. Production of bio-fertilizer from microwave vacuum pyrolysis of waste palm shell for cultivation of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun Nam, Wai; Huan Su, Man; Phang, Xue Yee; Chong, Min Yee; Keey Liew, Rock; Ma, Nyuk Ling; Lam, Su Shiung

    2017-11-01

    Microwave vacuum pyrolysis of waste palm shell (WPS) was performed to produce biochar, which was then tested as bio-fertilizer in growing Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). The pyrolysis approach generated a biochar containing a highly porous structure with a high BET surface area (up to 1250 m2/g) and a low moisture content (≤ 10 wt%), exhibiting desirable adsorption properties to be used as bio-fertilizer since it can act as a housing that provides many sites on which living microorganisms (mycelium or plant-growth promoting bacteria) and organic nutrients can be attached or adsorbed onto. This could in turn stimulate plant growth by increasing the availability and supply of nutrients to the targeted host plant. The results from growing Oyster mushroom using the biochar record an impressive growth rate and a monthly production of up to about 550 g of mushroom. The shorter time for mycelium growth on whole baglog (30 days) and the highest yield of Oyster mushroom (550 g) was obtained from the cultivation medium added with 20 g of biochar. Our results demonstrate that the biochar-based bio-fertilizer produce from microwave vacuum pyrolysis of WPS show exceptional promise as an alternative growing substrate for mushroom cultivation.

  10. Rethinking Timber: Investigation into the Use of Waste Macadamia Nut Shells for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdis, Jordan; Gaudion, Lauren; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Löschke, Sandra; Dong, Andy

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the feasibility of turning macadamia nutshells, a waste product from the forestry and agricultural industries, into a three-dimensional (3D) printed, innovative, microtimber product is examined by composing a wood plastic feed stock for fusion deposition modeling. Different ratios of micro-ground macadamia nutshells and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics were mixed with a binding agent to extrude a range of filaments. By using a commercial 3D printer, these filaments helped to fabricate specimens that were tested in tension and compression. The results show that printed samples of macadamia-nutshell—ABS composites offer a viable alternative to commercially available wood polymer composite filaments. Although they possess similar mechanical properties, they have a lower density, making them suitable for a range of lightweight product applications. The research demonstrates that there are new opportunities for the use of macadamia nutshell filament in additive manufacturing as a result of its enhanced properties compared with traditional wood filaments.

  11. A broadening temperature sensitivity range with a core-shell YbEr@YbNd double ratiometric optical nanothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, L.; Prorok, K.; Francés-Soriano, L.; Pérez-Prieto, J.; Bednarkiewicz, A.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle based optical nano-thermometer under single ~808 nm wavelength photo-excitation from around ΔT = 150 K to over ΔT = 300 K (150-450 K). Such engineered nanocrystals are suitable for remote optical temperature measurements in technology and biotechnology at the sub-micron scale.The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle

  12. Death, Innocence, and the Cyborg: Theorizing the Gynoid Double-Bind in Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tembo Kwasu D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Donna Haraway’s “A Cyborg Manifesto” (1983, the author presents a discussion of the concept and praxis of the cyborg in emancipatory terms. Haraway presents the cyborg as a transgressive and latently mercurial figure that decouples and contravenes numerous exploitative ideological frameworks of repressive biopower that repress human being and reproduce the conditions of said repression. Using Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence (2004 as a dialogic case study, this essay explores the manner in which the cyborg, particularly its figuration as female-gendered anthropic machine or gynoid in 20th- and 21st-century science fiction, simultaneously confirms and contradicts Haraway’s assessment of the concept of the cyborg. As to its methodology, this essay opens with a contextualizing excursus on the cyber-being in contemporary Western society and sociopolitics, with a view to offering a framework analysis of the figuration of the gynoid in Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence as a recent example of contemporary science fiction’s representation of the issues and debates inherent to the concept of the gynoid. Lastly, this essay performs a detailed close reading of Oshii’s text in relation to its exploration of themes of the conceptual emancipatory potential of the cyber-being and the paradoxically exploitative patriarchal power relations that re-inscribe said potential within what this essay refers to as ‘the gynoid double-bind.’

  13. Application of wasted sea-shell to desulfurizer in fluidized bed coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Ichiro; Saito, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Takahiro

    1999-07-01

    Almost all wasted seashells consist of CaCo{sub 3}, and are similar to limestone. It would be proposed that the seashell could be applied as a desulfurizer. In this study, desulfurization characteristics of the seashell are fundamentally studied by using a thermobalance and a bubbling fluidized coal combustor with comparing the results obtained by limestone as a reference. Under the constant calcination temperature, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells attains more than about 70% after the desulfurization period of 30 h. For the limestones, on the other hand, the desulfurization efficiency becomes only 38%. Under practical conditions of fluidized bed coal combustion, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells also indicates higher value than that for the limestones. The desulfurization efficiency depends on the pore size distribution of CaO rather than its specific surface area. The mean pore size of the calcined seashell is about 10 times as large as that of the calcined limestones. from Scanning Electro-Microscope (SEM) photos of the surface of CaCO{sub 3}, CaO and the sulfurized particles of the seashells the large pores can be observed. In measuring cross-sectional distribution of sulfur inside the particles by using an Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) system, the sulfur in the sulfurized particle of limestone is only trapped near the particle surface. For the seashells, whereas, the sulfur is distributed over the whole body of particle. Desulfurization efficiency for the limestone, into which some alkali metal compounds are added, increases with increasing the concentration of alkali metal compounds added. In order of increasing effect the key elemental species to enhance the desulfurization activities are Cl, Na and K. Alkali metal compounds can enhance the desulfurization activities, due to solution of CaO in molten NaCl. This is one of the reasons why the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells improves.

  14. Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water Using Nanoporous Material Prepared from Waste Avian Egg Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmumin A. Nuhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a biocompatible calcium carbonate vateritic polymorph was recrystallized from eggshell waste and its application for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples was demonstrated. This nanoporous calcium carbonate was used as sorbent in dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction method. In this approach 50 mg of the calcium carbonate material having about 25 nm pores was placed in a 5 mL of water sample and ultrasonicated for 30 min. The cloudy sample was centrifuged at 13500 rpm for 2 min. The aqueous layer was then discarded and the CaCO3 material was dabbed dry with a lint-free tissue. The analytes were then desorbed with 100 μL of dichloromethane by ultrasonication for 5 min. Finally, the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography flame ionization detector. Experimental parameters affecting the extraction recoveries were optimized. Using optimum extraction conditions, calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficients of 0.9853 to 0.9973 over the concentration range of 0.05 to 30 ng/mL. This method showed a detection limit as low as 0.004 ng/mL (at signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Performance of the dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction was compared with a previously optimized solid-phase extraction technique. The developed method displayed good extraction recoveries (85 ± 8–110 ± 4% with high enhancement factors (388–1433-fold and good repeatability (% RSD < 13 and involved the use of minimal solvents. Analysis of seawater from Dammam Port revealed the presence of the analytes at concentrations between 0.15±0.01 and 13.43±1.54 ng/mL.

  15. Lanthanide-alkali double sulfate precipitation from strong sulfuric acid NiMH battery waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porvali, Antti; Wilson, Benjamin P; Lundström, Mari

    2018-01-01

    In NiMH battery leaching, rare earth element (REE) precipitation from sulfate media is often reported as being a result of increasing pH of the pregnant leach solution (PLS). Here we demonstrate that this precipitation is a phenomenon that depends on both Na + and SO 4 2- concentrations and not solely on pH. A two-stage leaching for industrially crushed NiMH waste is performed: The first stage consists of H 2 SO 4 leaching (2 M H 2 SO 4 , L/S = 10.4, V = 104 ml, T = 30 °C) and the second stage of H 2 O leaching (V = 100 ml, T = 25 °C). Moreover, precipitation experiments are separately performed as a function of added Na 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 4 . During the precipitation, higher than stoichiometric quantities of Na to REE are utilized and this increase in both precipitation reagent concentrations results in an improved double sulfate precipitation efficiency. The best REE precipitation efficiencies (98-99%) - achieved by increasing concentrations of H 2 SO 4 and Na 2 SO 4 by 1.59 M and 0.35 M, respectively - results in a 21.8 times Na (as Na 2 SO 4 ) and 58.3 times SO 4 change in stoichiometric ratio to REE. Results strongly indicate a straightforward approach for REE recovery from NiMH battery waste without the need to increase the pH of PLS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Chitosan Produced from Fermented Shrimp Shell Waste by Bacillus subtilis NA12 Using Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashandy, A.S.; Raffat, E.A.; Ibrahim, H.M.M.; El Tayeb, T.S.; Gamal, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on characterization of chitosan obtained in a previous study from fermented shrimp shell waste (SSW) by Bacillus subtilis NA12. Extracted chitin was exposed to different gamma radiation doses (5-35 kGy). The molecular weight of the resultant chitosan decreased constantly with increasing radiation dose from 1.9 × 10"6 (g/mol) (non-irradiated) to 3.7 ×10"4 (g/mol) (at 35 kGy). The degree of deacetylation (DDA %) was determined by using potentiometric titration. The structural properties of chitin and chitosan were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared chitosan has higher solubility and DDA % compared to the standard chitosan. FT-IR analysis clearly confirmed the successful extraction of pure chitin and chitosan. TGA showed that chitin exhibited a stable structure toward thermal decomposition than chitosan. XRD analysis revealed that extracted chitin was more crystalline than prepared chitosan. Chitosan with different molecular weights was evaluated as an antibacterial agent against representative pathogenic bacterial strains. Chitosan obtained at 35 kGy, with molecular weight 3.7×10"4 (g/mol ) and DDA of 87.9 %, showed the highest antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It revealed inhibition zone diameter of 5.4 ± 0.2, 5.4 ± 0.12, 3.5 ± 0.21 and 1.4 ± 0.06 cm, respectively

  17. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level wastes, for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  18. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C.A.

    1996-09-20

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  19. Probing Charge Transfer between Shells of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sorted by Outer-Wall Electronic Type

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Green, A. A.; Hersam, M. C.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 35 (2011), s. 9806-9815 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : density-gradient ultracentrifugation * double-walled carbon nanotubes * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 5.925, year: 2011

  20. Coal option. [Shell Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This paper notes the necessity of developing an international coal trade on a very large scale. The role of Shell in the coal industry is examined; the regions in which Shell companies are most active are Australia, Southern Africa, Indonesia; Europe and North America. Research is being carried out on marketing and transportation, especially via slurry pipelines; coal-oil emulsions; briquets; fluidized-bed combustion; recovery of coal from potential waste material; upgrading of low-rank coals; unconventional forms of mining; coal conversion (the Shell/Koppers high-pressure coal gasification process). Techniques for cleaning flue gas (the Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization process) are being examined.

  1. Shell Venster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, P.; Looijesteijn, B.; Regeer, B.; Stip, B.

    1995-03-01

    In the bi-monthly issues of 'Shell Venster' (window on Shell) attention is paid to the activities of the multinational petroleum company Shell Nederland and the Koninklijke/Shell Groep by means of non-specialist articles

  2. Multi-functional integration of pore P25@C@MoS{sub 2} core-double shell nanostructures as robust ternary anodes with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Biao [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Zhao, Naiqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Collaborative Innovation Centre of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wei, Chaopeng; Zhou, Jingwen; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Liu, Enzuo, E-mail: ezliu@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Collaborative Innovation Centre of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • P25@carbon supported MoS{sub 2} composite was prepared by a one-step process. • The distribution and interaction of C, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} are systematically examined. • The enjoyable features of the three components are complementarily integrated. • The smart ternary electrode exhibits excellent cycling stability and rate capability. - Abstract: Ternary anodes have attracted more and more attention due to the characteristic advantages resulting from the effect integration of three different materials on the lithium storage mechanism with functional interfaces interaction. However, clarifying the distribution and interaction of carbon, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} in the MoS{sub 2}/C/TiO{sub 2} composite, which is helpful for the understanding of the formation and lithium storage mechanism of the ternary anodes, is a well-known challenge. Herein, a novel pore core-double shell nanostructure of P25@carbon network supported few-layer MoS{sub 2} nanosheet (P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2}) is successfully synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal approach. The distribution and interaction of the carbon, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} in the obtained P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2} hybrid are systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis et al. It is found that the carbon serves as binder, which supports few-layer MoS{sub 2} shell and coats the P25 core via Ti−O−C bonds at the same time. Such multi-functional integration with smart structure and strong interfacial contact generates favorable structure stability and interfacial pseudocapacity-like storage mechanism. As a consequence, superior cycling and rate capacity of the muti-functional integration ternary P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2} anode are achieved.

  3. In-situ construction of Au nanoparticles confined in double-shelled TiO2/mSiO2 hollow architecture for excellent catalytic activity and enhanced thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yiwei; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Shuo; Zhang, Hongxing; Sheng, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the synthesis of H-TS-Au microspheres (MCs) with double-shelled hollow architecture and sub-5 nm Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure involves the successive sol-gel template-assisted method for the preparation of uniform hierarchical hollow-in-hollow H-TS MCs with TiO2/mSiO2 as yolks/shells, and the unique deposition-precipitation method mediated with Au(en)2Cl3 precursors for the in-situ construction of extremely stable Au NPs under a low-temperature hydrogen reduction. The synthesized H-TS-Au MCs were characterized by TEM, SEM, FTIR, XRD, BET and UV-vis absorption spectra. Catalytic activity of H-TS-Au was evaluated using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results established that H-TS-Au MCs possessed a large-size double-shelled architecture with high structural integrity and robustness,which can effectively confine numerous tiny Au NPs and restrict them from sintering aggregation even up to further calcination at 800 °C. Owing to the advantageous structural configuration and the synergistic effect of TiO2/mSiO2 double shells, the H-TS-Au MCs were demonstrated to exhibit a remarkable catalytic activity and stability, and preserve the intact morphology after 6 repeating reduction of 4-NP.

  4. Steel corrosion in radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, E.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study is being conducted by CNEA and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America) to investigate the effects of tank waste chemistry on radioactive waste storage tank corrosion. Radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks that contain a combination of salts, consisting primarily of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide. The USDOE, Office of River Protection at the Hanford Site, has identified a need to conduct a laboratory study to better understand the effects of radioactive waste chemistry on the corrosion of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The USDOE science need (RL-WT079-S Double-Shell Tanks Corrosion Chemistry) called for a multi year effort to identify waste chemistries and temperatures within the double-shell tank (DST) operating limits for corrosion control and operating temperature range that may not provide the expected corrosion protection and to evaluate future operations for the conditions outside the existing corrosion database. Assessment of corrosion damage using simulated (non-radioactive) waste is being made of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloy. Evaluation of the influence of exposure time, and electrolyte composition and/or concentration is being also conducted. (author) [es

  5. Double photoionization of propylene oxide: A coincidence study of the ejection of a pair of valence-shell electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Vecchiocattivi, Franco; Alagia, Michele; Schio, Luca; Richter, Robert; Stranges, Stefano; Catone, Daniele; Arruda, Manuela S.; Mendes, Luiz A. V.; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Pirani, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    Propylene oxide, a favorite target of experimental and theoretical studies of circular dichroism, was recently discovered in interstellar space, further amplifying the attention to its role in the current debate on protobiological homochirality. In the present work, a photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, using an ion-imaging detector and tunable synchrotron radiation in the 18.0-37.0 eV energy range, permits us (i) to observe six double ionization fragmentation channels, their relative yields being accounted for about two-thirds by the couple (C2H4+, CH2O+) and one-fifth by (C2H3+, CH3O+); (ii) to measure thresholds for their openings as a function of photon energy; and (iii) to unravel a pronounced bimodality for a kinetic-energy-released distribution, fingerprint of competitive non-adiabatic mechanisms.

  6. Thermogravimetric pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo waste via Asymmetric Double Sigmoidal (Asym2sig) function deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuihan; Miao, Wei; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Hongjuan

    2017-02-01

    Thermogravimetric kinetic of bamboo waste (BW) pyrolysis has been studied using Asymmetric Double Sigmoidal (Asym2sig) function deconvolution. Through deconvolution, BW pyrolytic profiles could be separated into three reactions well, each of which corresponded to pseudo hemicelluloses (P-HC), pseudo cellulose (P-CL), and pseudo lignin (P-LG) decomposition. Based on Friedman method, apparent activation energy of P-HC, P-CL, P-LG was found to be 175.6kJ/mol, 199.7kJ/mol, and 158.4kJ/mol, respectively. Energy compensation effects (lnk 0, z vs. E z ) of pseudo components were in well linearity, from which pre-exponential factors (k 0 ) were determined as 6.22E+11s -1 (P-HC), 4.50E+14s -1 (P-CL) and 1.3E+10s -1 (P-LG). Integral master-plots results showed pyrolytic mechanism of P-HC, P-CL, and P-LG was reaction order of f(α)=(1-α) 2 , f(α)=1-α and f(α)=(1-α) n (n=6-8), respectively. Mechanism of P-HC and P-CL could be further reconstructed to n-th order Avrami-Erofeyev model of f(α)=0.62(1-α)[-ln(1-α)] -0.61 (n=0.62) and f(α)=1.08(1-α)[-ln(1-α)] 0.074 (n=1.08). Two-steps reaction was more suitable for P-LG pyrolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzymatic production of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine from crayfish shell wastes pretreated via high pressure homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guoguang; Zhang, Alei; Chen, Kequan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2017-09-01

    This study presents an efficient pretreatment of crayfish shell using high pressure homogenization that enables N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) production by chitinase. Firstly, the chitinase from Serratia proteamaculans NJ303 was screened for its ability to degrade crayfish shell and produce GlcNAc as the sole product. Secondly, high pressure homogenization, which caused the crayfish shell to adopt a fluffy netted structure that was characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), was evaluated as the best pretreatment method. In addition, the optimal conditions of high pressure homogenization of crayfish shell were determined to be five cycles at a pressure of 400bar, which achieved a yield of 3.9g/L of GlcNAc from 25g/L of crayfish shell in a batch enzymatic reaction over 1.5h. The results showed high pressure homogenization might be an efficient method for direct utilization of crayfish shell for enzymatic production of GlcNAc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chitosan mediated synthesis of core/double shell ternary polyaniline/Chitosan/cobalt oxide nano composite-as high energy storage electrode material in supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellakkat, Mini; Hundekkal, Devendrappa

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ternary composite of polyaniline (PANI), Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles, and Chitosan (CS) has been prepared by an in situ chemical oxidation method, and the nanocomposites (CPAESCO) were used as supercapacitor electrodes. The Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles are uniformly coated with CS and PANI layers in it. Different techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, x-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, UV−visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electro chemical analysis-cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge (GCD), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were used to analyse the optical, structural, thermal, chemical and supercapacitive aspects of the nanocomposites. Core/double shell ternary composite electrode exhibits significantly increased specific capacitance than PANI/Co 3 O 4 or PANI/CS binary composites in supercapacitors. The ternary nanocomposite with 40% nanoparticle exhibits a highest specific capacitance reaching 687 F g −1 , Energy density of (95.42 Wh kg −1 at 1 A g −1 ) and power density of (1549 W kg −1 at 3 A g −1 ) and outstanding cycling performance, with, 91% capacitance retained over 5000 cycles. It is found that this unique bio compatible nano composite with synergy is a new multifunctional material which will be useful in the design of supercapacitor electrodes and other energy conversion devices too. (paper)

  9. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) will provide permanent disposal for approximately 43 Mgal of radioactive liquid waste currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The first step in permanent disposal is accomplished by solidifying the liquid waste with cementitious dry materials. The resulting grout is cast within underground vaults. This report on the GTF contains information on the following: Vault design, run-on/run-off control design, and asphalt compatibility with 90-degree celsius double-shell slurry feed

  10. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.G.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL), in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX has impacted groundwater quality. The WMA is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and consists of the 241-S and 241-SX tank farms and ancillary waste systems. The unit is regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (40 CFR 265, Subpart F) and was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring (40 CFR 265.93 [d]) in August 1996 because of elevated specific conductance and technetium-99, a non-RCRA co-contaminant, in downgradient monitoring wells. Major findings of the assessment are summarized below: (1) Distribution patterns for radionuclides and RCRA/dangerous waste constituents indicate WMA S-SX has contributed to groundwater contamination observed in downgradient monitoring wells. (2) Drinking water standards for nitrate and technetium-99 are currently exceeded in one RCRA-compliant well (299-W22-46) located at the southeastern comer of the SX tank farm. (3) Technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium concentrations in downgradient well 299-W22-46 (the well with the highest current concentrations) appear to be declining after reaching maximum concentrations in May 1997. (4) Cesium-137 and strontium-90, major constituents of concern in single-shell tank waste, were not detected in any of the RCRA-compliant wells in the WMA network, including the well with the highest current technetium-99 concentrations (299-W22-46). (5) Low but detectable strontium-90 and cesium-137 were found in one old well (2-W23-7), located inside and between the S and SX tank farms

  11. Chemical Composition of Vermicompost Made from Organic Wastes through the Vermicomposting and Composting with the Addition of Fish Meal and Egg Shells Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of compost is an important indicator that determines the quality of compost. This study compared the chemical composition of vermicompost resulting from the process of vermicomposting alone with combined vermicomposting and composting with addition of egg shells flour and fish meal. Organic wastes used were the mixture of spent mushrooms waste, coconut husks, cow dung, vegetables residue, and leaf litter. Lumbricus rubellus was the species of earthworm used in the vermicomposting process. In the composting process, egg shells flour and fish meal are added into the vermicompost as additives materials. The results indicate that the combined vermicomposting and composting process with addition the additives materials improves the chemical composition of vermicompost compared to using vermicomposting process alone. The change of chemical composition was indicated by a decrease in C-organic content and C/N ratio by 29% and 99%, respectively, while the content of N, P, K and S increased by 52%, 67.5%, 29% and 25%, respectively due to the addition of additives material in the composting process. The largest increase of vermicompost nutrient content occurred in the Ca content by an average of up to 7-fold. While polyphenols, lignin and cellulose content of vermicompost decreased slightly. The treatment of two mixture (a spent mushrooms waste, cow dung and vegetables residue, and (b spent mushroom waste, cow dung, vegetables residue, and leaf litter gave the best chemical composition. However, to determine the quality, we need to test the product in a plant growth bioassay as a follow-up study.

  12. Sequestering Potential of Peach Nut Shells as an Efficient Sorbent for Sequestering Some Toxic Metal Ions from Aqueous Waste: A Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf Shaheen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The peach nut shells potential as a low cost biosorbent for separation of certain metal ions from aqueous media was investigated. The effects of different parameters such as pH, shaking speed, initial metal ions concentration and their contact time with adsorbent on sorption efficiency of biosorbent was investigated to optimize the parameters for maximum sorption. The FT–IR spectroscopy and TGA were used to characterize the biosorbent. A significant increase in sorption was noted with rise in pH of metal ions solution and maximum sorption was observed at pH 6. The isothermal data was fitted to Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R, Freundlich isotherms and equilibrium process was best fitted to Langmuir isotherm. The removal efficiency of chemically activated samples was found to be ~35 to 45% greater than raw sample. The results showed that peach nut shell was an effective biosorbent for the remediation of the contaminated water with lead (II, Nickle (II and Chromium (III ions. Being low cost material, PNS has a potential to be exploited in waste water treatment technologies. This study shows that activated PNS exhibited appreciable sorption for Pb, Cr and Ni metals ions (97%, 95% and 94% respectively from aqueous solution even at very low concentration of sorbent. The chemical and thermal activation of peach nut shells enhances the removal efficiency for all the metal ions and from the reported data; it was found that the adsorption ability of Pb ions was greater than nickel and chromium.

  13. Microwave pyrolysis using self-generated pyrolysis gas as activating agent: An innovative single-step approach to convert waste palm shell into activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yek, Peter Nai Yuh; Keey Liew, Rock; Shahril Osman, Mohammad; Chung Wong, Chee; Lam, Su Shiung

    2017-11-01

    Waste palm shell (WPS) is a biomass residue largely available from palm oil industries. An innovative microwave pyrolysis method was developed to produce biochar from WPS while the pyrolysis gas generated as another product is simultaneously used as activating agent to transform the biochar into waste palm shell activated carbon (WPSAC), thus allowing carbonization and activation to be performed simultaneously in a single-step approach. The pyrolysis method was investigated over a range of process temperature and feedstock amount with emphasis on the yield and composition of the WPSAC obtained. The WPSAC was tested as dye adsorbent in removing methylene blue. This pyrolysis approach provided a fast heating rate (37.5°/min) and short process time (20 min) in transforming WPS into WPSAC, recording a product yield of 40 wt%. The WPSAC was detected with high BET surface area (≥ 1200 m2/g), low ash content (< 5 wt%), and high pore volume (≥ 0.54 cm3/g), thus recording high adsorption efficiency of 440 mg of dye/g. The desirable process features (fast heating rate, short process time) and the recovery of WPSAC suggest the exceptional promise of the single-step microwave pyrolysis approach to produce high-grade WPSAC from WPS.

  14. Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

  15. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  16. Double-layered buffer to enhance the thermal performance in a high-level radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui-Joo; Choi, Jongwon

    2008-01-01

    A thermal performance is one of the most important factors in the design of a geological disposal system for high-level radioactive wastes. According to the conceptual design of the Korean Reference disposal System, the maximum temperature of its buffer with a domestic Ca-bentonite is close to the thermal criterion, 100 deg. C. In order to improve the thermal conductivity of its buffer, several kinds of additives are compared. Among the additives, graphite shows the best result in that the thermal conductivity of the bentonite block is more than 2.0 W/m deg. C. We introduced the concept of a double-layered buffer instead of a traditional bentonite block in order to use the applied additive more effectively. The thermal analysis, based upon the three-dimensional finite element method, shows that a double-layered buffer could reduce the maximum temperature on a canister's surface by 7 deg. C under identical conditions when compared with a single-layered buffer. An analytical solution was derived to efficiently analyze the effects of a double-layered buffer. The illustrative cases show that the temperature differences due to a double-layered buffer depend on the thickness of the buffer

  17. Development of a Remotely Operated NDE System for Inspection of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tank Knuckle Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F; Alzheimer, James M; Crawford, Susan L; Diaz, Aaron A; Gervais, Kevin L; Harris, Robert V; Riechers, Douglas M; Samuel, Todd J; Schuster, George J; Tucker, Joseph C

    2001-01-01

    This report documents work performed at the PNNL in FY01 to support development of a Remotely Operated NDE (RONDE) system capable of inspecting the knuckle region of Hanford's DSTs. The development effort utilized commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology wherever possible and provided a transport and scanning device for implementing the SAFT and T-SAFT techniques

  18. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan

  19. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management areas T and TX-TY at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL) under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs) T and TX-TY have impacted groundwater quality. Waste Management Areas T and TX-TY, located in the northern part of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, contain the 241-T, 241-TX, and 241-TY tank farms and ancillary waste systems. These two units are regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (under 40 CFR 265.93) and were placed in assessment groundwater monitoring because of elevated specific conductance in downgradient wells. Anomalous concentrations of technetium-99, chromium, nitrate, iodine-129, and cobalt-60 also were observed in some downgradient wells. Phase I assessment, allowed under 40 CFR 265, provides the owner-operator of a facility with the opportunity to show that the observed contamination has a source other than the regulated unit. For this Phase I assessment, PNNL evaluated available information on groundwater chemistry and past waste management practices in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY. Background contaminant concentrations in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY are the result of several overlapping contaminant plumes resulting from past-practice waste disposal operations. This background has been used as baseline for determining potential WMA impacts on groundwater

  20. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO 3 /h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting

  1. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-07

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan.

  2. 界面聚合聚脲/聚氨酯双层微胶囊相变材料的研制与性能%Characterization of Polyurea/Polyurethane Double-Shell MicroPCMs Prepared by Interfacial Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆少锋; 邢建伟; 吴钦; 贺江平; 任燕

    2011-01-01

    以硬脂酸丁酯为芯材,苯乙烯马来酸酐共聚物(SMA)为乳化分散剂,采用界面聚合制备双层微胶囊相变材料,其外壳体为甲苯-2,4-二异氰酸酯(TDI)和二乙烯三胺(DETA)反应形成的聚脲壳层,内壳体为TDI与聚丙二醇2000(PPG2000)反应形成的聚氨酯壳层.采用差示扫描量热仪(DSC)、热重分析仪(TGA)、扫描电镜(SEM)、光学显微镜等分别对微胶囊的热性能、表面形态做了研究和分析.结果表明,所制备的双层微胶囊表面光滑致密,相变温度24.1℃,相变热85 J/g.所制备双层微胶囊的致密性和耐热稳定性均比单层微胶囊有很大程度的提高.%Double-shell microcapsules containing butyl stearate were prepared by interracial polymerization. The outer shell is polyurea formed by polymerization of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and diethylene triamine (DETA),the inner shell is polyurethane formed by polymerization of TDI and polypropylene glycol 2000 (PPG2000). Styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA) was used as emulsifier. The thermal properties, surface morphologies of microcapsules were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope, respectively. The results indicate that the surface of the prepared double-shell microPCMs is smooth and compact, and the microPCMs have an phase change temperature of 24.1 ℃ and phase change heat of 85 J/g. The compactness and stabilities of the double-shell microcapsule are obviously improved compared with that of single-shell microcapsule.

  3. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carothers, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity

  4. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carothers, K.G.

    1998-07-25

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity.

  5. Evaluation of dynamics and equilibrium models for the sorption of Basic Violet 3 on activated carbon prepared from Moringa Oleifera fruit shell waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sumithra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of activated carbon prepared from Moringa oleifera fruit shell waste to remove Basic Violet 3 from aqueous solution was investigated through batch mode contact time studies. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using Boehm titrations and pH of PZC measurements indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly basic in nature. The surface area of the activated carbon is determined using BET method. The kinetics of Basic Violet 3 adsorption are observed to be pH dependent. The experimental data can be explained by Pseudo second order kinetic model. For, Basic Violet 3, the Langmuir model is best suited to stimulate the adsorption isotherms.

  6. 摩擦摆隔震双层球面网壳结构的多维地震响应%Seismic analysis of double-layer spherical lattice shell structures with FPS bearings under multi-component ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄鹏; 薛素铎

    2011-01-01

    将摩擦摆(FPS)引入到网壳结构的隔震控制中.文中首先阐明了FPS的工作机理和本构关系,建立了FPS隔震网壳结构的振动方程.通过双层球面网壳结构的数值算例考察了隔震和无控结构在单向和三向地震作用下的振动响应以及FPS的控制效果.研究结果表明,FPS具有良好的隔震和耗能效果,可有效地应用于球面网壳结构的振动控制.%The application of friction pendulum system (FPS) to seismic isolation of lattice shell structures is presented. Theoretical model of the FPS is first introduced. Motion equations of the lattice shell with FPS bearings are established. Then, seismic isolation studies are performed for double-layer spherical lattice shell structures subjected to both single and three-component seismic excitations. Meantime, seismic isolation performance of the FPS is investigated under different earthquake inputs. The results show that the isolation bearins provide the excellent properties of seismic isolation and energy dissipation. Therefore, the FPS can be effectively utilized to control the seismic response of the spherical lattice shell structures.

  7. Preparation of hierarchical porous carbon from waste printed circuit boards for high performance electric double-layer capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yi; Qi, Tao; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-08-01

    Renewable clean energy and resources recycling have become inevitable choices to solve worldwide energy shortages and environmental pollution problems. It is a great challenge to recycle tons of waste printed circuit boards (PCB) produced every year for clean environment while creating values. In this work, low cost, high quality activated carbons (ACs) were synthesized from non-metallic fractions (NMF) of waste PCB to offer a great potential for applications of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). After recovering metal from waste PCB, hierarchical porous carbons were produced from NMF by carbonization and activation processes. The experimental results exhibit that some pores were formed after carbonization due to the escape of impurity atoms introduced by additives in NMF. Then the pore structure was further tailored by adjusting the activation parameters. Roles of micropores and non-micropores in charge storage were investigated when the hierarchical porous carbons were applied as electrode of EDLCs. The highest specific capacitance of 210 F g-1 (at 50 mA g-1) and excellent rate capability were achieved when the ACs possessing a proper micropores/non-micropores ratio. This work not only provides a promising method to recycle PCB, but also investigates the structure tailoring arts for a rational hierarchical porous structure in energy storage/conversion.

  8. Aluminum Removal And Sodium Hydroxide Regeneration From Hanford Tank Waste By Lithium Hydrotalcite Precipitation Summary Of Prior Lab-Scale Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, T.L.; Guillot, S.

    2011-01-01

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  9. Enhanced Recyclable Magnetized Palm Shell Waste-Based Powdered Activated Carbon for the Removal of Ibuprofen: Insights for Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Tiek Wong

    Full Text Available A novel preparation method of magnetized palm shell waste-based powdered activated carbon (MPPAC, avg. size 112 μm was developed. The prepared MPPAC was assessed by several physicochemical analyses, and batch tests were performed for ibuprofen (IBP removal. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and N2 gas isotherms revealed that magnetite and maghemite were homogeneous and deposited mostly on the surface of PPAC without a significant clogging effect on the micropores. Isotherm results showed that 3.8% Fe (w/w impregnated PPAC [MPPAC-Fe(3.8%] had about 2.2-fold higher maximum sorption capacity (157.3 mg g-1 and a 2.5-fold higher sorption density (0.23 mg m-2 than pristine PPAC. Both Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and isotherm data indicated that the high sorption capacity and density of IBP by MPPAC was primarily attributable to donor-acceptor complexes with the C = O group and dispersive π-π interactions with the carbon surface. Based on kinetic and repeated adsorption tests, pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step, and MPPAC-Fe(3.8% had about 1.9~2.8- and 9.1~15.8-fold higher rate constants than MPPAC-Fe(8.6% and palm shell-waste granular activated carbon (PGAC, avg. size 621 μm, respectively. MPPAC showed almost eight fold greater re-adsorption capacity than PPAC due to a thermal catalytic effect of magnetite/maghemite.

  10. Supplemental design requirements document, Multifunction Waste Tank Facility, Project W-236A. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) consists of four, nominal 1 million gallon, underground double-shell tanks, located in the 200-East area, and two tanks of the same capacity in the 200-West area. MWTF will provide environmentally safe storage capacity for wastes generated during remediation/retrieval activities of existing waste storage tanks. This document delineates in detail the information to be used for effective implementation of the Functional Design Criteria requirements

  11. Earthquake-induced response and potential for gas mobilization in Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, H.C.; Deibler, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    Seismic events postulated to occur at Hanford are predicted to cause yielding of the various waste materials in double- and single-shell tanks such that some or most of the waste is driven to completely plastic behavior. The seismic analyses documented in this report evaluated waste response to a 1,000-year design basis earthquake (DBE) event. The three-dimensional finite element computational structural analysis models were used with an assumed nonlinear elastic-plastic material definition

  12. Graphene wrapped porous Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 double-shelled nanocages with enhanced electrocatalytic performance for glucose sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Bei; Li, Kezhi; Feng, Lei; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene wrapped Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs has been prepared for detection of glucose. • Sensing performance was improved by synergy between electrocatalytic activity and efficient electron transport. • The sensor has excellent sensing performance with high sensitivity and low detection limit. • The developed method was successfully applied to detect glucose in human serum. - Abstract: Graphene (G) wrapped porous Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 double-shelled nanocages (Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs@G) were prepared by the formation of Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs using zeolite imidazole frameworks-67 as template with the subsequent calcination and package of G by hydrothermal method. The abundant accessible active sites provided by the porous structure of Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs and efficient electron transport pathways for electrocatalytic reaction offered by the high conductive G worked very well together in a ferocious synergy, which endowed Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs@G with excellent electrocatalytic behaviors for determining glucose. A comparison between Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs without G packing and Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs@G showed that former had linear response window concentrations of 0.01-3.52 mM (correlation coefficient = 0.999), detection limit of 0.744 μM (S/N = 3) and sensitivity of 0.196 mA mM"−"1 cm"−"2, whereas the latter exhibited linear response window concentrations of 0.01-3.52 mM (correlation coefficient = 0.999), detection limit of 0.384 μM (S/N = 3) and sensitivity of 0.304 mA mM"−"1 cm"−"2. The combination of Co_3O_4/NiCo_2O_4 DSNCs and G was a meaningful strategy to fabricate high-performance non-enzyme glucose sensors with low detection limit, good selectivity and high sensitivity.

  13. Components for containment enclosures - Part 3: Transfer systems such as plain doors, airlock chambers, double door transfer systems, leaktight connections for waste drums. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This part of ISO 11933 specifies requirements for the selection, construction and use of the following leak tight components: doors, airlock chambers, double door transfer systems, leaktight connections for waste drums. Some of the elements, double doors or airlock chambers are described in ISO 11933-1 and ISO 11933-2 as well. Doors having bigger dimensions used for personnel od larger objects are not covered by this document

  14. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan

  15. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed

  16. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Model Nuclear Waste Glasses: A Solid-State Double-Resonance NMR Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martineau, Ch.; Michaelis, V.K.; Kroeker, S. [Univ Manitoba, Dept Chem, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Schuller, S. [CEA Valrho Marcoule, LDMC, SECM, DTCD, DEN, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2010-07-01

    Double-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in addition to single-resonance NMR experiments to probe the degree of mixing between network-forming cations Si and B, along with the modifier cations Cs{sup +} and Na{sup +} in two molybdenum-bearing model nuclear waste glasses. The double-resonance experiments involving {sup 29}Si in natural abundance are made possible by the implementation of a CPMG pulse-train during the acquisition period of the usual REDOR experiments. For the glass with lower Mo content, the NMR results show a high degree of Si-B mixing, as well as an homogeneous distribution of the cations within the borosilicate network, characteristic of a non-phase-separated glass. For the higher-Mo glass, a decrease of B-Si(Q{sup 4}) mixing is observed, indicating phase separation. {sup 23}Na and {sup 133}Cs NMR results show that although the Cs{sup +} cations, which do not seem to be influenced by the molybdenum content, are spread within the borate network, there is a clustering of the Na{sup +} cations, very likely around the molybdate units. The segregation of a Mo-rich region with Na{sup +} cations appears to shift the bulk borosilicate glass composition toward the metastable liquid liquid immiscibility region and induce additional phase separation. Although no crystallization is observed in the present case, this liquid liquid phase separation is likely to be the first stage of crystallization that can occur at higher Mo loadings or be driven by heat treatment. From this study emerges a consistent picture of the nature and extent of such phase separation phenomena in Mo-bearing glasses, and demonstrates the potential of double-resonance NMR methods for the investigation of phase separation in amorphous materials. (authors)

  17. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.

    1999-01-01

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  18. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  19. Survey package: Technical and contracting strategies for single-shell tank waste retrieval on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsower, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company is interested in innovative, commercially available or adaptable retrieval system equipment, concepts, and contracting strategies that will ad to existing Hanford Site technology and significantly reduce cost and/or risk from the baseline retrieval approach of sluicing (hydraulically mining) the waste from the SSTs onsite. The objective of this request is to gather information from industry to identify and summarize a suite of retrieval-related components, systems, and contracting approaches. This information will be used to ensure that WHC understands the various waste retrieval alternative approaches, their risks, and their application on the Hanford Site tanks for those occasions when sluicing is not sufficiently effective, appropriate, or cost-effective. An additional objective is to facilitate industry's understanding of the tank and site interface requirements for SST waste retrieval and the complex statutory, legal, regulatory, labor, and other institutional standards being applied to the Hanford Site. This effort will identify and summarize retrieval solutions by the end of September 1996 so that a clear basis for future retrieval program decisions can be established

  20. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  1. Listed waste history at Hanford facility TSD units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskho, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document was prepared to close out an occurrence report that Westinghouse Hanford Company issued on December 29, 1994. Occurrence Report RL-WHC-GENERAL-1994-0020 was issued because knowledge became available that could have impacted start up of a Hanford Site facility. The knowledge pertained to how certain wastes on the Hanford Site were treated, stored, or disposed of. This document consolidates the research performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company regarding listed waste management at onsite laboratories that transfer waste to the Double-Shell Tank System. Liquid and solid (non-liquid) dangerous wastes and mixed wastes at the Hanford Site are generated from various Site operations. These wastes may be sampled and characterized at onsite laboratories to meet waste management requirements. In some cases, the wastes that are generated in the field or in the laboratory from the analysis of samples require further management on the Hanford Site and are aggregated together in centralized tank storage facilities. The process knowledge presented herein documents the basis for designation and management of 242-A Evaporator Process Condensate, a waste stream derived from the treatment of the centralized tank storage facility waste (the Double-Shell Tank System). This document will not be updated as clean up of the Hanford Site progresses

  2. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING and SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  3. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING & SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN PW

    2009-08-27

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  4. Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl-(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of nitric acid which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO 3 from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO 3 concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  5. Conceptual models for waste tank mechanistic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Eyler, L.L.; Liljegren, L.M.; Roberts, J.S.

    1992-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a study for Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the work is to study possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from double-shell waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This interim report emphasizing the modeling work follows two other interim reports, Mechanistic Analysis of Double-Shell Tank Gas Release Progress Report -- November 1990 and Collection and Analysis of Existing Data for Waste Tank Mechanistic Analysis Progress Report -- December 1990, that emphasized data correlation and mechanisms. The approach in this study has been to assemble and compile data that are pertinent to the mechanisms, analyze the data, evaluate physical properties and parameters, evaluate hypothetical mechanisms, and develop mathematical models of mechanisms

  6. Copper Ferrocyanide Functionalized Core-Shell Magnetic Silica Composites for the Selective Removal of Cesium Ions from Radioactive Liquid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yang, Da Som; Oh, Wonzin; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-06-01

    The copper ferrocyanide functionalized core-shell magnetic silica composite (mag@silica-CuFC) was prepared and was found to be easily separated from aqueous solutions by using magnetic field. The synthesized mag@silica-CuFC composite has a high sorption ability of Cs owing to its strong affinity for Cs as well as the high surface area of the supports. Cs sorption on the mag@silica-CuFC composite quickly reached the sorption equilibrium after 2 h of contact time. The effect of the presence of salts with a high concentration of up to 3.5 wt% on the efficiency of Cs sorption onto the composites was also studied. The maximum sorption ability was found to be maintained in the presence of up to 3.5 wt% of NaCl in the solution. Considering these results, the mag@silica-CuFC composite has great potential for use as an effective sorbent for the selective removal of radioactive Cs ions.

  7. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as

  8. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient

  9. Initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    This document provides the mission analysis for the Initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System task, which supports the Single-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Program in its commitment to remove waste from single-shell tanks for treatment and final closure

  10. Stabilization of Pb²⁺ and Cu²⁺ contaminated firing range soil using calcined oyster shells and waste cow bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Khim, Jeehyeong; Wazne, Mahmoud; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Jeong-Hun; Chang, Yoon-Young; Ok, Yong Sik

    2013-05-01

    Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) contamination at army firing ranges poses serious environmental and health risks to nearby communities necessitating an immediate and prompt remedial action. In this study, a novel mixture of calcined oyster shells (COSs) and waste cow bones (WCBs) was utilized to immobilize Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) in army firing range soils. The effectiveness of the treatment was evaluated based on the Korean Standard leaching test. The treatment results showed that Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) immobilization in the army firing range soil was effective in significantly reducing Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) leachability upon the combined treatment with COS and WCB. A drastic reduction in Pb(2+) (99%) and Cu(2+) leachability (95%) was obtained as compared to the control sample, upon treatment with 5 wt.% COS and 5 wt.% WCB. The combination treatment of COS and WCB was more effective for Pb immobilization, than the treatment with COS or WCB alone. The 5 wt.% COS alone treatment resulted in 95% reduction in Cu(2+) leachability. The SEM-EDX results suggested that Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) immobilization was most probably associated with the formation of ettringite, pozzolanic reaction products and pyromorphite-like phases at the same time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous Process for Biodiesel Production in Packed Bed Reactor from Waste Frying Oil Using Potassium Hydroxide Supported on Jatropha curcas Fruit Shell as Solid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanai Buasri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The transesterification of waste frying oil (WFO with methanol in the presence of potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on Jatropha curcas fruit shell activated carbon (KOH/JS was studied. The catalyst systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET method. The effects of reaction variables such as residence time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst bed height in packed bed reactor (PBR on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. SEM images showed that KOH was well distributed on the catalyst support. The optimum conditions for achieving the conversion yield of 86.7% consisted of a residence time of 2 h, reaction temperature of 60 °C, methanol/oil molar ratio of 16 and catalyst bed height of 250 mm. KOH/JS could be used repeatedly five times without any activation treatment, and no significant activity loss was observed. The results confirmed that KOH/JS catalyst had a great potential to be used for industrial application in the transesterification of WFO. The fuel properties of biodiesel were also determined.

  12. Borehole data package for well 299-W15-41 at single-shell tank waste management Area TX-TY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.

    2000-01-01

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring well was installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) TX-TY during December 1999 and January 2000 in fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology 1996) milestone M-24-43. The well is 299-W15-41 and is located south of the 241-TX tank farm and south of 20th Street in the 200 West Area. A figure shows the locations of all wells in the WMA TX-TY monitoring network. The new well was constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, the groundwater monitoring plan for WMA TX-TY (Caggiano and Goodwin 1991), the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY (Caggiano and Chou 1993), and the description of work for well drilling and installation. This document compiles information on the drilling and construction, well development, pump installation, and sediment testing applicable to well 299-W1 5-41. Appendix A contains the geologist's log, the Well Construction Summary Report, and Well Summary Sheet (as-built diagram) and Appendix B contains borehole geophysical logs. Additional documentation concerning well construction is on file with Bechtel Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington

  13. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH BIOMASSA CANGKANG KAKAO DAN KEMIRI SEBAGAI BAHAN BAKAR BRIKET (Utilization of Biomass Wastes from Cocoa and Candlenut Shells as Fuel Briquette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harwin Saptoadi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK  Biomassa adalah sumber energi utama jutaan manusia di dunia, akan tetapi penggunaannya menurun ketika batubara, minyak dan gas tersedia cukup melirnpah. Namun akhir-akhir ini perhatian muncul kembali karena terjadinya krisis energi dan isu-isu lingkungan. Pemanfaatan biomassa untuk menggantikan bahan bakar fosil dapat menurunkan persoalan emisi CO2 global. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji alternatif sumber energi terbarukan dengan pemanfaatan limbah biomassa cangkang kakao dan kemiri. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menghaluskan biomassa dengan ukuran partikel kurang dari I mm. Kemudian 5 gram campuran bahan baku dengan bahan pengikat gel tepung kanji dengan perbandingan 70:30 untuk kakao dan 80:20 untuk kemiri dibriket dalarn cetakan berdiarneter l6 mm. Setelah dibriket kemudian dikeringkan dengan oven pada suhu 50 oC selama 5 jam. Pembakaran dilakukan dalam ruang bakar pada temperatur dinding 350 oC dan laju aliran udara bervariasi antara 0,1 - 0,4 m/s. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa cangkang kakao dan kemiri mempunyai nilai kalor masing-masing 16.998 dan 21.960 kJ/kg. Emisi CO cukup signifikan pada tahap devolatilisasi. Cangkang kakao memberikan total emisi CO lebih tinggi dibandingkan dengan cangkang kemiri. Laju aliran udara juga berpengaruh terhadap emisi CO yang dihasilkan. Penambahan laju aliran udara akan mengurangi emisi CO, hal ini karena adanya penambahan suplai oksigen sehingga pemnbakaran dapat berlangsung lebih sempurna.   ABSTRACT  Biomass was the  primary source of energy for millions of people in the world, but when coal, oil, and gas became widely available, its use was declined. However, in recent years interest in biomass utilization increases because of energy crisis and environmental issues. Utilization of biomass for substituting fossil fuel can reduce global CO2 emission problem. The objective of this research is to study alternative energy sources that utilize biomass waste from cocoa and candlenut

  14. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility phase out basis. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadalla, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    Additional double-shell tank storage capacity is not needed until FY 2004 or later. The waste volume in the current baseline program can be managed within the existing tank capacity. However, this requires implementation of some risk management actions and significant investment in software and hardware to accomplish the actions necessary to maximize use of existing storage tank space

  15. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility phase out basis. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadalla, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    Additional double-shell tank storage capacity is not needed until FY 2004 or later. The waste volume in the current baseline program can be managed within the existing tank capacity. However, this requires implementation of some risk management actions and significant investment in software and hardware to accomplish the actions necessary to maximize use of existing storage tank space.''

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT-TOP TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-01-01

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed in support of the

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT TOP TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-02-16

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed

  18. Electric double-layer capacitors with tea waste derived activated carbon electrodes and plastic crystal based flexible gel polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, M.; Deraman, M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Omar, R.; Hashim, M. A.; Basri, N. H.; Nor, N. S. M.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Hanappi, M. F. Y. M.; Hamdan, E.; Sazali, N. E. S.; Tajuddin, N. S. M.; Jasni, M. R. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel configuration of symmetrical electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) comprising a plastic crystalline succinonitrile (SN) based flexible polymer gel electrolyte, incorporated with sodium trifluoromethane sulfonate (NaTf) immobilised in a host polymer poly (vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP). The cost-effective activated carbon powder possessing a specific surface area (SSA) of ~ 1700 m2g-1 containing a large proportion of meso-porosity has been derived from tea waste to use as supercapacitor electrodes. The high ionic conductivity (~3.6×10-3 S cm-1 at room temperature) and good electrochemical stability render the gel polymer electrolyte film a suitable candidate for the fabrication of EDLCs. The performance of the EDLCs has been tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The performance of the EDLC cell is found to be promising in terms of high values of specific capacitance (~270 F g-1), specific energy (~ 36 Wh kg-1), and power density (~ 33 kW kg-1).

  19. Electric double-layer capacitors with tea waste derived activated carbon electrodes and plastic crystal based flexible gel polymer electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleman, M; Deraman, M; Othman, M A R; Omar, R; Basri, N H; Nor, N S M; Dolah, B N M; Hanappi, M F Y M; Hamdan, E; Sazali, N E S; Tajuddin, N S M; Jasni, M R M; Hashim, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel configuration of symmetrical electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) comprising a plastic crystalline succinonitrile (SN) based flexible polymer gel electrolyte, incorporated with sodium trifluoromethane sulfonate (NaTf) immobilised in a host polymer poly (vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP). The cost-effective activated carbon powder possessing a specific surface area (SSA) of ∼ 1700 m 2 g -1 containing a large proportion of meso-porosity has been derived from tea waste to use as supercapacitor electrodes. The high ionic conductivity (∼3.6×10 -3 S cm -1 at room temperature) and good electrochemical stability render the gel polymer electrolyte film a suitable candidate for the fabrication of EDLCs. The performance of the EDLCs has been tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The performance of the EDLC cell is found to be promising in terms of high values of specific capacitance (∼270 F g -1 ), specific energy (∼ 36 Wh kg -1 ), and power density (∼ 33 kW kg -1 ). (paper)

  20. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2002-01-01

    This document provides information on the construction of three new RCRA wells at Waste Management Area U in September 2001. These wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Codes 173-160 and 173-303. Grab samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the wells. Borehole and drill cuttings were monitored regularly for organic vapors and radionuclide contaminants. At well 299-W18-40, beta-gamma activity was found to be slightly above background at 120 ft below ground surface. All other measurements were below background. Cesium-137 was found at the ground surface and at 3 ft below ground surface (bgs). No other manmade contamination was found. At well 299-W19-44, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected at 3 ft bgs at 0.4 pCi/g. At well 299-W19-45, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected. At well 299-W19-45, samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the well. No contamination was noted. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 to 1.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected

  1. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell tank waste management Area U at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FN Hodges; CJ Chou

    2000-01-01

    Waste Management Area U (WMA U) includes the U Tank Farm, is currently regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations, and is scheduled for closure probably post-2030. Groundwater monitoring has been under an evaluation program that compared general contaminant indicator parameters from downgradient wells to background values established from upgradient wells. One of the indicator parameters, specific conductance, exceeded its background value in one downgradient well triggering a change from detection monitoring to a groundwater quality assessment program. The objective of the first phase of this assessment program is to determine whether the increased concentrations of nitrate and chromium in groundwater are from WMA U or from an upgradient source. Based on the results of the first determination, if WMA U is not the source of contamination, then the site will revert to detection monitoring. If WMA U is the source, then a second part of the groundwater quality assessment plan will be prepared to define the rate and extent of migration of contaminants in the groundwater and their concentrations

  2. Dyson shells: a retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert J.

    2001-08-01

    More than 40 years have passed since Freeman Dyson suggested that advanced technological civilizations are likely to dismantle planets in their solar systems to harvest all of the energy their stars wastefully radiate into space. Clearly this was an idea that was ahead of its time. Since that time, dozens of SETI searches have been conducted and almost all of them have focused their attention on stars which by definition cannot be the advanced civilizations that Dyson envisioned. I will review the data that created the confusion between Dyson spheres and Dyson shells. The sources that disprove Dyson spheres while still allowing Dyson shells will be discussed. The use of outmoded ideas that have biased the few searches for Dyson Shells that have occurred will be pointed out. An update of the concept of Dyson shells to include our current knowledge of biotechnology, nanotechnology and computer science will be explored. Finally, an approach to setting limits on the abundance of Dyson shells in our galaxy using existing optical astronomical data and future optical satellites will be proposed.

  3. Waste Analysis Plan for 241-Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIRZEL, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The 241-2 waste tanks are used to store, treat, and transfer waste to Tank Farms. The sampling requirements are established to identify the composition of the tank waste. The primary goal is to meet the Tank Farms acceptance criteria. Tank Farms will not accept waste without extensive characterization sample data. Process and lab wastes are sampled for suitability prior to routing to Tk-D8. The samples are helpful in tracking the amount of chemical constituents to determine treatment and are required to maintain Pu inventory and criticality prevention limitations. Likewise, the waste is sampled prior to inter-tank transfers. The revised Waste Analysis Plan for 241-2 (WAP) contains current facility, process and waste descriptions. The WAP lists the Double Shell Tank (DST) system acceptance criteria, sampling parameters and required analyses. The characterization data on historical process wastes was deleted. A section on the Tank Farms waste approval procedural process was added to describe the steps necessary and documentation required to transfer waste to the DST system. Failure to collect proper samples will result in Tank Farms' refusal to accept PFP waste until proper sampling conditions are met. This will use up unnecessary time and resources but not place the plant in a hazardous position

  4. Double NIR laser stimulation and enhancing the thermal sensitivity of Er3+/Tm3+/Nd3+ doped multilayer core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Zhaojing; Hu, Min; Zhao, Yiming; Wang, Yiqing; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2018-06-04

    Non-contact thermal sensors are important devices to study cellular processes and monitor temperature in vivo. Herein, a novel highly sensitive nanothermometer based on NaYF4:Yb,Er@ NaYF4@NaYF4:Yb,Tm@ NaYF4:Nd (denoted as Er@Y@Tm@Nd) was prepared by a facile solvothermal method. When excited by the NIR light of 808 and 980 nm, the as-prepared Er@Y@Tm@Nd nanoparticles could emit both blue and green light respectively, since the lanthanide cations responsible for these emissions are gathered inside this nanostructure. The green and blue light intensity ratio exhibits obvious temperature dependence in the range of the physiological temperature. Additionally, the fluorescence intensity of Er3+ and Tm3+ are also greatly enhanced due to the multilayer structure that implies avoiding the Er3+ and Tm3+ energy cross-relaxation by introduction of a NaYF4 wall between them. The as-prepared core-shell-shell-shell structure with Er3+ and Tm3+ in different layers improves dozens of times of the thermal sensitivity based on the non-thermal coupling levels of the probe: the maximum values for the sensitivity are 2.95% K-1 (IEr-521/ITm-450) and 6.30% K-1 (ITm-474/IEr-541) when excited by 980 and 808 nm laser sources respectively. These values are well above those previously reported (< 0.7% K-1), indicating that the prepared nanostructures are temperature sensors with excellent thermal sensitivity and sensitive to NIR wavelength excitation that makes them highly preferred for thermal detection. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2-CuxS double-shelled hollow spheres for enhanced chemo-/photothermal anti-cancer therapy and dual-modal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Wang, Xingmei; Lv, Ruichan; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Gulzar, Arif; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large specific surface area and uniform shape is composed of an inner shell of luminescent Y2O3:Yb,Er and an outer mesoporous silica shell. Ultra small CuxS nanoparticles (about 2.5 nm) served as photothermal agents, and a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin, DOX) was then attached onto the surface of mesoporous silica, forming a DOX-DSHS-CuxS composite. The composite exhibits high anti-cancer efficacy due to the synergistic photothermal therapy (PTT) induced by the attached CuxS nanoparticles and the enhanced chemotherapy promoted by the heat from the CuxS-based PTT when irradiated by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) light. Moreover, the composite shows excellent in vitro and in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) and up-conversion fluorescence (UCL) imaging properties owing to the doped rare earth ions, thus making it possible to achieve the target of imaging-guided synergistic therapy.Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large

  6. Low-level tank waste simulant data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-04-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent N- Reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST) in the form of liquids, slurries, sludges, and salt cakes. The tank waste remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. This report discusses three principle topics: the need for and basis for selecting target or reference LLW simulants, tanks waste analyses and simulants that have been defined, developed, and used for the GDP and activities in support of preparing and characterizing simulants for the current LLW vitrification project. The procedures and the data that were generated to characterized the LLW vitrification simulants were reported and are presented in this report. The final section of this report addresses the applicability of the data to the current program and presents recommendations for additional data needs including characterization and simulant compositional variability studies

  7. Borehole data package for wells 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335 at single-shell tank waste management Area B-BX-BY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DG Horton

    2000-06-01

    Two new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY during December 1999 through February 2000 in fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology 1996) Milestone M-24-45. The wells are 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335. These wells were installed in support of the WMA B-BX-BY assessment to track the movement of contaminant plumes that appear to be entering the WMA from the northeast. Well 299-E33-334 is located outside the southwest comer of the 241-BX tank farm and well 299-E33-335 is located south of the 241-BX tank farm. The locations of all wells in the extended monitoring network for WMA B-BX-BY are shown in a figure. The new wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, in the assessment groundwater monitoring plan (Narbutovskih 2000), and in the description of work for well drilling and installation. This document compiles information on the drilling, construction, well development, pump installation, and sampling activities applicable to wells 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335. Appendix A contains copies of the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs. Appendix B contains results of laboratory analyses of moisture content on samples from 299-E33-334 (moisture data were not collected from well 299-E33-335). Appendix C contains borehole geophysical logs and Appendix D contains analytical results from groundwater samples obtained during well construction. Additional documentation concerning well construction is on file with Bechtel Hanford, Inc.

  8. Photoluminescence of double core/shell infrared (CdSeTe)/ZnS quantum dots conjugated to Pseudo rabies virus antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchynska, T. V.; Casas Espinola, J. L.; Jaramillo Gómez, J. A.; Douda, J.; Gazarian, K.

    2013-06-01

    Double core CdSeTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with emission at 800 nm (1.60 eV) have been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and Raman scattering methods in the non-conjugated state and after the conjugation to the Pseudo rabies virus (PRV) antibodies. The transformation of PL spectra, stimulated by the electric charge of antibodies, has been detected for the bioconjugated QDs. Raman scattering spectra are investigated with the aim to reveal the CdSeTe core compositions. The double core QD energy diagrams were designed that help to analyze the PL spectra and their transformation at the bioconjugation. It is revealed that the interface in double core QDs has the type II quantum well character that permits to explain the near IR optical transition (1.60 eV) in the double core QDs. It is shown that the essential transformation of PL spectra is useful for the study of QD bioconjugation with specific antibodies and can be a powerful technique in early medical diagnostics.

  9. Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    There are 177 waste storage tanks containing over 210,000 m 3 (55 million gal) of mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The River Protection Project (RPP) has adopted the data quality objective (DQO) process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (EPA 1994a) and implemented by RPP internal procedure (Banning 1999a) to identify the information and data needed to address safety issues. This DQO document is based on several documents that provide the technical basis for inputs and decision/action levels used to develop the decision rules that evaluate the transfer of wastes. A number of these documents are presently in the process of being revised. This document will need to be revised if there are changes to the technical criteria in these supporting documents. This DQO process supports various documents, such as sampling and analysis plans and double-shell tank (DST) waste analysis plans. This document identifies the type, quality, and quantity of data needed to determine whether transfer of supernatant can be performed safely. The requirements in this document are designed to prevent the mixing of incompatible waste as defined in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040. Waste transfers which meet the requirements contained in this document and the Double-Shell Tank Waste Analysis Plan (Mulkey 1998) are considered to be compatible, and prevent the mixing of incompatible waste

  10. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system

  11. Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of the projectile charge and velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangama, J.

    2002-11-01

    Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of projectile charge and velocity. Auger electron spectroscopy is used for an experimental investigation of ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by ions (Kr34 + and Ar18 + ) and electrons at high impact velocities (from 6 to 60 a.u.). In particular, relative contributions of the mechanisms responsible for lithium K-shell ionization-excitation are determined for various projectile charges Zp and velocities vp. A large range of perturbation parameters |Zp|/vp is explored (|Zp|/vp = 0,05 - 0,7 a.u.). From single K-shell excitation results, it appears that the projectile-electron interaction gives mainly rise to a dipole-like transition 1s -> np Concerning K-shell ionization-excitation, the separation of the TS2 (two independent projectile-electron interactions) and TS1 (one projectile-electron interaction) mechanisms responsible for the formation of the 2snp 1,3P and 2sns 1,3S lithium states is performed. In TS1 process, the projectile-electron interaction can be followed by an electron-electron interaction (dielectronic process) or by an internal rearrangement of the residual target after a sudden potential change (shake process). From Born theory, ab initio calculations are performed. The good agreement between theoretical and experimental results confirms the mechanism identification. For the production of P states, TS1 is found to be strongly dominant for small |Zp|/vp values and TS2 is found to be most important for large |Zp|/vp values. Since P states cannot be formed significantly via a shake process, the TS1 and TS2 separation provides a direct signature of the dielectronic process. On the other hand, the TS1 process is shown to be the unique process for producing the S states. At the moment, only the shake aspect of the TS1 process can explain the fact that the 2s3s configuration is preferentially

  12. Shell supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A new statical and conceptual model for membrane shell structures - the stringer system - has been found. The principle was first published at the IASS conference in Copenhagen (OHL91), and later the theory has been further developed (ALMO3)(ALMO4). From the analysis of the stringer model it can...... be concluded that all membrane shells can be described by a limited number of basic configurations of which quite a few have free edges....

  13. Test Report for Cesium and Solids Removal from an 11.5L Composite of Archived Hanford Double Shell Tank Supernate for Off-Site Disposal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, S. R.; Cooke, G. A.

    2017-08-31

    The 222-S Laboratory blended supernate waste from Hanford Tanks 241-AN-101, 241-AN- 106, 241-AP-105, 241-AP-106, 241-AP-107, and 241-AY-101 from the hot cell archive to create a bulk composite. The composite was blended with 600 mL 19.4 M NaOH, which brought the total volume to approximately 11.5 L (3 gal). The composite was filtered to remove solids and passed through spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde ion-exchange resin columns to remove cesium. The composite masses were tracked as a treatability study. Samples collected before, during, and after the ion exchange process were characterized for a full suite of analytes (inorganic, organic, and radionuclides) to aid in the classification of the waste for shipping, receiving, treatment, and disposal determinations.

  14. Test Report for Cesium and Solids Removal from an 11.5L Composite of Archived Hanford Double Shell Tank Supernate for Off-Site Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Stephanie R. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Cooke, Gary A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    The 222-S Laboratory blended supernate waste from Hanford Tanks 241-AN-101, 241-AN- 106, 241-AP-105, 241-AP-106, 241-AP-107, and 241-AY-101 from the hot cell archive to create a bulk composite. The composite was blended with 600 mL 19.4 M NaOH, which brought the total volume to approximately 11.5 L (3 gal). The composite was filtered to remove solids and passed through spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde ion-exchange resin columns to remove cesium. The composite masses were tracked as a treatability study. Samples collected before, during, and after the ion-exchange process were characterized for a full suite of analytes (inorganic, organic, and radionuclides) to aid in the classification of the waste for shipping, receiving, treatment, and disposal determinations.

  15. Utilization of Snail (Achatina fulica Shell Waste for Synthesis of Calcium Tartrate Tetrahydrate (CaC4H4O6.4H2O Single Crystals in Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sakdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Snail (Achatina fulica shell waste is massively produced by many home industries in Indonesia, especially in East Java. The snail shell is known for high calcium; therefore it is potential to be used as calcium source of supernatant in the synthesis of piezoeletric material, such as single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate (CaTT. The aim of this research is to study the synthesis and characterization of CaTT or CaC4H4O6.4H2O from snail shell waste in silica gel. Supernatant solution of CaCl2 was prepared from CaO, which previously made by calcinating the shell at 1000°C, and then reacted with HCl 1,5M. Synthesis of CaTT was conducted in a single-tube reaction at room temperature in which silica gel was used as growth medium with gelling time of 10 days and growth time of 2 weeks. The pH of gel and CaCl2 concentration were varied, 3.00; 3.50; 4.00; 4.50; 5.00; and 0.27; 0.36; 0.45; 0.54 M respectively, in order to obtain optimum condition of the synthesis, which is indicated from crystal yields. The synthesized crystals were characterized by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (AAS, infrared spectroscopy (IR and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD. Experimental data shows that optimum condition was obtained at pH of 3.50 and [CaCl2] of 0.45M with yield of 69.37%. The obtained single crystal has clear color and octahedral-like shape with size ranged between 4 – 9 mm. Analysis data by FTIR and powder XRD confirmed that the obtained crystal was CaTT single crystals with crystal system of orthorhombic.

  16. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  17. Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document, Volume 2, provides the inventory of waste addressed in this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The inventories consist of waste from the following four groups: (1) Tank waste; (2) Cesium (Cs) and Strontium (Sr) capsules; (3) Inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs); and (4) Anticipated future tank waste additions. The major component by volume of the overall waste is the tank waste inventory (including future tank waste additions). This component accounts for more than 99 percent of the total waste volume and approximately 70 percent of the radiological activity of the four waste groups identified previously. Tank waste data are available on a tank-by-tank basis, but the accuracy of these data is suspect because they primarily are based on historical records of transfers between tanks rather than statistically based sampling and analyses programs. However, while the inventory of any specific tank may be suspect, the overall inventory for all of the tanks combined is considered more accurate. The tank waste inventory data are provided as the estimated overall chemical masses and radioactivity levels for the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The tank waste inventory data are broken down into tank groupings or source areas that were developed for analyzing groundwater impacts

  18. Waste minimization - Hanford's strategy for sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merry, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Site cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single-shell storage tanks, treating waste stored in 28 double-shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored onsite, removing thousands of structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, groundwater, and land restoration issues. The Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program supports the Hanford Site mission to safely clean up and manage legacy waste and to develop and deploy science and technology in many ways. Once such way is through implementing and documenting over 231 waste reduction projects during the past five years, resulting in over $93 million in cost savings/avoidances. These savings/avoidances allowed other high priority cleanup work to be performed. Another way is by exceeding the Secretary of Energy's waste reduction goals over two years ahead of schedule, thus reducing the amount of waste to be stored, treated and disposed. Six key elements are the foundation for these sustained P2/WMin results

  19. Interim Hanford Waste Management Technology Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Interim Hanford Waste Management Technology Plan (HWMTP) is a companion document to the Interim Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP). A reference plan for management and disposal of all existing and certain projected future radioactive Hanford Site Defense Wastes (HSDW) is described and discussed in the HWMP. Implementation of the reference plan requires that various open technical issues be satisfactorily resolved. The principal purpose of the HWMTP is to present detailed descriptions of the technology which must be developed to close each of the technical issues associated with the reference plan identified in the HWMP. If alternative plans are followed, however, technology development efforts including costs and schedules must be changed accordingly. Technical issues addressed in the HWMTP and HWMP are those which relate to disposal of single-shell tank wastes, contaminated soil sites, solid waste burial sites, double-shell tank wastes, encapsulated 137 CsCl and 90 SrF 2 , stored and new solid transuranic (TRU) wastes, and miscellaneous wastes such as contaminated sodium metal. Among the high priority issues to be resolved are characterization of various wastes including early determination of the TRU content of future cladding removal wastes; completion of development of vitrification (Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant) and grout technology; control of subsidence in buried waste sites; and development of criteria and standards including performance assessments of systems proposed for disposal of HSDW. Estimates of the technology costs shown in this report are made on the basis that all identified tasks for all issues associated with the reference disposal plan must be performed. Elimination of, consolidation of, or reduction in the scope of individual tasks will, of course, be reflected in corresponding reduction of overall technology costs

  20. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000

  1. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-03-21

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000.

  2. Borehole Data Package for Wells 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2000-01-01

    Two new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY during December 1999 through February 2000 in fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology 1996) Milestone M-24-45. The wells are 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335. These wells were installed in support of the WMA B-BX-BY assessment to track the movement of contaminant plumes that appear to be entering the WMA from the northeast. Well 299-E33-334 is located outside the southwest corner of the 241-BX tank farm and well 299-E33-335 is located south of the 241-BX tank farm. The locations of all wells in the extended monitoring network for WMA B-BX-BY are shown on Figure 1. The new wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, in the assessment groundwater monitoring plan (Narbutovskih 2000), and in the description of work for well drilling and installation. This document compiles information on the drilling, construction, well development, pump installation, and sampling activities applicable to wells 299-E33-334 and 299-E33-335. Appendix A contains copies of the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs. Appendix B contains results of laboratory analyses of moisture content on samples from 299-E33-334 (moisture data were not collected from well 299-E33-335). Appendix C contains borehole geophysical logs and Appendix D contains analytical results from groundwater samples obtained during well construction. Additional documentation concerning well construction is on file with Bechtel Hanford, Inc. English units are used in this report because that is the system of units used by drillers to measure and report depths and well construction details. Conversion to metric is made by multiplying feet by 0.3048 to obtain meters or multiplying inches by 2.54 to obtain

  3. Cask for concrete shells transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labergri, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, nuclear plant radioactive waste are conditioned in situ into concrete shells. Most of them enter in the industrial waste category defined by the regulations of radioactive material transportation. However, the content of a few ones exceeds the limits set for low specific activity substances. Thus, these shells must be transported into type B packagings. To this end, Robatel has undertaken, for EDF (Electricite de France), the development of a container, named ROBATEL TM R68, for further licensing. The particularity of this packaging is that the lid must have a wide opening to allow the usual handling operations of the concrete shells. This leads to a non-conventional conception, and makes the package more vulnerable to drop test solicitations. In order to define a minimal drop test program on a reduced scale model, we use a simple method to find the most damageable drop angle. (author)

  4. 242-A evaporator dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 242-A Evaporator is a waste management unit within the Hanford Facility that consists of process vessels and support systems for heating, evaporating, and condensing double-shell tank (DST) waste generated by Hanford Site operations. Operation of the 242-A Evaporator serves to reduce the volume of waste solutions within the DSTs that do not self-boil, while separating inorganic and radionuclide constituents from organic constituents. This operation reduces the number of underground DSTs required for waste storage and also makes the mixed waste more suitable for future treatment and disposal (i.e., grouting and vitrification). The 242-A Evaporator receives mixed-waste streams from the DSTs that contain organic and inorganic constituents and radionuclides. The waste is a dangerous waste (DW) because of corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity characteristics, and is an extremely hazardous waste (EHW) as a result of toxicity (state criteria only), carcinogenicity, and persistence under the state mixture rule. The waste also contains spent nonhalogenated solvents

  5. Environmental Assessment: Waste Tank Safety Program, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action in the near-term, to accelerate resolution of waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and reduce the risks associated with operations and management of the waste tanks. The DOE has conducted nuclear waste management operations at the Hanford Site for nearly 50 years. Operations have included storage of high-level nuclear waste in 177 underground storage tanks (UST), both in single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank configurations. Many of the tanks, and the equipment needed to operate them, are deteriorated. Sixty-seven SSTs are presumed to have leaked a total approximately 3,800,000 liters (1 million gallons) of radioactive waste to the soil. Safety issues associated with the waste have been identified, and include (1) flammable gas generation and episodic release; (2) ferrocyanide-containing wastes; (3) a floating organic solvent layer in Tank 241-C-103; (4) nuclear criticality; (5) toxic vapors; (6) infrastructure upgrades; and (7) interim stabilization of SSTs. Initial actions have been taken in all of these areas; however, much work remains before a full understanding of the tank waste behavior is achieved. The DOE needs to accelerate the resolution of tank safety concerns to reduce the risk of an unanticipated radioactive or chemical release to the environment, while continuing to manage the wastes safely

  6. Disposal of Hanford site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1993-09-01

    Between 1943 and 1986, 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) were built and used to store radioactive wastes generated during reprocessing of irradiated uranium metal fuel elements at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. The 149 SSTs, located in 12 separate areas (tank farms) in the 200 East and 200 West areas, currently contain about 1.4 x 10 5 m 3 of solid and liquid wastes. Wastes in the SSTs contain about 5.7 x 10 18 Bq (170 MCi) of various radionuclides including 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 137 Cs, and transuranium (TRU) elements. The 28 DSTs also located in the 200 East and West areas contain about 9 x 10 4 m 3 of liquid (mainly) and solid wastes; approximately 4 x 10 18 Bq (90 MCi) of radionuclides are stored in the DSTs. Important characteristics and features of the various types of SST and DST wastes are described in this paper. However, the principal focus of this paper is on the evolving strategy for final disposal of both the SST and DST wastes. Also provided is a chronology which lists key events and dates in the development of strategies for disposal of Hanford Site tank wastes. One of these strategies involves pretreatment of retrieved tank wastes to separate them into a small volume of high-level radioactive waste requiring, after vitrification, disposal in a deep geologic repository and a large volume of low-level radioactive waste which can be safely disposed of in near-surface facilities at the Hanford Site. The last section of this paper lists and describes some of the pretreatment procedures and processes being considered for removal of important radionuclides from retrieved tank wastes

  7. Properties of Activated Carbon Prepared from Coconut Shells in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials commonly used for preparation of activated carbons include coal and coconut shells. Ghana generates over 30,000 tonnes of coconut shells annually from coconut oil processing activities but apart from a small percentage of the shells, which is burned as fuel, the remaining is usually dumped as waste.

  8. Waste analysis plan for 222-S dangerous and mixed waste storage area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    The 222-S Laboratory Complex, in the southeast corner of the 200 West Area, consists of the 222-S Laboratory, the 222-SA Standards Laboratory, and several ancillary facilities. Currently, 222-S Laboratory activities are in supporting efforts to characterize the waste stored in the 200 Areas single shell and double shell tanks. Besides this work, the laboratory also provides analytical services for waste-management processing plants, Tank Farms, B Plant, 242-A Evaporator Facility, Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, Plutonium Finishing Plant, Uranium-Oxide Plant, Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, environmental monitoring and surveillance programs, and activities involving essential materials and research and development. One part of the 222-SA Laboratory prepares nonradioactive standards for the 200 Area laboratories. The other section of the laboratory is used for cold (nonradioactive) process development work and standards preparation. The 219-S Waste Handling Facility has three storage tanks in which liquid acid waste from 222-S can be received, stored temporarily, and neutralized. From this facility, neutralized waste, containing radionuclides, is transferred to the Tank Farms. A 700-gallon sodium-hydroxide supply tank is also located in this facility. This plan provides the methods used to meet the acceptance criteria required by the 204-AR Waste Receiving Facility

  9. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, Pierre

    The origin of the wastes (power stations, reprocessing, fission products) is determined and the control ensuring the innocuity with respect to man, public acceptance, availability, economics and cost are examined [fr

  10. Electrical double layer capacitor using poly(methyl methacrylate)–C4BO8Li gel polymer electrolyte and carbonaceous material from shells of mata kucing (Dimocarpus longan) fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arof, A.K.; Kufian, M.Z.; Syukur, M.F.; Aziz, M.F.; Abdelrahman, A.E.; Majid, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA based gel polymer electrolytes (GPE) containing immobilized lithium bis(oxalato)borate, C 4 BO 8 Li or LiBOB dissolved in a propylene carbonate–ethylene carbonate binary solvent were prepared by heating the cast solution between 70 and 80 °C for 20 min. The electrolyte composition with 5 wt.% PMMA exhibited the highest conductivity of 3.27 and 7.46 mS cm −1 at 298 and 343 K respectively. Cyclic voltammetry studies on the GPE containing 15 wt.% PMMA and 85 wt.% (0.6 M LiBOB) dissolved in equal weight of ethylene and propylene carbonates showed that the electrochemical potential stability window of the electrolyte lies in the range between −1.7 to +1.7 V. Linear sweep voltammetry indicates the gel polymer electrolyte is stable up to 1.7 V. The electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) using the highest conducting GPE and activated carbon derived from shells of the mata kucing (Dimocarpus longan) fruit has capacitance of ∼685 mF g −1 on the first cycle. The EDLC performance was also characterized using cyclic voltammetry and charge–discharge processes at constant current.

  11. Waste volume reduction factors for potential 242-A evaporator feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Double-shell tank (DST) storage space requirements have been shown to be highly dependent on the end point of 242-A operations. Consequences to the DST of various waste volumes, and concentrations, are evaluated. Only waste streams that are currently planned to be stored in the DST system before the year 2004 are discussed. As of January 1, 1995, approximately 27-million L (7.2-million gal) of dilute wastes are stored in the DSTs available for evaporator processing. Waste streams planned to be transferred to the DSTs before December 31, 2004, are identified. The DST volume for storing slurry from these wastes is presented in this document. At a final slurry specific gravity of -1.35, 22.5-million L (5.93-million gal) of DST space would be needed on December 31, 2004, to store the product from evaporator processing of these feedstocks. The expected volume needed if the resultant slurry were concentrated to the traditional double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) phase boundary (a specific gravity of ∼1.5) would be 17.7-million L (4.67-million gal). An additional 4.8-million L (1.26-million gal) is therefore needed if these wastes are concentrated to a specific gravity of 1.35 instead of the DSSF limit

  12. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many (∼25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval

  13. Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-09-28

    This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

  14. Hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Stewart, T.L.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Site was established in 1944 to produce plutonium for defense. During the past four decades, a number of reactors, processing facilities, and waste management facilities have been built at Hanford for plutonium production. Generally, Hanford's 100 Area was dedicated to reactor operation; the 200 Area to fuel reprocessing, plutonium recovery, and waste management; and the 300 Area to fuel fabrication and research and development. Wastes generated from these operations included highly radioactive liquid wastes, which were discharged to single- and double-shell tanks; solid wastes, including both transuranic (TRU) and low-level wastes, which were buried or discharged to caissons; and waste water containing low- to intermediate-level radioactivity, which was discharged to the soil column via near-surface liquid disposal units such as cribs, ponds, and retention basins. Virtually all of the wastes contained hazardous chemical as well as radioactive constituents. This paper will focus on the hazardous chemical components of the radioactive mixed waste generated by plutonium production at Hanford. The processes, chemicals used, methods of disposition, fate in the environment, and actions being taken to clean up this legacy are described by location

  15. Hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Stewart, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Site was established in 1944 to produce plutonium for defense. During the past four decades, a number of reactors, processing facilities, and waste management facilities were built at Hanford for plutonium production. Generally, Hanford's 100 Area was dedicated to reactor operation; the 200 Areas to fuel reprocessing, plutonium recovery, and waste management; and the 300 Area to fuel fabrication and research and development. Wastes generated from these operations included highly radioactive liquid wastes, which were discharged to single- and double-shell tanks; solid wastes, including both transuranic and low-level wastes, which were buried or discharged to caissons; and waste water containing low- to intermediate-level radioactivity, which was discharged to the soil column via near-surface liquid disposal units such as cribs, ponds, and retention basins. Virtually all of the wastes contained hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive constituents. This paper focuses on the hazardous chemical components of the radioactive mixed waste generated by plutonium production at Hanford. The processes, chemicals used, methods of disposition, fate in the environment, and actions being taken to clean up this legacy are described by location

  16. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns

  17. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  18. Final characterization and safety screen report of double shell tank 241-AP-104 for 242-A evaporator, campaign 96-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    This data package satisfies the requirement for a format IV, final report. It is a follow-up to the 45-day safety screen report for tank AP-104. Evaporator candidate feed from tank 241-AP-104 (hereafter referred to as AP-104) was characterized for physical, inorganic, organic and radiochemical parameters by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 222-S Laboratory, and by the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) as directed by the Tank Sample and Analysis Plan (TSAP), References 1 through 4. Preliminary data in the form of summary analytical tables were provided to the project in advance of this final report to enable early estimation of evaporator operational parameters, using the Predict modeling program. Laboratory analyses at ACL Laboratory was performed according to the TSAP. Analyses were performed at the 222-S Laboratory as defined and specified in the TSAP and the Laboratory's Quality Assurance Plan, References 5 and 6. Any deviations from the instructions documented in the TSAP are discussed in this narrative and are supported with additional documentation. SAMPLING The TSAP, section 2, provided sampling information for waste samples collected from tank AP-104. The bottle-on-a-string method was used to collect liquid grab samples from the tank. Each glass sample bottle was amber, precleaned, and contained approximately 100 milliliters. Each bottle was closed with a teflon seal cap (or teflon septum for volatile organic analysis samples). Field blank samples were prepared by placing deionized water into sampling bottles, lowering the unclosed bottles into the riser for a period of time, retrieving them from the riser, and then closing the bottles with the same types of caps used for the tank samples. None of the samples were preserved by acidification. Upon receipt, the sample bottles destined for organic analyses were placed in a refrigerator. No attempt was made during sampling to assure the complete

  19. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes

  20. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives