WorldWideScience

Sample records for double diffractive production

  1. Exclusive Double Diffractive Higgs Boson Production at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, V; 10.1140/epjc/s2004-01972-4

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive double diffractive (EDD) Higgs boson production is analyzed in the framework of the Regge-eikonal approach. Total and differential cross-sections for the process $p+p\\to p+H+p$ are calculated. Experimental possibilities to find Higgs boson at LHC are discussed.

  2. Double Regge model for non diffractive A1 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, J.C.; Endler, A.; Santoro, A.; Simao, F.R.A.

    1977-07-01

    A Reggeized double-nucleon-exchange model is shown to be able to to reproduce qualitatively the non-diffractive A 1 production recently observed in the reaction K - p → Σ - π + π - π + at 4.15 GeV/c

  3. Double Diffractive Process Factorization from ηc and γ Associated Production at Tevatron and LHC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANZhan-Yuan; LIZhi-Wen; DUANChun-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of associated ηc and γ double diffractive production in pp- collision based on Ingelman-Schlein model, and the framework of non-relativistic QOD factorization formalism for quarkonia production. The prediction of ηc and γ is more reliable than J/ψ production, because the associated ηc and γ production is a pure color-octet process, and the dominant contribution comes from color octet 1S0(8) subprocess, which is related to the color octet matrix element of 1S0(8) of J/ψ by the heavy quark spin symmetry and the large PT J/ψ production data. We find that the ratio of diffractive to inclusive cross sections is independent of the values of color octet matrix elements, but is sensitive to the gluon factor of the Pomeron and renormalized Pomeron flux factors. So experimental measurement of this ratio can give us more information of the nature of Pomeron and test the assumption of hard diffractive factorization in hadron-hadron collisions.

  4. Double Diffractive Process Factorization from ηc and γ Associated Production at Tevatron and LHC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; LI Zhi-Wen; DUAN Chun-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of associated ηc and γ double diffractive production in p-p collision based on Ingelman-Schlein model, and the framework of non-relativistic QCD factorization formalism for quarkonia production. The predic-tion of ηc and γ is more reliable than J/ψ production, because the associated ηc and γ production is a pure color-octetprocess, and the dominant contribution comes from color octet 1So(8) subprocess, which is related to the color octet matrixelement of 1So(8) of J/ψ by the heavy quark spin symmetry and the large PT J/ψ production data. We find that the ratioof diffractive to inclusive cross sections is independent of the values of color octet matrix elements, but is sensitive to thegluon factor of the Pomeron and renormalized Pomeron flux factors. So experimental measurement of this ratio can giveus more information of the nature of Pomeron and test the assumption of hard diffractive factorization in hadron-hadron collisions.

  5. Coherent and noncoherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar pairs in heavy-ion collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agababyan, N.M.; Chatrchyan, S.A.; Galoyan, A.S.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Jenkovszky, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent and noncoherent double diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs in ion scattering at the LHC energies has been considered. The total and differential cross sections for such processes featuring the production of cc-bar and bb-bar quark pairs in pp, CaCa, and PbPb collisions have been estimated. It has been shown that the fraction of heavy quark-antiquark pairs produced in double diffractive scattering amounts to a few percent of the number of QQ-bar pairs produced in hard QCD scattering; therefore, it is necessary to take into account such processes in detecting heavy quarks, in seeking Higgs bosons of intermediate mass, in investigating the suppression of heavy quarkonia in quark-gluon plasma, and so on. It has been demonstrated that the cross section for coherent scattering is so large that this process can be used to study collective effects in nuclei at high energies. Large values of the quark-antiquark invariant mass, M QQ-bar > or approx. 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets, Δη>5, exemplify manifestations of such nuclear interactions

  6. Correlations in the hadronic double diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldegol, Alexandre.

    1991-05-01

    A given reaction of double diffractive dissociation is studied based on the three-component Deck Model. The correlations among the diffractive slope, the effective mass of the dissociated particle sub-system and the dissociation angle in the Gottfried-Jackson are studied based in this model. 9 refs, 19 figs

  7. Coherent and non-coherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar-pairs in collisions of heavy ions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agababyan, N.M.; Galoyan, A.S.; Enkovskij, L.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Chatrchyan, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The double coherent and non-coherent diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs (QQ-bar) in heavy ion scattering at high energies (LHC) is considered. The total and differential cross sections of these processes with the formation of cc-bar and bb-bar pairs in pp, CaCa and PbPb collisions are evaluated. The contribution of the considered mechanisms is a few per cent of the number of heavy quark-antiquark pairs obtained in the processes of hard (QCD) scattering, and it will be taken into account in the registration of c, b quarks or, for instance, in the study of the heavy quarkonia suppression effect in Quark-Gluon Plasma, in the search got intermediate mass Higgs bosons and so on. It is shown that the cross section of the coherently scattering process is great enough. This makes it suitable for studying collective effects in nuclear interactions at high energies. An example of such effects is given: large values of the invariant mass of a QQ-bar pair, M QQ-bar ≥ 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets Δη >5 [ru

  8. Coherent and non-coherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar - pairs in collisions of heavy ions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agababyan, N.M.; Chatrchyan, S.A.; Galoyan, A.S.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Jenkovszky, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    The double coherent and non-coherent diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pair (QQ-bar) in heavy ion scattering at high energies (LHC) is considered. The total and differential cross sections of these processes with the formation of cc bar and bb bar pairs in pp, CaCa and PbPb collisions are evaluated. The contribution of the considered mechanisms is a few per cent of the number of heavy quark-antiquark pairs obtained in the processes of hard (QCD) scattering, and it will be taken into account in the registration of c, b quarks or, for instance, in the study of the heavy quarkonia suppression effects in quark-gluon plasma, in the search for intermediate mass Higgs bosons and so on. It is shown that the cross section of the coherent scattering process is great enough. This makes it suitable for studying collective effects in nuclear interactions at high energies. An example of such effects is given: large values of the invariant mass of a QQ- bar pair, M QQb ar ≥ 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets Δη>5

  9. Diffractive production and hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussinov, S.; Szwed, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of diffractive production on nuclei implied cross sections of the diffractively produced system on nucleons which are smaller than the corresponding projectile nucleon cross sections. A natural explanation for this feature is provided in the Good-Walker coherent production formalism. A specific realization of the Good-Walker formalism stated in terms of quarks and connecting electric flux tubes and some ensuing consequences are also discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  10. Multiorder nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2009-01-01

    We analyze experimentally light scattering from 2 nonlinear gratings and observe two types of second-harmonic frequency-scattering processes. The first process is identified as Raman–Nath type nonlinear diffraction that is explained by applying only transverse phase-matching conditions. The angular...... position of this type of diffraction is defined by the ratio of the second-harmonic wavelength and the grating period. In contrast, the second type of nonlinear scattering process is explained by the longitudinal phase matching only, being insensitive to the nonlinear grating...

  11. Slit and phase grating diffraction with a double crystal diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treimer, Wolfgang; Hilger, Andre; Strobl, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The lateral coherence properties of a neutron beam (λ=0.5248nm) in a double crystal diffractometer (DCD) were studied by means of single slit diffraction and by diffraction by different perfect Silicon phase gratings. Perfect agreements were found for the lateral coherence length measured with the slit and for the one determined by Silicon phase gratings, however, some peculiarities are still present

  12. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  13. Loss of coherence in double-slit diffraction experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, A.S.; Borondo, F.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    By using optical models based on the theory of partially coherent light, and the quantum decoherence model proposed by Joos and Zeh [Z. Phys. B 59, 223 (1985)], we explore incoherence and decoherence in interference phenomena. The problem chosen to study is that of the double-slit diffraction

  14. Double-diffractive processes in high-resolution missing-mass experiments at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoze, V.A.; Martin, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluate, in a model-independent way, the signal-to-background ratio for Higgs→b anti b detection in exclusive double-diffractive events at the Tevatron and the LHC. For the missing-mass approach to be able to identify the Higgs boson, it will be necessary to use a central jet detector and to tag b quark jets. The signal is predicted to be very small at the Tevatron, but observable at the LHC. However we note that the background, that is double-diffractive dijet production, may serve as a unique gluon factory. We also give estimates for the double-diffractive production of χ c and χ b mesons at the Tevatron. We emphasize that a high-resolution missing-mass measurement, on its own, is insufficient to identify rare processes. (orig.)

  15. Diffractive charm and jet production at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    A new high precision inclusive measurement of the diffractive production of D* ± (2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the kinematic region Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 , 0.02 IP 2 2 , 165 2 , χ IP < 0.03 are presented. Diffractive parton densities extracted using a NLO DGLAP QCD fit are used for comparisons with diffractive DIS and PHP dijet and open charm cross sections at HERA and the Tevatron, thus testing the factorization properties of hard diffraction

  16. Advanced diffraction-based overlay for double patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yongdong; Dasari, Prasad; Hu, Jiangtao; Smith, Nigel; Kritsun, Oleg; Volkman, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Diffraction based overlay (DBO) technologies have been developed to address the tighter overlay control challenges as the dimensions of integrated circuit continue to shrink. Several studies published recently have demonstrated that the performance of DBO technologies has the potential to meet the overlay metrology budget for 22nm technology node. However, several hurdles must be cleared before DBO can be used in production. One of the major hurdles is that most DBO technologies require specially designed targets that consist of multiple measurement pads, which consume too much space and increase measurement time. A more advanced spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) technology-Mueller Matrix SE (MM-SE) is developed to address the challenge. We use a double patterning sample to demonstrate the potential of MM-SE as a DBO candidate. Sample matrix (the matrix that describes the effects of the sample on the incident optical beam) obtained from MM-SE contains up to 16 elements. We show that the Mueller elements from the off-diagonal 2x2 blocks respond to overlay linearly and are zero when overlay errors are absent. This superior property enables empirical DBO (eDBO) using two pads per direction. Furthermore, the rich information in Mueller matrix and its direct response to overlay make it feasible to extract overlay errors from only one pad per direction using modeling approach (mDBO). We here present the Mueller overlay results using both eDBO and mDBO and compare the results with image-based overlay (IBO) and CD-SEM results. We also report the tool induced shifts (TIS) and dynamic repeatability.

  17. Diffraction-based overlay metrology for double patterning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Prasad; Korlahalli, Rahul; Li, Jie; Smith, Nigel; Kritsun, Oleg; Volkman, Cathy

    2009-03-01

    The extension of optical lithography to 32nm and beyond is made possible by Double Patterning Techniques (DPT) at critical levels of the process flow. The ease of DPT implementation is hindered by increased significance of critical dimension uniformity and overlay errors. Diffraction-based overlay (DBO) has shown to be an effective metrology solution for accurate determination of the overlay errors associated with double patterning [1, 2] processes. In this paper we will report its use in litho-freeze-litho-etch (LFLE) and spacer double patterning technology (SDPT), which are pitch splitting solutions that reduce the significance of overlay errors. Since the control of overlay between various mask/level combinations is critical for fabrication, precise and accurate assessment of errors by advanced metrology techniques such as spectroscopic diffraction based overlay (DBO) and traditional image-based overlay (IBO) using advanced target designs will be reported. A comparison between DBO, IBO and CD-SEM measurements will be reported. . A discussion of TMU requirements for 32nm technology and TMU performance data of LFLE and SDPT targets by different overlay approaches will be presented.

  18. Diffractive beauty production at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, K.; Morsch, A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the framework of Pomeron exchange to describe diffractive pp collisions at the LHC we discuss beauty production in those events. The cross sections for beauty production at different diffractive masses and the topology for the beauty particles and the underlying event are given. When triggering on large diffractive masses, the beauty system is boosted into the Pomeron hemisphere opposite the underlying event, which tends to follow the excited proton direction. This may offer some advantages for the acceptance of beauty and its reconstruction in forward spectrometers. For the identification of diffractive events at the LHC collider, we present a scheme to measure the momentum loss of forward protons in the range 2x10 -3 < Δp/p <0.1. This momentum loss can be determined with a precision of about 10%. ((orig.))

  19. Diffractive production off nuclei-shadow of hadronic bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.

    1974-01-01

    Diffractive production on nuclei is calculated using as an input a specific model for diffractive production on nucleons. In this model diffractive production is described as a shadow of non-diffractive multiple production of particles. The mechanism for non-diffractive production is taken to be hadronic bremsstrahlung of independently produced clusters. It is shown that such a model naturally explains the strikingly simple pattern of absorption observed in coherent production on nuclei. Possible generalizations of these results are indicated. (author)

  20. On the determination of double diffraction dissociation cross section at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtmann, H.; Nikolaev, N.N.; Speth, J.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1996-01-01

    The excitation of the proton into undetected multiparticle states (double diffraction dissociation) is an important background to single diffractive deep-inelastic processes ep→e'p'ρ 0 , e'p'J/Ψ, e'p'X at HERA. We present estimates of the admixture of the double diffraction dissociation events in all diffractive events. We find that in the J/Ψ photoproduction, electroproduction of the ρ 0 at large Q 2 and diffraction dissociation of real and virtual photons into high mass states X the contamination of the double diffraction dissociation can be as large as ∼30%, thus affecting substantially the experimental tests of the pomeron exchange in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. We discuss a possibility of tagging the double diffraction dissociation by neutrons observed in the forward neutron calorimeter. We present evaluations of the spectra of neutrons and efficiency of neutron tagging based on the experimental data for diffractive processes in the proton-proton collisions. (orig.)

  1. ATLAS results on diffraction and exclusive production

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224260; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Various aspects of forward physics have been studied by the ATLAS collaboration using data from Run I at the LHC. In this text, main results of three published analyses are summarized, based on data from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ or 8 TeV collected between 2010 and 2012. One analysis deals with diffractive signature with at least two jets in the final state, the other two study exclusive production of a pair of leptons or W bosons.

  2. Diffractive heavy quark production in AA collisions at the LHC at NLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. M.; Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. V. T.

    2011-07-01

    The single and double diffractive cross sections for heavy quarks production are evaluated at NLO accuracy for hadronic and heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Diffractive charm and bottom production is the main subject of this work, providing predictions for CaCa, PbPb and pPb collisions. The hard diffraction formalism is considered using the Ingelman-Schlein model where a recent parametrization for the Pomeron structure function (DPDF) is applied. Absorptive corrections are taken into account as well. The diffractive ratios are estimated and theoretical uncertainties are discussed. Comparison with competing production channels is also presented.

  3. Diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering at ZEUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonato, A.

    2008-03-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of dijet production of diffractive deep inelastic scattering ep collisions. This type of process is specially relevant for the experimental validity of the perturbative QCD approach to diffractive physics. The measurement was based on an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 collected at the HERA collider with the ZEUS experiment. The events were selected for virtualities of the photon, γ*, 5 2 2 , and energies of the γ*p centre-of-mass, 100 T algorithm in the γ*p frame. The jets were required to have a transverse energy in the γ*p frame E T jet *>4 GeV. The jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E T jet *>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5 jet * P , was required to be x P TOT D (ep→ep jet 1 jet 2 X')=9.15±1.2 (stat.) 5.4 3.3 (syst.) -5.3 +6.4 (corr.)pb. Single and double differential cross sections were extracted and compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The latter used several diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. The agreement with the leading and next-to-leading order predictions is good and no hints of factorisation breaking are observed. The double differential measurement can be a previous input for the extraction of more accurate diffractive parton densities. (orig.)

  4. Hard single diffractive jet production at D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary results from the D null experiment on jet production with forward rapidity gaps in p anti p collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies √s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard single diffractive process. A small class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange

  5. Advancements of diffraction-based overlay metrology for double patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Liu, Yongdong; Dasari, Prasad; Weher, Ulrich; Volkman, Catherine; Mazur, Martin; Hu, Jiangtao

    2011-03-01

    As the dimensions of integrated circuit continue to shrink, diffraction based overlay (DBO) technologies have been developed to address the tighter overlay control challenges. Previously data of high accuracy and high precision were reported for litho-etch-litho-etch double patterning (DP) process using normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry on specially designed targets composed of 1D gratings in x and y directions. Two measurement methods, empirical algorithm (eDBO) using four pads per direction (2x4 target) and modeling based algorithm (mDBO) using two pads per direction (2x2 target) were performed. In this work, we apply DBO techniques to measure overlay errors for a different DP process, litho-freeze-litho-etch process. We explore the possibility of further reducing number of pads in a DBO target using mDBO. For standard targets composed of 1D gratings, we reported results for eDBO 2x4 targets, mDBO 2x2 targets, and mDBO 2x1 target. The results of all three types of targets are comparable in terms of accuracy, dynamic precision, and TIS. TMU (not including tool matching) is less than 0.1nm. In addition, we investigated the possibility of measuring overlay with one single pad that contains 2D gratings. We achieved good correlation to blossom measurements. TMU (not including tool matching) is ~ 0.2nm. To our best knowledge, this is the first time that DBO results are reported on a single pad. eDBO allows quick recipe setup but takes more space and measurement time. Although mDBO needs details of optical properties and modeling, it offers smaller total target size and much faster throughput, which is important in high volume manufacturing environment.

  6. Diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering at ZEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, A.

    2008-03-15

    This thesis presents a measurement of dijet production of diffractive deep inelastic scattering ep collisions. This type of process is specially relevant for the experimental validity of the perturbative QCD approach to diffractive physics. The measurement was based on an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1} collected at the HERA collider with the ZEUS experiment. The events were selected for virtualities of the photon, {gamma}*, 54 GeV. The jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E{sub T} {sub jet}*>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5<{eta}{sub jet}*<0 as measured in the {gamma}*p frame. The selection of diffractive events was carried out by requiring a large rapidity gap in the direction of the scattered proton. The value of the fraction of initial proton momentum entering in the hard process, x{sub P}, was required to be x{sub P}<0.03. The total cross section for the process was measured to be {sigma}{sub TOT}{sup D}(ep{yields}ep jet{sub 1}jet{sub 2} X')=9.15{+-}1.2 (stat.){sub 5.4}{sup 3.3} (syst.){sub -5.3}{sup +6.4} (corr.)pb. Single and double differential cross sections were extracted and compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The latter used several diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. The agreement with the leading and next-to-leading order predictions is good and no hints of factorisation breaking are observed. The double differential measurement can be a previous input for the extraction of more accurate diffractive parton densities. (orig.)

  7. Systematics of 2-body diffractive dissociations and search of double diffractive dissociation in K-p interactions at 14.3 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Yvette.

    1977-12-01

    The diffractive dissociation mechanism is shown to be general when looking at 22 mesonic or baryonic threshold enhancements. The dissociation systems are all produced peripherally and present the property of slope-mass correlation. The production slopes and cross-sections mainly depend on the diffractive excitation mass. The comparison of the results with those from the I.S.R. shows that dissociation systems are very similar in their effective mass shape, momentum transfer structure and angular distributions at center-of-mass energies differing by a factor of ten. Evidence for double diffractive dissociation mechanism is found in 2 exclusive reactions at a cross section level of 5-10+-2 μb. The factorisation hypothesis seems well verified [fr

  8. Correlations in the hadronic double diffractive dissociation; Correlacoes na dupla dissociacao difrativa hadronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldegol, Alexandre

    1991-05-01

    A given reaction of double diffractive dissociation is studied based on the three-component Deck Model. The correlations among the diffractive slope, the effective mass of the dissociated particle sub-system and the dissociation angle in the Gottfried-Jackson are studied based in this model. 9 refs, 19 figs.

  9. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Baechler, J.; Avati, V.; Berardi, V.; Bossini, E.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Deile, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Karev, A.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Maki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Orava, R.; Oljemark, F.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Prochazka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-12-26

    The first double diffractive cross-section measurement in the very forward region has been carriedout by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC with center-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV. By utilizingthe very forward TOTEM tracking detectors T1 and T2, which extend up to pseudo rapidity |$\\eta$|=6.5, a clean sample of double diffractive pp events was extracted. From these events, we measured the cross-section $\\sigma_{DD}$ = (116±25) mb for events where both diffractive systems have 4.7 < |$\\eta$|$_{min}$ < 6.5.

  10. Low missing mass, single- and double diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2014-01-01

    Low missing mass, single- and double diffraction dissociation is calculated for the LHC energies from a dual-Regge model, dominated by a Pomeron Regge pole exchange. The model reproduces the rich resonance structure in the low missing mass Mx region. The diffractionly excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single- and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given. The model predicts a possible turn-down of the cross section towards, t -> 0 in a region probably accessible in future experiments in the nearly forward direction. The present work is a continuation and extension (e.g. with double diffraction) of a previous work using the dual Regge approach.

  11. Remarks on diffractive production of the Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peschanski, R. [CEA Saclay, Service de Physique Theorique, URA 2306, Unite de Recherche Associee au CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Central diffractive production of the Higgs boson has recently received much attention as a potentially interesting production mode at the LHC (large hadron collider). While the standard production of Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion can reach high cross-sections, the study of the Higgs boson will be uneasy due to accompanying particles and background. The original guiding line for central diffractive production is to compensate the weak cross-sections by a cleaner signal, and precise production kinematics thanks to the tagging of diffracted protons. We shall review some of the wishes and realities encountered in this field. Theoretical open problems of diffractive dynamics are involved in making accurate predictions for the LHC, among which the most crucial is understanding factorization breaking in hard diffraction.

  12. AIP Single and double diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Roberto; Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-01-01

    Single and double di ff raction dissociation at the LHC is studied in a factorizable Regge-pole model, dominated by a Pomeron pole exchange in the t channel. While the contribution from secondary reggeon exchanges at the LHC is negligible, they are indispensable to match the lower-energy, ISR and FNAL data. To this end we append to the leading Pomeron exchange an e ff ective reggeon. The main emphasis in our study is on the nucleon resonances in missing masses, that are accounted for by a dual model of the inelastic pP → M X vertex, similar to the DIS structure function, known from HERA, with a non-linear nucleon, N ∗ trajectory in the direct, M 2 X channel. Regge factorization and its breakdown due to a renormalization factor, tempering the energy rise is discussed.

  13. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Diameter of the useful diffraction halo in double-exposure speckle photographs recorded under various conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Marti, L.; Moreno, A.; Ostrovskii, Iu. I.; Serra, R.

    1985-06-01

    Consideration is given to the relationship between the diffraction halo radius Theta(h) and the displacement (Delta) of the object in double exposed speckle photographs taken in various conditions. The numerical values of Theta(h)/Delta were obtained for several speckle recordings having exposure times in the range 0.5-3.8 s. It is shown that long exposure times did not significantly decrease the minimum measureable displacement of the object. The radii of the diffraction halo were the same in the case of both long and short exposure times.

  15. Probing diffractive production of gauge bosons at forward rapidities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, Eduardo; Rangel, Murilo S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Victor P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    Gauge boson production at forward rapidities in single diffractive events at the LHC is investigated considering pp collisions at √(s) = 8 and 13 TeV. The impact of gap survival effects is analysed using two different models for the soft rescattering contributions. We demonstrate that using the forward shower counter Project at LHCb-HERSCHEL, together with the Vertex Locator-VELO, it is possible to discriminate diffractive production of the gauge bosons W and Z from the non-diffractive processes and studies of the Pomeron structure and diffraction phenomenology are feasible. Moreover, we show that the analysis of this process can be useful to constrain the modelling of the gap survival effects. (orig.)

  16. Quark-antiquark production in DIS diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Lotter, H.; Wuesthoff, M.

    1996-02-01

    We calculate the cross section for the production of two jets with large transverse momenta k 2 in DIS diffractive dissociation for both transverse and longitudinally polarized photons. The scale which defines the hardness of the Pomeron is found to be k 2 (Q 2 +M 2 )/M 2 . We present analytic expressions and discuss numerical results relevant for the diffractive dissociation at HERA. (orig.)

  17. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asratyan, A. E.; Aderholz, M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Burkot, W.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Gapienko, G. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Guy, J.; Hantke, D.; Jones, G. T.; Kaftanov, V. S.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Korotkov, V. A.; Krutchinin, S. P.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Marage, P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Sacton, J.; Schmitz, N.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wittek, W.; Zaetz, V. G.

    1993-03-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D {s/*} and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV)-2. The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D{s/+}→φτ+ branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)×10-4.

  18. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asratyan, A.E.; Kaftanov, V.S.; Krutchinin, S.P.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U.F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Ammosov, V.V.; Gapienko, G.S.; Gapienko, V.A.; Korotkov, V.A.; Zaetz, V.G.; Burkot, W.; Coghen, T.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Erriquez, O.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Jones, G.T.; Varvell, K.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Neveu, M.

    1993-01-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D s * and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV) -2 . The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D s + →φπ + branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)x10 -4 . (orig.)

  19. Dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-08-01

    The production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . The dijet cross section has been measured for virtualities of the exchanged virtual photon, 5 2 2 , and γ * p centre-of-mass energies, 100 T algorithm in the γ * p frame, were required to have a transverse energy E * T,jet >4 GeV and the jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E * T,jet >5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5 * jet <0. The differential cross sections are compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading- order QCD calculations based on recent diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. (orig.)

  20. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at LHC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Kašpar, Jan; Kopal, Josef; Kundrát, Jan; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Procházka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 26 (2013), "262001-1"-"262001-6" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LHC * TOTEM * diffractive production Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  1. Radiosurgery and the double logistic product formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, J.C.; Steiner, L.

    1990-01-01

    The double logistic product formula is proposed as a method for predicting the probability of developing brain necrosis after high dose irradiation of small target volumes as used in stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose-response data observed for the production of localized radiation necreosis for treating intractable pain with the original Leksell gamma unit were used to choose the best fitting parameters for the double logistic product formula. This model can be used with either exponential or linear quadratic formulas to account for the effects of dose, fractionation and time in addition to volume. Dose-response predictions for stereotactic radiosurgery with different sized collimators are presented. (author). 41 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Double boson production at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, D.

    1996-07-01

    New measurements of boson pair production in p anti p collisions have been performed by the CDF collaboration using a data sample of approximately 110 pb -1 . The cross sections for WW and WZ production are measured in the pure leptonic decay channel to σ(p anti p → WZ) = 3.2 +5.0 -3. 2 pb and σ(p anti p → W + W - ) = 10.2 +6.5 -5.3 pb, respectively. Limits on anomalous coupling parameters are set in the searches for WW and WZ production. Assuming an energy scale of Λ FF = 2 TeV, we find for the WWZ and WWγ couplings at 95% CL: -0.4 < λ < 0.3 (δκ 0) and -0.5 < δκ < 0.5 (λ = 0)

  3. Diffractive production in deep inelastic scattering and hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalow, A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffractive processes in hadronic interactions are considered and important role of multi-Pomeron exchanges is emphasized. It is argued that in deep inelastic scattering these contributions are much less important and energy behavior of structure functions at Q 2 ≥ 1 GeV 2 is determined mostly by bare Pomeron intercept. It is shown that the model based on these ideas is in a perfect agreement with recent results from HERA. Diffractive production in DIS is discussed and theoretical predictions for the structure function of the Pomeron are compared with experimental observations. It is emphasized that both quarks and gluons in the Pomeron have hard distributions. Shadowing corrections to structure function of a nucleon are calculated and found to small in the region of x > 10 -4 . A good agreement with experimental data on the shadowing of structure functions of nuclei is obtained. Energy dependence for the cross sections of the diffractive production of vector mesons by real and virtual photons is calculated in the same approach and is found to be in an excellent agreement with experiment. (author)

  4. Double diffractive dissociation in the reaction K-p→K-π+π-nπ+ at 14.3 GeV/c and pomeron factorisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denegri, D.; Pons, Y.; Borg, A.; Spiro, M.; Paler, K.; Tovey, S.; Comber, C.; Shah, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the double dissociation process K - p→QN*sub(1/2)→(anti K* 0 π - ) (nπ + ) at 14.3GeV/c. The cross section for the process is of the order of 10 μb. The production differential cross section is steep (for near-threshold excitation masses), as typical of diffractive processes, and exhibits a strong correlation between the production slope and the masses of the dissociated systems. The spin-parity composition and states of the two dissociation systems closely resemble those found in single dissociation, indicating that a common diffraction-like mechanism is responsible for both processes. The mass variations of the differential cross-section slope, the decay angular correlations and the total cross section of the double dissociation component are consistent with the predictions of a factorisable pomeron exchange model. (Auth.)

  5. Diffractive D{sup *}-mesons production in DIS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinokurova, Svetlana

    2010-05-15

    This thesis presents a measurement of the cross sections for the production of the charmed mesons in diffractive deep inelastic positron-proton scattering (DIS) interactions of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the system X is separated from a low-mass system Y, by a large rapidity gap where no particles are observed. These diffractive processes can be explained as a result of the exchange of a strongly interacting colour singlet object between the final state particles. In this measurement data taken with the H1 detector in the years 1999-2000, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L{sub int}=46.7 pb{sup -1} are used. Inclusive DIS events are selected in the kinematic range with the momentum transfer Q{sup 2} element of [2;100] GeV and inelasticity y{sub bj} element of [0.05;07]. The charm quark is tagged by requiring a D{sup *} meson decaying into the channel D{sup *}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sub slow}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{sub slow} inside the central tracking system with transverse momenta p{sub t}(D{sup *})>2 GeV. The forward components of the H1 detector are used to select genuine diffractive events on the basis of the forward sub-detectors activity and of the presence a large rapidity gap in the final state hadrons. The visible charm production cross sections are measured in the diffractive kinematic range M{sub Y} < 1.6 GeV, vertical stroke t vertical stroke < 1 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub P} < 0.04 to be {sigma}(ep{yields}e{sup '}(D{sup *}X)Y)=249{+-}31(stat.){+-}30(sys) pb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The shape of the differential distributions for diffractive D{sup *} production are well described by the collinear factorisation model which is implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation RAPGAP. (orig.)

  6. Dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    The production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1}. The dijet cross section has been measured for virtualities of the exchanged virtual photon, 54 GeV and the jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E{sup *}{sub T,jet}>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5<{eta}{sup *}{sub jet}<0. The differential cross sections are compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading- order QCD calculations based on recent diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. (orig.)

  7. Double diffractive ρ -production in γ*γ* collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present a first estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive process γ * L (Q 1 2 )γ * L (Q 2 2 )→ρ L 0 ρ L 0 , which will be studied in the future high energy e + e - -linear collider. As a first step, we calculate the Born order approximation of the amplitude for longitudinally polarized virtual photons and mesons, in the kinematical region s >>-t, Q 1 2 , Q 2 2 . This process is completely calculable in the hard region Q 1 2 , Q 2 2 >>Λ 2 QCD . We perform most of the steps in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q 1 2 and Q 2 2 in the range of a few GeV 2 . (orig.)

  8. Observation of double charm production at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The production of J/ψ together with an open charm meson, and double open charm production are observed in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 355 pb−1 collected with the LHCb detector. Model independent estimates of absolute cross-sections are given together with ratios to the measured J/ψ and open charm cross-sections. The properties of these events are studied and compared to theoretical predictions.

  9. Dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering in next-to-next-to-leading order QCD arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Britzger, D.; Gehrmann, T.; Huss, A.; Niehues, J.; Žlebčík, R.

    Hard processes in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering can be described by a factorisation into parton-level subprocesses and diffractive parton distributions. In this framework, cross sections for inclusive dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering (DIS) are computed to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD accuracy and compared to a comprehensive selection of data. Predictions for the total cross sections, 39 single-differential and four double-differential distributions for six measurements at HERA by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations are calculated. In the studied kinematical range, the NNLO corrections are found to be sizeable and positive. The NNLO predictions typically exceed the data, while the kinematical shape of the data is described better at NNLO than at next-to-leading order (NLO). A significant reduction of the scale uncertainty is achieved in comparison to NLO predictions. Our results use the currently available NLO diffractive parton distributions, and the dis...

  10. Double Image Design in Newspaper Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Barišić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the high circulation production of daily newspapers, a double image, double information is set under the rules of Infraredesign theory (Pap et al, 2010. The management of visible and near infrared is posted with process colors for color setting configured for conventional newspaper print. The place of imprint that has delimited information in vs (Visible Spectrum and nir (Near InfraRed is called “a print with an infrared effect,” or conditionally “a print with infrared colors.” Daily newspapers, as massive carriers of information made by printing technique, are receiving a new form of presentation: printed image with a built-in invisible image.

  11. Neutron Powder Diffraction Studies of Ca2-xSrxCoWO6 Double Perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qingdi; Kennedy, Brendan; Elcombe, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A series of double perovskite compounds of A 2-x Sr x CoWO 6 (A = Ca, Ba) were synthesized and the room- and variable-temperature structural phase transitions have been studied by synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction techniques. These studies demonstrated that the symmetry increases as the average size of the A-site cation increases. These transitions are associated with the gradual reduction and ultimately removal of the octahedral tiles of the BO 6 octahedra. Temperature dependent structural studies have been undertaken for selected samples. The transition to cubic is continuous in the three Ca doped samples studied as a function of temperature, Ca 2-x Sr x CoWO 6 x = 1.8, 1.7, 1.6, however in each case analysis of the spontaneous strain shows the transition to be tricritical rather than second order in nature. Where observed the temperature induced P2 1 /n to I4/m transition is first order as required by symmetry. (authors)>>>>

  12. Diffraction-based overlay for spacer patterning and double patterning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Hoon; Park, JeongSu; Lee, Jongsu; Park, Sarohan; Lim, ChangMoon; Yim, Dong-Gyu; Park, Sungki; Ryu, Chan-Ho; Morgan, Stephen; van de Schaar, Maurits; Fuchs, Andreas; Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve

    2011-03-01

    Overlay performance will be increasingly important for Spacer Patterning Technology (SPT) and Double Patterning Technology (DPT) as various Resolution Enhancement Techniques are employed to extend the resolution limits of lithography. Continuous shrinkage of devices makes overlay accuracy one of the most critical issues while overlay performance is completely dependent on exposure tool. Image Based Overlay (IBO) has been used as the mainstream metrology for overlay by the main memory IC companies, but IBO is not suitable for some critical layers due to the poor Tool Induced Shift (TIS) values. Hence new overlay metrology is required to improve the overlay measurement accuracy. Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) is regarded to be an alternative metrology to IBO for more accurate measurements and reduction of reading errors. Good overlay performances of DBO have been reported in many articles. However applying DBO for SPT and DPT layers poses extra challenges for target design. New vernier designs are considered for different DPT and SPT schemes to meet overlay target in DBO system. In this paper, we optimize the design of the DBO target and the performance of DBO to meet the overlay specification of sub-3x nm devices which are using SPT and DPT processes. We show that the appropriate vernier design yields excellent overlay performance in residual and TIS. The paper also demonstrated the effects of vernier structure on overlay accuracy from SEM analysis.

  13. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Mihaela; Gheata, Andrei George; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Ramni; Gupta, Anik; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacobs, Peter; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khan, Palash; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Beomkyu; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Kravcakova, Adela; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Le Bornec, Yves; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nikulin, Sergey; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oh, Saehanseul; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selioujenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Rohini; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Jihye; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Trubnikov, Victor; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Alexander; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; vrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, You; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, Daicui; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton--proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass $M_X 3$) $\\sigma_{\\rm DD}/\\sigma_{\\rm INEL} = 0.11 \\pm 0.03, 0.12 \\pm 0.05$, and $0.12^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$, respectively at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9, 2.76$, and 7 TeV. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: $\\sigma_{\\rm INEL} = 62.8^{+2.4}_{-4.0} (model) \\pm 1.2 (lumi)$ mb at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 2.76 TeV and $73.2^{+2.0}_{-4.6} (model) \\pm 2.6 (lumi)$ mb at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared t...

  14. Exclusive central diffractive production of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector mesons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebiedowicz P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss exclusive central diffractive production of scalar (ƒ0(980, ƒ0(1370, ƒ0(1500, pseudoscalar (η, η′(958, and vector (ρ0 mesons in proton-proton collisions. The amplitudes are formulated in terms of effective vertices required to respect standard rules of Quantum Field Theory and propagators for the exchanged pomeron and reggeons. Different pomeron-pomeron-meson tensorial (vectorial coupling structures are possible in general. In most cases two lowest orbital angular momentum - spin couplings are necessary to describe experimental differential distributions. For the ƒ0(980 and η production the reggeon-pomeron, pomeron-reggeon, and reggeon-reggeon exchanges are included in addition, which seems to be necessary at relatively low energies. The theoretical results are compared with the WA102 experimental data, in order to determine the model parameters. For the ρ0 production the photon-pomeron and pomeron-photon exchanges are considered. The coupling parameters of tensor pomeron and/or reggeon are fixed from the H1 and ZEUS experimental data of the γp → ρ0 p reaction. We present first predictions of this mechanism for pp → ppπ+π− reaction being studied at COMPASS, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC. Correlation in azimuthal angle between outgoing protons and distribution in pion rapidities at √s = 7 TeV are presented. We show that high-energy central production of mesons could provide crucial information on the spin structure of the soft pomeron.

  15. Double and triple crystal diffraction investigation on ion implanted and electron beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servidori, M.; Cembali, F.; Winter, U.; Zaumseil, P.; Richter, H.

    1985-01-01

    Double (DCD) and triple crystal (TCD) diffractometry was used to investigate radiation damage produced in silicon by silicon bombardment and its evolution after electron beam annealing. The implantation processes were carried out at 60 keV energy and at doses of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 200 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . As to the annealing treatments, an electron gun was used, operating in the ranges 7.5 to 24 W/cm 2 and 2 to 20 seconds. DCD rocking curves were analyzed by means of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The formalism introduced by Taupin was used to simulate the experimental intensity profiles. From the resulting best fits, the lattice strain vs. depth profiles were obtained, indicating an increase of the damage with dose for the as-implanted samples up to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 dose, whereas amorphous layers are produced for the higher doses. After annealing, lowering of the residual strain was observed to be directly proportional to the implanted dose. In particular, a complete recovery of the damage occurred for the 0.5 and 1 x 10 13 cm -2 samples. The results obtained by the fitting procedure were substantially independent from the power densities and times used during electron beam irradiation. TCD as a very sensitive method to investigate lattice defects after implantation was used to obtain information about the crystallographic perfection of the surface layer. The absence of diffuse scattering indicates that the annealed layers do not contain microdefects within the detection limits. (author)

  16. Diffractive production of charm quark/antiquark pairs at RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszczak, Marta; Szczurek, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    We have discussed single and central diffractive production of c(bar sign)c pairs in the Ingelman-Schlein model. In these calculations we have included diffractive parton distributions obtained by the H1 collaboration at HERA and absorption effects neglected in some early calculations in the literature. The absorption effects which are responsible for the naive Regge factorization breaking cause that the cross section for diffractive processes is much smaller than that for the fully inclusive case, but could be measured at RHIC and LHC by imposing special condition on rapidity gaps. We discuss also different approaches to diffractive production of heavy quark/antiquark [1, 2, 3]. The particular mechanism is similar to the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons into quarks, which drives diffractive deep inelastic production of charm in the low-mass diffraction, or large β-region.

  17. Diffractive production of charm quark/antiquark pairs at RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luszczak, Marta [University of Rzeszow, PL-35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Szczurek, Antoni [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, PL-31-342 Cracow and University of Rzeszow, PL-35-959 Rzeszow (Poland)

    2013-04-15

    We have discussed single and central diffractive production of c(bar sign)c pairs in the Ingelman-Schlein model. In these calculations we have included diffractive parton distributions obtained by the H1 collaboration at HERA and absorption effects neglected in some early calculations in the literature. The absorption effects which are responsible for the naive Regge factorization breaking cause that the cross section for diffractive processes is much smaller than that for the fully inclusive case, but could be measured at RHIC and LHC by imposing special condition on rapidity gaps. We discuss also different approaches to diffractive production of heavy quark/antiquark [1, 2, 3]. The particular mechanism is similar to the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons into quarks, which drives diffractive deep inelastic production of charm in the low-mass diffraction, or large {beta}-region.

  18. Production of antihydrogen via double charge exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muellers, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition of antihydrogen confined in a neutral atom trap and comparison with the equivalent spectral line in hydrogen will provide an accurate test of CPT symmetry and the first one in a mixed baryon-lepton system. Also, with neutral antihydrogen atoms, the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter can be tested unperturbed by the much stronger Coulomb forces. Antihydrogen is regularly produced at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator by three-body-recombination (TBR) of one antiproton and two positrons. The method requires injecting antiprotons into a cloud of positrons, which raises the average temperature of the antihydrogen atoms produced way above the typical 0.5 K trap depths of neutral atom traps. Therefore only very few antihydrogen atoms can be confined at a time. Precision measurements, like laser spectroscopy, will greatly benefit from larger numbers of simultaneously trapped antihydrogen atoms. Therefore, the ATRAP collaboration developed a different production method that has the potential to create much larger numbers of cold, trappable antihydrogen atoms. Positrons and antiprotons are stored and cooled in a Penning trap in close proximity. Laser excited cesium atoms collide with the positrons, forming Rydberg positronium, a bound state of an electron and a positron. The positronium atoms are no longer confined by the electric potentials of the Penning trap and some drift into the neighboring cloud of antiprotons where, in a second charge exchange collision, they form antihydrogen. The antiprotons remain at rest during the entire process, so much larger numbers of trappable antihydrogen atoms can be produced. Laser excitation is necessary to increase the efficiency of the process since the cross sections for charge-exchange collisions scale with the fourth power of the principal quantum number n. This method, named double charge-exchange, was demonstrated by ATRAP in 2004. Since then, ATRAP constructed a new

  19. Production of antihydrogen via double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellers, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition of antihydrogen confined in a neutral atom trap and comparison with the equivalent spectral line in hydrogen will provide an accurate test of CPT symmetry and the first one in a mixed baryon-lepton system. Also, with neutral antihydrogen atoms, the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter can be tested unperturbed by the much stronger Coulomb forces. Antihydrogen is regularly produced at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator by three-body-recombination (TBR) of one antiproton and two positrons. The method requires injecting antiprotons into a cloud of positrons, which raises the average temperature of the antihydrogen atoms produced way above the typical 0.5 K trap depths of neutral atom traps. Therefore only very few antihydrogen atoms can be confined at a time. Precision measurements, like laser spectroscopy, will greatly benefit from larger numbers of simultaneously trapped antihydrogen atoms. Therefore, the ATRAP collaboration developed a different production method that has the potential to create much larger numbers of cold, trappable antihydrogen atoms. Positrons and antiprotons are stored and cooled in a Penning trap in close proximity. Laser excited cesium atoms collide with the positrons, forming Rydberg positronium, a bound state of an electron and a positron. The positronium atoms are no longer confined by the electric potentials of the Penning trap and some drift into the neighboring cloud of antiprotons where, in a second charge exchange collision, they form antihydrogen. The antiprotons remain at rest during the entire process, so much larger numbers of trappable antihydrogen atoms can be produced. Laser excitation is necessary to increase the efficiency of the process since the cross sections for charge-exchange collisions scale with the fourth power of the principal quantum number n. This method, named double charge-exchange, was demonstrated by ATRAP in 2004. Since then, ATRAP constructed a new combined

  20. Diffractive heavy flavor production-including W/sup +-/ and Z/sup 0/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that when the Pomeron has the semiperturbative origin in QCD, diffractive heavy quark production is independent from, and not suppressed relative to, the perturbative gluon fusion process. It is emphasized that anomalously large diffractive heavy flavor cross-sections could anticipate correspondingly large cross-sections for the diffractive production of W/sup +-/ and Z 0 -providing distinctive evidence for the dynamical nature of the electroweak Higgs sector

  1. Statistical description of multipion production in diffractive hadronic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, R.

    1980-01-01

    A statistical model in which higher-multiplicity enhancements are generated from lower ones in a completely determined fashion is presented. Full account is taken of isospin and G-parity conservation as well as the finite width of the produced resonances. It is applied to diffractive dissociation on nucleon and deuteron targets, for which multipion mass distributions and relative cross sections are calculated. Agreement with available experimental data is seen to be excellent

  2. Diffractive vector meson production in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamps, M. de.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis seeks to bring comfort to those who are appalled by the usual high level of violence in high energy physics. Although also here we engage in the customary vandalistic smashing together of two particles, the reaction we will study has a happy end in store for both of them. The subject of this thesis will be the reaction: e + p→e + pV where V is one of the vector mesons ρ, ω, φ, J/ψ. We will investigate the situation where the final state positron enters the ZEUS main detector, which indicates that a violent reaction has taken place between the initial state particles, but nevertheless the proton does not break up. The violence with which the positron is scattered characterises the reaction as a Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS), the fact that the proton does not break up characterises the reaction as diffractive which explains the title of the thesis. Both DIS and diffractive physics will be defined and discussed in the context of this thesis. (orig./WL)

  3. Double K-vacancy production by x-ray photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S. H.; Dunford, R. W.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Young, L.; Armen, G. B.; Levin, J. C.; Chen, M. H.; Ederer, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied double K-shell photoionization of Ne and Mo (Z = 10 and 42) at the Advanced Photon Source. Double K-vacancy production in Ne was observed by recording the KK-KLL Auger hypersatellite spectrum. Comparison is made with calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. For Mo, double K-vacancy production was observed by recording the Kα, β fluorescence hypersatellite and satellite x rays in coincidence. From the intensities of the Auger or x-ray hypersatellites relative to diagram lines, the probabilities for double K-vacancy production relative to single K-vacancies were determined. These results, along with reported measurements on other atoms, are compared with Z-scaling calculations of the high-energy limits of the double-to-single K-shell photoionization ratio

  4. Diffractive open charm production at DESY HERA. Experiment versus two-gluon exchange model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Inst. of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    Diffractive production of D{sup *} mesons at HERA conditions is considered in the framework of collinear two-gluon exchange model. Theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of Dijet Production in Diffractive Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2015-03-18

    A measurement is presented of single- and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA using data collected by the H1 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb^{-1}. The investigated phase space is spanned by the photon virtuality in the range of 4diffractive parton distribution functions and the value of the strong coupling constant is extracted.

  6. Diffractive jet production in a simple model with applications to DESY HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berera, A.; Soper, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In diffractive jet production, two high energy hardons A and B collide and produce high transverse momentum jets, while hadron A is diffractively scattered. Ingelman and Schlein predicted this phenomenon. In their model, part of the longitudinal momentum transferred from hadron A is delivered to the jet system, part is lost. Lossless diffractive jet production, in which all of this longitudinal momentum is delivered to the jet system, has been discussed by Collins, Frankfurt, and Strikman. We study the structure of lossless diffractive jet production in a simple model. The model suggests that the phenomenon can be probed experimentally at DESY HERA, with A being a proton and B being a bremsstrahlung photon with virtuality Q 2 . Lossless events should be present for small Q 2 , but not for Q 2 larger than 1/R P 2 , where R P is a characteristic size of the Pomeron

  7. Prompt photon production in double-Pomeron-exchange events at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohara, A.K., E-mail: kendi@if.ufrj.br [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Instituto de Física – Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970, RJ (Brazil); Marquet, C., E-mail: cyrille.marquet@polytechnique.edu [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2016-06-10

    Within the resolved Pomeron model of hard diffractive scattering, we compute prompt photon production in double-Pomeron-exchange events in proton–proton collisions. Using specific kinematical constraints chosen according to the acceptances of the forward proton detectors of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, we provide estimates for inclusive and isolated photon production. This is done using the JetPhox program. We find that next-to-leading order corrections to the hard process are important and must be included in order to correctly constrain the quark and gluon content of the Pomeron from such processes at the LHC.

  8. Prompt photon production in double-Pomeron-exchange events at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, A.K.; Marquet, C.

    2016-01-01

    Within the resolved Pomeron model of hard diffractive scattering, we compute prompt photon production in double-Pomeron-exchange events in proton–proton collisions. Using specific kinematical constraints chosen according to the acceptances of the forward proton detectors of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, we provide estimates for inclusive and isolated photon production. This is done using the JetPhox program. We find that next-to-leading order corrections to the hard process are important and must be included in order to correctly constrain the quark and gluon content of the Pomeron from such processes at the LHC.

  9. Experimental investigation of shock wave diffraction over a single- or double-sphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. T.; Wang, T. H.; Hao, L. N.; Huang, B. Q.; Chen, W. J.; Shi, H. H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the unsteady drag produced by the interaction of a shock wave with a single- and a double-sphere model is measured using imbedded accelerometers. The shock wave is generated in a horizontal circular shock tube with an inner diameter of 200 mm. The effect of the shock Mach number and the dimensionless distance between spheres is investigated. The time-history of the drag coefficient is obtained based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) band-block filtering and polynomial fitting of the measured acceleration. The measured peak values of the drag coefficient, with the associated uncertainty, are reported.

  10. Études par diffraction de fibres de l'ADN double brin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, V. T.; Parrot, I. M.

    2005-11-01

    L'état fibreux est un état naturel pour les molécules de polymère qui ont tendance à adopter des conformations hélicoïdales régulières plutôt que des structures globulaires caractéristiques à de nombreuses protéines. La diffraction de fibres a donc une application étendue pour l'étude d'une grande variété de polymères biologiques et synthétiques. Ce papier a pour objectif d'illustrer l'étendue générale de la méthode et, en particulier, de démontrer l'impact des sources modernes de rayonnement synchrotron et de faisceaux neutroniques.

  11. Production application of injection-molded diffractive elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter P.; Chao, Yvonne Y.; Hines, Kevin P.

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate that transmission kinoforms for visible light applications can be injection molded in acrylic in production volumes. A camera is described that employs molded Fresnel lenses to change the convergence of a projection ranging system. Kinoform surfaces are used in the projection system to achromatize the Fresnel lenses.

  12. Evidence for factorization breaking in diffractive low-Q2 dijet production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    We calculate diffractive dijet production in deep-inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD, including contributions from direct and resolved photons, and compare our predictions to preliminary data from the H1 Collaboration at DESY HERA. In contrast to recent experimental claims, evidence for factorization breaking is found only for resolved, and not direct, photon contributions. No evidence is found for large normalization uncertainties in diffractive parton densities. The results confirm theoretical expectations for the (non)cancellation of soft singularities in diffractive scattering as well as previous results for (almost) real photoproduction

  13. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC)

  14. Characterization of lattice damage in ion implanted silicon: a Monte Carlo simulation combined with double crystal X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cembali, F.; Mazzone, A.M.; Servidori, M.; Gabilli, E.; Lotti, R.

    1985-01-01

    Double crystal X-ray diffractometry is applied to the characterization of damage in silicon samples, irradiated with 60 keV self-ions for doses ranging from 5 x 10 12 cm -2 to the threshold for amorphisation. The samples were also electron beam annealed in such a condition as to give rise to a temperature of 800 0 C. The in-depth strain and atomic disorder distributions, due to the implantation defects, were determined for the specimens before and after high temperature annealing. This was possible by application of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction from imperfect crystals and by taking into account the diffuse (thermal, Compton) scattering accompanying Bragg diffraction intensity measurements. Transmission electron microscopy observations, in conventional (planar) and cross-section mode, were also performed. The results of these analyses were compared with a complex simulation method, designed to account for the physical origin of the disorder. The method consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the damage growth during implantation and of the defect annealing and clustering in a warm lattice. The evolution of disorder is examined either in the phase of spontaneous annealing subsequent to the implantation or during the externally induced annealing. Theory and experiments led to a close characterization of damage in terms of cluster size, type and concentration, both before and after annealing. (author)

  15. Single-diffractive Drell-Yan pair production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccopieri, Federico Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Universite de Liege, IFPA, Liege (Belgium); INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We present predictions for single-diffractive low-mass Drell-Yan pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 13 TeV. Predictions are obtained adopting a factorised form for the relevant cross sections and are based on a new set of diffractive parton distributions resulting from the QCD analysis of combined HERA leading proton data. We discuss a number of observables useful to characterise the expected factorisation breaking effects. (orig.)

  16. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq-barg transition within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. We also rederive the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq-bar transition within the same framework. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as, for two and three jets diffractive production, which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  17. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussarie, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Bât. 210, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS,91405 Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Physics Department, Novosibirsk State University,2 Pirogova street, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Theory division, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics,11 Lavrenteva avenue, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Szymanowski, L. [Theoretical Physics Division, National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ),Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Bât. 210, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS,91405 Orsay (France); UPMC Université Paris 06, Faculté de Physique,4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-09-02

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq-barg transition within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. We also rederive the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq-bar transition within the same framework. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as, for two and three jets diffractive production, which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  18. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature

  19. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussarie, R. [LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Faculté de Physique, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  20. Diffraction-limited 577 nm true-yellow laser by frequency doubling of a tapered diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mathias; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Noordegraaf, Danny; Hansen, Anders K.; Buß, Thomas; Jensen, Ole B.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2018-02-01

    A wide range of laser medical treatments are based on coagulation of blood by absorption of the laser radiation. It has, therefore, always been a goal of these treatments to maximize the ratio of absorption in the blood to that in the surrounding tissue. For this purpose lasers at 577 nm are ideal since this wavelength is at the peak of the absorption in oxygenated hemoglobin. Furthermore, 577 nm has a lower absorption in melanin when compared to green wavelengths (515 - 532 nm), giving it an advantage when treating at greater penetration depth. Here we present a laser system based on frequency doubling of an 1154 nm Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser, emitting 1.1 W of single frequency and diffraction limited yellow light at 577 nm, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 30.5%. The frequency doubling is performed in a single pass configuration using a cascade of two bulk non-linear crystals. The system is power stabilized over 10 hours with a standard deviation of 0.13% and the relative intensity noise is measured to be 0.064 % rms.

  1. Diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in vp andbar ν p chargedcurrent interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV< E v <60 GeV the cross sections for diffractive ρ and diffractive ρπ production are found to be (0.64±0.14 (stat.)±0.08 (syst.))% and (0.28±0.08 (stat.)±0.04 (syst.))% of the charged-current cross section. The diffractive ρπ signal is consistent with being entirely due to diffractive a 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2, x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions.

  2. Single- and central-diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Łuszczak, Marta; Szczurek, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We discuss diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC. The differential cross sections for single- and central-diffractive mechanisms for $c\\bar c$ and $b\\bar b$ pair production are calculated in the framework of the Ingelman-Schlein model corrected for absorption effects. The LO gluon-gluon fusion and quark-antiquark anihilation partonic subprocesses are taken into consideration, which are calculated within standard collinear approximation. The extra corrections from reggeon exchanges are taken into account. The hadronization of charm and bottom quarks is taken into account by means of fragmentation functions. Predictions for single- and central-diffractive production in the case of $D$ and $B$ mesons, as well as $D\\bar D$ pairs are presented, including detector acceptance of the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  3. Diffractive Jet Production in Deep-Inelastic $e^{+}p$ Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of dijet and 3-jet cross sections in low-|t| diffractive deep-inelastic scattering interactions of the type ep -> eXY, where the system X is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low-mass baryonic system Y. Data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.0 pb^(-1), are used to measure hadron level single and double differential cross sections for 44 GeV. The energy flow not attributed to jets is also investigated. The measurements are consistent with a factorising diffractive exchange with trajectory intercept close to 1.2 and tightly constrain the dominating diffractive gluon distribution. Viewed in terms of the diffractive scattering of partonic fluctuations of the photon, the data require the dominance of qqbarg over qqbar states. Soft colour neutralisation models in their present form cannot simultaneously reproduce the shapes and the normalisations of the differential cross sections. Models based on 2-gluon exchange are able to reprod...

  4. Diffractive jet production in deep-inelastic e+p collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of dijet and 3-jet cross sections in low- vertical stroke t vertical stroke diffractive deep-inelastic scattering interactions of the type ep →eXY, where the system X is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low-mass baryonic system Y. Data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.0 pb -1 , are used to measure hadron level single and double differential cross sections for 4 2 2 , x P T,jet >4 GeV. The energy flow not attributed to jets is also investigated. The measurements are consistent with a factorising diffractive exchange with trajectory intercept close to 1.2 and tightly constrain the dominating diffractive gluon distribution. Viewed in terms of the diffractive scattering of partonic fluctuations of the photon, the data require the dominance of qqg over qq states. Soft colour neutralisation models in their present form cannot simultaneously reproduce the shapes and the normalisations of the differential cross sections. Models based on 2-gluon exchange are able to reproduce the shapes of the cross sections at low x P values. (orig.)

  5. Diffractive Production of Jets and Weak Bosons, and Tests of Hard-Scattering Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Alvero, L; Terrón, J; Whitmore, J; Alvero, Lyndon; Collins, John C.; Terron, Juan; Whitmore, Jim

    1999-01-01

    We extract diffractive parton densities from diffractive, deep inelastic (DIS) ep data from the ZEUS experiment. Then we use these fits to predict the diffractive production of jets and of W's and Z's in p\\bar p collisions at the Tevatron. Although the DIS data require a hard quark density in the pomeron, we find fairly low rates for the Tevatron processes (a few percent of the inclusive cross section). This results from the combined effects of Q^{2} evolution and of a normalization of the parton densities to the data. The calculated rates for W production are generally consistent with the preliminary data from the Tevatron. However, the jet data from CDF with a ``Roman pot'' trigger are substantially lower than the results of our calculations; if confirmed, this would signal a breakdown of hard-scattering factorization.

  6. Diffractive open charm production in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Anthonis, T. [Inter-Univ. Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium)]|[Antwerp Univ. (BE)] (and others)

    2006-10-15

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep{yields}eXY where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D{sup *{+-}}(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction ({gamma}p). In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in diffractive DIS and {gamma}p. (orig.)

  7. Diffractive open charm production in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-03-01

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep→eXY where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D*±(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction (γp). In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in diffractive DIS and γp.

  8. Study of the diffractive production of baryon states and search for cryptoexotic baryons with hidden strangeness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatz, M.Ya.; Belyaev, I.M.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Dzyubenko, G.B.; Filimonov, I.M.; Frolov, S.V.; Golovkin, S.V.; Grishkin, Yu.L.; Gritzuk, M.V.; Jilin, A.V.; Kamenskii, A.D.; Kliger, G.K.; Kolganov, V.Z.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Korchagin, Yu.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Kubarovskii, V.P.; Kulman, N.Yu.; Kulyavtsev, A.I.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Kushnirenko, A.E.; Lakaev, V.S.; Landsberg, L.G.; Lebedev, A.A.; Lomkatzi, G.S.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Nilov, A.F.; Novoghilov, Yu.B.; Prutskoi, V.A.; Sitnikov, A.I.; Smolyankin, V.T.; Solyanik, V.I.; Vavilov, D.V.; Victorov, V.A.; Vishnyakov, V.E. (Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation) Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation) Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); SPHINX Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The reactions of baryon diffractive production p + N [yields] (pK[sup +] K[sup -]) + N, p + N [yields] (p[Phi]) + N, p + N [yields] [Lambda](1520) K[sup +] + N and p + N [yields] [Sigma](1385) K[sup +] + N in the 70 GeV proton beam were studied. Very sensitive upper limits for the production cross sections of heavy narrow cryptoexotic baryon resonances with hidden strangeness were obtained. (orig.)

  9. Study of the diffractive production of baryon states and search for cryptoexotic baryons with hidden strangeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatz, M.Ya.; Belyaev, I.M.; Dorofeev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions of baryon diffractive production p + N → (pK + K - ) + N, p + N → (pφ) + N, p + N → [Λ(1520)K + ] + N and p + N → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + N in the 70 GeV proton beam were studied. Very sensitive upper limits for the production cross sections of heavy narrow cryptoexotic baryon resonances with hidden strangeness were obtained

  10. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2015-05-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e ± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb -1 . The measurement was performed for γ * -p centre-of-mass energies in the range 9025 GeV 2 . Energy and transverse-energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β=x/x P , x is the Bjorken variable and x P is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ * -dijet plane and the γ * -e ± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  11. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Gueta, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Schmidke, W.B.; Verbytskyi, A.; Adamczyk, L.; Gach, G.; Guzik, M.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M.; Adamus, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Iudin, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Trofymov, A.; Viazlo, O.; Zakharchuk, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Dolinska, G.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Hain, W.; Januschek, F.; Klein, U.; Korol, I.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Libov, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Myronenko, V.; Notz, D.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Stefaniuk, N.; Szuba, J.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.; Wolf, G.; Zenaiev, O.; Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Brock, I.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Paul, E.; Brook, N.H.; Wing, M.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Bruni, A.; Corradi, M.; Bussey, P.J.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Capua, M.; Schioppa, M.; Tassi, E.; Catterall, C.D.; Chwastowski, J.; Figiel, J.; Krupa, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Perlanski, W.; Tomaszewska, J.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Walczak, R.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Zotkin, D.S.; Foster, B.; Gallo, E.; Klanner, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Turcato, M.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Hori, R.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Kuze, M.; Nobe, T.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Ruspa, M.; Shyrma, Yu.; Zhmak, N.; Solano, A.; Tsurugai, T.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e ± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector atHERAusing an integrated luminosity of 372 pb -1 . The measurement was performed for γ* - p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90 < W < 250 GeV and for photon virtualities Q 2 > 25 GeV 2 . Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β = x/x P , x is the Bjorken variable and x P is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ*-dijet plane and the γ*-e ± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange. (orig.)

  12. Diffractive production of p-mesons and of pπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in νp and anti νp charged-current interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV ν 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2 , x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of D* production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Jung, A.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Cerny, K.; Jansova, M.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [Irfu/SPP, CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS, Rez (Czech Republic); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A. [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Grab, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perez, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Polifka, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Radescu, V. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Information Transmission Problems RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Sauvan, E. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Shushkevich, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (Italy); INFN Roma 3, Rome (Italy); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Tseepeldorj, B. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Ulaanbaatar University, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Measurements of D*(2010) meson production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering (5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2}) are presented which are based on HERA data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy √(s) = 319 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 287 pb{sup -1}. The reaction ep → eXY is studied, where the system X, containing at least one D*(2010) meson, is separated from a leading low-mass proton dissociative system Y by a large rapidity gap. The kinematics of D* candidates are reconstructed in the D* → Kππ decay channel. The measured cross sections compare favourably with next-to-leading order QCD predictions, where charm quarks are produced via boson-gluon fusion. The charm quarks are then independently fragmented to the D* mesons. The calculations rely on the collinear factorisation theorem and are based on diffractive parton densities previously obtained by H1 from fits to inclusive diffractive cross sections. The data are further used to determine the diffractive to inclusive D* production ratio in deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  14. Diffractive Open Charm Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truoel, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep -> eX Y where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D*(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction. In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in...

  15. Neutron diffraction studies of a double-crystal ( plus n,-m) setting containing a fully asymmetric diffraction geometry (FAD) of a bent perfect crystal (BPC)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav; Šaroun, Jan; Em, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 32, Supl-1 (2017), s. 13-18 ISSN 0885-7156 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC16-08803J; GA MŠk LM2015048 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron diffraction * monochromator * bent perfect crystal Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.674, year: 2016

  16. X-ray diffraction study of slags forming during corrosion resistant steel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavov, V.I.; Zadorozhnaya, V.N.; Shurygina, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    Using X-ray diffraction analysis slags, forming during corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T grade steel production by two flowsheets, are studied. Standard two-slag technology of steel production does not provide efficient disintegration of chromospinelides in slags, gives high steel contamination with respect to nonmetallic impurities, coarse structure and, as a consequence, presence of macrodefects on rolled products surface. One-slag steel melting technology with titanium alloying of the steel at vacuum causes fast removal of chromospinelides at the beginning of reduction period, promotes titanium absorption by the steel, refines nonmetallic inclusions, provides more fine structure and steel plasticity, removes surface defects

  17. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  18. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Double-differential heavy-ion production cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T. M.; Townsend, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Current computational tools used for space or accelerator shielding studies transport energetic heavy ions either using a one-dimensional straight-ahead approximation or by dissociating the nuclei into protons and neutrons and then performing neutron and proton transport using Monte Carlo techniques. Although the heavy secondary particles generally travel close to the beam direction, a proper treatment of the light ions produced in these reactions requires that double-differential cross sections should be utilised. Unfortunately, no fundamental nuclear model capable of serving as an event generator to provide these cross sections for all ions and energies of interest exists currently. Herein, we present a model for producing double-differential heavy-ion production cross sections that uses heavy-ion fragmentation yields produced by the NUCFRG2 fragmentation code coupled with a model of energy degradation in nucleus-nucleus collisions and systematics of momentum distributions to provide energy and angular dependences of the heavy-ion production. (authors)

  20. Diffraction production of tagged Bdo Beams to search for mixing and rare decay modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    The expected large cross section for (Σ b antiB d o ) diffractive production can be used to obtain an intense beam of pure B d o mesons. We review the search for mixing in the B s o system from the UA1 experiment and comment on the need for B d o beams to search for mixing in this system as well. 6 refs

  1. Measurement of D* production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Reimer, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-14, č. článku 340. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : diffractive deep inelastic scattering * charm meson production * boson-gluon fusion * next-to- leading order QCD Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  2. Di-jet production by double pomeron exchange in CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, M.G.

    1998-05-01

    We have studied events with a high-x F antiproton and two central jets with E T > 7 GeV in CDF, in p anti p collisions at √s = 1800 GeV. We find an excess of events with a rapidity gap at least 3.5 units wide in the proton direction, which we interpret as di-jet production in double pomeron exchange events

  3. Structural and microstructural changes during anion exchange of CoAl layered double hydroxides: an in situ X-ray powder diffraction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Krumeich, Frank; Norby, Poul

    2010-01-01

    Anion-exchange processes in cobalt-aluminium layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The processes investigated were CoAl-CO3 CoAl-Cl CoAl-CO3, CoAl-Cl CoAl-NO3 and CoAl-CO3 CoAl-SO4. The XRPD data show that the CoAl-CO3 CoAl-Cl process...

  4. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Gueta, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Schmidke, W.B.; Verbytskyi, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Gach, G.; Guzik, M.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Tymieniecka, T. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Antonelli, S. [University, Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Aushev, V. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); Aushev, Y.; Iudin, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Trofymov, A.; Viazlo, O.; Zakharchuk, N. [National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Dolinska, G.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Hain, W.; Januschek, F.; Klein, U.; Korol, I.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Libov, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Myronenko, V.; Notz, D.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Stefaniuk, N.; Szuba, J.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.; Wolf, G.; Zenaiev, O. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L. [INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Bloch, I. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O. [Institute of Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education and Science of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Brock, I.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Paul, E. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brook, N.H.; Wing, M. [University College London, Physics and Astronomy Department, London (United Kingdom); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Univ., Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Bruni, A.; Corradi, M. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bussey, P.J.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Capua, M.; Schioppa, M.; Tassi, E. [Calabria University, Physics Department, Cosenza (Italy); INFN, Cosenza (Italy); Catterall, C.D. [York University, Department of Physics, Ontario (Canada); Chwastowski, J.; Figiel, J.; Krupa, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Perlanski, W.; Tomaszewska, J.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Walczak, R. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Corriveau, F. [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dementiev, R.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Zotkin, D.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Foster, B.; Gallo, E.; Klanner, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Turcato, M. [Hamburg University, Institute of Experimental Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Hochman, D.; Karshon, U. [Weizmann Institute, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Hori, R.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Ibrahim, Z.A.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T. [Universiti Malaya, National Centre for Particle Physics, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Iga, Y. [Polytechnic University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishitsuka, M.; Kuze, M.; Nobe, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tokyo (JP); Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (IN); Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W. [Jagellonian University, Department of Physics, Krakow (PL); Ruspa, M. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (IT); INFN, Turin (IT); Shyrma, Yu.; Zhmak, N. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (UA); Solano, A. [Universita di Torino (IT); INFN, Turin (IT); Tsurugai, T. [Meiji Gakuin University, Faculty of General Education, Yokohama (JP); Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-01-15

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e{sup ±}p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector atHERAusing an integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed for γ* - p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90 < W < 250 GeV and for photon virtualities Q{sup 2} > 25 GeV{sup 2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β = x/x{sub P}, x is the Bjorken variable and x{sub P} is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ*-dijet plane and the γ*-e{sup ±} plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange. (orig.)

  5. D* Meson Production in Deep-Inelastic Diffractive Interactions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Becker, J.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boehme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the cross section for D* meson production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering for the first time at HERA. The cross section is given for the process ep -> eXY, where the system X contains at least one D* meson and is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low mass proton remnant system Y. The cross section is presented in the diffractive deep-inelastic region defined by 2 2 GeV and |\\eta_D* | < 1.5. The cross section is found to be 246+-54+-56 pb and forms about 6% of the corresponding inclusive D* cross section. The cross section is presented as a function of various kinematic variables, including z_pom^obs which is an estimate of the fraction of the momentum of the diffractive exchange carried by the parton entering the hard-subprocess. The data show a large component of the cross section at low z_pom^obs where the contribution of the Boson-Gluon-Fusion process is expected to dominate. The data are compared with several QCD--based calculations.

  6. Can we discover double Higgs production at the LHC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandre; Ghosh, Tathagata; Sinha, Kuver

    2017-08-01

    We explore double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the b b ¯γ γ channel at the high-luminosity LHC using machine learning tools. We first propose a Bayesian optimization approach to select cuts on kinematic variables, obtaining a 30%-50% increase in the significance compared to current results in the literature. We show that this improvement persists once systematic uncertainties are taken into account. We next use boosted decision trees (BDT) to further discriminate signal and background events. Our analysis shows that a joint optimization of kinematic cuts and BDT hyperparameters results in an appreciable improvement in the significance. Finally, we perform a multivariate analysis of the output scores of the BDT. We find that assuming a very low level of systematics, the techniques proposed here will be able to confirm the production of a pair of standard model Higgs bosons at 5 σ level with 3 ab-1 of data. Assuming a more realistic projection of the level of systematics, around 10%, the optimization of cuts to train BDTs combined with a multivariate analysis delivers a respectable significance of 4.6 σ . Even assuming large systematics of 20%, our analysis predicts a 3.6 σ significance, which represents at least strong evidence in favor of double Higgs production. We carefully incorporate background contributions coming from light flavor jets or c jets being misidentified as b jets and jets being misidentified as photons in our analysis.

  7. Double elementary Goldstone Higgs boson production in future linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yue, Chong-Xing; Liu, Zhi-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    The Elementary Goldstone Higgs (EGH) model is a perturbative extension of the Standard Model (SM), which identifies the EGH boson as the observed Higgs boson. In this paper, we study pair production of the EGH boson in future linear electron positron colliders. The cross-sections in the TeV region can be changed to about ‑27%, 163% and ‑34% for the e+e‑→ Zhh, e+e‑→ νν¯hh and e+e‑→ tt¯hh processes with respect to the SM predictions, respectively. According to the expected measurement precisions, such correction effects might be observed in future linear colliders. In addition, we compare the cross-sections of double SM-like Higgs boson production with the predictions in other new physics models.

  8. Scattering, diffraction and multiparticle production on hadron and nuclei at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.; Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for different types of interactions of hadronic with hadrons and nuclei at high energy are obtained in the simple form in the supercritical pomeron theory. Diffraction desintegration (DD) of hadrons both in the intermediate states, between rescatterings on pomerons, and in the final states is taken into account. With the same accuracy the cross sections δ n for production of n pomeron jets on hadrons and nuclei are also obtained. They determine the whole dynamics of the multiple particle productions, i.e. the spectra and multiplicities of produced particles, the cross sections for DD of colliding hadrons and nucleons inside the target nuclei. The numerical results for δ tot , δ el and for dδ el /dp tr 2 with the set of the pomeron and f, ω-reggeons pole parameters obtained early are presented. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  9. An X-ray diffraction study of corrosion products from low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    It was found in earlier work a decrease in the corrosion rate from low carbon steel when it was subjected to the action of a combined pollutant concentration (SO 4 ''2-=10''-4 M+Cl=1.5x 10''-3 M). It was also found that large magnetic content of the rust was related to higher corrosion rates. In the present study corrosion products are further analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction to account for composition changes during the corrosion process. it is found that lepidocrocite and goethite are the dominant components for the short-term corrosion in all batches considered while for log-term corrosion lepidocrite and goethite dominates if the corrosion rates is low and magnetite dominates if the corrosion rate is high. The mechanism for decreasing the corrosion rate is related to the inhibition of magnetite production at this particular concentration. (Author) 15 refs

  10. Diffraction based overlay and image based overlay on production flow for advanced technology node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancquaert, Yoann; Dezauzier, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    One of the main challenges for lithography step is the overlay control. For the advanced technology node like 28nm and 14nm, the overlay budget becomes very tight. Two overlay techniques compete in our advanced semiconductor manufacturing: the Diffraction based Overlay (DBO) with the YieldStar S200 (ASML) and the Image Based Overlay (IBO) with ARCHER (KLA). In this paper we will compare these two methods through 3 critical production layers: Poly Gate, Contact and first metal layer. We will show the overlay results of the 2 techniques, explore the accuracy and compare the total measurement uncertainty (TMU) for the standard overlay targets of both techniques. We will see also the response and impact for the Image Based Overlay and Diffraction Based Overlay techniques through a process change like an additional Hardmask TEOS layer on the front-end stack. The importance of the target design is approached; we will propose more adapted design for image based targets. Finally we will present embedded targets in the 14 FDSOI with first results.

  11. Double vector meson production in the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C.P. 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we study double vector meson production in γγ interactions at high energies and estimate, using the color dipole picture, the main observables which can be probed at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The total γ(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}) + γ(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}) → V{sub 1} + V{sub 2} cross sections for V{sub i} = ρ, J/ψ, and Υ are computed and the energy and virtuality dependencies are studied in detail. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analysis of this process is feasible at the ILC and it can be useful to constrain the QCD dynamics at high energies. (orig.)

  12. Diffractive baryon production and the relation between reggeon and photon couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Gault, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The authors illustrate how one can employ the γ-analogy hypothesis, introduced in a previous paper, which relates the couplings of the leading natural-parity reggeon exchanges, P, f and ω, to those of the isoscalar part of the photon. It enables the prediction of the differential cross sections for the diffractive processes pp→pN*(5/2 + ,1688), N*(3/2 - ,1520), and N*(7/2 - ,2190) starting from Regge fits to pp elastic scattering, with just a single free parameter in each case. This success stems from an intimate relation between electromagnetic and hadronic couplings demanded by duality, scaling and vector dominance. Dips due to pole-cut interference in the N* production differential cross sections are not expected because of their more complicated helicity structure. (Auth.)

  13. Effects of dynamic diffraction conditions on magnetic parameter determination in a double perovskite Sr_2FeMoO_6 using electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.C.; Zhong, X.Y.; Jin, L.; Chen, X.F.; Moritomo, Y.; Mayer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) spectroscopy, which is similar to the well-established X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), can determine the quantitative magnetic parameters of materials with high spatial resolution. One of the major obstacles in quantitative analysis using the EMCD technique is the relatively poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compared to XMCD. Here, in the example of a double perovskite Sr_2FeMoO_6, we predicted the optimal dynamical diffraction conditions such as sample thickness, crystallographic orientation and detection aperture position by theoretical simulations. By using the optimized conditions, we showed that the SNR of experimental EMCD spectra can be significantly improved and the error of quantitative magnetic parameter determined by EMCD technique can be remarkably lowered. Our results demonstrate that, with enhanced SNR, the EMCD technique can be a unique tool to understand the structure-property relationship of magnetic materials particularly in the high-density magnetic recording and spintronic devices by quantitatively determining magnetic structure and properties at the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • We demonstrate how to choose the optimal experimental conditions by using dynamical diffraction calculations in Sr_2FeMoO_6. • With optimized diffraction conditions, the signal-to-noise ratio of experimental EMCD spectra has been significantly improved. • We have determined orbital to spin magnetic moment ratio of Sr_2FeMoO_6 quantitatively. • We have discussed the effects of dynamical diffraction conditions on the error bar of quantitative magnetic parameters.

  14. Production of haploids and doubled haploids in oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croxford Adam E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oil palm is the world's most productive oil-food crop despite yielding well below its theoretical maximum. This maximum could be approached with the introduction of elite F1 varieties. The development of such elite lines has thus far been prevented by difficulties in generating homozygous parental types for F1 generation. Results Here we present the first high-throughput screen to identify spontaneously-formed haploid (H and doubled haploid (DH palms. We secured over 1,000 Hs and one DH from genetically diverse material and derived further DH/mixoploid palms from Hs using colchicine. We demonstrated viability of pollen from H plants and expect to generate 100% homogeneous F1 seed from intercrosses between DH/mixoploids once they develop female inflorescences. Conclusions This study has generated genetically diverse H/DH palms from which parental clones can be selected in sufficient numbers to enable the commercial-scale breeding of F1 varieties. The anticipated step increase in productivity may help to relieve pressure to extend palm cultivation, and limit further expansion into biodiverse rainforest.

  15. High production of wheat double haploids via anther culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondić-Šipka Ankica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgenous and regeneration abilities of 14 randomly selected F1 hybrids of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. were analyzed. Anthers were grown in vitro on a modified Potato-2 inductive medium. The hybrid NS111-95/Ana had the highest average values for androgenous capacity (33% and callus yield (119%, while the hybrid NS 92-250/Tiha had the lowest values for these traits (9 and 21%, respectively. Seven genotypes (50% had a frequency of green plants relative to the number of isolated anthers of over 10%, with the highest frequency of 21.3% (NS111-95/Sremica. This hybrid produced 12.8 doubled haploid (DH lines per spike used for isolation. In the other genotypes, the number of produced DH lines per spike ranged from 1 (30­Sc.Smoc.88-89/Hays-2 to 11.2 (NS111-95/Ana. As half of the randomly selected genotypes exhibited high green plant regeneration ability and a high production of DH lines per spike, it can be concluded that in vitro anther culture can be successfully used in breeding programs for rapid production of homozygous wheat lines.

  16. Double diffractive {rho} -production in {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *} collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT, Palaiseau (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Wallon, S. [Universite Paris-Sud, LPT, Orsay (France)

    2005-12-01

    We present a first estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive process {gamma}{sup *}{sub L}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sup *}{sub L}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}){yields}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}, which will be studied in the future high energy e{sup +} e{sup -}-linear collider. As a first step, we calculate the Born order approximation of the amplitude for longitudinally polarized virtual photons and mesons, in the kinematical region s >>-t, Q{sub 1}{sup 2}, Q{sub 2}{sup 2}. This process is completely calculable in the hard region Q{sub 1}{sup 2}, Q{sub 2}{sup 2}>>{lambda}{sup 2}{sub QCD}. We perform most of the steps in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q{sub 1}{sup 2} and Q{sub 2}{sup 2} in the range of a few GeV{sup 2}. (orig.)

  17. Tests of QCD factorisation in the diffractive production of dijets in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-08-01

    Measurements are presented of differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction (Q2<0.01 GeV2) and deep-inelastic scattering processes (DIS, 4diffractive parton densities previously obtained from a QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS cross sections by H1. In DIS, the dijet data are well described, supporting the validity of QCD factorisation. The diffractive DIS dijet data are more sensitive to the diffractive gluon density at high fractional parton momentum than the measurements of inclusive diffractive DIS. In photoproduction, the predicted dijet cross section has to be multiplied by a factor of approximately 0.5 for both direct and resolved photon interactions to describe the measurements. The ratio of measured dijet cross section to NLO prediction in photoproduction is a factor 0.5±0.1 smaller than the same ratio in DIS. This suppression is the first clear observation of QCD hard scattering factorisation breaking at HERA. The measurements are also compared to the two soft colour neutralisation models SCI and GAL. The SCI model describes diffractive dijet production in DIS but not in photoproduction. The GAL model fails in both kinematic regions.

  18. Single-diffractive production of charmed mesons at the LHC within the k{sub t}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łuszczak, Marta [University of Rzeszów,PL-35-959 Rzeszów (Poland); Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni; Trzebiński, Maciej [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN,PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-16

    We discuss the single-diffractive production of cc̄ pairs and charmed mesons at the LHC. For a first time we propose a k{sub t}-factorization approach to the diffractive processes. The transverse momentum dependent diffractive parton distributions are obtained from standard (collinear) diffractive parton distributions used in the literature. In this calculation the transverse momentum of the pomeron is neglected with respect to transverse momentum of partons entering the hard process. We also perform a first evaluation of the cross sections at the LHC using the diffractive transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. The results of the new approach are compared with those of the standard collinear one. Significantly larger cross sections are obtained in the k{sub t}-factorization approach in which some parts of higher-order effects is effectively included. The differences between corresponding differential distributions are discussed. Finally, we present a feasibility study of the process at the LHC using proton tagging technique. The analysis suggests that the measurement of single-diffractive charm production is possible using ATLAS and CMS/TOTEM detectors.

  19. X-rays diffraction characterization of corrosion products transported by secondary side of a CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, A.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.

    2016-01-01

    To verify the chemistry of secondary side of CANDU steam generators, Millipore filters are used to sampling from condensing extraction pump, from feed water header and blow down of steam generator. These filters retain the corrosion products as very fine particles and are used as samples in chemistry water control. X-Ray diffraction technique is the able to distinguish the different crystallographic compounds present in oxide films deposited on the Millipore filters and gives information referring to the nature of corrosion products transported in secondary side. The XRD analysis has identified the following substance in deposited layer: magnetite (Fe_3O_4), hematite (Fe_2O_3), and iron oxide hydroxide (FeOOH). By optical microscopy it was observed a brown-reddish background specific to hematite and iron oxide hydroxide, especially for filters extracted from condensing extraction pump. The black colour of crud present on filters extracted from feed water header and blow down of steam generator shows the presence of magnetite. (authors)

  20. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisohara, N.; Suzuki, H.; Akita, K.; Kasahara, N.

    2012-01-01

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  1. Electronic interaction in an outer-sphere mixed-valence double salt: a polarized neutron diffraction study of K(3)(MnO(4))(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Roderick D; Jayasooriya, Upali A; Tilford, Claire; Anson, Christopher E; Sowrey, Frank E; Rosseinsky, David R; Stride, John A; Tasset, Francis; Ressouche, Eric; White, Ross P; Ballou, Rafik

    2004-11-01

    The mixed-valence double salt K(3)(MnO(4))(2) crystallizes in space group P2(1)/m with Z = 2. The manganese centers Mn1 and Mn2 constitute discrete "permanganate", [Mn(VII)O(4)](-), and "manganate", [Mn(VI)O(4)](2-), ions, respectively. There is a spin-ordering transition to an antiferromagnetic state at ca. T = 5 K. The spin-density distribution in the paramagnetic phase at T = 10 K has been determined by polarized neutron diffraction, confirming that unpaired spin is largely confined to the nominal manganate ion Mn2. Through use of both Fourier refinement and maximum entropy methods, the spin on Mn1 is estimated as 1.75 +/- 1% of one unpaired electron with an upper limit of 2.5%.

  2. Factorization and non-factorization in diffractive hard scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berera, Arjun

    1997-01-01

    Factorization, in the sense defined for inclusive hard scattering, is discussed for diffractive hard scattering. A factorization theorem similar to its inclusive counterpart is presented for diffractive DIS. For hadron-hadron diffractive hard scattering, in contrast to its inclusive counterpart, the expected breakdown of factorization is discussed. Cross section estimates are given from a simple field theory model for non-factorizing double-pomeron-exchange (DPE) dijet production with and without account for Sudakov suppression

  3. Possibility of gravitational wave detector production on the base of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational wave detector based on the light diffraction is proposed. Under the gravitation wave incidence on an elastic rod standing acoustic oscillations are excited in it, which are then used as a diffraction grating for the light scattering. A detailed mathematical analysis of this detector is given. 1 ref

  4. Crystallography of waxes - an electron diffraction study of refined and natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure of four waxes has been investigated by electron crystallography. Two of these waxes, including a refined petroleum product (Gulfwax) and a material from lignite (montan wax), form well ordered crystals and their structure could be solved quantitatively from the observed 0022-3727/30/3/018/img1 diffraction patterns. As also found previously for simpler binary n-paraffin solid solutions, the average structure resembles that of a pure paraffin (e.g. n-0022-3727/30/3/018/img2) but with a Gaussian distribution of atomic occupancies near the chain ends to account for the statistical distribution of chain lengths within a lamella. Two other waxes from living organisms, South African bee honeycomb and the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba palm, are much less ordered, even though they share the same methylene subcell packing of the most crystalline parts of the previous materials. It appears that these waxes cannot fully separate into distinct lamellae, perhaps due to the presence of very long `tie' molecules, and are therefore `frustrated' crystal structures.

  5. Ferromagnetic interaction in an asymmetric end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) dinuclear complex: a combined structure, magnetic, polarized neutron diffraction and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Christophe; Jeanneau, Erwann; El Moll, Hani; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Goujon, Antoine; Cousson, Alain; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Robert, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    A new end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) complex [Cu(2)L(2)(N(3))2] (1) was synthesized and characterized (L=1,1,1-trifluoro-7-(dimethylamino)-4-methyl-5-aza-3-hepten-2-onato). Despite the rather long Cu-Cu distance (5.105(1) A), the magnetic interaction is ferromagnetic with J= +16 cm(-1) (H=-JS(1)S(2)), a value that has been confirmed by DFT and high-level correlated ab initio calculations. The spin distribution was studied by using the results from polarized neutron diffraction. This is the first such study on an end-to-end system. The experimental spin density was found to be localized mainly on the copper(II) ions, with a small degree of delocalization on the ligand (L) and terminal azido nitrogens. There was zero delocalization on the central nitrogen, in agreement with DFT calculations. Such a picture corresponds to an important contribution of the d(x2-y2) orbital and a small population of the d(z2) orbital, in agreement with our calculations. Based on a correlated wavefunction analysis, the ferromagnetic behavior results from a dominant double spin polarization contribution and vanishingly small ionic forms.

  6. Doubled haploid production in Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Bohus; Zácková, Zuzana; Samaj, Jozef; Pretová, Anna

    2009-01-01

    There is a requirement of haploid and double haploid material and homozygous lines for cell culture studies and breeding in flax. Anther culture is currently the most successful method producing doubled haploid lines in flax. Recently, ovary culture was also described as a good source of doubled haploids. In this review we focus on tissue and plants regeneration using anther culture, and cultivation of ovaries containing unfertilized ovules. The effect of genotype, physiological status of donor plants, donor material pre-treatment and cultivation conditions for flax anthers and ovaries is discussed here. The process of plant regeneration from anther and ovary derived calli is also in the focus of this review. Attention is paid to the ploidy level of regenerated tissue and to the use of molecular markers for determining of gametic origin of flax plants derived from anther and ovary cultures. Finally, some future prospects on the use of doubled haploids in flax biotechnology are outlined here.

  7. Diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  8. Unraveling double stranded alpha-helical coiled coils: an x-ray diffraction study on hard alpha-keratin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, L; Doucet, J; Briki, F

    2001-04-15

    Transformations of proteins secondary and tertiary structures are generally studied in globular proteins in solution. In fibrous proteins, such as hard alpha-keratin, that contain long and well-defined double stranded alpha-helical coiled coil domains, such study can be directly done on the native fibrous tissue. In order to assess the structural behavior of the coiled coil domains under an axial mechanical stress, wide angle x-ray scattering and small angle x-ray scattering experiments have been carried out on stretched horse hair fibers at relative humidity around 30%. Our observations of the three major axial spacings as a function of the applied macroscopic strain have shown two rates. Up to 4% macroscopic strain the coiled coils were slightly distorted but retained their overall conformation. Above 4% the proportion of coiled coil domains progressively decreased. The main and new result of our study is the observation of the transition from alpha-helical coiled coils to disordered chains instead of the alpha-helical coiled coil to beta-sheet transition that occurs in wet fibers.

  9. Survival probability for diffractive dijet production in p anti p collisions from next-to-leading order calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasen, M.; Kramer, G.

    2009-08-01

    We perform next-to-leading order calculations of the single-diffractive and non-diffractive cross sections for dijet production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. By comparing their ratio to the data published by the CDF collaboration for two different center-of-mass energies, we deduce the rapidity-gap survival probability as a function of the momentum fraction of the parton in the antiproton. Assuming Regge factorization, this probability can be interpreted as a suppression factor for the diffractive structure function measured in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA. In contrast to the observations for photoproduction, the suppression factor in protonantiproton collisions depends on the momentum fraction of the parton in the Pomeron even at next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  10. New applications of Boson's coherent states of double modes at regular product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongde; Ren Yong

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a series of new applications of boson's coherent states of double modes by means of the technique of regular products. They include non-coupled double oscillator solutions at two time dependent extra-sources; coupled double oscillator solutions at two time dependent extra-sources; some applications to regular momentum theory; an explicit expression for time-reversal operator. (author). 7 refs

  11. Diffractive Dijet Production with a Leading Proton in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2015-05-11

    The cross section of the diffractive process e^+p -> e^+Xp is measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction with photon virtualities Q^2 <2 GeV^2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV^2diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering.

  12. Measurement of Dijet Production in Diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering with a Leading Proton at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.

    2012-04-18

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep \\rightarrow eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss xIP < 0.1 and covers the range 0.1 < |t| < 0.7 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 < Q2 < 110 GeV2 in photon virtuality. The differential cross sections extrapolated to |t| < 1 GeV2 are in agreement with next-toleading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models.

  13. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Placakyte, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2012-01-01

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep→eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x P 2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 2 2 in photon virtuality. The differential cross sections extrapolated to vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 are in agreement with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  14. Diffractive dijet production with a leading proton in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.

    2014-12-01

    The cross section of the diffractive process e + p→e + Xp is measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction with photon virtualities Q 2 <2 GeV 2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV 2 diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering.

  15. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Univ. of Belgrade, Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)] [and others

    2012-04-15

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep{yields}eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x{sub P}<0.1 and covers the range 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  16. Diffractive dijet production with a leading proton in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlebcik, Radek

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the diffractive process e + p → e + Xp is measured at a centre-of mass energies of 319 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction defined by photon virtualities Q 2 < 2 GeV 2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV 2 < Q 2 < 80 GeV 2 . The results are compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations based on diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. A collinear QCD factorization theorem is tested against the measured cross sections and their ratios.

  17. Diffractive {rho} production with an AdS/QCD holographic wavefunction for the {rho} meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forshaw, Jeff [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sandapen, Ruben [Universite de Moncton, Moncton, N-B, E1A 3E9 (Canada) and Mount Allison University, Sackville, N-B, E46 1E6 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    We report on the results of our recent research published in [1] that shows that AdS/QCD generates predictions for the rate of diffractive {rho}-meson electroproduction that are in agreement with data collected at the HERA electron-proton collider [2, 3]. Preliminary results of this research were presented in [4].

  18. Diffractive ρ production with an AdS/QCD holographic wavefunction for the ρ meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forshaw, Jeff; Sandapen, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    We report on the results of our recent research published in [1] that shows that AdS/QCD generates predictions for the rate of diffractive ρ-meson electroproduction that are in agreement with data collected at the HERA electron-proton collider [2, 3]. Preliminary results of this research were presented in [4].

  19. Phase inversion and frequency doubling of reflection high-energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations in the layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhangwen; Guo, Wei; Ji, Dianxiang; Zhang, Tianwei; Gu, Chenyi; Tang, Chao; Gu, Zhengbin; Nie*, Yuefeng; Pan, Xiaoqing

    In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and its intensity oscillations are extremely important for the growth of epitaxial thin films with atomic precision. The RHEED intensity oscillations of complex oxides are, however, rather complicated and a general model is still lacking. Here, we report the unusual phase inversion and frequency doubling of RHEED intensity oscillations observed in the layer-by-layer growth of SrTiO3 using oxide molecular beam epitaxy. In contacts to the common understanding that the maximum(minimum) intensity occurs at SrO(TiO2) termination, respectively, we found that both maximum or minimum intensities can occur at SrO, TiO2, or even incomplete terminations depending on the incident angle of the electron beam, which raises a fundamental question if one can rely on the RHEED intensity oscillations to precisely control the growth of thin films. A general model including surface roughness and termination dependent mean inner potential qualitatively explains the observed phenomena, and provides the answer to the question how to prepare atomically and chemically precise surface/interfaces using RHEED oscillations for complex oxides. We thank National Basic Research Program of China (No. 11574135, 2015CB654901) and the National Thousand-Young-Talents Program.

  20. Double Regge pole exchange model analysis of a 7 Gev/c. pi. /sup -/p experiment. [Absolute cross sections, one-particle exchange, diffraction scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A C.L.

    1973-01-01

    A double Regge Pole Exchange Model is used to analyze Quasi-Three-Body final states selected from a 7 GeV/c - /sup -/p experiment. Three sets of data are analyzed namely: I ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. p..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/; II ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. p..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/; III ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/n. The final states, selected from data sets I, II and III are (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/p, f/sup 0/..pi../sup -/p, ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup + +/), (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup +/, rho/sup -/..pi..-..delta../sup + +/, ..omega pi../sup -/p) and (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup +/), respectively. It is found that these channels after appropriate kinematic cuts can be well described by exchanging two Regge Trajectories. Predictions for the absolute cross-sections were also obtained by taking limits of one particle exchange and a diffraction scattering approximation. (auth)

  1. Stacking Faults and Polytypes for Layered Double Hydroxides: What Can We Learn from Simulated and Experimental X-ray Powder Diffraction Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławiński, Wojciech A; Sjåstad, Anja Olafsen; Fjellvåg, Helmer

    2016-12-19

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) are a broad group of widely studied materials. The layered character of those materials and their high flexibility for accommodating different metals and anions make them technologically interesting. The general formula for the LDH compound is [M 1-x II M x III (OH) 2 ][A n- ] x/n ·mH 2 O, where M II is a divalent metal cation which can be substituted by M III trivalent cation, and A n- is a charge compensating anion located between positively charged layers. In this paper we present a comprehensive study on possible structural disorder in LDH. We show how X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) can be used to reveal important features of the LDH crystal structure such as stacking faults, random interlayer shifts, anion-molecule orientation, crystal water content, distribution of interlayer distances, and also LDH slab thickness. All calculations were performed using the Discus package, which gives a better flexibility in defining stacking fault sequences, simulating and refining XRPD patterns, relative to DIFFaX, DIFFaX+, and FAULTS. Finally, we show how the modeling can be applied to two LDH samples: Ni 0.67 Cr 0.33 (OH) 2 (CO 3 ) 0.16 ·mH 2 O (3D structure) and Mg 0.67 Al 0.33 (OH) 2 (NO 3 ) 0.33 (2D layered structure).

  2. Production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the allergen Can f 2 from Canis familiaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Nilsson, Ola B.; Jönsson, Klas; Grönlund, Hans; Achour, Adnane

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant form of the allergen Can f 2 from C. familiaris was produced, isolated and crystallized in two different forms. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses are reported for the two crystal forms of Can f 2. The allergen Can f 2 from dog (Canis familiaris) present in saliva, dander and fur is an important cause of allergic sensitization worldwide. Here, the production, isolation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two crystal forms of recombinant Can f 2 are reported. The first crystal form belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 77.3, c = 65.1 Å, and diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution, while the second crystal form belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.7, b = 48.3, c = 68.7 Å, β = 126.5°, and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. Preliminary data analysis indicated the presence of a single molecule in the asymmetric unit for both crystal forms

  3. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-09-15

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep{yields}eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x{sub P}<0.1 and covers the range 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  4. Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-06-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

  5. Double-Sided Laser Heating in Radial Diffraction Geometry for Diamond Anvil Cell Deformation Experiments at Simultaneous High Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, L. M.; Kunz, M.; Couper, S.; Lin, F.; Yan, J.; Doran, A.; MacDowell, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of rocks and minerals in the Earth's deep interior plays a primary role in controlling large scale geodynamic processes such as mantle convection and slab subduction. Plastic deformation resulting from these processes can lead to texture development and associated seismic anisotropy. If a detailed understanding of the link between deformation and seismic anisotropy is established, observations of seismic anisotropy can be used to understand the dynamic state in the deep Earth. However, performing deformation experiments at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions are extremely challenging. Thus most deformation studies have been performed either at room temperature and high pressure or at reduced pressures and high temperature. Only a few extraordinary efforts have attained pressures and temperatures relevant to lower mantle. Therefore our ability to interpret observations of lower mantle seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow models remains limited. In order to expand the pressure and temperature range available for deformation of deep Earth relevant mineral phases, we have developed a laser heating system for in-situ double-sided heating in radial diffraction geometry at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This allows texture and lattice strain measurements to be recorded at simultaneous high pressures and temperatures in the diamond anvil cell. This new system is integrated into the newly built axial laser heating system to allow for rapid and reliable transitioning between double-sided laser heating in axial and radial geometries. Transitioning to radial geometry is accomplished by redirecting the laser and imaging paths from 0° and 180° to 90° and 270°. To redirect the 90° path, a motorized periscope mirror pair with an objective lens can be inserted into the downstream axial beam path. The 270° redirection is accomplished by removing the upstream axial objective lens and

  6. Light Production in the Double Chooz Photomultiplier Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo, J. I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Jimenez, S.; Lopez, M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Verdugo, A.

    2012-09-13

    In this document we present a study of the phenomenon of light emission (called glowing) in the bases of the Hamamatsu R7081MOD-ASSY photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) used in the Double Chooz experiment. The tests have been carried out at the CIEMAT laboratories over a photomultiplier tube of the same model. We have studied the phenomenon making first a characterization of it, and then focusing on the dependence of the rate and the amount of emitted light versus voltage and temperature. In addition, we have looked for the possible existence of an ultraviolet component in the light which would be harmful for the experiment because it could be able to excite the scintillator liquid. Finally, we propose and test a method to reduce the light emission using a cover on the base of the photomultiplier tube.. (Author)

  7. Production of excited double hypernuclei via Fermi breakup of excited strange systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Botvina, Alexander S.; Pochodzalla, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Precise spectroscopy of multi-strange hypernuclei provides a unique chance to explore the hyperon-hyperon interaction. In the present work we explore the production of excited states in double hypernuclei following the micro-canonical break-up of an initially excited double hypernucleus which is created by the absorption and conversion of a stopped Ξ - hyperon. Rather independent on the spectrum of possible excited states in the produced double hypernuclei the formation of excited states dominates in our model. For different initial target nuclei which absorb the Ξ - , different double hypernuclei nuclei dominate. Thus the ability to assign the various observable γ-transitions in a unique way to a specific double hypernuclei by exploring various light targets as proposed by the PANDA Collaboration seems possible. We also confront our predictions with the correlated pion spectra measured by the E906 Collaboration.

  8. 64nm pitch metal1 double patterning metrology: CD and OVL control by SEMCD, image based overlay and diffraction based overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoté, Julien; Dettoni, Florent; Bouyssou, Régis; Le-Gratiet, Bertrand; Carau, Damien; Dezauzier, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Patterning process control of advanced nodes has required major changes over the last few years. Process control needs of critical patterning levels since 28nm technology node is extremely aggressive showing that metrology accuracy/sensitivity must be finely tuned. The introduction of pitch splitting (Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch) at 14FDSOInm node requires the development of specific metrologies to adopt advanced process control (for CD, overlay and focus corrections). The pitch splitting process leads to final line CD uniformities that are a combination of the CD uniformities of the two exposures, while the space CD uniformities are depending on both CD and OVL variability. In this paper, investigations of CD and OVL process control of 64nm minimum pitch at Metal1 level of 14FDSOI technology, within the double patterning process flow (Litho, hard mask etch, line etch) are presented. Various measurements with SEMCD tools (Hitachi), and overlay tools (KT for Image Based Overlay - IBO, and ASML for Diffraction Based Overlay - DBO) are compared. Metrology targets are embedded within a block instanced several times within the field to perform intra-field process variations characterizations. Specific SEMCD targets were designed for independent measurement of both line CD (A and B) and space CD (A to B and B to A) for each exposure within a single measurement during the DP flow. Based on those measurements correlation between overlay determined with SEMCD and with standard overlay tools can be evaluated. Such correlation at different steps through the DP flow is investigated regarding the metrology type. Process correction models are evaluated with respect to the measurement type and the intra-field sampling.

  9. Diffraction analysis of customized illumination technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seo-Min; Eom, Tae-Seung; Moon, Seung Chan; Shin, Ki S.

    2004-05-01

    Various enhancement techniques such as alternating PSM, chrome-less phase lithography, double exposure, etc. have been considered as driving forces to lead the production k1 factor towards below 0.35. Among them, a layer specific optimization of illumination mode, so-called customized illumination technique receives deep attentions from lithographers recently. A new approach for illumination customization based on diffraction spectrum analysis is suggested in this paper. Illumination pupil is divided into various diffraction domains by comparing the similarity of the confined diffraction spectrum. Singular imaging property of individual diffraction domain makes it easier to build and understand the customized illumination shape. By comparing the goodness of image in each domain, it was possible to achieve the customized shape of illumination. With the help from this technique, it was found that the layout change would not gives the change in the shape of customized illumination mode.

  10. Twisting products in Hopf algebras and the construction of the quantum double

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer Santos, W.R.

    1992-04-01

    Let H be a finite dimensional Hopf algebra and B an (H, H*)-comodule algebra. The purpose of this note is to present a construction in which the product of B is twisted by the given actions. The constructions of the smash product and of the Quantum Double appear as special cases. (author). 7 refs

  11. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Kolganov, V.Z.; Lomkatsi, G.S.; Nilov, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Using data obtained by upgraded SPHINX spectrometer at IHEP accelerator the preliminary results on the reaction p + N → (Σ 0 K + ) + N at the energy of 70 GeV are presented. The existence of state X(2000) observed in our previous data is confirmed with the increased statistic for this state by a factor of approx 5. We also observed radiative decay of Λ (1520) → Λ + γ. The significant increase of statistics for many diffractive production reactions will allow to study them in great detail

  12. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, Y M; Batarin, V A

    2002-01-01

    First preliminary results from upgraded SPHINX spectrometer, working in the proton beam with the energy of 70 GeV of IHEP accelerator, are presented. The data for the reaction p + N -> [SIGMA sup 0 K sup +] + N based on a new statistics are in a good agreement with our previous data and strongly support the existence of X(2000) state (with the increase of statistics for this state by a factor of approx 5). Radiative decay of LAMBDA(1520) -> LAMBDA subgamma was also observed. The significant increase of statistics for many diffractive-production reactions will allow to study them in great detail

  13. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  14. Use of intergeneric cross for production of doubled haploid wheat (triticum aestivum l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Shaukat, S.; Kashif, M.; Khan, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of conventional breeding or hybridisation is to bring about homozygosity, for which 6 to 7 years may be required. Wheat and maize crosses have proved to be more efficient in DH lines production than anther culture methods, because of its lower genetic specificity. Doubled haploid technique facilitates the development of homozygous plants within one generation. The system is developed through haploid production, followed by chromosome doubling, to produce homozygous plants in a single generation. For doubled haploid production method wheat and maize crossing system is better than anther culture and ovule culture because maize pollens are highly responsive and produce stable progeny population. Wheat is being used as female parent and maize as a male parent for the production of doubled haploid. Moreover, Silver Nitrate (AgNO/sub 3/) in tiller culture media can improve the frequency of haploid embryo production in this crossing system. Our result showed that DH production through wheat and maize crossing system was proved to be time saving (2 years) as compared to other conventional breeding methods (6 years). (author)

  15. Structural and microstructural changes during anion exchange of CoAl layered double hydroxides. An in situ X-ray powder diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Rune E.; Krumeich, Frank; Norby, Poul

    2010-01-01

    Anion-exchange processes in cobalt-aluminium layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The processes investigated were CoAl-CO 3 →CoAl-Cl →CoAl-CO 3 , CoAl-Cl→CoAl-NO 3 and CoAl-CO 3 →CoAl-SO 4 . The XRPD data show that the CoAl-CO 3 →CoAl-Cl process is a two-phase transformation, where the amount of the CoAl-CO 3 phase decreases exponentially while that of the CoAl-Cl phase increases exponentially. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) studies of a partially chloride-exchanged CoAl-CO 3 LDH sample along with in situ XRPD data suggested that the individual particles in the CoAl-CO 3 sample are generally anion-exchanged with chloride one at a time. In contrast with the CoAl-CO 3 →CoAl-Cl transformation, the XRPD data show that the reverse CoAl-Cl→CoAl-CO 3 process is a one-phase transformation. Rietveld refinements indicate that the occupancy factors of the carbon and oxygen sites of the carbonate group increase, while that of the chloride site decreases. In the CoAl-Cl→CoAl-NO 3 anion-exchange reaction, the XRPD patterns reveal the existence of two intermediate phases in addition to the initial CoAl-Cl and final CoAl-NO 3 phases. The in situ data indicate that one of these intermediates is a mixed nitrate- and chloride-based LDH phase, where the disorder decreases as the nitrate content increases. The XRPD data of the partial CoAl-CO 3 →CoAl-SO 4 anion-exchange reaction show that the process is a two-phase transformation involving a sulfate-containing LDH with a 1H polytype structure. (orig.)

  16. Synthesis of Cd/(Al+Fe) layered double hydroxides and characterization of the calcination products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Barriga, C.; Fernandez, J.M.; Rives, V.; Ulibarri, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method at a constant pH value of 8. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange at pH 9. The samples have been characterized by elemental chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and FT-IR spectroscopy. Their thermal stability has been assessed by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) and mass spectrometric analysis of the evolved gases. The PXRD patterns of the solids calcined at 800 deg. C show diffraction lines corresponding to Cd(Al)O and spinel-type materials, which precise nature (CdAl 2 O 4 , Cd 1-x Fe 2+x O 4 , or Cd x Fe 2.66 O 4 ) depends on location and concentration of iron in the parent material or precursor. - Graphical abstract: Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange. Calcination at 800 deg. C shows diffraction lines corresponding to CdO and to spinel-type materials. SEM micrograph of sample CdAlFe-N-0

  17. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al 2 O 3 ; 1.56g of Na 2 CO 3 ; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K 2 CO 3 ; 0.13g of CeO 2 . Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  18. Double-quarkonium production at a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions for double-quarkonium production in the kinematical region relevant for the proposed fixed-target experiment using the LHC beams (dubbed as AFTER@LHC). These include all spin-triplet S -wave charmonium and bottomonium pairs, i.e. Psi(n_1S) + Psi(n_2S), Psi(n_1S) + Upsilon(m_1S) and Upsilon(m_1S) + Upsilon(m_2S ) with n_1,n_2 = 1,2 and m_1,m_2 = 1,2,3. We calculate the contributions from double-parton scatterings and single-parton scatterings. With an integrated luminosity of 20 fb-1 to be collected at AFTER@LHC, we find that the yields for double-charmonium production are large enough for differential distribution measurements. We discuss some differential distributions for J/Psi + J/Psi production, which can help to study the physics of double-parton and single-parton scatterings in a new energy range and which might also be sensitive to double intrinsic c-bar(c) coalescence at large negative Feynman x.

  19. Double vector meson production in γγ interactions at hadronic colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V.P. [Lund University, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund (Sweden); Universidade Federal de Pelotas, High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C.P. 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper we revisit the double vector meson production in γγ interactions at heavy ion collisions and present, by the first time, predictions for the ρρ and J/ΨJ/Ψ production in proton.nucleus and proton.proton collisions. In order to obtain realistic predictions for rapidity distributions and total cross sections for the double vector production in ultra peripheral hadronic collisions we take into account the description of γγ → VV cross section at lowenergies as well as its behavior at large energies, associated to the gluonic interaction between the color dipoles. Our results demonstrate that the double ρ production is dominated by the low energy behavior of the γγ → VV cross section. In contrast, for the double J/Ψ production, the contribution associated to the description of the QCD dynamics at high energies contributes significantly, mainly in pp collisions. Predictions for the RHIC, LHC, FCC, and CEPC-SPPC energies are shown. (orig.)

  20. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of an industrial production suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin crystals by powder diffraction: a powerful quality-control tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankaer, Christian G; Moroz, Olga V; Turkenburg, Johan P; Aspmo, Stein I; Thymark, Majbritt; Friis, Esben P; Stahl, Kenny; Nielsen, Jens E; Wilson, Keith S; Harris, Pernille

    2014-04-01

    A microcrystalline suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin (Savinase) produced during industrial large-scale production was analysed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and X-ray single-crystal diffraction (MX). XRPD established that the bulk microcrystal sample representative of the entire production suspension corresponded to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.65, b = 62.43, c = 75.74 Å, equivalent to those for a known orthorhombic crystal form (PDB entry 1ndq). MX using synchrotron beamlines at the Diamond Light Source with beam dimensions of 20 × 20 µm was subsequently used to study the largest crystals present in the suspension, with diffraction data being collected from two single crystals (∼20 × 20 × 60 µm) to resolutions of 1.40 and 1.57 Å, respectively. Both structures also belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), but were quite distinct from the dominant form identified by XRPD, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.04, b = 57.55, c = 71.37 Å and a = 52.72, b = 57.13, c = 65.86 Å, respectively, and refined to R = 10.8% and Rfree = 15.5% and to R = 14.1% and Rfree = 18.0%, respectively. They are also different from any of the forms previously reported in the PDB. A controlled crystallization experiment with a highly purified Savinase sample allowed the growth of single crystals of the form identified by XRPD; their structure was solved and refined to a resolution of 1.17 Å with an R of 9.2% and an Rfree of 11.8%. Thus, there are at least three polymorphs present in the production suspension, albeit with the 1ndq-like microcrystals predominating. It is shown how the two techniques can provide invaluable and complementary information for such a production suspension and it is proposed that XRPD provides an excellent quality-control tool for such suspensions.

  2. Diffraction theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  3. Optimization of the flexible mould process for the production of double-curved concrete elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H.R.; Grunewald, S.; Eigenraam, P.; Raghunath, P.; Kok, M.

    2014-01-01

    Free-form buildings tend to be expensive. By optimizing the production process, economical and wellperforming concrete structures and elements can be manufactured. In this paper, an innovative method is presented that allows producing highly accurate double curved-elements without the need for

  4. An order αs Monte Carlo calculation of hadronic double photon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an order α s calculation of hadronic double photon production are discussed and compared with data from both colliding beam and fixed target experiments. The calculation utilizes a combination of analytic and Monte Carlo integration methods which make it easy to calculate a variety of observables and impose experimental cuts. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Effect of resonance production and diffraction on the inclusive spectra of pions and protons in 19 GeV/c pn interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baken, V.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Inst.)

    1984-01-01

    Bubble chamber data on pn interactions at 19 GeV/c are used to investigate the effects of nucleon diffraction and resonance production on the inclusive x- and psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions of protons and pions. We determine the differential distributions of p, ..pi../sup -/ and ..pi../sup +/ due to neutron and proton diffraction and similarly the distributions from the decay of the strong resonances ..delta../sup + +/(1232) and ..delta../sup -/(1232) and from rho/sup 0/(770). The x-distributions of the protons in the two c.m. hemispheres become quite similar when the effect of diffraction and ..delta../sup + +/ is subtracted. The psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions can then be described by a single exponential in the whole kinematic region. The net effect on the shapes of the x-distributions of the pions due to diffraction, ..delta../sup + +//..delta../sup -/ and rho/sup 0/ production is rather small. The separate effects of these processes on the particle ratio ..pi../sup -//..pi../sup +/ is investigated. By excluding the diffraction and ..delta../sup + +//..delta../sup -/ production, the strength of the low-psub(T)/sup 2/ component of the psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions of the pions is reduced, but it seems that diffraction and resonance production cannot account for all of this low-psub(T)/sup 2/ enhancement.

  6. [Carbon efficiency of double-rice production system in Hunan Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-du; Wu, Yao; Ti, Jin-song; Chen, Fu; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Improving the carbon efficiency of crop production systems is one of the important ways to realize low-carbon agriculture. A life cycle assessment approach and input-output calculation method was applied for a double-rice production system in the Hunan Province. Based on statistical data of crop yield and investment in the production system in the period from 2004 to 2012, carbon emission, carbon absorption, carbon efficiency and their dynamic changes of the double rice production systems were estimated. The results showed that the average of annual carbon emission from 2004 to 2012 was 656.4 x 10(7) kg CE. Carbon emissions from production and transport of fertilizer and pesticide accounted for a majority of agricultural input carbon emissions, approximately 70.0% and 15.9%, respectively. The carbon emission showed a decreasing trend from 2004 to 2012 in the Hunan Province, with an annual reduction rate of 2.4%, but the carbon emission intensity was in a trend of increase. The average of annual carbon absorption was 1547.0 x 10(7) kg C. The annual carbon absorption also showed a decreasing trend from 2004 to 2012 in Hunan Province, with an average annual reduction rate of 1.2%, and the carbon absorption intensity showed a trend of increase. Furthermore, production efficiency of carbon showed a slow upward trend. The economic efficiency of carbon showed a larger increasing rate with time, with an average annual growth rate of 9.9%. Ecological efficiency of carbon was stable and low, maintained at about 2.4 kg C . kg-1 CE. It indicated that the integrated carbon efficiency of Hunan double rice crop production system improved slowly with time and the key to improve the carbon efficiency of double rice production systems lies in reducing the rates of nitrogen fertilizer and pesticide, and improving their use efficiencies.

  7. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  8. Observation of a diffractive contribution to dijet production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Monika; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Proskuryakov, Alexander; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; 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Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; 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    2013-01-08

    The cross section for dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is presented as a function of xi, a variable that approximates the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 2.7 inverse nanobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at low instantaneous luminosities, and uses events with jet transverse momentum of at least 20 GeV. The dijet cross section results are compared to the predictions of diffractive and non-diffractive models. The low-xi data show a significant contribution from diffractive dijet production, observed for the first time at the LHC. The associated rapidity gap survival probability is estimated.

  9. Doubling sockeye salmon production in the Fraser River—Is this sustainable development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Healey, Michael C.

    1993-11-01

    We evaluate a proposal to double sockeye salmon production from the Fraser River and conclude that significant changes will be required to current management processes, particularly the way available catch is allocated, if the plan is to be consistent with five major principles embodied in the concept of sustainable development. Doubling sockeye salmon production will not, in itself, increase economic equity either regionally or globally. Developing nations may actually be hindered in their attempts to institute other, nonsalmon fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean as a result of the possible interception of salmon. Further, other users of the Fraser River basin will have to forgo opportunities so that salmon habitat can be conserved. If doubling sockeye salmon production is to meet the goal of doing more with less, it will be necessary to develop more efficient technologies to harvest the fish. If increasing salmon production is to reflect the integration of environmental and economic decision making at the highest level, then a serious attempt must be made to incorporate environmental assets into national economic accounting. Finally, to promote biodiversity and cultural self-sufficiency within the Fraser River basin, it will be important to safeguard the small, less-productive salmon stocks as well as the large ones and to allocate a substantial portion of the increased production to the Native Indian community.

  10. A new technique for production of yellow cake with double precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua; Zeng Yijun; Li Shangyuan; Kong Guiying

    1997-01-01

    The author presents a new technique for production of yellow cake with double precipitation, thus solving a series of problems for precipitating uranium with traditional double precipitation. The new technique can not only remove ferric ions and sulfate radicals but also make solid-liquid separation easy, utilize effectively the sulfuric acid produced in ferric ions precipitation process, and increase uranium concentration of leaching liquor. To take it as producing yellow cake will save investment, simplify operation, and cut down the consumption of raw materials and energies. It is more competitive than ion-exchange or solvent extraction in the process of extracting-purifying and preparing yellow cake

  11. Diffractive J/Psi Production; Produção Difrativa de $J/psi$ no Experimento DØ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dos Santos Assis Jesus, Ana Carolina [Federal Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents measurements of two diffractive production ratio for heavy flavour physics with the use of a reconstructed J/Ψ → μ+μ- sample in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab Tevatron. These events were selected using the Luminosity Monitor detectors, the calorimeter system and the muon system in a pseudo-rapidity region with range 2.7 ≤ |η| ≤ 4.4. The measured ratio were estimated to be N$J/Ψ\\atop{diff}$/N$J/Ψ\\atop{total}$ = (1.74 ± 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst))% e N$b\\atop{diff}$/N$b\\atop{total}$ = (0.79 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.23(syst))%.

  12. Prompt double J/ψ production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, S.P.; Rezaeian, Amir H.

    2015-11-01

    We provide a detailed study of prompt double J/ψ production within the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) framework in proton-proton collisions at the LHC.We confront the recent LHC data with the results obtained at leading-order (LO) in the NRQCD framework within two approaches of the collinear factorization and the k T -factorization. We show that the LHCb data can be fairly described within the k T -factorized LO NRQCD, while the collinearly factorized LO NRQCD significantly overshoots the LHCb data at low J/ψ-pair invariant mass. We show that the LO NRQCD formalism cannot describe the recent CMS data, with about one order of magnitude discrepancy. If the CMS data are confirmed, this indicates rather large higher-order corrections for prompt double J/ψ production. We provide various predictions which can further test the NRQCD-based approach at the LHC in a kinematic region that LO contributions dominate. We also investigate long-range in rapidity double J/ψ correlations. We found no evidence of a ridge-like structure for double J/ψ production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC up to subleading α 6 s accuracy.

  13. Efficiency of anther culture technique in the production of wheat double haploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondić-Špika Ankica Đ.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate efficiency of anther culture in the production of spontaneous double haploids from randomly selected heterozygous genotypes of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Anthers of 20 F1 wheat combinations were grown in vitro on a modified Potato-2 medium. All of the examined genotypes have shown the ability to produce pollen calluses as well as to regenerate green plants. On average for the whole experiment material, 47.2 calluses were produced per 100 cultured anthers. The green plant regeneration ranged from 0.8 to 13.4 green plants per spike, with an overall mean of 5.8. From the total of 582 regenerated green plants, 47.9% (279 were spontaneous double haploids. The final average yield from the study was 2.8 double haploids per spike.

  14. Duality in diffraction dissociations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto.

    1977-01-01

    Diffractive dissociations (aN→a*πN) are naturally explained and a model that accounts for the three-variable correlation (mass-transfer-Jackson angle correlation) is presented. This model takes into account the three possible exchanges: t (pion), u(a*) and s(a) channel exchanger. The physical consequences of the model are: a strong mass-slope correlation due to the zeros of the amplitude, a factorization of diffractive dissociations (factorization of the Pomeron), the possibility of extending this model to double diffractive dissociation and diffraction by nuclei. This model was applied to the NN→NπN reaction. Using the usual parameters of the Deck model, a comparison is made with experiments for all available distributions. the strong slope of the peak at 1400 MeV is naturally explained [fr

  15. Semiquantitative analysis of corrosion products in iron channel by the X-ray diffraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, C.R.E.; Varela, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The corrosion in the us very important in the slag line region, but in others regions over and above this line there is a corrosion process still important. We have made a detailed mapping of phases present in seven different regions in the iron channel in three distinct positions. After the phases identifications, it was made a deconvolution of the diffractograms using Gaussian functions. The analysis of the relative intensity of each phase gave an idea for a semi-quantitative analysis and we have proposed a mechanism of the refractory corrosion. It was observed that the calcium oxide migrates by diffusion to different regions originating low melting point products like pseudo-wolastonite, anorthite and guelenite. (author)

  16. X-ray diffraction phase analysis of crystalline copper corrosion products after treatment in different chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielova, M.; Seidlerova, J.; Weiss, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion products Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl, Cu 2 O, and CuCl 2 were identified on the surface of copper plates after their four days treating in three different sodium chloride, sodium/magnesium, and sodium/calcium chloride solutions using X-ray diffraction powder analysis. However, the quantitative proportions of individual corrosion products differ and depend on the type of chloride solution used. Treating of copper plates only in the sodium chloride solution produced the mixture of corrosion products where Cu 2 O is prevailing over the Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl and CuCl 2 was not identified. The sample developed after treating of the cooper surface in the sodium/magnesium chloride solution contains Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl and CuCl 2 prevailing over the Cu 2 O, while the sample developed after treatment of copper in sodium/calcium chloride solution contains Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl prevailing over CuCl 2 and Cu 2 O was not identified

  17. Single meson production in proton diffraction at 190 GeV/c at COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisrock, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The quark model successfully describes all ground state baryons as members of SU(N) flavour multiplets. For excited baryon states the situation is totally different. There are much less states found in the experiment than predicted in most theoretical calculations. This fact has been known for a long time as the 'missing resonance problem'. In addition, many states found in experiments are only poorly measured up to now. Therefore, further experimental efforts are needed to clarify the situation. At COMPASS, reactions of a 190 GeV/c hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target are investigated. The hadron beam contains different species of particles (π,K,p). To distinguish these particles, two Cherenkov detectors are used. In this thesis, a new method for the identification of particles from the detector information is developed. This method is based on statistical approaches and allows a better kaon identification efficiency with a similar purity compared to the method, which was used before. The reaction pp→ppX with X=(π 0 ,η,ω,φ) is used to study different production mechanisms. A previous analysis of ω and φ mesons is extended to pseudoscalar mesons. As the resonance contributions in pη are smaller than in pπ 0 a different behaviour of these two final states is expected as a function of kinematic variables. The investigation of these differences allows to study different production mechanisms and to estimate the size of the resonant contribution in the different channels. In addition, the channel pp→ppX allows to study baryon resonances in the pX system. In the COMPASS energy regime, the reaction is dominated by Pomeron exchange. As a Pomeron carries vacuum quantum numbers, no isospin is transferred between the target proton and the beam proton. Therefore, the pX final state has isospin (1)/(2) and all baryon resonances in this channel are N* baryons. This offers the opportunity to do spectroscopy without taking Δ resonances into

  18. Diffractive production of two ρ0L mesons in e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segond, M.; Wallon, S.; Szymanowski, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present an estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive production of a ρ L 0 -meson pair in e + e - scattering, which will be studied in the future high-energy International Linear Collider. For this aim, we complete calculations of the Born order approximation of the amplitudes γ * L,T (Q 1 2 )γ * L,T (Q 2 2 )→ρ L 0 ρ L 0 , for arbitrary polarization of virtual photons and longitudinally polarized mesons, in the kinematical region s>>-t,Q 1 2 ,Q 2 2 . These processes are completely calculable in the hard region Q 1 2 ,Q 2 2 >>Λ 2 QCD , and we perform most of the calculations in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q 1 2 and Q 2 2 in the range of a few GeV 2 . (orig.)

  19. Double product and end-organ damage in African and Caucasian men: the SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A J; Schutte, A E; Schutte, R

    2013-08-10

    Increasing urbanisation in sub-Saharan African countries is causing a rapid increase in cardiovascular disease. Evidence suggests that Africans have higher blood pressures and a higher prevalence of hypertension-related cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, compared to Caucasians. We investigated double product (systolic blood pressure × heart rate), a substantial measure of cardiac workload, as a possible cardiovascular risk factor in African and Caucasian men. The study consisted of 101 urbanised African and 101 Caucasian male school teachers. We measured 24h ambulatory blood pressure and the carotid cross-sectional wall area, and determined left ventricular hypertrophy electrocardiographically by means of the Cornell product. Urinary albumin and creatinine were analysed to obtain the albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Africans had higher 24h, daytime and nighttime systolic- and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate and resultant double product compared to the Caucasians. In addition, markers of end-organ damage, albumin-to-creatinine ratio and left ventricular hypertrophy were higher in the Africans while cross-sectional wall area did not differ. In Africans after single partial and multiple regression analysis, 24h systolic blood pressure, but not double product or heart rate, correlated positively with markers of end-organ damage (cross-sectional wall area: β=0.398, P=0.005; left ventricular hypertrophy: β=0.455, Pproduct may not be a good marker of increased cardiovascular risk when compared to systolic blood pressure in African and Caucasian men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of energy inputs in glasshouse double crop (fall and summer crops) tomato production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, Burhan; Ceylan, R. Figen; Kizilay, Hatice [Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics, Akdeniz University, Antalya 07070 (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    The study examines energy use patterns and the relationship between energy inputs and yield for double crop (fall and summer) glasshouse tomato production in Antalya province, where is one of the most important greenhouse centres in Turkey. The data of the study was retrieved from 37 fall and 25 summer glasshouse tomato producers via face to face survey in 2007. The research findings revealed energy use values for inputs such as manure, electricity, chemical fertilizer and fuel. While the average yield per hectare is 25025.4 kg for enterprises involved in tomato production in fall, it is 22392.9 kg for summer production. The overall energy consumption is higher in fall production with 81362.2 MJ ha{sup -1} in comparison to summer production 63023.2 MJ ha{sup -1}. In addition, the specific energy requirement is 3521.2 MJ t{sup -1} and 2814.4 MJ t{sup -1} for fall and summer production in order and the energy efficiency was found out to be 0.31 kg MJ{sup -1} and 0.36 kg MJ{sup -1} respectively. Finally, the energy relationship was tested using the production relationship. The findings indicated that direct energy sources are effective in tomato yield for both of the two seasons. More clearly, the most significant energy input was electrical energy for summer production and a combination of electrical energy, human power and machinery for fall production. Yet, excess and unconscious use of chemical ingredients in glasshouse tomato production was confirmed as energy derived from chemical drugs leaded a declination in the yield for fall season. Therefore, the paper revealed energy relationship for double crop glasshouse tomato production in Antalya, being a reference for similar production methodologies. (author)

  1. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for intermediate energy pion incident reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Satoh, Daiki

    2002-01-01

    Neutron-production double-differential cross sections for 870-MeV π + and π - and 2.1-GeV π + mesons incident on iron and lead targets were measured with NE213 liquid scintillators by time-of-flight technique. NE213 liquid scintillators 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm thick were placed in directions of 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150deg. The typical flight path length was 15 m. Neutron detection efficiencies were derived from the calculation results of SCINFUL and CECIL codes. The experimental results were compared with the JAM code. The double differential cross sections calculated by the JAM code disagree with experimental data at neutron energies below about 30 MeV. JAM overestimates π + -incident neutron-production cross sections in forward angles at neutron energies of 100 to 500 MeV. (author)

  2. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  3. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  4. Measurements of Particle Production, Underlying Event and Double Parton Interactions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00439671; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The effects of soft, non-pertubative strong interactions (QCD) are an important part of the phenomenology of the events at hadron colliders, as the LHC. In order to constrain the parameters of models of soft QCD, diverse measurements are provided by the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Measurements of particle production, underlying event and double parton interactions are presented. In general, reasonable agreement between the measured data and the models is found, but discrepancies hint at the need for a better description.

  5. The effect of resonance production and diffraction on the inclusive spectra of pions and protons in 19 GeV/c pn interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, V.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.

    1984-01-01

    Bubble chamber data on pn interactions at 19 GeV/c are used to investigate the effects of nucleon diffraction and resonance production on the inclusive x- and psub(T)sup(2)-distributions of protons and pions. The differential distributions of p, π - and distributions from the decay of the strong resonances Δsup(++)(1232) and Δ - (1232) and from rho 0 (770) are determined. The x-distributions of the protons in the two c.m. hemispheres become quite similar when the effect of diffraction and Δsup(++) is subtracted. The psub(T)sup(2)-distributions can then be described by a single exponential in the whole kinematic region. The net effect on the shape of the x-distributions of the pions due to diffraction, effect of these processes on the particle ratio π - /π + is investigated. By excluding the diffraction and Δsup(++)/Δ - production, the strength of the low-psub(T)sup(2) component of the psub(T)sup(2)-distributions of the pions is reduced, but it seems that diffraction and resonance production cannot account for all oft his low-psub(T)sup(2) enhancement

  6. Double emulsion generation in the mass production of inertial confinement fusion targets using T-junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Matthew J.

    This work demonstrates a new device for the continuous controlled production of double emulsions for the manufacturing of inertial confinement fusion targets. This device can be integrated into a microfluidic approach to produce targets which should increase the yield and quality of the targets and at a lower cost. The device is a double T-Junction, which has been scaled, optimized and built to produce oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions from diameters of roughly 4 mm or less. A T-Junction is an intersection of two channels at a right angle where fluid emerges and is broken off to form droplets. A systematic study presented here has shown that a single T-Junction has four modes of operation: squeezing, dripping, transition and streaming. The droplet size may be controlled by controlling the fluid flow rate through the channels; the droplet increases with increasing dispersed flow and decreasing continuous flow. The device was utilized to produce hundreds of ˜ 2.5 mm diameter resorcinol formaldehyde double emulsions with better than 2 percent reproducibility in diameter. The device was used to produce 2.0 mm shells with an average wall thickness of 510 microns.

  7. The investigation of deuteron production double differential cross section induced by 392 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kin, Tadahiro; Nakano, Masahiro; Imamura, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the deuteron productions from 392 MeV proton induced reaction for target nuclei of 12 C, 27 Al, 93 Nb. Deuteron production double differential cross sections were determined over a broad energy range and scattered angles from 20 to 105 degrees in laboratory system. Those spectra were compared with two theoretical models; Quantum Molecular Dynamics model and Intranuclear Cascade model. We developed the code of Intra Nuclear Cascade model and we've got good results to reproduce the experimental data. (author)

  8. Thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data related with the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Íris Duarte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals as part of the research article entitled “Green production of cocrystals using a new solvent-free approach by spray congealing” (Duarte et al., 2016 [1]. More specifically, here we present the thermal analysis and the X-ray powder diffraction data for pure Glutaric Acid, used as a raw material in [1]. We also include the X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data obtained for the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystal (form II produced using the cooling crystallization method reported in “Operating Regions in Cooling Cocrystallization of Caffeine and Glutaric Acid in Acetonitrile” (Yu et al., 2010 [2]. Lastly, we show the X-ray powder diffraction data obtained for assessing the purity of the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric cocrystals produced in [1].

  9. Study of diffractive production processes in proton-nucleon and proton-nucleus interactions and search for exotic baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Coherent diffractive production reactions p+C→[Σ(1385)0K+]+C and p+C→[Σ0K+]+C on carbon nuclei were investigated in experiments at the SPHINX facility in a 70-GeV proton beam from the IHEP accelerator. A large body of evidence for new baryon states was obtained in the study of hyperon-kaon effective-mass spectra in these two reactions: X(2050) with mass M=2052±6 MeV and width Γ=35+22-35 MeV in M[Σ(1385)0K+] and X(2000) with M=1999±6 MeV and Γ=91±17 MeV in M[Σ0K+]. The unusual features of these massive states (comparatively small decay widths and anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange-particle emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. Preliminary data on the reactions p+N→[pη]+N and p+N→[pη']+N, as well as first results for M[Σ0K+], M(pη'), and M(pη') effective mass spectra in nonperipheral region (with p2T(greater-or-similar sign)0.3 GeV2), are presented

  10. Improvement of the crystallinity and photocatalytic property of zinc oxide as calcination product of Zn–Al layered double hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir bin; Zakaria, Azmi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnO phase and ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel can be formed as Zn–Al–NO 3 –LDH calcination products. ► The crystallinity of ZnO phase increased with an increase of calcination temperature. ► The optical band gaps of ZnO were improved with an increase in temperature. ► The oxygen vacancies in ZnO and ZnAl 2 O 4 generated the ESR signals. - Abstract: Zinc oxide with different degrees of crystallinity can be formed as Zn–Al-layered double hydroxide (Zn–Al–NO 3 –LDH) calcination products. ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel is also formed in a range of calcination temperatures from 600 to 1000 °C from the LDH. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the crystallinity of the ZnO phase increased as calcination temperatures increased. The LDH structure was fully collapsed at and above 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity was determined by UV–VIS–NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The band gap of the calcined samples increased as the calcination temperature increased. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the fresh and calcined LDH at room temperature demonstrated that oxygen vacancies in the ZnO and ZnAl 2 O 4 were responsible for the generation of ESR signals. One BET specific surface area increased from 1 m 2 /g for the LDH to a maximum at 400 °C (43 m 2 /g) and decreased thereafter down to 6 m 2 /g at 1000 °C.

  11. Effects of dynamic diffraction conditions on magnetic parameter determination in a double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} using electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.C. [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhong, X.Y., E-mail: xyzhong@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jin, L. [Peter Grünberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Chen, X.F. [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Moritomo, Y. [Graduate School of Pure & Applied Science and Faculty of Pure & Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-7571 (Japan); Mayer, J. [Peter Grünberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) spectroscopy, which is similar to the well-established X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), can determine the quantitative magnetic parameters of materials with high spatial resolution. One of the major obstacles in quantitative analysis using the EMCD technique is the relatively poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compared to XMCD. Here, in the example of a double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}, we predicted the optimal dynamical diffraction conditions such as sample thickness, crystallographic orientation and detection aperture position by theoretical simulations. By using the optimized conditions, we showed that the SNR of experimental EMCD spectra can be significantly improved and the error of quantitative magnetic parameter determined by EMCD technique can be remarkably lowered. Our results demonstrate that, with enhanced SNR, the EMCD technique can be a unique tool to understand the structure-property relationship of magnetic materials particularly in the high-density magnetic recording and spintronic devices by quantitatively determining magnetic structure and properties at the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • We demonstrate how to choose the optimal experimental conditions by using dynamical diffraction calculations in Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}. • With optimized diffraction conditions, the signal-to-noise ratio of experimental EMCD spectra has been significantly improved. • We have determined orbital to spin magnetic moment ratio of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} quantitatively. • We have discussed the effects of dynamical diffraction conditions on the error bar of quantitative magnetic parameters.

  12. High-temperature X-ray powder diffraction as a tool for characterization of smectites, layered double hydroxides, and their intercalates with porphyrins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píšková, A.; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Káfuňková, E.; Lang, Kamil; Večerníková, Eva; Kovanda, F.; Grygar, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2010), s. 363-371 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/1244; GA AV ČR KAN100500651; GA AV ČR IAA3032401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : smectite * Layered double hydroxides * thermal decomposition Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.303, year: 2010

  13. Diffractive production of {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} in {pi}{sup -}p interactions at COMPASS(CERN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao

    2012-11-06

    Diffractive dissociation of a {pi}{sup -} beam(190 GeV/c) on a proton target was measured at the COMPASS spectrometer. During a run in 2008, a large number of events with {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta} in the final state was recorded. Partial wave analyses(PWA) of these data are being performed, concentrating on the kinematic domain of momentum transfer t' from 0.1 to 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Subject of this thesis is the diffractive production of X from {pi}{sup -}p{yields}Xp with the subsequent decays X{yields}{pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} and f{sub 1}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}. Two different decays of the {eta} were selected: {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}({gamma}{gamma}) and {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}. A kinematic fitting routine was used to improve the data selection. In order to do the PWA, a Monte Carlo(MC) simulation is needed to account for the detector acceptance. In the mass-independent PWA the angular distributions of the real events are compared with the event distributions imposed on Monte Carlo(MC) events in order to determine the production amplitudes of different assumed partial waves in mass bins of 50 MeV/c{sup 2} of the invariant mass m{sub X} of X in the range 1.3 < m{sub X} < 3.0 GeV/c{sup 2}, by means of a maximum-likelihood-fit. Then a simplified mass-dependent fit of Breit-Wigner amplitudes has been applied to the distributions of production intensities as a function of m{sub X} in order to determine the contributions of known or presumed resonances. In the {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} channel, we focus on the S, P and D wave i.e. orbital angular momentum L=0, 1, 2 between {pi}{sup -} and f{sub 1}. Significant intensity and phase motion are observed for the following J{sup PC}M{sup {epsilon}} combinations, where J, P, C, M and {epsilon} stand for the total angular momentum, parity and charge conjugation, total spin projection and reflectivity: 1{sup -+}1{sup +} (S wave), 1{sup ++}0{sup +} (P wave), 2{sup -+}0{sup +} (D

  14. Doubled haploid production from Spanish onion (Allium cepa L.) germplasm: embryogenesis induction, plant regeneration and chromosome doubling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayos, Oreto; Vallés, María P; Garcés-Claver, Ana; Mallor, Cristina; Castillo, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    The use of doubled haploids in onion breeding is limited due to the low gynogenesis efficiency of this species. Gynogenesis capacity from Spanish germplasm, including the sweet cultivar Fuentes de Ebro, the highly pungent landrace BGHZ1354 and the two Valenciana type commercial varieties Recas and Rita, was evaluated and optimized in this study. The OH-1 population, characterized by a high gynogenesis induction, was used as control. Growing conditions of the donor plants were tested with a one-step protocol and field plants produced a slightly higher percentage of embryogenesis induction than growth chamber plants. A one-step protocol was compared with a two-step protocol for embryogenesis induction. Spanish germplasm produced a 2-3 times higher percentage of embryogenesis with the two-step protocol, Recas showing the highest percentage (2.09%) and Fuentes de Ebro the lowest (0.53%). These percentages were significantly lower than those from the OH-1 population, with an average of 15% independently of the protocol used. The effect of different containers on plant regeneration was tested using both protocols. The highest percentage of acclimated plants was obtained with the two-step protocol in combination with Eco2box (70%), whereas the lowest percentage was observed with glass tubes in the two protocols (20-23%). Different amiprofos-methyl (APM) treatments were applied to embryos for chromosome doubling. A similar number of doubled haploid plants were recovered with 25 or 50 μM APM in liquid medium. However, the application of 25 μM in solid medium for 24 h produced the highest number of doubled haploid plants. Somatic regeneration from flower buds of haploid and mixoploid plants proved to be a successful approach for chromosome doubling, since diploid plants were obtained from the four regenerated lines. In this study, doubled haploid plants were produced from the four Spanish cultivars, however further improvements are needed to increase their gynogenesis

  15. Doubled haploid production from Spanish onion (Allium cepa L. germplasm: embryogenesis induction, plant regeneration and chromosome doubling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreto eFayos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of doubled haploids in onion breeding is limited due to the low gynogenesis efficiency of this species. Gynogenesis capacity from Spanish germplasm, including the sweet cultivar Fuentes de Ebro, the highly pungent landrace BGHZ1354 and the two Valenciana type commercial varieties Recas and Rita, was evaluated and optimized in this study. The OH-1 population, characterized by a high gynogenesis induction, was used as control. Growing conditions of the donor plants were tested with a one-step protocol and field plants produced a slightly higher percentage of embryogenesis induction than growth chamber plants. A one-step protocol was compared with a two-step protocol for embryogenesis induction. Spanish germplasm produced a 2 to 3 times higher percentage of embryogenesis with the two-step protocol, Recas showing the highest percentage (2.09% and Fuentes de Ebro the lowest (0.53%. These percentages were significantly lower than those from the OH-1 population, with an average of 15% independently of the protocol used. The effect of different containers on plant regeneration was tested using both protocols. The highest percentage of acclimated plants was obtained with the two-step protocol in combination with Eco2box (70%, whereas the lowest percentage was observed with glass tubes in the two protocols (20-23%. Different amiprofos-methyl (APM treatments were applied to embryos for chromosome doubling. A similar number of doubled haploid plants were recovered with 25 or 50 µM APM in liquid medium. However, the application of 25 µM in solid medium for 24 h produced the highest number of doubled haploid plants. Somatic regeneration from flower buds of haploid and mixoploid plants proved to be a successful approach for chromosome doubling, since diploid plants were obtained from the 4 regenerated lines. In this study, doubled haploid plants were produced from the four Spanish cultivars, however further improvements are needed to increase their

  16. CMS results on hard diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00107098

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings we present CMS results on hard diffraction. Diffractive dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV is discussed. The cross section for dijet production is presented as a function of $\\tilde{\\xi}$, representing the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The observation of W and Z boson production in events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap is also presented.

  17. Diffractive DIS: Where are we?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, N.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of the modern QCD theory of diffractive DIS is given. The recent progress has been remarkably rapid, all the principal predictions from the color dipole approach to diffraction - the (Q 2 + m V 2 ) scaling, the pattern of SCHNC, shrinkage of the diffraction cone in hard diffractive DIS, the strong impact of longitudinal gluons in inclusive J/Ψ production at Tevatron - have been confirmed experimentally

  18. Tests of QCD Factorisation in the Diffractive Production of Dijets in Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmerman, J.; Zimmerman, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are presented of differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction (Q^2 e X Y, in which the system X, containing at least two jets, is separated from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y by a large rapidity gap. The dijet cross sections are compared with NLO QCD predictions based on diffractive parton densities previously obtained from a QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS cross sections by H1. In DIS, the dijet data are well described, supporting the validity of QCD factorisation. The diffractive DIS dijet data are more sensitive to the diffractive gluon density at high fractional parton momentum than the measurements of inclusive diffractive DIS. In photoproduction, the predicted dijet cross section has to be multiplied by a factor of approximately 0.5 for both direct and resolved photon interactions to describe the measurements. The ratio of measured dijet cross section to NLO prediction in photoproduction is a factor 0.5+-0.1 smaller than the same ratio in DIS. This...

  19. Semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions with electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of one of the protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cisek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the cross sections for both electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of protons for the semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions at the LHC. Several differential distributions in missing mass (MX, or single-particle variables related exclusively to the J/ψ meson are calculated for s=7and13 TeV. The cross sections and distributions are compared to the cross section of the purely exclusive reaction pp→ppJ/ψ. We show the corresponding ratio as a function of J/ψ meson rapidity. We compare the distributions for purely electromagnetic and purely diffractive proton excitations/dissociation. We predict cross sections for electromagnetic and diffractive excitations of similar order of magnitude.

  20. Vulnerability of Thai rice production to simultaneous climate and socioeconomic changes: a double exposure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangpenchan, R.

    2011-12-01

    This research explores the vulnerability of Thai rice production to simultaneous exposure by climate and socioeconomic change -- so-called "double exposure." Both processes influence Thailand's rice production system, but the vulnerabilities associated with their interactions are unknown. To understand this double exposure, I adopts a mixed-method, qualitative-quantitative analytical approach consisting of three phases of analysis involving a Vulnerability Scoping Diagram, a Principal Component Analysis, and the EPIC crop model using proxy datasets collected from secondary data sources at provincial scales.The first and second phases identify key variables representing each of the three dimensions of vulnerability -- exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity indicating that the greatest vulnerability in the rice production system occurs in households and areas with high exposure to climate change, high sensitivity to climate and socioeconomic stress, and low adaptive capacity. In the third phase, the EPIC crop model simulates rice yields associated with future climate change projected by CSIRO and MIROC climate models. Climate change-only scenarios project the decrease in yields by 10% from the current productivity during 2016-2025 and 30% during 2045-2054. Scenarios applying both climate change and improved technology and management practices show that a 50% increase in rice production is possible, but requires strong collaboration between sectors to advance agricultural research and technology and requires strong adaptive capacity in the rice production system characterized by well-developed social capital, social networks, financial capacity, and infrastructure and household mobility at the local scale. The vulnerability assessment and climate and crop adaptation simulations used here provide useful information to decision makers developing vulnerability reduction plans in the face of concurrent climate and socioeconomic change.

  1. Inclusive charmonium production via double cc-bar in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kuiyong; He Zhiguo; Chao Kuangta

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of double-charm quark pair production by the Belle Collaboration, we calculate the complete O(α s 2 ) inclusive production cross sections for η c , J/ψ, and χ cJ (J=0,1,2) plus cc-bar in e + e - annihilation through a virtual photon. We consider both color-singlet and color-octet contributions, and give the analytical expressions for these cross sections. The complete color-singlet calculations are compared with the approximate fragmentation calculations as functions of the center-of-mass energy √(s). We find that most of the fragmentation results substantially overestimate the cross sections (e.g., by a factor of ∼4 for χ c1 and χ c2 ) at the Belle and BaBar energy √(s)=10.6 GeV. The fragmentation results become a good approximation only when √(s) is higher than about 100 GeV. We further calculate the color-octet contributions to these cross sections with analytical expressions. We find that while the color-octet contribution to J/ψ inclusive production via double charm is negligible (only about 7%), the color-octet contributions to χ c1 and χ c2 can be very significant

  2. Melting of tantalum at high pressure determined by angle dispersive x-ray diffraction in a double-sided laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errandonea, D; Somayazulu, M; Haeusermann, D; Mao, H K

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure and high-temperature phase diagram of Ta has been studied in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC) using x-ray diffraction measurements up to 52 deg. GPa and 3800 deg. K. The melting was observed at nine different pressures, the melting temperature being in good agreement with previous laser-heated DAC experiments, but in contradiction with several theoretical calculations and previous piston-cylinder apparatus experiments. A small slope for the melting curve of Ta is estimated (dT m /dP ≅ 24 GPa -1 at 1 deg. bar) and a possible explanation for this behaviour is given. Finally, a P-V -T equation of states is obtained, the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient and the bulk modulus being estimated

  3. Diffraction attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  4. Diffractive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  5. Diffractive Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  6. Diffraction attraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  7. Measurement of double differential t anti t production cross sections with the CMS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korol, Ievgen

    2016-05-01

    The high energy scale of the pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN makes this facility to a real factory for the production of t anti t pairs. This enables to study the top-quark properties and its production and decay mechanisms in unprecedent detail. The dileptonic decay channel of the top-quark pair, in which both W bosons, produced from the top-quark decay, decay into a lepton and neutrino, is studied in this analysis. The limitation to one electron and one muon in final state used in this work allows to strongly suppress the possible background processes and leads to a higher signal purity. About 40k events with a top-quark pair have been selected using the √(s)=8 TeV data recorded with the CMS detector in the year 2012. Exploiting this large sample, double differential top-quark pair production cross sections are measured for the first time. The cross sections are studied as functions of various observables which describe the top and top-pair kinematics. To obtain the full kinematics of the t anti t final state, which contains two undetected neutrinos, a kinematic reconstruction procedure was developed and exploited in this work. The new procedure makes use of all available constraints and is based on a repeated reconstruction of each event with detector observables smeared according to their resolutions in order to obtain for each event solutions for the kinematic constraint equations. In order to obtain double differential cross sections, the distributions of reconstructed observables are then corrected for detector effects by using a double differential unfolding procedure, which is based on a χ 2 minimization. The double differential cross sections presented in this work allow to test the Standard Model in detail and investigate previously seen disagreements between measured and predicted single differential cross sections. The results of this work are compared to Standard Model predictions (up to next-to-leading order of the hard

  8. An electron diffraction and bond valence sum study of the space group symmetries and structures of the photocatalytic 1:1 ordered A2InNbO6 double perovskites (A=Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, V.; Liu, Y.; Withers, R.L.; Krausz, E.

    2004-01-01

    A careful investigation has been carried out into the space group symmetries, structures and crystal chemistries of the 1:1 B-site ordered double perovskites A 2 InNbO 6 (A=Ca 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) using a combination of bond valence sum calculations, powder XRD and electron diffraction. A recent investigation of these compounds by Yin et al. reported a random distribution of In 3+ and Nb 5+ ions onto the perovskite B-site positions of these compounds and hence Pm3-barm (a=a p , subscript p for parent perovskite sub-structure) space group symmetry for the A=Ba and Sr compounds and Pnma (a=a p +b p , b=-a p +b p , c=2c p ) space group symmetry for the A=Ca compound. A careful electron diffraction study, however, shows that both the A=Ca and Sr compounds occur at room temperature in P12 1 /n1 (a=a p +b p , b=-a p +b p , c=2c p ) perovskite-related superstructure phases while the A=Ba compound occurs in the Fm3-barm, a=2a p , elpasolite structure type. Bond valence sum calculations are used to explain why this should be so as well as to provide a useful first-order approximation to the structures of each of the compounds

  9. On the novel double perovskites A2Fe(Mn0.5W0.5)O6 (A= Ca, Sr, Ba). Structural evolution and magnetism from neutron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Crisanto A.; Larrégola, Sebastián; Retuerto, María; Fernández-Díaz, María Teresa; Krezhov, Kiril; Alonso, José Antonio

    2018-06-01

    New A2Fe(Mn0.5W0.5)O6 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) double perovskite oxides have been prepared by ceramic techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) complemented with neutron powder diffraction (NPD) indicate a structural evolution from monoclinic (space group P21/n) for A = Ca to cubic (Fm-3m) for A = Sr and finally to hexagonal (P63/mmc) for A = Ba as the perovskite tolerance factor increases with the A2+ ionic size. The three oxides present different tilting schemes of the FeO6 and (Mn,W)O6 octahedra. NPD data also show evidence in all cases of a considerable anti-site disordering, involving the partial occupancy of Fe positions by Mn atoms, and vice-versa. Magnetic susceptibility data show magnetic transitions below 50 K characterized by a strong irreversibility between ZFC and FC susceptibility curves. The A = Ca perovskite shows a G-type magnetic structure, with weak ordered magnetic moments due to the mentioned antisite disordering. Interesting magnetostrictive effects are observed for the Sr perovskite below 10 K.

  10. Pair double heavy diquark production in high energy proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynenko, A.P. [Samara State University, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State Aerospace University named after S.P. Korolyov, Samara (Russian Federation); Trunin, A.M. [Samara State Aerospace University named after S.P. Korolyov, Samara (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of perturbative QCD and relativistic quark model we calculate relativistic and bound state corrections in the production processes of a pair of double heavy diquarks. Relativistic factors in the production amplitude connected with the relative motion of heavy quarks and the transformation law of the bound state wave function to the reference frame of the moving S-wave diquark bound states are taken into account. For the gluon and quark propagators entering the amplitudes we use a truncated expansion in relative quark momenta up to the second order. Relativistic corrections to the quark-quark bound state wave functions in the rest frame are considered by means of a Breit-like potential. It turns out that the examined effects significantly decrease the nonrelativistic cross sections. (orig.)

  11. Inelastic nucleon diffraction at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goggi, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out at ISR and at FNAL which have yielded a substantial amount of data on double diffraction processes, which were unambiguously indentified and measured and which provide new tools to study the dynamical properties shared by different classes of diffractive reactions are identified. In this review interest is focused on the experimental aspects of inclusive and exclusive results both on single and double diffraction and on the problems arising from their comparison. Problems covered include; inclusive and semi-inclusive diffraction, multiparticle inclusive studies, single-particle inclusive studies, resonance region, high mass region, exclusive single diffractive reactions, mass spectra, cross sections, t-dependence, decay angular properties, and double diffraction. (U.K.)

  12. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of SDF2-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Ravaud, Stephanie; Schott, Andrea; Strahl, Sabine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. The crystals belonged to the space group P6 1 and diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution. The stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSDL) has been shown to be highly up-regulated in response to unfolded protein response (UPR) inducing reagents, suggesting that it plays a crucial role in the plant UPR pathway. AtSDL has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms have been obtained under very similar conditions. The needle-shaped crystals did not diffract X-rays, while the other form diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.1, c = 69.3 Å

  13. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, A.R.; Stevens, S.

    1977-01-01

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x10 10 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  14. High mass exclusive diffractive dijet production in ppˉ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 705, č. 3 (2011), s. 193-199 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : pair production * diffraction * Batavia TEVATRON Coll * anti-p p: exclusive reaction * mass spectrum: (2jet) * DZERO * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1009.2444

  15. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Kazuya, E-mail: kazuya.morimoto@aist.go.jp [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Tamura, Kenji [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Anraku, Sohtaro [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sato, Tsutomu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Suzuki, Masaya [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Yamada, Hirohisa [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  16. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  17. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  18. Hydrogen isotope double differential production cross sections induced by 62.7 MeV neutrons on a lead target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerveno, M.; Haddad, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Slypen, I.; Meulders, J.P.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Louvel, M.; Lefebvres, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Double differential hydrogen isotope production cross sections have been extracted in 62.7 MeV neutron induced reactions on a lead target. The angular distribution was measured at eight angles from 20 deg. to 160 deg. allowing the extraction of angle-differential, energy differential, and total production cross sections. A first set of comparisons with several theoretical calculations is also presented

  19. Monte Carlo study of particle production in diffractive proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the very forward detector combined with central information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qi-Dong [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Itow, Yoshitaka; Sako, Takashi [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Menjo, Hiroaki [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Very forward (VF) detectors in hadron colliders, having unique sensitivity to diffractive processes, can be a powerful tool for studying diffractive dissociation by combining them with central detectors. Several Monte Carlo simulation samples in p-p collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV were analyzed, and different nondiffractive and diffractive contributions were clarified through differential cross sections of forward neutral particles. Diffraction selection criteria in the VF-triggered-event samples were determined by using the central track information. The corresponding selection applicable in real experiments has ∼ 100% purity and 30-70% efficiency. Consequently, the central information enables classification of the forward productions into diffraction and nondiffraction categories; in particular, most of the surviving events from the selection belong to low-mass diffraction events at log{sub 10}(ξ{sub x}) < -5.5. Therefore, the combined method can uniquely access the low-mass diffraction regime experimentally. (orig.)

  20. The Dubna double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer for heavy-ion reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, K.D.; Gippner, P.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Will, E.; Heidel, K.; Lukyanov, S.M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Salamatin, V.S.; Sodan, H.; Chubarian, G.G.

    1986-05-01

    The double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer DEMAS designed for the detection and identification of heavy-ion reaction products at incident energies below 10 MeV/amu is presented. Based on the kinematic coincidence method, the relevant physical information is obtained from the measurement of the two correlated velocity vectors of the binary fragments. Construction and performance of the different detector systems applied to measure the time-of-flight values, the position coordinates and the kinetic energies of both fragments are presented in detail. The description of the data acquisition and analysing procedures is followed by the discussion of some experimental examples to demonstrate the spectrometer performance. A mass resolution of typically 4 - 5 amu (fwhm) is routinely achieved. (author)

  1. Production of heavy meson pairs in p p-bar collisions within a double handbag approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritschnig, A T; Pire, B; Schweiger, W

    2014-01-01

    We study the pair-production of heavy mesons in proton-antiproton annihilations within a perturbative QCD-motivated framework. In particular we investigate p p-bar → D0D 0 within a double handbag approach, where a hard subprocess factorizes from soft hadronic matrix elements. The soft matrix elements can be parametrized by transition distribution amplitudes, which are off-diagonal in flavor space. The transition distribution amplitudes are modelled as overlaps of light-cone wave functions. We obtain rather robust model results for p p-bar → D0D 0 cross sections, which are expected to be measured at the future PANDA detector at GSI-FAIR.

  2. Diffractive dijet production in p-bar p collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 3 (2012), "032009-1"-"032009-21" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON * diffraction * jet * high transverse energy * CDF * dijet hadronproduction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1206.3955

  3. New results from HERA on photoproduction and diffraction, the proton structure function, deep inelastic scattering at low x, heavy flavour production, jets and searches for leptoquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Bhadra, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lim, J.N.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Straub, B.

    1994-11-01

    This report contains some of the papers presented by the ZEUS Collaboration at the 27th international conference on high energy physics in Glasgow (20-27 July 1994). These concern deep inelastic ep scattering at low x, photoproduction and diffraction in ep scattering, a measurement of the proton structure function and determination of the low-x gluon distribution, D * and J/Ψ production in ep scattering, multi-jet production and determination of α s in ep scattering, and the search for leptoquarks in ep collisions. (HSI)

  4. Production, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Vieira, Plinio Salmazo; Ward, Richard John; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy; Oliveira, Arthur Henrique Cavalcante de; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major are reported. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 21 and diffracted to 2.18 Å resolution. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs; EC 2.7.4.6) play an essential role in the synthesis of nucleotides from intermediates in the salvage pathway in all parasitic trypanosomatids and their structural studies will be instrumental in shedding light on the biochemical machinery involved in the parasite life cycle and host–parasite interactions. In this work, NDKb from Leishmania major was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The NDK crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal crystal system, with unit-cell parameters a = 114.2, c = 93.9 Å. Translation-function calculations yielded an unambiguous solution in the enantiomorphic space group P3 2 21

  5. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  6. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-11-01

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  7. Inclusive distributions of diffractively produced neutral kaons, lambdas, and antilambdas, and upper limits on Λ/sub c/+ production in high energy γ p interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadra, S.

    1985-01-01

    The author has used a large acceptance spectrometer in a tagged photon beam to study the interactions of real photons with protons in a hydrogen target. In particular, this thesis presents distributions of neutral kaons, lambdas, and antilambdas from diffractive dissociation where the kinematic regions of the target and projectile fragments are clearly distinguished by using events with clean recoiling protons. This data extends the neutral strange particle production rate measurements to higher overall centre-of-mass energies than previous photoproduction experiments. Comparison to pion-induced reactions supports the hypothesis that the photon behaves primarily as a hardon. Finally, upper limits have been set on the Λ/sub c/ + cross section times the branching ratio for decay modes leading to neutral strange particles for a diffractive dissociation process

  8. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  9. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  10. CMS results on soft diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00086121

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections, as well as of forward rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV at the LHC, and compare the results to other measurements and to theoretical predictions implemented in various Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Enhancement of H{sup -}/D{sup -} volume production in a double plasma type negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumasa, Osamu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sakiyama, Satoshi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01

    H{sup -}/D{sup -} production in a pure volume source has been studied. In our double plasma type negative ion source, both energy and density of fast electrons are well controlled. With the use of this source, the enhancement of H{sup -}/D{sup -} production has been observed. Namely, under the same discharge power, the extracted H{sup -}/D{sup -} current in the double plasma operation is higher than that in the single plasma operation. At the same time, measurements of plasma parameters have been made in the source and the extractor regions for these two cases. (author)

  12. Domain sizing diffraction and deformation degree of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure pipes of national production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchik, A D; Buoli, D C; Flores, A; Vizcaino, P

    2012-01-01

    The Life Extension Program for the PHWR Embalse power reactor requires the replacement of the original Zr-2, 5% Nb pressure tubes by a new set of Zr-2,5%Nb pressure tubes. It was also decided to make the new set de pressure tubes locally from imported extruded tubes. As the mechanical properties of pressure tubes in operation depends on the microstructural deformation it is necessary to add to the normal macroscopic quality control same microstructural studies, specially .during the development stage. In the present work x-ray diffraction techniques are applied to determine the magnitude of the micro-structural deformation of three pressure tubes obtained Zr-2,5% Nb extruded tubes that were processes following designer specifications. The pressure tubes were obtained by two step of plastic deformation in a HPTR 60-120 tube rolling machine without intermediate annealing and a final thermal treatment. The line width at half height (FWHM) diffraction lines diagrams are drawn in a Williamson - Hall plot to determine the size of the coherent diffraction domains and estimate the degree of micro-structural deformation. To evaluate the possible effects of texture and/or anisotropy the X-ray measurement were made at the three principal directions of the processed tubes. In summary, the three pressure tubes obtained follow the same average Williamson-Hall line and similar dispersion with respect to that line. That result implies an acceptable homogeneity between the micro-deformation of these pressure tubes. As then have been chosen at random from a lot of preceded pressure tubes, it is possible to predict similar conclusions for the entire batch (author)

  13. Product diversification of banana cv. Mas Kirana off grade by using a double rotating screw extruder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyadjit, S.; Sukasih, E.; Risfaheri, R.

    2018-01-01

    Extrusion technology is today’s favorite technology since it has a varied, practical and consistent product form. The purpose of this research was to get precise composite flour composition so that the quality of the resulted product has optimum quality for breakfast meals. The experimental design used was Design Expert vs. 7 with response surface box-behnken. The flour composition and level to be inputted to the program were banana flour (10-50g), mung beans (10-30g), egg flour (10-20g). Formula made was based on 200 g with addition of maize flour if the amount is less than 200 g. The extrusion tool used is a Thermo Scientific double rotating screw; with Haake Reomax OS. The best results in terms of carbohydrate content is the Formula 8 with a composition of 60 g of banana flour, 20 g eggs, 20 g of green beans and 100 g maize flour. The proximate chemical content of this formula is carbohydrate 84.04%, protein 8.55%, fat 5.49%, ash content 1.24%. K-calories per 100 g is 419.5 which is higher than the standard of breakfast meals calories.

  14. Single and double inclusive forward jet production at the LHC at s=7 and 13 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Bury

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We provide a description of the transverse momentum spectrum of single inclusive forward jets produced at the LHC, at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 13 TeV, using the high energy factorization (HEF framework. We subsequently study double inclusive forward jet production and, in particular, we calculate contributions to azimuthal angle distributions coming from double parton scattering. We also compare our results for double inclusive jet production to those obtained with the Pythia Monte Carlo generator. This comparison confirms that the HEF resummation acts like an initial state parton shower. It also points towards the need to include final state radiation effects in the HEF formalism.

  15. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of a central barrel, a muon spectrometer and of additional detectors for trigger and event classification purposes. The low transverse momentum threshold of the central barrel gives ALICE a unique opportunity to study the low mass sector of central production at the LHC. I will report on first analysis results of meson production in double gap events in minimum-bias proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, and will describe a dedicated double gap trigger for future data taking.

  16. Energy production from distillery wastewater using single and double-phase upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muyodi, F J; Rubindamayugi, M S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A Single-phase (SP) and Double-phase (DP) Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating distillery wastewater were operated in parallel. The DP UASB reactor showed better performance than the SP UASB reactor in terms of maximum methane production rate, methane content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency. (au) 20 refs.

  17. Energy production from distillery wastewater using single and double-phase upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muyodi, F.J.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A Single-phase (SP) and Double-phase (DP) Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating distillery wastewater were operated in parallel. The DP UASB reactor showed better performance than the SP UASB reactor in terms of maximum methane production rate, methane content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency. (au) 20 refs.

  18. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.; Rockefeller U.

    2005-01-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron (bar p)p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held

  19. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Golovkin, S V; Kozhevnikov, A A; Kubarovskii, V P; Kulyavtsev, A I; Kurshetsov, V F; Kushnirenko, A Yu; Landsberg, G L; Molchanov, V V; Mukkin, V A; Solyanik, V I; Vavilov, D V; Victorov, V A; Balats, M Ya; Dzubenko, G B; Kamenskii, A D; Kliger, G K; Kolganov, V Z; Lakaev, V S; Lomkatsi, G S; Nilov, A P; Smolyankin, V T; Vishniakov, V V

    1994-01-01

    Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

  20. Effective field theory analysis of double Higgs production via gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Panico, Giuliano; Son, Minho

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework where effects from new physics are parametrized by local operators. Our analysis provides a perspective broader than the one followed in most of the previous analyses, where this process was merely considered as a way to extract the Higgs trilinear coupling. We focus on the $hh \\to b\\bar b\\gamma\\gamma$ channel and perform a thorough simulation of signal and background at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We make use of invariant mass distributions to enhance the sensitivity on the EFT coefficients and give a first assessment of the impact of jet substructure techniques on the results. The range of validity of the EFT description is estimated, as required to consistently exploit the high-energy range of distributions, pointing out the potential relevance of dimension-8 operators. Our analysis contains a few important improvements over previous studies and identifies so...

  1. Indication for double parton scatterings in W+ prompt J/ψ production at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; Shao, Hua-Sheng; Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2018-06-01

    We re-analyse the associated production of a prompt J / ψ and a W boson in pp collisions at the LHC following the results of the ATLAS Collaboration. We perform the first study of the Single-Parton-Scattering (SPS) contributions at the Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in αs in the Colour-Evaporation Model (CEM), an approach based on the quark-hadron-duality. Our study provides clear indications for Double-Parton-Scattering (DPS) contributions, in particular at low transverse momenta, since our SPS CEM evaluation, which can be viewed as a conservative upper limit of the SPS yields, falls short compared to the ATLAS experimental data by 3.1 standard deviations. We also determine a finite allowed region for σeff, inversely proportional to the size of the DPS yields, corresponding to the otherwise opposed hypotheses, namely our NLO CEM evaluation and the LO direct Colour-Singlet (CS) Model contribution. In both cases, the resulting DPS yields are significantly larger than that initially assumed by ATLAS based on jet-related analyses but is consistent with their observed raw-yield azimuthal distribution and with their prompt J / ψ + J / ψ and Z+ prompt J / ψ data.

  2. Pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, G.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste performed in November 1988, and the subsequent thermal behavior of the grout as it cured in a large, insulated vessel. The report was issued in draft form in April 1989 and comments were subsequently received; however, the report was not finalized until 1994. In finalizing this report, references or information gained after the report was drafted in April 1989 have not been incorporated to preserve the report`s historical perspective. This report makes use of criteria from Ridelle (1987) to establish formulation criteria. This document has since been superseded by a document prepared by Reibling and Fadeef (1991). However, the reference to Riddelle (1987) and any analysis based on its content have been maintained within this report. In addition, grout is no longer being considered as the waste form for disposal of Hanford`s low-level waste. However, grout disposal is being maintained as an option in case there is an emergency need to provide additional tank space. Current plans are to vitrify low-level wastes into a glass matrix.

  3. Is the color-octet mechanism consistent with the double J/ψ production measurement at B-factories?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yu [Third Military Medical University, Department of Physics, School of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Sun, Zhan [Guizhou Minzu University, School of Science, Guiyang (China); Zhang, Hong-Fei [Third Military Medical University, Department of Physics, School of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Science, Chongqing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Double J/ψ production in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions involving color-octet channels are evaluated up to order α{sup 2}α{sub s}{sup 3}. Having implemented the variation of the parameters (m{sub c}, μ{sub r} and long-distance matrix elements), we found that the cross sections for producing double J/ψ at B-factories range from -0.016 to 0.245 fb, which are even much smaller than that via the color-singlet mechanism. Accordingly, this result is consistent with the measurement by the Belle and BABAR Collaborations. (orig.)

  4. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation

  5. Precision Meson Spectroscopy: Diffractive Production at COMPASS and Development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Weitzel, Q

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q ¯ qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q ¯ q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c2. During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of −−+ final state events were recorded within a few days of d...

  6. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a family 101 glycoside hydrolase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Katie J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic module of a family 101 glycoside hydrolase from S. pneumoniae was cloned, recombinantly produced and crystallized. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious human pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of diseases including pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia and otitis media. The full virulence of this bacterium is reliant on carbohydrate processing and metabolism, as revealed by biochemical and genetic studies. One carbohydrate-processing enzyme is a family 101 glycoside hydrolase (SpGH101) that is responsible for catalyzing the liberation of galactosyl β1,3-N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Galβ1,3GalNAc) α-linked to serine or threonine residues of mucin-type glycoproteins. The 124 kDa catalytic module of this enzyme (SpGH101CM) was cloned and overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained in space group P2 1 and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.86, b = 88.91, c = 88.77 Å, β = 112.46°. SpGH101CM also qualitatively displayed good activity towards the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(β-d-galactopyranosyl) -α-d-galactopyranoside, which is consistent with the classification of this enzyme as an endo-α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

  7. Single- and double-scattering production of four muons in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas van Hameren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss production of two μ+μ− pairs in ultraperipheral ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We take into account electromagnetic (two-photon double-scattering production and for a first time direct γγ production of four muons in one scattering. We study the unexplored process γγ→μ+μ−μ+μ−. We present predictions for total and differential cross sections. Measurable nuclear cross sections are obtained and corresponding differential distributions and counting rates are presented.

  8. Production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid using two sequential enzymes overexpressed as double-tagged fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chung-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two sequential enzymes in the production of sialic acids, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase, were overexpressed as double-tagged gene fusions. Both were tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST at the N-terminus, but at the C-terminus, one was tagged with five contiguous aspartate residues (5D, and the other with five contiguous arginine residues (5R. Results Both fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and retained enzymatic activity. The fusions were designed so their surfaces were charged under enzyme reaction conditions, which allowed isolation and immobilization in a single step, through a simple capture with either an anionic or a cationic exchanger (Sepharose Q or Sepharose SP that electrostatically bound the 5D or 5R tag. The introduction of double tags only marginally altered the affinity of the enzymes for their substrates, and the double-tagged proteins were enzymatically active in both soluble and immobilized forms. Combined use of the fusion proteins led to the production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac from N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc. Conclusion Double-tagged gene fusions were overexpressed to yield two enzymes that perform sequential steps in sialic acid synthesis. The proteins were easily immobilized via ionic tags onto ionic exchange resins and could thus be purified by direct capture from crude protein extracts. The immobilized, double-tagged proteins were effective for one-pot enzymatic production of sialic acid.

  9. Analysis of an industrial production suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin crystals by powder diffraction: a powerful quality-control tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Moroz, Olga V.; Turkenburg, Johan P.

    2014-01-01

    . A controlled crystallization experiment with a highly purified Savinase sample allowed the growth of single crystals of the form identified by XRPD; their structure was solved and refined to a resolution of 1.17 Å with an R of 9.2% and an Rfree of 11.8%. Thus, there are at least three polymorphs present...... in the production suspension, albeit with the 1ndq -like microcrystals predominating. It is shown how the two techniques can provide invaluable and complementary information for such a production suspension and it is proposed that XRPD provides an excellent quality-control tool for such suspensions....

  10. Pomeron fusion and central η and η' meson production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochelev, N.I.; Morii, T.; Vinnikov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of pomeron fusion to the cross section of η and η ' productions in double-diffractive scattering has been calculated within the Donnachie-Landshoff model of pomeron. It is shown that the double pomeron exchange mechanism does not explain the full set of the recent data of WA102 Collaboration, though it might not be inconsistent with η ' productions

  11. Study of correlation of production and decay planes in π → 3π diffractive dissociation process on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, A.V.; Ivan'shin, Yu.I.; Tkachev, L.G.; Zul'karneev, R.Ya.

    1998-01-01

    A large correlation of production and decay planes of (π - π + π - )-system in dissociation of π - -beam 40 GeV/c on nuclear targets was observed. The dependences of the correlation on atomic number, Feynman variable and transverse momentum as well as on invariant mass of the pion triple and neutral pion pair were investigated. It was shown that the phenomenon has a clear dynamic origin and resembles the single spin asymmetry behaviour

  12. Precision meson spectroscopy. Diffractive production at COMPASS and development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Quirin

    2008-01-01

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q anti qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q anti q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c 2 . During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of π - π - π + final state events were recorded within a few days of data taking. A full partial wave analysis (PWA) of these data has been performed for this dissertation, concentrating on the kinematic domain of large momentum transfer (t' element of [0.1, 1.0] GeV 2 /c 2 ). While well-known mesons are resolved with high quality, also a strong signal consistent with the much disputed hybrid candidate π 1 (1600) is observed in the spin-exotic J PC = 1 -+ partial wave. A Breit-Wigner parameterization yields a mass and width of 1.660 +0.010 -0.074 and 0.269 +0.063 -0.085 GeV/c 2 , respectively. In addition, a first PWA of events with small momentum transfer (t' element of [10 -3 ,10 -2 ] GeV 2 /c 2 ) has been carried out, yielding several high-mass radial-excitation states. In the future, the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility will perform highprecision spectroscopy in the charm-sector employing anti pp annihilations. Due to its excellent tracking capabilities for charged particles, a time projection chamber (TPC

  13. Precision meson spectroscopy. Diffractive production at COMPASS and development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Quirin

    2008-09-24

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q anti qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q anti q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final state events were recorded within a few days of data taking. A full partial wave analysis (PWA) of these data has been performed for this dissertation, concentrating on the kinematic domain of large momentum transfer (t' element of [0.1, 1.0] GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}). While well-known mesons are resolved with high quality, also a strong signal consistent with the much disputed hybrid candidate {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is observed in the spin-exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} partial wave. A Breit-Wigner parameterization yields a mass and width of 1.660{sup +0.010}{sub -0.074} and 0.269{sup +0.063}{sub -0.085} GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. In addition, a first PWA of events with small momentum transfer (t' element of [10{sup -3},10{sup -2}] GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) has been carried out, yielding several high-mass radial-excitation states. In the future, the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility will perform highprecision spectroscopy in the charm-sector employing anti pp annihilations

  14. On the one loop γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussarie, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics,11, Lavrenteva avenue, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University,630090, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, University of Minnesota,Duluth, Minnesota, 55812 (United States); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ),Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); UPMC University Paris 06, faculté de physique,4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-11-24

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄g Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of infrared, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  15. On the one loop γ(∗)→qq̄ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq̄ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the γ (∗) →qq̄g Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of infrared, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  16. Hard scattering and a diffractive trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-02-01

    Conclusions concerning the properties of hard scattering in diffractively produced systems are summarized. One motivation for studying diffractive hard scattering is to investigate the interface between Regge theory and perturbative QCD. Another is to see whether diffractive triggering can result in an improvement in the signal-to-background ratio of measurements of production of very heavy quarks. 5 refs

  17. Complex language, complex thought? The relation between children's production of double embeddings and Theory of Mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerds-Hazenberg, Suzanne; Hendriks, Petra

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued (e.g., by De Villiers and colleagues) that the acquisition of sentence embedding is necessary for the development of first-order Theory of Mind (ToM): the ability to attribute beliefs to others. This raises the question whether the acquisition of double embedded sentences is

  18. Denaturation strategies for detection of double stranded PCR products on GMR magnetic biosensor array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Guldberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    Microarrays and other surface-based nucleic acid detection schemes rely on the hybridization of the target to surface-bound detection probes. We present the first comparison of two strategies to detect DNA using a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor platform starting from an initially double...

  19. Large-sub(pT) production of single and double photons in proton-proton and pion-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.L.; Argonne National Lab., IL; Braaten, E.; Field, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamic (QCD) predictions are made for the large transverse momentum production of single and double photons in proton-proton, proton-antiproton, and pion-proton collisions. In π - p collisions at center-of-mass energy W=27.4 GeV and psub(T)=4.0 GeV, it is estimated that about 0.3% of the 90 0 single photon triggers will be balanced on the 'away-side' by a single photon with roughly the same transverse momentum. In π + p collisions this fraction drops to about 0.09%. These fractions increase with psub(T). In addition to the pure QED annihilation term qanti q -> γγ, it is found that the QCD-induced subprocess gg -> γγ provides an important source of double photons. Photon bremsstrahlung contributions are also examined. Experimental study of the systematics of single and double photon production in hadron-hadron collisions will provide information on the size of the strong interaction coupling constant, αsub(s)(Q), and on the charges of the quarks. Knowledge of the gluon distributions within hadrons and of the effective transverse momentum of partons in hadrons can also be gained. (orig.)

  20. Diffractive production of two {rho}{sup 0} {sub L} mesons in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segond, M.; Wallon, S. [Universite Paris-Sud - CNRS, LPT, Orsay (France); Szymanowski, L. [Universite Paris-Sud - CNRS, LPT, Orsay (France); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS, CPHT, Palaiseau (France)

    2007-09-15

    We present an estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive production of a {rho}{sub L}{sup 0}-meson pair in e{sup +}e{sup -} scattering, which will be studied in the future high-energy International Linear Collider. For this aim, we complete calculations of the Born order approximation of the amplitudes {gamma}{sup *}{sub L,T}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sup *}{sub L,T}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}){yields}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}, for arbitrary polarization of virtual photons and longitudinally polarized mesons, in the kinematical region s>>-t,Q{sub 1} {sup 2},Q{sub 2} {sup 2}. These processes are completely calculable in the hard region Q{sub 1}{sup 2},Q{sub 2}{sup 2}>>{lambda}{sup 2}{sub QCD}, and we perform most of the calculations in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q{sub 1}{sup 2} and Q{sub 2}{sup 2} in the range of a few GeV{sup 2}. (orig.)

  1. Study of diffractive dissociation especially into strange and charmed particles with EHS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs leading to strangeness-antistrangeness and charm-anticharm systems is intended to be measured in this experiment. The use of the rapid cycling bubble chamber (RCBC) with a volume of 100 x 40 x 40 cm$^{3}$ and a picture taking rate of 15 Hz as vertex detector and EHS as forward spectrometer is suitable for the first step of this physics programme. Inclusive cross-sections for diffraction dissociation into $s\\bar{s}$ are lacking whereas diffractive $c\\bar{c}$ production is already better known. The gain of more insight into the mechanism of heavy quark-antiquark production, exclusive diffractive reactions with $\\pi^{0}$'s, diffractive resonance production and also the extraction of data for the double Pomeron exchange mechanism are envisaged. \\\\\\\\ This experiment will be run in two parts, the first one recording the entire unbiased sample of $pp$ and $\\pi^{-}p$ interactions, the second however using triggering for beam and high mass target diffraction di...

  2. Copper Vapor Laser with One-Beam Radiation of Diffraction Quality and Its Capabilities for Microprocessing of Materials for Electronic Engineering Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Lyabin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure, spatial, time and energy characteristics of copper vapor laser radiation (CVL with optical resonators possessing high spatial selectivity have been investigated: with an unstable resonator (UR with two convex mirrors and telescopic UR, and the conditions to form one-beam radiation with diffraction divergence and high stability of directivity pattern axis have been defined.The most weighty and prospective application of CVL with UR with two convex mirrors is to use it as a driving oscillator (DO in a copper vapor laser system (CVLS of the type: driving oscillator – power amplifier (DO – PA when diffraction beam radiating power and power density in a focused spot of 10-20 µm in diameter increases by 1-2 orders. Using industrial sealed-off active elements (AE of “Kulon” series with an average radiation power of 15-25 W as PAs the peak power density increases up to 1011 W/cm 2 while an application of AE “Crystal” with 30- 50 W power gives up to 1012 W/cm 2 , which is sufficient for efficient and qualitative microprocessing of materials up to 1…2 mm thick. Such a CVLS has become the basis for creating up-to-date automated laser technological installations (ALTI of “Karavella-1” and “Karavella-1M” types to manufacture precision parts of electronic engineering products (EEP of metal up to 0.5 mm thick and of non-metal up to 1.5…1.8 mm thick.CVL with a telescopic UR with an average power of 5-6 W diffraction radiation beam has become the basis for creating industrial ALTI “Karavella-2” and “Karavella-2M” to manufacture precision parts of electronic engineering products (EEP of metal up to 0.3 mm thick and of non-metal up to 0.5 – 0.7 mm thick.Practical work on all types of ALTI “Karavella” has shown a set of significant advantages of a laser way of pulsed microprocessing over the traditional ones, including electro-erosion machining: a wide range of structural metal and non-metal materials to be

  3. Double product response and diastolic blood pressure in treadmill, stationary bicycle and muscular circuit exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmiro Santos Resende

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various causes for cardiovascular problems affecting the world population nowadays, the most relevant risk factors is sedentary lifestyle. Many studies have been carried out to analyse and elucidate main adaptations on the cardiovascular system stimulated by different sorts of exercises.In this way, this study had aimed at comparing the acute response of double product (DP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP after treadmill (TRM, stationary bicycle (BIC or muscle circuit training (MCT exercises. Nine individuals (6 women and 3 men exercised at 60% of heart rate reserve (HRR on the TRM and BIC and at 60% of one repetition maximum (1RM in MCT. The results showed that pre- and post-effort DP were significantly difference in all three exercises. However, DP did not differ among exercise types. The hypotensive DBP pos-effort response was greater in MCT. According to the results, it was concluded that there is no difference on the heart work demand rate estimated by DP among the three exercises and MCT at 60% 1RM provokes a greater hypotensive DBP post-effort response. RESUMO Entre as diversas causas de problemas cardiovasculares que afetam a população mundial, na atualidade, o sedentarismo é apontado como um dos fatores de risco mais relevantes. Vários estudos têm se preocupado em analisar e esclarecer as principais adaptações provocadas pelos diferentes tipos de exercícios sobre o sistema cardiovascular. Seguindo esta linha o presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar a resposta aguda do duplo produto (DP e a pressão arterial diastólica (PAD em exercício de esteira, bicicleta estacionária e circuito na musculação. Foram avaliados nove indivíduos sendo seis mulheres e três homens, na esteira, a 60% da freqüência cardíaca de reserva (FCR, na bicicleta estacionária, a 60% FCR e circuito de musculação a 60% de 1 repetição máxima (1RM. Os resultados encontrados apresentaram diferença significativa do DP pr

  4. Double product response and diastolic blood pressure in treadmill, stationary bicycle and muscular circuit exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Teixeira Paranhos Lopes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the various causes for cardiovascular problems affecting the world population nowadays, the most relevant risk factors is sedentary lifestyle. Many studies have been carried out to analyse and elucidate main adaptations on the cardiovascular system stimulated by different sorts of exercises.In this way, this study had aimed at comparing the acute response of double product (DP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP after treadmill (TRM, stationary bicycle (BIC or muscle circuit training (MCT exercises. Nine individuals (6 women and 3 men exercised at 60% of heart rate reserve (HRR on the TRM and BIC and at 60% of one repetition maximum (1RM in MCT. The results showed that pre- and post-effort DP were significantly difference in all three exercises. However, DP did not differ among exercise types. The hypotensive DBP pos-effort response was greater in MCT. According to the results, it was concluded that there is no difference on the heart work demand rate estimated by DP among the three exercises and MCT at 60% 1RM provokes a greater hypotensive DBP post-effort response. . Resumo Entre as diversas causas de problemas cardiovasculares que afetam a população mundial, na atualidade, o sedentarismo é apontado como um dos fatores de risco mais relevantes. Vários estudos têm se preocupado em analisar e esclarecer as principais adaptações provocadas pelos diferentes tipos de exercícios sobre o sistema cardiovascular. Seguindo esta linha o presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar a resposta aguda do duplo produto (DP e a pressão arterial diastólica (PAD em exercício de esteira, bicicleta estacionária e circuito na musculação. Foram avaliados nove indivíduos sendo seis mulheres e três homens, na esteira, a 60% da freqüência cardíaca de reserva (FCR, na bicicleta estacionária, a 60% FCR e circuito de musculação a 60% de 1 repetição máxima (1RM. Os resultados encontrados apresentaram diferença significativa do DP

  5. Production and characterization of femtosecond laser-written double line waveguides in heavy metal oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Diego Silvério; Wetter, Niklaus Ursus; de Rossi, Wagner; Kassab, Luciana Reyes Pires; Samad, Ricardo Elgul

    2018-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of double line waveguides directly written in tellurite and germanate glasses using a femtosecond laser delivering 30 μJ, 80 fs pulses at 4 kHz repetition rate. The double line waveguides produced presented internal losses inferior to 2.0 dB/cm. The output mode profile and the M2 measurements indicate multimodal guiding behavior. A better beam quality for the GeO2 - PbO waveguide was observed when compared with TeO2 - ZnO glass. Raman spectroscopy of the waveguides showed structural modification of the glassy network and indicates that a negative refractive index modification occurs at the focus of the laser beam, therefore allowing for light guiding in between two closely spaced laser written lines. The refractive index change at 632 nm is around 10-4, and the structural changes in the laser focal region of the writing, evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, corroborated our findings that these materials are potential candidates for optical waveguides and passive components. To the best of our knowledge, the two double line configuration demonstrated in the present work was not reported before for germanate or tellurite glasses.

  6. Nitrogen removal and electricity production at a double-chamber microbial fuel cell with cathode nitrite denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Wang, Sha; Zhao, Huimin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Gao, Kun

    2017-12-01

    Double-chamber microbial fuel cell was applied to investigate the performance of the electricity production and nitrite denitrification through feeding nitrite into the cathode. Factors influencing denitrification performance and power production, such as external resistance, influent nitrite concentration and Nitrite Oxygen Bacteria inhibitors, were studied. The results show that when the concentration of nitrite nitrogen and external resistance were 100 mg L -1 and 10 Ω, respectively, the nitrite denitrification reached the best state. The NaN 3 can inhibit nitrite oxidation effectively; meanwhile, the nitrite denitrification with N 2 O as the final products was largely improved. The [Formula: see text] was reduced to [Formula: see text], causing the cathode denitrification coulombic efficiency to exceed 100%. In chemoautotrophic bio-nitrification, microorganisms may utilize H 2 O to oxidize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Proteobacteria might play a major role in the process of denitrification in MFC.

  7. Multicomponent exercise decreases blood pressure, heart rate and double product in normotensive and hypertensive older patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Júnior, Hélio José; Asano, Ricardo Yukio; Gonçalvez, Ivan de Oliveira; Brietzke, Cayque; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-02-26

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program on blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of uncontrolled and controlled normotensive and hypertensive older patients. The study included 183 subjects, 97 normotensives, of which 53 were controlled normotensives (CNS), and 44 uncontrolled normotensives (UNS), as well as 86 hypertensives, of which 43 were controlled hypertensives (CHS), and 43 uncontrolled hypertensives (UHS). Volunteers were recruited and blood pressure and heart rate measurements were made before and after a 6-month multicomponent exercise program. The program of physical exercise was performed twice a week for 26 weeks. The physical exercises program was based on functional and walking exercises. Exercise sessions were performed at moderate intensity. The results indicated that UHS showed a marked decrease in systolic (-8.0mmHg), diastolic (-11.1mmHg), mean (-10.1mmHg), and pulse pressures, heart rate (-6.8bpm), and double product (-1640bpmmmHg), when compared to baseline. Similarly, diastolic (-5.5mmHg) and mean arterial (-4.8mmHg) pressures were significantly decreased in UNS. Concomitantly, significant changes could be observed in the body mass index (-0.9kg/m 2 ; -1.5kg/m 2 ) and waist circumference (-3.3cm; only UHS) of UNS and UHS, which may be associated with the changes observed in blood pressure. In conclusion, the data of the present study indicate that a 6-month multicomponent exercise program may lead to significant reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of normotensive and hypertensive patients with high blood pressure values. Copyright © 2018 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of aerobic exercise training on the double product break point in low-to-moderate risk adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Trent A; Griffin, Diane C; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Whaley, Mitchell H

    2011-02-01

    The double product is the product of the heart rate and systolic blood pressure. The double product break point (DPBP) is a physiologic threshold that occurs at similar exercise intensities to that of the ventilatory threshold (VT). The influence of aerobic exercise training on the DPBP has not yet been examined. The purpose of this study was to examine whether aerobic exercise training (ET) increases the exercise intensity at which the DPBP occurs, and whether it increases in a similar fashion to the VT. Seven males and 11 females, all sedentary (mean ± SD: age = 29.9 ± 10.5 years) underwent supervised cardiopulmonary exercise testing using a cycle ergometer ramp protocol at baseline and after 8 weeks of vigorous ET on a cycle ergometer. The VT was determined by gas analysis and the V-slope method. Experienced observers using standardized instructions visually determined the DPBP. Following ET, VO(2 peak), maximal workload, and body composition variables all showed significant positive changes. The VO(2) at which the DPBP and VT occurred increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (P fashion to that of the VT, and may be an easier and more useful marker of the VT for exercise training purposes.

  9. Characterization of double face adhesive sheets for ceramic tile installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Otavio L.; Mansur, Alexandra A.P.; Mansur, Herman S.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this work was the characterization of an innovative ceramic tile installation product based on double face adhesive sheets. Density, hardness, tensile strength, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with spectroscopy of dispersive energy assays were conducted. The results are in agreement with some manufacture specifications and the obtained information will be crucial in the analysis of durability and stability of the ceramic tile system installed with this new product. (author)

  10. Transverse Imaging of the Proton in Exclusive Diffractive pp Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian Weiss; Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde-Wright; Mark Strikman

    2006-01-01

    In a forthcoming paper we describe a new approach to rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H = dijet, Higgs, etc.) in exclusive double-gap diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. It is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions are approximately independent (QCD factorization), and allows us to calculate the RGS probability in a model-independent way in terms of the gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the colliding protons and the pp elastic scattering amplitude. Here we focus on the transverse momentum dependence of the cross section. By measuring the ''diffraction pattern'', one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions, and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton from the data

  11. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for high-energy pion-incident reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Yousuke; Iga, Kiminori; Kitsuki, Hirohiko

    2000-01-01

    Double-differential neutron-production yields for 870-MeV π + , π - and 2.1-GeV π + incident on iron and lead targets were measured with NE213 liquid scintillators by time-of-flight technique. The two-gate integration method was used for the pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma-rays. Neutron detection efficiencies were derived from the calculation results of SCINFUL and CECIL codes. The experimental results were compared with the calculation including the neutron transport in the actual thickness target by the contribution use of both NMTC/JAERI97 and MCNPX. (author)

  12. Measurements of double differential charged-particle production cross sections for 55, 65, 75 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Yoshitaka; Baba, Mamoru; Nauchi, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    We have performed the measurements of double differential charged-particle production cross section ((n,xz)DDXs) of iron and nickel for 55, 65, 75 MeV neutrons using the 7 Li(p,n) quasi-monoenergetic source of TIARA(Takasaki Ion Accelerator for Radiation Application). The experimental data were compared with the LA-150 data library, which agreed generally with the present data. KERMA(Kinetic Energy Released in MAtter) coefficients(of Fe) were deduced from the experimental data and compared with the integral measurement and calculations by the LA-150 data library. (author)

  13. Beamline I11 at Diamond: a new instrument for high resolution powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S P; Parker, J E; Potter, J; Hill, T P; Birt, A; Cobb, T M; Yuan, F; Tang, C C

    2009-07-01

    The performance characteristics of a new synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction beamline (I11) at the Diamond Light Source are presented. Using an in-vacuum undulator for photon production and deploying simple x-ray optics centered around a double-crystal monochromator and a pair of harmonic rejection mirrors, a high brightness and low bandpass x-ray beam is delivered at the sample. To provide fast data collection, 45 Si(111) analyzing crystals and detectors are installed onto a large and high precision diffractometer. High resolution powder diffraction data from standard reference materials of Si, alpha-quartz, and LaB6 are used to characterize instrumental performance.

  14. Improved α-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae after a double deletion of genes involved in carbon catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Sakurako; Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, the expression of secretory glycoside hydrolase encoding genes, such as those for amylases, cellulases, and xylanases, is generally repressed in the presence of glucose. CreA and CreB have been observed to be regulating factors for carbon catabolite repression. In this study, we generated single and double deletion creA and/or creB mutants in Aspergillus oryzae. The α-amylase activities of each strain were compared under various culture conditions. For the wild-type strain, mRNA levels of α-amylase were markedly decreased in the later stage of submerged culture under inducing conditions, whereas this reduced expression was not observed for single creA and double creA/creB deletion mutants. In addition, α-amylase activity of the wild-type strain was reduced in submerged culture containing high concentrations of inducing sugars, whereas all constructed mutants showed higher α-amylase activities. In particular, the α-amylase activity of the double deletion mutant in a medium containing 5% starch was >10-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain under the same culture conditions. In solid-state cultures using wheat bran as a substrate, the α-amylase activities of single creA and double deletion mutants were >2-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results suggested that deleting both creA and creB resulted in dramatic improvements in the production of secretory glycoside hydrolases in filamentous fungi.

  15. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  16. J/ψ -pair production at large momenta: Indications for double parton scatterings and large α$_s^5$ contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recent observations of prompt J/psi-pair production by CMS at the LHC and by D0 at the Tevatron reveal the presence of different production mechanisms in different kinematical regions. We find out that next-to-leading-order single-parton-scattering contributions at alpha_s^5 dominate the yield at large transverse momenta of the pair. Our analysis further emphasises the importance of double-parton-scatterings --which are expected to dominate the yield at large rapidity differences-- at large invariant masses of the pair in the CMS acceptance. In addition, we provide the first exact --gauge-invariant and infrared-safe-- evaluation of a class of leading-P_T next-to-next-to-leading-order contributions, which are dominant in the region of large sub-leading transverse momenta, precisely where the colour-octet contributions can be non-negligible. Finally, we discuss the contribution from decays of excited charmonium states within both single- and double-parton scatterings and suggest measurements to distinguish ...

  17. Double Parton Scattering in 4-jet production at the LHC with and without open b-bar

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Mirko; Kutak, Krzysztof; van Hameren, Andreas; Bury, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    We report the preliminary results of the ongoing update of our study of 4-jet production at the LHC in High Energy Factorization, which is being supplemented by parton showers. We focus on a specific angular variable introduced in two papers by the CMS collaboration on 4-jet production with and without two b-tagged jets. The variable is, by construction, sensitive to contributions from Multi Parton Interactions (MPIs), specifically hard Double Parton Scattering (DPS). We preliminarily find that, adding parton showers to the single parton scattering channel, the evidence for the need for MPIs is compatible with the one reported by the CMS collaboration after a comparison of the data with simulations based on collinear Monte Carlo event generators.

  18. Double Parton Scattering in 4-jet production at the LHC with and without open b-bar

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Mirko; Kutak, Krzysztof; van Hameren, Andreas; Bury, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    We report the preliminary results of the ongoing update of our study of 4-jet production at the LHC in High Energy Factorization, which is being supplemented by parton showers. We focus on a specific angular variable introduced in two papers by the CMS collaboration on 4-jet production with and without two b-tagged jets. The variable is, by construction, sensitive to contributions from Multi Parton Interactions (MPIs), specifically hard Double Parton Scattering (DPS). We preliminarily find that, adding parton showers to the single parton scattering channel, the evidence for the need for MPIs is compatible with the one reported by the CMS collaboration after a comparison of the data with simulations based on collinear Monte Carlo event generators.

  19. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, A.

    1995-09-01

    The field of hard diffraction, which studies events with a rapidity gap and a hard scattering, has expanded dramatically recently. A review of new results from CDF, D OE, H1 and ZEUS will be given. These results include diffractive jet production, deep-inelastic scattering in large rapidity gap events, rapidity gaps between high transverse energy jets, and a search for diffractive W-boson production. The combination of these results gives new insight into the exchanged object, believed to be the pomeron. The results axe consistent with factorization and with a hard pomeron that contains both quarks and gluons. There is also evidence for the exchange of a strongly interacting color singlet in high momentum transfer (36 2 ) events

  20. Law proposition aiming to establish the double display of sale prices of petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannson, F.

    2006-03-01

    Petroleum products are submitted to the internal tax (called TIPP in France) and the sales tax (called TVA in France). The TVA product is increasing proportionally to the petroleum products prices. On the other hand the TIPP product, which is five time as much high as the TVA, is proportional to the consumed volumes and decreases proportionally with the consumption decrease, resulting from the prices increase. In a framework of transparency for the consumers, and to reveal the importance of the taxes in the hydrocarbons prices, it should be desirable to display the sale prices without and with the taxes. Here are the objectives of this law proposition. (A.L.B.)

  1. Study of quark line selection rule (OZI rule) in the hadron processes. 3. Study of the OZI rule in production of φ and ω mesons in diffractive p N interactions at the energy of 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balats, M.Ya.; Vavilov, D.V.; Viktorov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ratio of cross sections for pφ- and pω-production in diffractive p N-interactions was measured with the Sphinx facility at the energy of E p = 70 GeV. Results of this work demonstrate significant OZI rule violation in proton-induced reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs

  2. Investigation of the OZI selection rule for connected quark diagrams in hadronic processes: 3. Diffractive φ and ω production in pN collisions at 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The ratio between the cross sections for the diffractive production of pφ and pω systems in pN collisions at Ep=70 GeV is determined by using data from the SPHINX detector. A significant violation of the OZI rule in proton-induced transitions is observed

  3. Life cycle assessment of the transesterification double step process for biodiesel production from refined soybean oil in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Monica; da Silva, Elson Santos; Andersen, Silvia L F; Abrahão, Raphael

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel has been attracting considerable attention as being a renewable, biodegradable, and nontoxic fuel that can contribute to the solution of some energy issues as it presents potential to help mitigate climate change. The Life Cycle Assessment of biodiesel from soybean oil (transesterification double step process) was carried out herein. A pilot plant was considered, designed to produce 72 L of biodiesel in daily continuous flow, throughout a lifetime of 15 years (8000 annual hours). The materials and equipment utilized in the construction of the plant were considered as well as the energy and substances required for the production of biodiesel. Environmental impact assessment method IPCC 2013 GWP 100a was utilized within the SimaPro software to express the final result in kg CO2-equivalent. The results quantified the CO2 emissions associated with biodiesel production throughout the lifetime of the production plant (15 years), resulting in a total value of 1,441,426.05 kg CO2-eq. (96,095.07 kg CO2-eq. per year), which was equivalent to 4.01 kg CO2-eq. per liter of biodiesel produced. Decrease of environmental loads associated with the production of biodiesel could include improvements on the handling of biomass agriculture and on the technology production of biodiesel.

  4. Phase behavior in diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  5. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  6. Testing the Scale Dependence of the Scale Factor $\\sigma_{eff}$ in Double Dijet Production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Domdey, Svend; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2010-01-01

    The scale factor σ eff is the effective cross section used to characterize the measured rate of inclusive double dijet production in high energy hadron collisions. It is sensitive to the two-parton distributions in the hadronic projectile. In principle, the scale factor depends on the center of mass energy and on the minimal transverse energy of the jets contributing to the double dijet cross section. Here, we point out that proton-proton collisions at the LHC will provide for the first time experimental access to these scale dependences in a logarithmically wide, nominally perturbative kinematic range of minimal transverse energy between 10 GeV and 100 GeV. This constrains the dependence of two-parton distribution functions on parton momentum fractions and parton localization in impact parameter space. Novel information is to be expected about the transverse growth of hadronic distribution functions in the range of semi-hard Bjorken x (0.001 < x < 0.1) and high resolution Q^2. We discuss to what exten...

  7. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N$^3$LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N$^3$LO Higgs production. The second uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.

  8. Heavy quark-antiquark pair production by double pomeron exchange in pp and AA collisions on the CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agababyan, N.M.; Ajrapetyan, M.G.; Galoyan, A.S.; Zarubin, P.I.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Chatrchyan, S.A.; Enkovskij, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Events in hadronic and nuclear collisions, which contain a central dijet system together with the two quasi-elastically scattered beam particles are usually described by double pomeron scattering. We investigate these processes for central production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs on the LHC by using the CMS detector. The total and differential cross sections with the formation of cc bar and bb bar pairs for various interactions assumed to a realization on the LHC are evaluated. It is especially marked that this process can be used for investigations of various aspects of low-x physics, for instance, for a research of the gluon and quark distributions in the pomerons, the factorization hypothesis, coherent interaction of nuclei, nuclei shadowing and so on

  9. Conformations of double-headed, triple-tailed phospholipid oxidation lipid products in model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermetter, Albin; Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Products of phospholipid oxidation can produce lipids with a carbonyl moiety at the end of a shortened lipid acyl tail, such as 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC). The carbonyl tail of POVPC can covalently bond to the free tertiary amine of a phosphatidylethanolamine...

  10. High-energy particle diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of neutron and gamma-ray production double differential cross section at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    High energy nuclear radiations were measured for 0.8-3.0 GeV proton induced reactions at KEK. The measurement was carried out to overcome the problems arising from the use of secondary beam line of a quite low incident beam intensity. Digital pulse shape discrimination method was applicable to separation between high energy neutrons and gamma-rays. By the use of a number of scintillators, cross sections were obtained for production of neutrons and gamma-rays. (author)

  12. Search for Double Higgs Production in the Final State with Two Photons and Two Bottom Quarks at the CMS Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebda, Philip Robert

    A search for the production of Higgs pairs in the decay channel with two photons and two bottom quarks is reported for both resonant and nonresonant cases. The data corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 /fb of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the CMS detector at the CERN Large Hardron Collider. The candidate events are selected by requiring two photons and two jets and are classified according to the number of jets tagged as coming from the hadronization of a bottom quark. The search for resonance production of two Higgs bosons through a new particle as hypothesized in extensions to the Standard Model involving a Radion or KK-graviton from models with warped extra dimensions or involving a heavy Higgs from models with supersymmetry, is performed on the resonant mass range from 260 GeV to 1100 GeV. The search for Standard Model nonresonant production of two Higgs bosons is performed; in addition a theoretical framework is explored for the analysis of anomalous values of the couplings tt¯H, HHH, and tt¯HH. The observations are consistent with background expectations. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are extracted on the production cross section of resonant and SM nonresonant production. In particular, the Radion with a vacuum expectation of 1 TeV is observed (expected) to be excluded with masses below 0.97 TeV (0.88 TeV), while the analysis is not sensitive to the Radion with a vacuum expectation of 3 TeV. The nonresonant double Higgs cross section is observed (expected) to be excluded at 1.91 fb (1.59 fb) or 72.9 (60.7) times the NNLO Standard Model value.

  13. Protectin DX, a double lipoxygenase product of DHA, inhibits both ROS production in human neutrophils and cyclooxygenase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Boussetta, Tarek; Makni-Maalej, Karama; Fay, Michèle; Driss, Fathi; El-Benna, Jamel; Lagarde, Michel; Guichardant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase (NOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This ROS overproduction is mediated by phosphorylation of the NOX subunits with an uncontrolled manner. Therefore, targeting neutrophil subunits would represent a promising strategy to moderate NOX activity, lower ROS, and other inflammatory agents, such as cytokines and leukotrienes, produced by neutrophils. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of protectin DX (PDX) - a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) di-hydroxylated product which inhibits blood platelet aggregation - on neutrophil activation in vitro. We found that PDX decreases ROS production, inhibits NOX activation and MPO release from neutrophils. We also confirm, that PDX is an anti-aggregatory and anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting both cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2, E.C. 1.14.99.1) as well as COX-2 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-treated human neutrophils. However, PDX has no effect on the 5-lipoxygenase pathway that produces the chemotactic agent leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Taken together, our results suggest that PDX could be a protective agent against neutrophil invasion in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24254970

  14. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  15. Production of double antibody for radioimmunoassay (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.R. da.

    1993-01-01

    A second antibody (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum) to be used in RIAs in which the first antibody is raised in rabbits was produced. For this production, initially the IgG was isolated from rabbit serum and purified by sodium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Four sheep were immunized with 500 u g of purified rabbit IgG, emulsified in Freund Complete Adjuvant and administered by multisite subcutaneous injections. These injections were repeated at 20-days intervals and blood samples (40 ml) were taken from the jugular vein 10 days after the boosts for the evaluation of the antisera title. After each four boosts a great bleeding was done by the same route. Approximately 500 ml of serum were obtained in each bleeding per animal. The antisera were evaluated by the human thyrotropin RIA developed at IPEN laboratories employing reagents provided by NIDDKD, USA. These evaluations referred to the determination of the antisera title and of the ideal concentration of carrier IgG, to the study of the kinetic of precipitation and to the confirmation of the inexistent cross-reactivity with human IgG, in comparison with a reference antiserum of know precipitation characteristics supplied by the Radioassay System Laboratories. Approximately 3,6 l of antiserum (sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum) were produced from the four sheep, which presented title and precipitation characteristics very similar to those exhibited by the imported commercial product, even presenting higher titles. The results obtained in this work indicated that it was created enough experience for the production of this biological reagent for RIA, that could be done integrally in the country in greater scale, and at a very reduced cost. (author). 81 refs, 36 figs, 33 tabs

  16. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  17. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  18. Double quantum dots decorated 3D graphene flowers for highly efficient photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qifa; Xu, Jing; Wang, Tao; Fan, Ling; Ma, Ruifang; Yu, Xinzhi; Zhu, Jian; Xu, Zhi; Lu, Bingan

    2017-11-01

    Photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) has been demonstrated as a promising technique for hydrogen production. However, the high over-potential and high recombination rate of photo-induced electron-hole pairs lead to poor hydrogen production efficiency. In order to overcome these problems, TiO2 and Au dual quantum dots (QDs) on three-dimensional graphene flowers (Au@TiO2@3DGFs) was synthesized by an electro-deposition strategy. The combination of Au and TiO2 modulates the band gap of TiO2, shifts the absorption to visible lights and improves the utilization efficiency of solar light. Simultaneously, the size-quantization TiO2 on 3DGFs not only achieves a larger specific surface area over conventional nanomaterials, but also promotes the separation of the photo-induced electron-hole pairs. Besides, the 3DGFs as a scaffold for QDs can provide more active sites and stable structure. Thus, the newly-developed Au@TiO2@3DGFs composite exhibited an impressive PEC activity and excellent durability. Under -240 mV potential (vs. RHE), the photoelectric current density involved visible light illumination (100 mW cm-2) reached 90 mA cm-2, which was about 3.6 times of the natural current density (without light, only 25 mA cm-2). It worth noting that the photoelectric current density did not degrade and even increased to 95 mA cm-2 over 90 h irradiation, indicating an amazing chemical stability.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  20. Neutron production with a pyroelectric double-crystal assembly without nano-tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Corse, W.; Crimi, S.; Fox, J.

    2010-01-01

    Two cylindrical LiTaO 3 crystals facing each other's deuterated circular face were exposed to deuterium gas at an ambient pressure of a few mTorr. With a distance of about 4 cm between the z + and z - cut crystal faces, neutrons were produced via the 2 H(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction upon the heating and cooling of the crystals. The 2.5 MeV neutrons were detected with organic liquid scintillation detectors equipped with neutron-gamma pulse-shape discrimination electronics to reject pulses generated by the intense X-ray flux. During the cooling phase of naked crystals, deuterium ion-beam (D 2 + ) energies of up to 400 keV were obtained as deduced from the associated electron bremsstrahlung end-point energy. The highest electron-beam energy observed during the heating phase was 360 keV. With a layer of deuterated polyethylene evaporated on the front face of the crystals, the maximal energies were about 10% lower. In contrast to earlier studies, an electric-field enhancing nano-tip was not employed. Neutron yields up to 500 per thermal cycle were observed, resulting in a total neutron production yield of about 1.6x10 4 neutrons per thermal cycle. Our approach has the potential of being substantially improved by reducing the frequency of the discharges we are currently experiencing with our geometry, which was not designed for the unprecedented high potentials produced in the presentwork.

  1. Neutron production with a pyroelectric double-crystal assembly without nano-tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornow, W., E-mail: tornow@tunl.duke.ed [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Corse, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Crimi, S. [Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Fox, J. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2010-12-21

    Two cylindrical LiTaO{sub 3} crystals facing each other's deuterated circular face were exposed to deuterium gas at an ambient pressure of a few mTorr. With a distance of about 4 cm between the z{sup +} and z{sup -} cut crystal faces, neutrons were produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He fusion reaction upon the heating and cooling of the crystals. The 2.5 MeV neutrons were detected with organic liquid scintillation detectors equipped with neutron-gamma pulse-shape discrimination electronics to reject pulses generated by the intense X-ray flux. During the cooling phase of naked crystals, deuterium ion-beam (D{sub 2}{sup +}) energies of up to 400 keV were obtained as deduced from the associated electron bremsstrahlung end-point energy. The highest electron-beam energy observed during the heating phase was 360 keV. With a layer of deuterated polyethylene evaporated on the front face of the crystals, the maximal energies were about 10% lower. In contrast to earlier studies, an electric-field enhancing nano-tip was not employed. Neutron yields up to 500 per thermal cycle were observed, resulting in a total neutron production yield of about 1.6x10{sup 4} neutrons per thermal cycle. Our approach has the potential of being substantially improved by reducing the frequency of the discharges we are currently experiencing with our geometry, which was not designed for the unprecedented high potentials produced in the presentwork.

  2. Observables of QCD diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  3. Diffraction based overlay re-assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Laidler, David; D'havé, Koen; Cheng, Shaunee

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, numerous authors have reported the advantages of Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) over Image Based Overlay (IBO), mainly by comparison of metrology figures of merit such as TIS and TMU. Some have even gone as far as to say that DBO is the only viable overlay metrology technique for advanced technology nodes; 22nm and beyond. Typically the only reported drawback of DBO is the size of the required targets. This severely limits its effective use, when all critical layers of a product, including double patterned layers need to be measured, and in-die overlay measurements are required. In this paper we ask whether target size is the only limitation to the adoption of DBO for overlay characterization and control, or are there other metrics, which need to be considered. For example, overlay accuracy with respect to scanner baseline or on-product process overlay control? In this work, we critically re-assess the strengths and weaknesses of DBO for the applications of scanner baseline and on-product process layer overlay control. A comprehensive comparison is made to IBO. For on product process layer control we compare the performance on critical process layers; Gate, Contact and Metal. In particularly we focus on the response of the scanner to the corrections determined by each metrology technique for each process layer, as a measure of the accuracy. Our results show that to characterize an overlay metrology technique that is suitable for use in advanced technology nodes requires much more than just evaluating the conventional metrology metrics of TIS and TMU.

  4. X-ray induced DNA double strand break production and repair in mammalian cells as measured by neutral filter elution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, M O; Kohn, K W [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1979-10-01

    A neutral filter elution method was used for detecting DNA double strand breaks in mouse L1210 cells after X-ray. The assay detected the number of double strand breaks induced by as little as 1000 rad of X-ray. The rate of DNA elution through the filters under neutral conditions increased with X-ray dose. Certain conditions for deproteinization, pH, and filter type were shown to increase the assay's sensitivity. Hydrogen peroxide and Bleomycin also induced apparent DNA double strand breaks, although the ratios of double to single strand breaks varied from those produced by X-ray. The introduction of double strand cuts by HpA I restriction endonuclease in DNA lysed on filters resulted in a rapid rate of elution under neutral conditions, implying that the method can detect double strand breaks if they exist in the DNA. The eluted DNA banded with a double stranded DNA marker in cesium chloride. This evidence suggested that the assay detected DNA double strand breaks. L1210 cells were shown to rejoin most of the DNA double strand breaks induced by 5-10 krad of X-ray with a half-time of about 40 minutes. (author).

  5. Two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test for sensory analysis of spread products as an alternative to descriptive analysis with trained panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Ah; den-Hollander, Elyn; Lee, Hye-Seong

    2018-03-01

    Descriptive analysis with a trained sensory panel has thus far been the most well defined methodology to characterize various products. However, in practical terms, intensive training in descriptive analysis has been recognized as a serious defect. To overcome this limitation, various novel rapid sensory profiling methodologies have been suggested in the literature. Among these, attribute-based methodologies such as check-all-that-apply (CATA) questions showed results comparable to those of conventional sensory descriptive analysis. Kim, Hopkinson, van Hout, and Lee (2017a, 2017b) have proposed a novel attribute-based methodology termed the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with a novel output measure of applicability magnitude (d' A ) for measuring consumers' product usage experience throughout various product usage stages. In this paper, the potential of the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with d' A was investigated as an alternative to conventional sensory descriptive analysis in terms of sensory characterization and product discrimination. Twelve commercial spread products were evaluated using both conventional sensory descriptive analysis with a trained sensory panel and two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with an untrained sensory panel. The results demonstrated that the 'double-faced applicability' test can be used to provide a direct measure of the applicability magnitude of sensory attributes of the samples tested in terms of d' A for sensory characterization of individual samples and multiple sample comparisons. This suggests that when the appropriate list of attributes to be used in the questionnaire is already available, the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with d' A can be used as a more efficient alternative to conventional descriptive analysis, without requiring any intensive training process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  7. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  8. Non-diffractive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  9. Double positive CD4+CD8+ T cells: key suppressive role in the production of autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkang Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The presence of CD4+CD8+ (double positive T cells (DPT in the target organs of several autoimmune diseases has been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenic role of DPT in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Methods: A total of 175 SLE cases and 125 matched healthy controls were investigated for CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ lymphocytes and DPT by flow cytometry. Serum samples from SLE patients and controls were tested for antinuclear antibody (ANA, anti-double strain deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA, anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein (anti-U1 RNP, anti-sjogren syndrome A (anti-SSA, anti-ribosomal P protein (anti-rib-P, anti-Smith (anti-Sm, anti-Sjogren syndrome B (anti-SSB, complement 3 (C3 and complement 4 (C4. Results: The DPT median and 5-95 per cent range of SLE cases and healthy controls were 0.50 [0.10-2.60] and 0.80 [0.20-2.74] respectively (P<0.001. SLE patients were divided into a ≥1:1000 subgroup and a <1:1000 subgroup according to the ANA titre. The DPT of the former subgroup was significantly lower than that of the latter (P=0.032. The DPT medians of positive subgroups with anti-dsDNA (P<0.001, anti-U1RNP (P=0.018, anti-SSA (P=0.021 or anti-rib-P (P=0.039 were also significantly lower than the negative subgroups. Likewise, DPT was significantly lower in SLE subgroups with low concentration of C3 or C4 than those with high concentration (P<0.006. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that the DPT cells may play a key suppressive role in the production of autoantibodies in SLE. Direct evidence that DPT regulates the pathogenesis of SLE needs to be investigated in future work.

  10. Production of associated $\\Upsilon$ and open charm hadrons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV via double parton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-07-11

    Associated production of bottomonia and open charm hadrons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$TeV is observed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3$fb^{-1}$ accumulated with the LHCb detector. The observation of five combinations, $\\Upsilon(1S)D^0$, $\\Upsilon(2S)D^0$, $\\Upsilon(1S)D^+$, $\\Upsilon(2S)D^+$ and $\\Upsilon(1S)D^+_{s}$, is reported. Production cross-sections are measured for $\\Upsilon(1S)D^0$ and $\\Upsilon(1S)D^+$ pairs in the forward region. The measured cross-sections and the differential distributions indicate the dominance of double parton scattering as the main production mechanism. This allows a precise measurement of the effective cross-section for double parton scattering.

  11. High energy diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  12. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Magazzu, G.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Notarnicola, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petajajarvi, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Rella, G.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Rummel, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Ster, A.; Taylor, C.; Trummal, A.; Turini, N.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximize its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs. In addition, a novel scheme to extend the diffractive proton acceptance for high luminosity runs by installing proton detectors at IP3 is described.

  13. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Giani, S; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Cecchi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dadel, P; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; García, F; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hildén, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, R; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macrí, M; Magazzù, G; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Notarnicola, G; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Rella, G; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Rostkowski, M; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Ster, A; Taylor, C; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Zalewski, M

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximise its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM diffractive physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs.

  14. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  15. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  16. Effect of cationic substitution on the double-well hydrogen-bond potential in [K1-x(NH4)x]3H(SO4)2 proton conductors: a single-crystal neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R R; Chitra, R; Selezneva, E V; Makarova, I P

    2017-10-01

    The structure of the mixed crystal [K 1-x (NH 4 ) x ] 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 as obtained from single-crystal neutron diffraction is compared with the previously reported room-temperature neutron structure of crystalline K 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 . The two structures are very similar, as indicated by the high value of their isostructurality index (94.8%). It was found that the replacement of even a small amount (3%) of K + with NH 4 + has a significant influence on the short strong hydrogen bond connecting the two SO 4 2- ions. Earlier optical measurements had revealed that the kinetics of the superionic transition in the solid solution [K 1-x (NH 4 ) x ] 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 are much faster than in K 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 ; this reported difference in the kinetics of the superionic phase transition in this class of crystal is explained on the basis of the difference in strength of the hydrogen-bond interactions in the two structures.

  17. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  18. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix

  19. Production, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the HIV-2-neutralizing V3 loop-specific Fab fragment 7C8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Sourial, Samer; Friemann, Rosmarie; Ehnlund, Mariethe; Spetz, Anna-Lena; Harris, Robert A.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Achour, Adnane

    2009-01-01

    Neutralizing Fab fragments of the HIV-2-binding murine antibody 7C8 were generated after purification from hybridoma cell-culture supernatant. Crystallization conditions were determined and diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution. 7C8 is a mouse monoclonal antibody that is specific for the third hypervariable loop (V3 loop) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) associated protein gp125. Fab fragments of 7C8 effectively neutralize HIV-2. 7C8 was expressed and purified from a hybridoma cell line in order to establish the molecular basis underlying the specificity of the 7C8 antibody for the V3 loop as well as the specific role of the elongated third complementarity-determining region of the heavy chain (CDRH3). The antibody was digested with papain and Fab fragments were purified using size-exclusion chromatography. Hanging-drop vapour-diffusion crystallization techniques were employed and the protein was crystallized in 50 mM ammonium sulfate, 100 mM Tris–HCl pH 8.5, 25%(w/v) PEG 8000 and 2.5%(w/v) PEG 400 at 275 K. The analysed crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 100.1, c = 196.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution

  20. Doubling the CO{sub 2} concentration enhanced the activity of carbohydrate-metabolism enzymes, source carbohydrate production, photoassimilate transport, and sink strength for Opuntia ficus-indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ning; Nobel, P.S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    After exposure to a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration of 750 {mu}mol mol{sup -1} air for about 3 months, glucose and starch in the chlorenchyma of basal cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica increased 175 and 57%, respectively, compared with the current CO{sub 2} concentration of 370 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}, but sucrose content was virtually unaffected. Doubling the CO{sub 2} concentration increased the noncturnal malate production in basal cladodes by 75%, inorganic phosphate (Pi) by 32% soluble starch synthase activity by 30%, and sucrose-Pi synthase activity by 146%, but did not affect the activity of hexokinase. Doubling CO{sub 2} accelerated phloem transport of sucrose out of the basal cladodes, resulting in a 73% higher dry weight for the daughter cladodes. Doubling CO{sub 2} increased the glucose content in 14-d-old daughter cladodes by 167%, increased nocturnal malate production by 22%, decreased total amino acid content by 61%, and increased soluble starch synthase activity by 30% and sucrose synthase activity by 62%. No downward acclimation of photosynthesis during long-term exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations occurs for O. ficus-indica, consistent with its higher source capacity and sink strength than under current CO{sub 2}. These changes apparently do not result in Pi limitation of photosynthesis or suppression of genes governing photosynthesis for this perennial Crassulacean acid metabolism species, as occur for some annual crops.

  1. Natural products for the management of xerostomia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Morante, Anabel; Wolff, Andy; Bautista Mendoza, Gloria Rocio; López-Jornet, Pia

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of lycopene-enriched virgin olive oil in spray form used to treat patients with drug-induced xerostomia, comparing this with a placebo spray. This double-blind, randomized clinical trial included elderly subjects with drug-induced xerostomia (n = 60). Resting salivary flow was measured using the draining technique. The Xerostomia Inventory (XI) was used to assess symptoms and the Oral Health Impact Profile 14 (OHIP-14) to assess patient quality of life. Evaluations were made before and after 12 weeks of product/placebo application. Sixty patients took part in the study. Symptoms improved among the treatment group (n = 30) after 12 weeks in the following XI domains: 'Rate the difficulty you experience in speaking because of dryness' (P = 0.03); 'Rate how much saliva is in your mouth' (P = 0.03); and 'Rate the dryness of your lips' (P = 0.04). The placebo group (n = 30) underwent improvements in: 'Rate how much saliva is in your mouth' (P = 0.02) and 'Rate the dryness of your mouth' (P = 0.01). A significant improvement (P = 0.001) in oral-related quality of life (OHIP-14) was identified in the treatment group, while no significant differences were observed in the placebo group (P > 0.05). The topical application of lycopene-enriched virgin olive oil and its placebo counterpart improved xerostomia-related symptoms significantly (but not salivary flow rate) in patients with drug-induced xerostomia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Production of a double-humped ion velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma.......An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma....

  3. Hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A relation between hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron is discussed. A model, which takes into account unitarity effects is developed for interaction of high-energy virtual photons with nucleons. It is shown that this model gives a good description of HERA data on both total γ* p total cross section and diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in a broad region of Q 2 . It is shown how to describe the CDF data on diffractive jet production at Tevatron using an information on distribution of partons in the Pomeron from HERA experiments

  4. Effect of the double mutant e//e w//w and the culture medium on the productivity of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Mora

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of two culture media on the productivity of the double mutant ebony-white (e//e w//w of Drosophila melanogaster, aimed at improving the conditions for maintenance of Drosophila’s collection, Departamento de Biología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia. The results indicate that the productivity is affected by the culture medium, being the maize culture medium more productive than the wheat one; it was also shown that the productivity depends both, on the crosses type that is realize and on the mutant. The “+//+ +//+ x e//e w/ cross is more productive than its reciprocal cross, where the position of the ebony allele is the most important factor. With respect to the white allele, when carried by males it does not have effect on the productivity. In addition, we detected a negative effect of wheat culture medium on females +//e +//w.

  5. Influence of Zn/Fe Molar Ratio on Optical and Magnetic Properties of ZnO and ZnFe2O4 Nanocrystal as Calcined Products of Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The coprecipitation method has been used to synthesize layered double hydroxide (Zn-Fe-LDH nanostructure at different Zn2+/Fe3+ molar ratios. The structural properties of samples were studied using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD. LDH samples were calcined at 600°C to produce mixed oxides (ZnO and ZnFe2O4. The crystallite size of mixed oxide was found in the nanometer scale (18.1 nm for ZnFe2O4 and 43.3 nm for ZnO. The photocatalytic activity of the calcination products was investigated using ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The magnetic properties of calcined LDHs were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The calcined samples showed a paramagnetic behavior for all Zn2+/Fe3+ molar ratios. The effect of molar ratio on magnetic susceptibility of the calcined samples was also studied.

  6. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p+p collisions at √ps=200 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.I.; Bai, Y.; Benedosso, F.; Botje, M.A.J.; Grebenyuk, O.; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; Russcher, M.J.; Snellings, R.J.M.; van der Kolk, N.

    2008-01-01

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A_LL for inclusive jet production at mid-rapidity in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5

  7. Double π production on the deuteron with the energy-tagged photon beam of the spectrometer facility for photon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, R.

    1992-11-01

    Within the framework of this thesis it has been achieved to complete the tagging system TOPAS 1 including all aspects of hardware, software and calibration procedures. In addition, TOPAS 1, has been integrated into SAPHIR successfully, thus adding an indispensable tool for making physical measurements. Initial data analysis of the double Pion production at the Deuteron proved the basic function and usability of the tagging system in measuring total cross sections, also comprising their dependence on photon energy. (orig.) [de

  8. Diffraction. Single crystal, magnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of crystal structure and magnetic ordering is usually based on diffraction phenomena caused by the interaction of matter with X-rays, neutrons, or electrons. Complementary information is achieved due to the different character of X-rays, neutrons and electrons, and hence their different interactions with matter and further practical aspects. X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (K.A.)

  9. Increased production of biomass-degrading enzymes by double deletion of creA and creB genes involved in carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Sakurako; Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2018-02-01

    In a previous study, we reported that a double gene deletion mutant for CreA and CreB, which constitute the regulatory machinery involved in carbon catabolite repression, exhibited improved production of α-amylase compared with the wild-type strain and single creA or creB deletion mutants in Aspergillus oryzae. Because A. oryzae can also produce biomass-degrading enzymes, such as xylolytic and cellulolytic enzymes, we examined the production levels of those enzymes in deletion mutants in this study. Xylanase and β-glucosidase activities in the wild-type were hardly detected in submerged culture containing xylose as the carbon source, whereas those enzyme activities were significantly increased in the single creA deletion (ΔcreA) and double creA and creB deletion (ΔcreAΔcreB) mutants. In particular, the ΔcreAΔcreB mutant exhibited >100-fold higher xylanase and β-glucosidase activities than the wild-type. Moreover, in solid-state culture, the β-glucosidase activity of the double deletion mutant was >7-fold higher than in the wild-type. These results suggested that deletion of both creA and creB genes could also efficiently improve the production levels of biomass-degrading enzymes in A. oryzae. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  11. Dynamics from diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  12. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  13. Diffraction through partial identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  14. Diffractive optics for industrial and commercial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turunen, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland); Wyrowski, F. [eds.] [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: diffractive optics, diffraction gratings, optical system design with diffractive optics, continuous-relief diffractive lenses and microlens arrays, diffractive bifocal intraocular lenses, diffractive laser resonators, diffractive optics for semiconductor lasers, diffractive elements for optical image processing, photorefractive crystals in optical measurement systems, subwavelenth-structured elements, security applications, diffractive optics for solar cells, holographic microlithography. 999 refs.

  15. Production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the Gαs α-helical domain in complex with a nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triest, Sarah; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan

    2014-11-01

    GPCR-G-protein complexes are one of the most important components of cell-signalling cascades. Extracellular signals are sensed by membrane-associated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and transduced via G proteins towards intracellular effector molecules. Structural studies of these transient complexes are crucial to understand the molecular details of these interactions. Although a nucleotide-free GPCR-G-protein complex is stable, it is not an ideal sample for crystallization owing to the intrinsic mobility of the Gαs α-helical domain (AHD). To stabilize GPCR-G-protein complexes in a nucleotide-free form, nanobodies were selected that target the flexible GαsAHD. One of these nanobodies, CA9177, was co-crystallized with the GαsAHD. Initial crystals were obtained using the sitting-drop method in a sparse-matrix screen and further optimized. The crystals diffracted to 1.59 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=44.07, b=52.55, c=52.66 Å, α=90.00, β=107.89, γ=90.00°. The structure of this specific nanobody reveals its binding epitope on GαsAHD and will help to determine whether this nanobody could be used as crystallization chaperone for GPCR-G-protein complexes.

  16. Further enhanced production of heterologous proteins by double-gene disruption (ΔAosedD ΔAovps10) in a hyper-producing mutant of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae is used as one of the most favored hosts for heterologous protein production due to its ability to secrete large amounts of proteins into the culture medium. We previously generated a hyper-producing mutant strain of A. oryzae, AUT1, which produced 3.2- and 2.6-fold higher levels of bovine chymosin (CHY) and human lysozyme (HLY), respectively, compared with the wild-type strain. However, further enhancement of heterologous protein production by multiple gene disruption is difficult because of the low gene-targeting efficiency in strain AUT1. Here, we disrupted the ligD gene, which is involved in nonhomologous recombination, and the pyrG gene to create uridine/uracil auxotrophy in strain AUT1, to generate a hyper-producing mutant applicable to pyrG marker recycling with highly efficient gene targeting. We generated single and double disruptants of the tripeptidyl peptidase gene AosedD and vacuolar sorting receptor gene Aovps10 in the hyper-producing mutant background, and found that all disruptants showed significant increases in heterologous protein production. Particularly, double disruption of the Aovps10 and AosedD genes increased the production levels of CHY and HLY by 1.6- and 2.1-fold, respectively, compared with the parental strain. Thus, we successfully generated a fungal host for further enhancing the heterologous protein production ability by combining mutational and molecular breeding techniques.

  17. The diffraction and walk off in the second harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yujuan; Cai Bangwei; Zhang Bin

    2000-01-01

    Taking the second harmonic generation of Gaussian beam in a KDP crystal of type I matching for example, the effects of diffraction and walk off on doubling conversion efficiency have been worked out. The result indicates that the effect of diffraction is very small and can even by neglected. When the input Gaussian beam size is very small, the effect of walk off is very deleterious on doubling conversion. Along with the enlarging of beam size, the effect of walk off is much smaller and can even be neglected

  18. Multi-order nonlinear diffraction in second harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, S. M.; Neshev, D.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    We analyze the emission patterns in the process of second harmonic (SH) generation in χ(2) nonlinear gratings and identify for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the evidence of Raman-Nath type nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes.......We analyze the emission patterns in the process of second harmonic (SH) generation in χ(2) nonlinear gratings and identify for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the evidence of Raman-Nath type nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes....

  19. Contribution to diffraction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  20. Double-double effect and coordination number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mioduski, T.

    1992-01-01

    The original method of interpretation together with its theoretical foundations is developed, making it possible to use location and direction of the double-double (tetrad) effect within the Ln and An series to determine the coordination number (CN) complexes of the f-block elements. The method is applied for potentiometric and radiometric equilibrium studies. It has been pointed and that the decisive factor for the direction of the double-double effect in the case of the Gibbs energy variations is a difference in the CN of the f-element ion between the reaction product complex and that for the reaction substrate the ''regular'' effect for a given tetrad is accompanied by decrease in the CN while the ''reverse'' effect by increase in the CN. (author). 122 refs, 5 tabs, 8 figs

  1. Double-parton scattering effects in D0B+ and B+B+ meson-meson pair production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2018-05-01

    We extend our previous studies of double-parton scattering (DPS) to simultaneous production of c c ¯ and b b ¯ and production of two pairs of b b ¯. The calculation is performed within a factorized ansatz. Each parton scattering is calculated within the kT-factorization approach. The hadronization is done with the help of fragmentation functions. Production of D mesons in our framework was tested in our previous works. Here, we present our predictions for B mesons. A good agreement is achieved with the LHCb data. We present our results for c c ¯b b ¯ and b b ¯b b ¯ final states. For completeness, we compare results for double- and single-parton scattering (SPS). As for the c c ¯c c ¯ final state, the DPS dominates over the SPS, especially for small transverse momenta. We present several distributions and integrated cross sections with realistic cuts for simultaneous production of D0B+ and B+B+, suggesting future experimental studies at the LHC.

  2. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  3. Double-spin asymmetries in the cross section of rho sup 0 and phi production at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M

    2003-01-01

    Double-spin asymmetries in the cross section of electroproduction of rho sup 0 and phi mesons on the proton and deuteron are measured at the HERMES experiment. The photoabsorption asymmetry in exclusive rho sup 0 electroproduction on the proton exhibits a positive tendency. This is consistent with theoretical predictions that the exchange of an object with unnatural parity contributes to exclusive rho sup 0 electroproduction by transverse photons. The photoabsorption asymmetry on the deuteron is found to be consistent with zero. Double-spin asymmetries in rho sup 0 and phi meson electroproduction by quasi-real photons were also found to be consistent with zero; the asymmetry in the case of the phi meson is compatible with a theoretical prediction which involves s anti s knockout from the nucleon. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of neutron production double-differential cross-sections on carbon bombared with 430 MeV/ Nucleon carbon irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itashiki, Yutaro; Imahayashi, Youichi; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Uozumi, Yusuke [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Satoh, Daiki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Sanami, Toshiya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); Koba, Yusuke; Matufuji, Naruhiro [Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Carbon ion therapy has achieved satisfactory results. However, patients have a risk to get a secondary cancer. In order to estimate the risk, it is essential to understand particle transportation and nuclear reactions in the patient's body. The particle transport Monte Carlo simulation code is a useful tool to understand them. Since the code validation for heavy ion incident reactions is not enough, the experimental data of the elementary reaction processes are needed. We measured neutron production double-differential cross-sections (DDXs) on a carbon bombarded with 430 MeV/nucleon carbon beam at PH2 beam line of HIMAC facility in NIRS. Neutrons produced in the target were measured with NE213 liquid organic scintillators located at six angles of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90°. Neutron production double-differential cross-sections for carbon bombarded with 430 MeV/nucleon carbon ions were measured by the time-of-flight method with NE213 liquid organic scintillators at six angles of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90°. The cross sections were obtained from 1 MeV to several hundred MeV. The experimental data were compared with calculated results obtained by Monte Carlo simulation codes PHITS, Geant4, and FLUKA. PHITS was able to reproduce neutron production for elementary processes of carbon-carbon reaction precisely the best of three codes.

  5. Improving thermal efficiency and increasing production rate in the double moving beds thermally coupled reactors by using differential evolution (DE) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Rafiei, Razieh; Shariati, Alireza; Iranshahi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Double moving bed thermally coupled reactor is modeled in two dimensions. • The required heat of naphtha process is attained with nitrobenzene hydrogenation. • DE optimization method is applied to optimize operating conditions. • Hydrogen, aromatic and aniline productions increase in the proposed configuration. - Abstract: According to the global requirements for energy saving and the control of global warming, multifunctional auto-thermal reactors as a novel concept in the process integration (PI) have risen up in the recent years. In the novel modification presented in this study, the required heat of endothermic naphtha reforming process has been supplied by nitrobenzene hydrogenation reaction. In addition, the enhancement of reactor performance, such as the increase of production rate, has become a key issue in the diverse industries. Thus, Differential Evolution (DE) technique is applied to optimize the operating conditions (temperature and pressure) and designing parameters of a thermally coupled reactor with double moving beds. Ultimately, the obtained results of the proposed model are compared with non-optimized and conventional model. This model results in noticeable reduction in the operational costs as well as enhancement of the net profit of the plant. The increase in the hydrogen and aromatic production shows the superiority of the proposed model.

  6. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p+C→[Y0Κ+]+C type and observation of narrow structures in Σ(1385)0Κ+ and Σ0Κ+ effective mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovkin, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Kubarovsky, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the coherent diffractive production reactions on carbon nuclei p + C → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + C and p + C → [Σ 0 K + ] + C were investigated. The evidences for new baryon states were obtained in the study of hyperon-kaon effective mass spectra in these two reactions: X(2050) with mass M = (2052 ± 6) MeV and width Γ = (35 +22 -35 ) MeV in M[Σ(1385) 0 K + ] and X(2000) with M = 1999 ± 6 MeV and Γ = 91 ± 17 MeV in M[Σ 0 K + ]. The unusual features of these massive states (small enough decay widths, anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange particles emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. (orig.)

  7. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of ρ + C → [Y0 K+] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) → Σ(1385)0 K+ and X(2000) → Σ0 K+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovkin, S.V.; Konychev, A.P.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the coherent diffractive production reactions on carbon nuclei ρ + C → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + C and ρ + C → [Σ 0 K + ] + C were studied. In the effective mass spectrum M(Y K) of the first reaction X(2050) peak with mass M = (2052 ± 6) MeV and width Γ = (35 -35 +22 ) was observed (with C.L. > 6/8 standard deviations) and in the second reaction X(2000) state with M = 1999 ± 7 MeV and Γ = 91 ± 17 MeV (C.L. > 10 s.d.) was clearly seen. The unusual features of these massive states (small enough decay widths, anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange particles emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  8. The Higgs-strahlung and double Higgs-strahlung production in the left-right twin Higgs model at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao-Bei, Liu; Hong-Mei, Han; Xue-Lei, Wang

    2008-01-01

    The Higgs-strahlung process e + e - → ZH and the double Higgs-strahlung process e + e - → ZHH are very important for studying Higgs boson properties and the Higgs self-coupling in the high-energy e + e - collider (ILC). We calculate the contributions of the left-right twin Higgs (LRTH) model to these processes and find that, in the favorable parameter spaces, the LRTH model can generate significant corrections to the production cross-section of these processes. We expect that the possible signals of the LRTH model can be detected via these processes in the future ILC experiments. (authors)

  9. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive $J/\\psi$ production in longitudinally polarized $p+p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=510$ GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the double helicity asymmetry, $A_{LL}^{J/\\psi}$, in inclusive $J/\\psi$ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and rapidity $|y|$. The data analyzed were taken during $\\sqrt{s}=510$ GeV longitudinally polarized $p$$+$$p$ collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, $J/\\psi$ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus $A_{LL}^{J/\\psi}$ is ...

  10. Application of the double change model to the A1 production in the π-p→p (3π)- reaction at 1800 in C.M.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Mesons of spin-parity J sup(P)=1 + are presented, doing a theoretical and experimental summary of current state of these particles and a Regge double-change model is applied to the π - p→p (3π) - reaction to study the A 1 - backward production with π - P sub(lab) at 9 and 12 GeV/c. The results obtained using this model are compared to the experimental results, and it is verified that the model works well. Further, it is verified that the unknown coupling constant G 2 sub(pΔΔ)/4π should be around 40. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon.

  12. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Propagation and diffraction of optical vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Pascal; Skelton, Susan E.; Leburn, Christopher G.; Streuber, Casey T.; Wright, Ewan M.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the propagation and diffraction of optical vortices (Laguerre-Gaussian beams) of varying azimuthal index past a circular obstacle and Young's double slits. When the beam and obstacle centers are aligned the famous spot of Arago, which arises for zero azimuthal index, is replaced for non-zero azimuthal indices by a dark spot of Arago, a simple consequence of the conserved phase singularity at the beam center. We explore how for larger azimuthal indices, as the beam and obstacle centers are progressively misaligned, the central dark spot breaks up into several dark spots of Arago. Using Young's double slits we can easily measure the azimuthal index of the vortex beam, even for polychromatic vortices generated by broadband supercontinuum radiation

  14. A double-edged sword: the effects of challenge and hindrance time pressure on new product development teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, D.S.F.; van Eerde, W.; Chai, K.H.; Rutte, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Bringing new products to market requires team effort. New product development teams often face demanding schedules and high deliverable expectations, making time pressure a common experience at the workplace. Past literature have generally associated the relationship between time pressure and

  15. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  16. Developments in diffraction databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of databases available to the diffraction community. Two of the more important of these are the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) maintained by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) maintained by Fachsinformationzentrum (FIZ, Karlsruhe). In application, the PDF has been used as an indispensable tool in phase identification and identification of unknowns. The ICSD database has extensive and explicit reference to the structures of compounds: atomic coordinates, space group and even thermal vibration parameters. A similar database, but for organic compounds, is maintained by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. These databases are often used as independent sources of information. However, little thought has been given on how to exploit the combined properties of structural database tools. A recently completed agreement between ICDD and FIZ, plus ICDD and Cambridge, provides a first step in complementary use of the PDF and the ICSD databases. The focus of this paper (as indicated below) is to examine ways of exploiting the combined properties of both databases. In 1996, there were approximately 76,000 entries in the PDF and approximately 43,000 entries in the ICSD database. The ICSD database has now been used to calculate entries in the PDF. Thus, to derive d-spacing and peak intensity data requires the synthesis of full diffraction patterns, i.e., we use the structural data in the ICSD database and then add instrumental resolution information. The combined data from PDF and ICSD can be effectively used in many ways. For example, we can calculate PDF data for an ideally random crystal distribution and also in the absence of preferred orientation. Again, we can use systematic studies of intermediate members in solid solutions series to help produce reliable quantitative phase analyses. In some cases, we can study how solid solution properties vary with composition and

  17. Double-spin asymmetry of J/ψ production in polarized pp-collisions at HERA-N-vector polarized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teryaev, O.; Tkabladze, A.

    1996-01-01

    We calculated the color-octet contribution to the double spin asymmetry of J/ψ hadroproduction with nonzero transverse momenta at fixed target energies √ s ≅ 40 GeV. It is shown that color-octet contribution is dominant in the asymmetries. The expected asymmetries and statistical errors in a future option of HERA with longitudinally polarized protons at √ s = 39 GeV (HERA-N polarized) should allow one to distinguish between different parametrizations for polarized gluon distribution in proton

  18. The 'Double-Edged Sword' of high-feature products: an explorative study of the business impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzers, J.; Ouden, den P.H.; Lu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In high-technology consumer markets, manufacturers integrate a growing number of technologies and features to satisfy consumers' preference for high-feature products. At the same time, companies report an increasing number of consumer complaints and even product returns, not due to product faults

  19. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde-Wright; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-03-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H = dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp-->p + (gap) + H + (gap) + p. It is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions proceed over widely different time- and distance scales and are thus approximately independent. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons. Its amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the protons, which can be measured in J= production in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate in a model-independent way in terms of the pp elastic scattering amplitude. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. A simple geometric picture of the interplay of hard and soft interactions in diffraction is obtained. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton, or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons (''diffraction pattern''). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions, and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the LHC.

  20. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde-Wright; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H = dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp-->p + (gap) + H + (gap) + p. It is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions proceed over widely different time- and distance scales and are thus approximately independent. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons. Its amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the protons, which can be measured in J= production in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate in a model-independent way in terms of the pp elastic scattering amplitude. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. A simple geometric picture of the interplay of hard and soft interactions in diffraction is obtained. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton, or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons (''diffraction pattern''). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions, and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the LHC

  1. 5-dimensional quantum gravity effects in exclusive double diffractive events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, A.V.; Petrov, V.A.; Ryutin, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The experimentally measurable effects related to extra dimensional gravity in a RS-type brane world are estimated. Two options of the RS framework (with small and large curvature) are considered. It is shown that physical signals of both can be detected by the joint experiment of the CMS and TOTEM Collaborations at the LHC

  2. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive J /ψ production in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report the double-helicity asymmetry, ALL J /ψ, in inclusive J /ψ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum pT and rapidity |y |. The data analyzed were taken during √{s }=510 GeV longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, J /ψ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus ALL J /ψ is sensitive to the gluon polarization inside the proton. We measured ALL J /ψ by detecting the decay daughter muon pairs μ+μ- within the PHENIX muon spectrometers in the rapidity range 1.2 <|y |<2.2 . In this kinematic range, we measured the ALL J /ψ to be 0.012 ±0.010 (stat) ±0.003 (syst). The ALL J /ψ can be expressed to be proportional to the product of the gluon polarization distributions at two distinct ranges of Bjorken x : one at moderate range x ≈5 ×10-2 where recent data of jet and π0 double helicity spin asymmetries have shown evidence for significant gluon polarization, and the other one covering the poorly known small-x region x ≈2 ×10-3. Thus our new results could be used to further constrain the gluon polarization for x <5 ×10-2.

  3. GENXICC: A generator for hadronic production of the double heavy baryons ΞccΞcc, ΞbcΞbc and ΞbbΞbb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Wu, Xing-Gang

    2007-09-01

    We write down a generator program for the hadronic production of the double-heavy baryons Ξ, Ξ and Ξ according to relevant publications. We name it as GENXICC and we test it by comparing its numerical results with those in references. It is written in a PYTHIA-compatible format and it can be easily implemented into PYTHIA. GENXICC is also written in modularization manner, with make, a GNU C compiler, one may apply the generator to various situations or experimental environments very conveniently. Program summaryProgram title:GENXICC Catalogue identifier:ADZJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:99 252 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:1 432 846 Distribution format:tar.gz Programming language:FORTRAN77/90 Computer:Any LINUX based on PC with FORTRAN77 or FORTRAN90 and GNU C compiler installed Operating systems:LINUX RAM:About 2.0 MB Classification:11.2 Nature of problem:Hadronic production of a double-heavy baryons: Ξ, Ξ and Ξ. Solution method:The production of the double-heavy baryons is realized by producing a binding double-heavy diquark either (QQ)[3]3¯,6 ( Q,Q=b,c) or (QQ)[1]3¯,6, which is in color anti-triplet 3¯ or color sextuplet 6 and in S-wave triplet or singlet configuration, respectively, and then by absorbing a proper light quark non-perturbatively. For the production of the various double-heavy baryons Ξ, Ξ and Ξ, the 'gluon-gluon fusion' mechanism, being the most important, is written precisely in the generator, but two additional mechanisms, i.e. the 'gluon-charm collision' and the 'charm-charm collision' ones, only for Ξ ( Ξcc+ or Ξcc++) are written. Furthermore, all the mechanisms are treated consistently within the general-mass flavor

  4. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized

  5. Self-assembled 3D flower-like Ni2+-Fe3+ layered double hydroxides and their calcined products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Ting; Tang Yiwen; Jia Zhiyong; Li Dawei; Hu Xiaoyan; Li Bihui; Luo Lijuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a facile solvothermal method to synthesize self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) Ni 2+ -Fe 3+ layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Flower-like Ni 2+ -Fe 3+ LDHs constructed of thin nanopetals were obtained using ethylene glycol (EG) as a chelating reagent and urea as a hydrolysis agent. The reaction mechanism and self-assembly process are discussed. After calcinating the as-prepared LDHs at 450 0 C in nitrogen gas, porous NiO/NiFe 2 O 4 nanosheets were obtained. This work resulted in the development of a simple, cheap, and effective route for the fabrication of large area Ni 2+ -Fe 3+ LDHs as well as porous NiO/NiFe 2 O 4 nanosheets.

  6. Double Trouble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas; Kievit, Robert; Simons, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Double Trouble highlights the career of Dutch scriptwriter and television producer Chiem van Houweninge, well-known for his long-running TV comedy series and as author of episodes for TV detective series. Double Trouble gives Van Houweninge's own views on writing and filming in television prime

  7. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  8. Diffraction and Unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  9. A Bragg curve counter with an internal production target for the measurement of the double-differential cross-section of fragment production induced by neutrons at energies of tens of MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanami, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Oishi, T.; Hosokawa, M.; Kamada, S.; Tanaka, Su.; Iwamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Baba, M.

    2009-01-01

    A Bragg curve counter equipped with an internal production target was developed for the measurements of double-differential cross-sections of fragment production induced by neutrons at energies of tens of MeV. The internal target permitted a large detection solid angle and thus the registration of processes at low production rates. In this specific geometry, the detection solid angle depends on the emission angle and the range of the particle. Therefore the energy, atomic number, and angle of trajectory of the particle have to be taken into account for the determination of the solid angle. For the selection of events with tracks confined within a defined cylindrical volume around the detector axis, a segmented anode was applied. The double-differential cross-sections for neutron-induced production of lithium, beryllium, and boron fragments from a carbon target were measured at 0 deg. for 65 MeV neutrons. The results are in good agreement with theoretical calculation using PHITS code with GEM and ISOBAR model.

  10. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    OpenAIRE

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  11. Prospects for Diffractive and Forward Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Albrow, M; Arneodo, M; Avati, V; Bartalini, P; Berardi, V; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brucken, E; Burtovoy, V; Buzzo, A; Calicchio, M; Capurro, F; Catanesi, M G; Catastini, P; Ciocci, M A; Croft, R; Datsko, K; Deile, M; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; De Jesus Damiao, D; Robutti, E; de Roeck, A; D'Enterria, D G; De Wolf, E A; Eggert, K; Engel, R; Erhan, S; Ferro, F; García-Fuertes, W; Geist, W; Grothe, M; Guillaud, J P; Heino, J; Hees, A; Hilden, T; Kalliopuska, J; Kaspar, J; Katsas, P; Kim, V; Klyukhin, V; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Kuznetsov, A; Lami, S; Lamsa, J; Latino, G; Lauhakanga, R; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Liu, Y; Loginov, A; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macri, M; Mäki, T; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Mnich, J; Moussienko, I; Murray, M; Niewiadomski, H; Noschis, E; Notarnicola, G; Ochesanu, S; Österberg, K; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Ottela, M; Ovyn, S; Palazzi, P; Panagiotou, A D; Paoletti, R; Popov, V; Petrov, V; Pierzchala, T; Piotrzkowski, K; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Rella, G; Reucroft, S; Ropelewski, Leszek; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Ruspa, M; Ryutin, R; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santoro, A F S; Santroni, A; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarycheva, L; Schilling, F P; Schlein, P E; Scribano Memoria, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Snow, G R; Sobol, A; Solano, A; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Swain, J; Sznajder, A; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, C C; Torp, F; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Van Der Donckt, M; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Vilela-Pereira, A; Whitmore, J; Zaborov, D

    2006-01-01

    The CMS and TOTEM experiments intend to carry out a joint diffractive/forward physics program with an unprecedented rapidity coverage. The present document outlines some aspects of such a physics program, which spans from the investigation of the low-x structure of the proton to the diffractive production of a SM or MSSM Higgs boson.

  12. Inclusive measurements on diffractive processes in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Measurements from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process, ep → eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation, are presented for photon virtualities in the range 2.2 2 2 and squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfying | t | 2 . Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis. Combining measurements of the inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process with an analysis of diffractive di jet production allows a very sensitive determination of both quark and gluon distributions. (author)

  13. Efficient production of α-ketoglutarate in the gdh deleted Corynebacterium glutamicum by novel double-phase pH and biotin control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjun; Sun, Lanchao; Feng, Jia; Wu, Ruifang; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2016-06-01

    Production of L-glutamate using a biotin-deficient strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum has a long history. The process is achieved by controlling biotin at suboptimal dose in the initial fermentation medium, meanwhile feeding NH4OH to adjust pH so that α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) can be converted to L-glutamate. In this study, we deleted glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh1 and gdh2) of C. glutamicum GKG-047, an L-glutamate overproducing strain, to produce α-KG that is the direct precursor of L-glutamate. Based on the method of L-glutamate fermentation, we developed a novel double-phase pH and biotin control strategy for α-KG production. Specifically, NH4OH was added to adjust the pH at the bacterial growth stage and NaOH was used when the cells began to produce acid; besides adding an appropriate amount of biotin in the initial medium, certain amount of additional biotin was supplemented at the middle stage of fermentation to maintain a high cell viability and promote the carbon fixation to the flux of α-KG production. Under this control strategy, 45.6 g/L α-KG accumulated after 30-h fermentation in a 7.5-L fermentor and the productivity and yield achieved were 1.52 g/L/h and 0.42 g/g, respectively.

  14. Project Half Double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Ehlers, Michael; Adland, Karoline Thorp

    activities carried out within the framework of the projects. The formal part of Project Half Double was initiated in June 2015. We started out by developing, refining and testing the Half Double methodology on seven pilot projects in the first phase of the project, which will end June 2016. The current......Project Half Double has a clear mission to succeed in finding a project methodology that can increase the success rate of our projects while increasing the speed at which we generate new ideas and develop new products and services. Chaos and complexity should be seen as a basic condition...... and as an opportunity rather than a threat and a risk. We are convinced that by doing so, we can strengthen Denmark’s competitiveness and play an important role in the battle for jobs and future welfare. The overall goal is to deliver “projects in half the time with double the impact”, where projects in half the time...

  15. Project Half Double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Gerstrøm, Anna; Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe

    The Half Double mission: Project Half Double has a clear mission. We want to succeed in finding a project methodology that can increase the success rate of our projects while increasing the development speed of new products and services. We are convinced that by doing so we can strengthen...... the competitiveness of Denmark and play an important role in the battle for jobs and future welfare. The overall goal is to deliver “Projects in half the time with double the impact” where projects in half the time should be understood as half the time to impact (benefit realization, effect is achieved......) and not as half the time for project execution. The Half Double project journey: It all began in May 2013 when we asked ourselves: How do we create a new and radical project paradigm that can create successful projects? Today we are a movement of hundreds of passionate project people, and it grows larger...

  16. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  17. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  18. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS. The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, −t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  19. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π 0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and Φ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  20. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e → p → → epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and EbarT. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  1. Double Z-scheme ZnO/ZnS/g-C3N4 ternary structure for efficient photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhifang; Wu, Yan; Thirugnanam, Natarajan; Li, Gonglin

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, a novel ZnO/ZnS/g-C3N4 ternary nanocomposite with double Z-scheme heterojunction has been designed via a two-step facile chemical conversion route. The spherical ZnS nanoparticles were uniformly loaded onto ZnO nanoflowers surface. And then the ZnO/ZnS nanocomposite was further hybridized with g-C3N4 nanosheets. Ternary ZnO/ZnS/g-C3N4 nanocomposite displays the largest specific surface area (about 76.2 m2/g), which provides plentiful activated sites for photocatalytic reaction. Furthermore, the ternary material exhibits the highest methylene blue photodegradation rate of about 0.0218 min-1 and the optimum photocatalytic H2 production (1205 μmol/g) over water splitting at 4 h under solar light irradiation. Moreover, it showed the highest photocurrent effect and the minimum charge-transfer resistance. These results implied that the higher photoactivity of ZnO/ZnS/g-C3N4 nanocomposite could be attributed to the multi-steps charge transfer and effective electron-hole separation in the double Z-scheme system.

  2. Causal aspects of diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-01-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known

  4. Gluon radiation in diffractive electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; McDermott, M.F.; Hebecker, A.

    1996-07-01

    Order α s -correlations to the diffractive structure functions F L D and F 2 D at large Q 2 and small x are evaluated in the semiclassical approach, where the initial proton is treated as a classical colour field. The diffractive final state contains a fast gluon in addition to a quark-antiquark pair. Two of these partons may have large transverse momentum. Our calculations lead to an intuitive picture of deep-inelastic diffractive processes which is very similar to Bjorken's aligned-jet model. Both diffractive structure functions contain leading twist contributions from high-p perpendicular to jets. (orig.)

  5. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  6. Double inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    The Zel'dovich spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations is a generic prediction of inflation. There is increasing evidence that when the spectrum is normalized by observational data on small scales, there is not enough power on large scales to account for the observed large-scale structure in the Universe. Decoupling the spectrum on large and small scales could solve this problem. As a means of decoupling the large and small scales we propose double inflation (i.e., two episodes of inflation). In this scenario the spectrum on large scales is determined by the first episode of inflation and those on small scales by a second episode of inflation. We present three models for such a scenario. By nearly saturating the large angular-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy bound, we can easily account for the observed large-scale structure. We take the perturbations on small scales to be very large, deltarho/rho approx. = 0.1 to 0.01, which results in the production of primordial black holes (PBHs), early formation of structure, reionization of the Universe, and a rich array of astrophysical events. The Ω-problem is also addressed by our scenario. Allowing the density perturbations produced by the second episode of inflation to be large also lessens the fine-tuning required in the scalar potential and makes reheating much easier. We briefly speculate on the possibility that the second episode of inflation proceeds through the nucleation of bubbles, which today manifest themselves as empty bubbles whose surfaces are covered with galaxies. 37 refs., 1 fig

  7. Production of DNA Double Strand Breaks in Human Cells due to Acute Exposure to Tritiated Water (HTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, R.; German, U.; Alfassi, Z. B.; Priel, E.

    2014-01-01

    The average and maximum energies of the beta emission from 3H are 5.69 keV and 18.6 keV respectively. The average range in water (or soft tissues), around 0.5 1/4m (500 nm), is considerably less than the typical diameter of a cell (10-30 1/4m), and even of a cell nucleus (5-10 1/4m), thus the micro-location of the tritium atom may well be crucial in determining its biochemical consequences. Due to the high ionization density of the beta particles emitted by tritium (about 400 ion pairs/1/4m) possible interaction of tritium beta radiation with DNA may play a significant role. Tritiated water (HTO) is the main chemical form in which tritium is found in the environment. In the body it may be retained as organically bound tritium (OBT), binding to biological molecules or remaining as OBT with various degrees of solubility. OBT can be retained in the human body much longer than HTO and therefore the dose arising from OBT can reach 50% of the total tritium dose . Histones are major protein components of chromatin. They function as spools around which DNA winds and play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. In the absence of histones, the DNA in chromosomes would be unmanageably long, as human cells each have about 1.8 m of DNA. During mitosis, DNA is duplicated and condensed, resulting in about 120 1/4m of chromosomes. It was recently reported that the phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine residue 139 (D 3 -H2AX) is associated with Double Strand Breaks (DSB) sites in DNA), which indicates the possibility of research based on the detection of DSBs in DNA. The phosphorylated megabase chromatin domain surrounding the DSB can be immunostained and visualized as discrete foci by fluorescence microscopy, as each DNA DSB formed produces a visible D 3 -H2AX focus. Since 1 Gy of radiation produces approximately 60 DSBs/cell, doses of a few mGy should be distinguishable from the background, and it was recently shown that the exposure to 1 mGy of X-rays induces

  8. Measurement of the cross section and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for dijet production in polarized p p collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, F.; Liu, Y.; Liu, P.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, C.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Z.; Zhu, X.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We report the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry AL L for midrapidity dijet production in polarized p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=200 GeV . The dijet cross section was measured and is shown to be consistent with next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD predictions. AL L results are presented for two distinct topologies, defined by the jet pseudorapidities, and are compared to predictions from several recent NLO global analyses. The measured asymmetries, the first such correlation measurements, support those analyses that find positive gluon polarization at the level of roughly 0.2 over the region of Bjorken-x >0.05 .

  9. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for continuous neutron-incidence reaction up to 100 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takehito; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kenji; Satoh, Daiki; Nakamura, Takashi; Haight, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    The inclusive measurements of neutron-incident neutron-production double-differential cross sections in intermediate energy range is now being carried out. Spallation neutrons are used as incident particles. As a part of this, the experiment was performed by using of NE213 liquid organic scintillators to detect outgoing-neutrons. Incident-neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique, and outgoing-neutron energy spectrum was derived by unfolding light-output spectrum of NE213 with response functions calculated by SCINFUL-R. Preliminary cross sections were obtained up to about 100 MeV, and were compared with calculations by the GNASH code. It is hoped to get pure measurements by using measured response functions for our detectors used in this study. (author)

  10. British and German manufacturing productivity compared : A new benchmark for 1935/36 based on double deflated value added

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fremdling, Rainer; de Jong, Herman; Timmer, Marcel P.

    We present a new estimate of Anglo-German manufacturing productivity levels for 1935/36. It is based on archival data on German manufacturing and published British census data. We calculate comparative levels of value added, correcting for differences in prices for outputs and inputs. This so-called

  11. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  12. New DC conductivity spectra of Zn–Al layered double hydroxide (Zn–Al–NO3–LDH and its calcined product of ZnO phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zn–Al–NO3–LDH nanostructure was synthesized via the coprecipitation method at molar ratio Zn2+/Al3+ = 4 and pH = 7. The resultant sample was thermally treated at calcined temperatures of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 °C. The layered structure of the Zn–Al–NO3–LDH samples was stable below the calcination temperature 200 °C as shown in powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD patterns of calcined samples. The calcination products showed a collapse of LDH structure and ZnO phase was formed at 200 °C and above. The dielectric spectroscopy of LDH was explained using anomalous low frequency dispersion (ALFD due to the low mobility of LDH carriers. The conductivity spectra of LDH can be theoretically described according to the effective phase within the calcination products of LDH. In the comparison with previously researches, this study presented higher values of DC conductivity for all studied samples.

  13. Characterization of double face adhesive sheets for ceramic tile installation; Caracterizacao de sistema de colagem dupla-face para assentamento de revestimento ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Otavio L.; Mansur, Alexandra A.P.; Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. UFMG, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The main goal of this work was the characterization of an innovative ceramic tile installation product based on double face adhesive sheets. Density, hardness, tensile strength, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with spectroscopy of dispersive energy assays were conducted. The results are in agreement with some manufacture specifications and the obtained information will be crucial in the analysis of durability and stability of the ceramic tile system installed with this new product. (author)

  14. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  15. IPARZINE-SKR study: randomized, double-blind clinical trial of a new topical product versus placebo to prevent pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, José; Soldevilla, Javier

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a new topical agent (IPARZINE-4A-SKR) on preventing category I pressure ulcers (PUs) over a 2-week period, compared with a placebo. A double-blind, randomised, multi-centre, placebo-controlled clinical trial in two parallel groups was conducted. The primary objective was to compare PU incidence between groups. Hospital and socio-sanitary centre patients (n = 194) at risk of developing a PU (Braden scale) were randomised into two groups. The intervention group included 99 patients, and the placebo group comprised 95 patients. Patients were comparable in terms of age, sex and PU risk. In both groups, patients had a high risk of developing PUs. The product was applied on the sacrum, trochanters and heels. Six PUs (incidence = 6·1%) were detected in the intervention group versus seven (incidence = 7·4%) in the placebo group. Differences were not statistically significant (z = 0·08; P = 0·94), relative risk = 0·82 (95% confidence interval = 0·29–2·36). The main limitation of the study was the sample size and, therefore, the main difficulty encountered was in determining whether the product is ineffective or simply has not been used with sufficient patients. In conclusion, it is not possible to confirm that there are any differences between the studied and the placebo treatments in the prevention of PUs. The results obtained were similar to those obtained in studies of PU prevention using products based on topical fatty acids.

  16. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  17. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  18. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, Michael G.; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC I given an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q 2 frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors I discuss high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. I introduce the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420 m downstream of ATLAS and CMS

  19. Inclusive glueball production in high-energy p+p(p) collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Peng Hong An; He Zhen Min

    2001-01-01

    Using the factorizable character of amplitudes for the double diffractive process in the Landshoff-Nachtmann model (1987), we have discussed the inclusive glueball production in high-energy pp collisions via the fusion process of two non-perturbative gluons, and have compared it with the double diffractive alike process. We found that, as the c.m. energy E/sub CMS/ increases from 20 to 20 000 GeV, the cross sections of the latter process are about one to two orders larger than the former. Such an outcome could be explained from the hypothesis of duality between glueballs and pomeron. (7 refs).

  20. Observation of double charm production involving open charm in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The production of $J/\\psi$ mesons accompanied by open charm, and of pairs of open charm hadrons are observed in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using an integrated luminosity of $355pb^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. Model independent measurements of absolute cross-sections are given together with ratios to the measured $J/\\psi$ and open charm cross-sections. The properties of these events are studied and compared to theoretical predictions.

  1. Hard diffraction and small-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In the United States, phrases such as ''small-x evolution'', ''the BFKL Pomeron'', ''deep-inelastic rapiditygap events'' and ''hard-diffraction'' do not generate the same intensity of discussion amongst high-energy physicists that they do in Europe. However, for three days in the fall such discussion filled the air at Fermilab. The ''2nd Workshop on Small-x and Diffractive Physics at the Tevatron'' was a review of the rapid theoretical and experimental progress taking place in this field. Although Quantum Chromo-dynamics (QCD) has been established as the theory of strong interactions for twenty years, as yet neither perturbative high-energy calculations nor low-energy non-perturbative techniques have been successfully extended to the mixture of high energy and low transverse momenta which characterize traditional ''soft'' diffractive processes. The simplest soft diffractive process is elastic scattering. In this case it is easiest to accept that there is an exchanged ''pomeron'', which can be pictured as a virtual entity with no electric charge or strong charge (colour), perhaps like an excitation of the vacuum. The same pomeron is expected to appear in all diffractive processes. Understanding the pomeron in QCD is a fundamental theoretical and experimental challenge. In the last two or three years the ''frontier'' in this challenging area of QCD has been pushed back significantly in both theory and experiment. Progress has been achieved by studying the evolution of hard collisions to relatively smaller constituent momenta (small x) and by studying ''hard'' diffractive collisions containing simultaneous signatures of diffraction and hard perturbative processes. The hard processes have included high transverse momentum jet production, deep inelastic lepton scattering, and (most recently) W-production

  2. Double dissociation in the reaction K-p→K-π+π-Nπ+ at 14.3GeV/c and pomeron factorisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denegri, D.; Pons, Y.; Borg, A.; Spiro, M.; Paler, K.; Tovey, S.; Combes, C.; Shah, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    Evidence for the double dissociation process K - p→QN*1/2→(antikaon neutral* π - ) (nπ + ) at 14.3GeV/c is presented. The cross section for this process is of the order of 10μb. The production differential cross section is steep, as typical of diffractive processes, and exhibits a strong correlation between the production slope and the dissociation system mass. The mass variation of the differential cross section slope and the total cross section of the double dissociation component are consistent with the factorisable Pomeron exchange model predictions [fr

  3. Fermented whey-based product improves the quality of life of males with moderate lower urinary tract symptoms: A randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausmees, Kristo; Ehrlich-Peets, Kersti; Vallas, Mirjam; Veskioja, Andre; Rammul, Kadi; Rehema, Aune; Zilmer, Mihkel; Songisepp, Epp; Kullisaar, Tiiu

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of a specific fermented whey product on lower urinary tract symptoms, main prostate related indices and oxidative stress/inflammatory markers in urine and seminal plasma in men with moderate dysuric symptoms. An additional purpose was to clarify associations between different parameters with special emphasis on pain. This was a prospective randomized double-blind 4-weeks study on men with moderate lower urinary tract symptoms who underwent the evaluation for quality of life at the baseline and at the end of the study. The symptoms were characterized by International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-PSI), the maximum urinary flow and the main prostate-related indices. In order to obtain more comprehensive information about the effects of fermented whey product on systemic oxidative stress marker 8-EPI and seminal plasma inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 and interleukin-8) were also measured. After 4 weeks consumption of fermented whey product there was a statistically significant decrease of prostate-specific antigen level in serum and systemic stress marker 8-EPI in urine compared to control group. Maximum urinary flow and NIH-PSI all studied scores and sub-scores had also significant improvement. In addition, seminal plasma interleukin-8 level substantially decreased. The consumption of special fermented whey product improved urinary function, reduced lower urinary tract symptoms, systemic oxidative stress marker and seminal plasma inflammatory status. Thus it contributed to an improvement of the quality of life in men with moderate lower urinary tract symptoms.

  4. Tetraplex PCR assay involving double gene-sites discriminates beef and buffalo in Malaysian meat curry and burger products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, S M Azad; Asing; Nizar, Nina Naquiah Ahmad; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Ali, Lokman; Asaduzzaman, Md; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque

    2017-06-01

    Replacement of beef by buffalo and vice versa is frequent in global markets, but their authentication is challenging in processed foods due to the fragmentation of most biomarkers including DNA. The shortening of target sequences through use of two target sites might ameliorate assay reliability because it is highly unlikely that both targets will be lost during food processing. For the first time, we report a tetraplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting two different DNA regions in beef (106 and 120-bp) and buffalo (90 and 138-bp) mitochondrial genes to discriminate beef and buffalo in processed foods. All targets were stable under boiling, autoclaving and microwave cooking conditions. A survey in Malaysian markets revealed 71% beef curries contained buffalo but there was no buffalo in beef burgers. The assay detected down to 0.01ng DNA and 1% meat in admixed and burger products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  6. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  7. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  8. Inhibitory effect of double atmospheric pressure argon cold plasma on spores and mycotoxin production of Aspergillus niger contaminating date palm fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouf, Salama A; Basher, Abdulrahman H; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillus niger has been reported as a potentially dangerous pathogen of date-palm fruits in Saudi Arabia due to the production of fumonisin B2 (FB2 ) and ochratoxin A (OTA). In a trial to disinfect this product, a double atmospheric pressure argon cold plasma (DAPACP) jet system was set up and evaluated against spore germination and mycotoxin production of the pathogen. The plasma jets were characterised photographically, electrically and spectroscopically. DAPACP jet length increases with the increase of argon flow rate, with optimum rate at 3.5 L min(-1) . The viability of A. niger spores, inoculated onto sterilised date palm fruit discs, progressively decreases with extension of the exposure time of DAPACP due to the more quantitative amount of OH and O radicals interacting with the examined samples. There was a progressive reduction of the amount of FB2 and OTA detected in date palm discs on extension of the exposure time of the plasma-treated inoculums at flow rate of 3.5 L min(-1) . FB2 was not detected in the discs inoculated with 6-min plasma-treated A. niger, while OTA was completely absent when the fungus was treated for 7.5 min. DAPACP showed promising results in dry fruit decontamination and in inhibition of mycotoxin release by A. niger contaminating the fruits. The progress in the commercial application of cold plasma needs further investigation concerning the ideal width of the plasma output to enable it to cover wider surfaces of the sample and consequently inducing greater plasma performance. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Prevention of head louse infestation: a randomised, double-blind, cross-over study of a novel concept product, 1% 1,2-octanediol spray versus placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian F; Brunton, Elizabeth R; French, Rebecca; Burgess, Nazma A; Lee, Peter N

    2014-05-30

    To determine whether regular use of a spray containing 1,2-octanediol 1%, which has been shown to inhibit survival of head lice, is able to work as a preventive against establishment of new infestations. Randomised, double-blind, cross-over, community study in Cambridgeshire, UK. 63 male and female schoolchildren aged 4-16 years judged to have a high risk of recurrent infestation. Only the youngest member of a household attending school participated. Participants were treated to eliminate lice, randomised between 1% octanediol or placebo sprays for 6 weeks then crossed-over to the other spray for 6 weeks. Parents applied the sprays at least twice weekly or more frequently if the hair was washed. Investigators monitored weekly for infestation and replenished supplies of spray. The primary endpoint was the time taken until the first infestation event occurred. The secondary measure was safety of the product in regular use. Intention-to-treat analysis found a total of 32 confirmed infestations in 20 participants, with 9 of them infested while using both products. In these nine participants the time to first infestation showed a significant advantage to 1% octanediol (p=0.0129). Per-protocol analysis showed only trends because the population included was not large enough to demonstrate significance. There were no serious adverse events and only two adverse events possibly related to treatment, one was a case of transient erythema and another of a rash that resolved after 5 days. Routine use of 1% octanediol spray provided a significant level of protection from infestation. It was concluded that this product is effective if applied regularly and thoroughly. ISRCTN09524995. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Evaluating the Production of Doubled Haploid Wheat Lines Using Various Methods of Wheat and Maize Crossing to Develop Heat-Tolerant Wheat Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh BAKHSHI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In this study, chromosome elimination method was used to develop doubled haploid wheat lines via crosses with maize. The plant materials used included 11, F1 wheat genotypes and maize genotype BC572. In these crosses, the maize plant was used as the male parent.Three methods of haploid production in wheat comprising conventional (A, detached-tiller culture (B and intermediate (C techniques were used and compared. The traits such as the number of seeds set, the number of embryos obtained and the number of haploid seedlings produced were studied. Comparisons showed that among various methods of storing wheat spikes, method (C was better than other techniques in terms of the percentage of seed production, embryo formation and haploid seedling production. Also, in all three methods, the percentage of seed production, the percentage of embryo formation and the percentage of haploid seedling production were respectively equal to 76.84, 25.22 and 51.89. Among the wheat genotypes in all three methods, genotype DH-133 with 87.28 percent seed set and genotype DH-132 with 32.71 percent embryo formation and 65.08 percent haploid seedling production were the best genotypes. A total of 92 doubled haploid lines were produced. In the field evaluations of 86 doubled haploid lines, traits such as growing season, plant height, lodging, kernel yield and 1000 kernel weight were examined. Finally, 3 lines were selected for adaptation and stability testing under heat stress conditions.Keywords: Wheat, Doubled haploid, Chromosome elimination, Detached-tiller culture Özet. Bu çalışmada, mısır ile çaprazlarla çift katlı haploid buğday hatlarının geliştirilmesi için kromozom eliminasyon yöntemi kullanılmıştır. Kullanılan bitki materyalleri 11, F1 buğday genotipleri ve BC572 mısır genotipini içermektedir. Bu çaprazlarda, mısır bitkisi erkek ebeveyn olarak kullanılmıştır. Geleneksel (A, ayrık-yeke kültürü (B ve ara (C

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  12. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. Diffraction at a Straight Edge: A Gem from Sommerfeld's Work in Classical Physics. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 389-400 ...

  13. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  14. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  15. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    teaching and understanding physics. ... and mathematical footing, using electromagnetic theory and the proper ... this article, we will use the word diffraction to cover all experiments ..... PES Institute of Technology. Campus ... communication!)

  16. Experimental studies of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent inelastic scattering process, usually called inclusive diffraction dissociation, is discussed. Topics include: t and M/sub x/ dependence, factorization, finite mass sum rule and charged particle multiplicities. 6 references, 14 figures

  17. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  18. Theoretical review of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2005-01-01

    We review QCD based descriptions of diffractive deep inelastic scattering emphasising the role of models with parton saturation. These models provide natural explanation of such experimentally observed facts as the constant ratio of σ diff /σ tot as a function of the Bjorken variable x, and Regge factorization of diffractive parton distributions. The Ingelman-Schlein model and the soft color interaction model are also presented

  19. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid...... medium, is presented. The DRIM is based on the velocity potential impulseresponse method, adapted to pulse-echo applications by the use of acoustical reciprocity. Specifically, the DRIM operates bydividing the reflector surface into planar elements, finding the diffraction response at the corners...

  20. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd and production of radionuclides relevant for double beta decay: Completing measurement in 5-35 MeV energy range

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Lozza, V.; Petzoldt, J.; Štursa, Jan; Zdychová, Vlasta; Zuber, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 929, SEP (2014), s. 129-142 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton activation * double beta decay * cross-section * production rates * natural neodymium Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.202, year: 2014

  1. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  2. Double Chooz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    The goal of the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment is to search for the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}. Double Chooz will use two identical detectors at 150 m and 1.05 km distance from the reactor cores. The near detector is used to monitor the reactor {nu}-bar {sub e} flux while the second is dedicated to the search for a deviation from the expected (1/distance){sup 2} behavior. This two detector concept will allow a relative normalization systematic error of ca. 0.6 %. The expected sensitivity for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} is then in the range 0.02 - 0.03 after three years of data taking. The antineutrinos will be detected in a liquid scintillator through the capture on protons followed by a gamma cascade, produced by the neutron capture on Gd.

  3. Double supergeometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederwall, Martin [Division for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology,SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-06-27

    A geometry of superspace corresponding to double field theory is developed, with type I I supergravity in D=10 as the main example. The formalism is based on an orthosymplectic extension OSp(d,d|2s) of the continuous T-duality group. Covariance under generalised super-diffeomorphisms is manifest. Ordinary superspace is obtained as a solution of the orthosymplectic section condition. A systematic study of curved superspace Bianchi identities is performed, and a relation to a double pure spinor superfield cohomology is established. A Ramond-Ramond superfield is constructed as an infinite-dimensional orthosymplectic spinor. Such objects in minimal orbits under the OSp supergroup (“pure spinors”) define super-sections.

  4. Double ambidexterity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    2017-01-01

    We leverage the business model innovation and ambidexterity literature to investigate a contradictory case, the Swedish-Finnish Telecom operator TeliaSonera. Despite being challenged by three major disruptions, the company not only still exists but also enjoys remarkably good financial performance....... Building on extant archival data and interviews, we carefully identify and map 26 organizational responses during 1992–2016. We find that the firm has overcome three critical phases by experimenting and pioneering with portfolios of business models and/or technological innovations. We describe...... this behaviour as double ambidexterity. We use an in-depth case study to conceptualize double ambidexterity and discuss its impact on the business's survival and enduring success....

  5. Transesterification of edible, non-edible and used cooking oils for biodiesel production using calcined layered double hydroxides as reusable base catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sivashunmugam; Antonyraj, Churchil A; Kannan, S

    2012-04-01

    Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were produced from edible, non-edible and used cooking oils with different fatty acid contents by transesterification with methanol using calcined layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as solid base catalysts. Among the catalysts, calcined CaAl2-LDH (hydrocalumite) showed the highest activity with >90% yield of FAME using low methanol:oil molar ratio (<6:1) at 65 °C in 5 h. The activity of the catalyst was attributed to its high basicity as supported by Hammett studies and CO(2)-TPD measurements. The catalyst was successfully reused in up to four cycles. Some of the properties such as density, viscosity, neutralization number and glycerol content of the obtained biodiesel matched well with the standard DIN values. It is concluded that a scalable heterogeneously catalyzed process for production of biodiesel in high yields from a wide variety of triglyceride oils including used oils is possible using optimized conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusiak, Anna; Strus, Magdalena; Heczko, Piotr B; Adamski, Paweł; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4-6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag(®), or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally). The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits) in both vaginal pH (Pvaginal microbiota, as demonstrated by predominance of the Lactobacillus bacteria in vaginal microbiota.

  7. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for π0 production at midrapidity in p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (AL L ) in inclusive π0 production at midrapidity from p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbative-quantum-chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π0AL L results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √{s } with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latest global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet AL L and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton Δ G for the gluon momentum fraction range x >0.05 . The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x ˜0.01 , and thus provide additional constraints on the value of Δ G .

  8. Preliminary morphological and X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals of the DNA cetyltrimethylammonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osica, V D; Pyatigorskaya, T L; Polyvtsev, O F; Dembo, A T; Kliya, M O; Vasilchenko, V N; Verkin, B I; Sukharevskya, B Y

    1977-04-01

    Double-stranded DNA molecules (molecular weight 2.5 X 10(5) - 5 X 10(5) daltons) have been crystallized from water-salt solutions as cetyltrimethylammonium salts (CTA-DNA). Variation of crystallization conditions results in a production of different types of CTA-DNA crystals: spherulits, dendrites, needle-shaped and faceted rhombic crystals, the latter beeing up to 0.3 mm on a side. X-ray diffraction data indicate that DNA molecules in the crystals form a hexagonal lattice which parameters vary slightly with the morphological type of the crystal. Comparison of the melting curves of the DNA preparation before and after crystallization suggests that DNA molecules are partially fractionated in the course of crystallization. Crystals of the CTA-DNA-proflavine complex have also been obtained.

  9. Studies of diffraction with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzebinski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The thesis is devoted to the study of diffractive physics with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. After a short introduction to diffractive physics including soft and hard diffraction, we discuss Jet-Gap-Jet production at the LHC which is particularly interesting for testing the Balitski Fadin Kuraev Lipatov QCD evolution equation. Using the signal selection requirements and a gap definition based on tracks reconstructed in the ATLAS Inner Detector, we observe a clear signal of Jet-Gap-Jet events in the data. Starting from the half-gap size of 0.8 the data cannot be properly described using only the Jet Monte Carlo sample without gaps. Furthermore, we demonstrated that DPE JGJ production, with both protons tagged in the AFP stations, should provide a significant test of the BFKL theory, once the 300 pb -1 of integrated luminosity is collected. In the last part of the thesis, we discussed the processes of Central Exclusive Jet and Exclusive π + π - production. After the data selection, the signal to background ratio is found to be of about 5/9 (1/13) for μ= 23 (46). For a collected integrated luminosity of 40(300) fb -1 (for pile-up of 23(46)) this measurement will deliver ten times better constraints on the theoretical models than the most recent ones. The additional measurement of exclusive pion production, relying on the use of the ALFA stations, allows to constrain further the exclusive models. We demonstrated that a data sample collected by the ALFA detectors should be sufficient to measure the cross section and to study various distributions, especially the invariant mass of the pion-pion system. (author) [fr

  10. A theoretical approach to low multiplicity diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishari, M.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamics of low mass inelastic diffractive production in the framework of the ''1/N dual unitarization'' scheme are investigated. The smallness of inelastic diffractive dissociation is explicitly demonstrated by incorporating a Deck type mechanism with the crucial planar bootstrap equation. Although both inelastic and elastic pomeron couplings are of the same order in 1/N, the origin for their smallness is not identical. The work further confirms the validity of the iterative procedure, where the elastic amplitude is first generated from only non-diffractive intermediate states (except possibly for central collisions). Using a previous study of the ''Cylinder'' strength, a semi-quantitative results for the integrated cross-section for low multiplicity diffractive production is also presented, and is compared with the elastic cross-section at very high energies. (author)

  11. Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV with ALICE at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidt, Felix [Physikalisches Institut, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    A double-gap topology is used for filtering central-diffractive events from a protonproton minimum-bias data sample at a centre-of-mass energy Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV. This topology is defined by particle activity in the ALICE central barrel and absence of particle activity outside. The fraction of events satisfying the double-gap requirement R{sub DG} is found to be 7.63{+-}0.02(st at.){+-}0.87(syst.) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. The background of this double-gap fraction is estimated by studying the contributions of non-diffractive, single-and double-diffractive dissociation processes as modelled by Monte Carlo event generators, and is found to be about 10%.

  12. Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 7TeV with ALICE at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidt, Felix

    2013-01-01

    A double-gap topology is used for filtering central-diffractive events from a protonproton minimum-bias data sample at a centre-of-mass energy Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 7TeV. This topology is defined by particle activity in the ALICE central barrel and absence of particle activity outside. The fraction of events satisfying the double-gap requirement R DG is found to be 7.63±0.02(st at.)±0.87(syst.)×10 −4 . The background of this double-gap fraction is estimated by studying the contributions of non-diffractive, single-and double-diffractive dissociation processes as modelled by Monte Carlo event generators, and is found to be about 10%.

  13. Diffractive hard scattering at ep and p antip colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruni, P.; Ingelman, G.; Uppsala Univ.

    1993-12-01

    Models for diffractive scattering based on the exchange of a pomeron with a parton structure are analysed in terms of hard scattering processes and the resulting characteristics of the final state. Diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering is considered in connection with the recently observed rapidity gap events at HERA. Heavy flavour and W, Z production in p anti p interactions are interesting measures of the gluon and quark component, respectively, in the pomeron. (orig.)

  14. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  15. TOF neutron diffraction study of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The time-of flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer ROTAX [1] at ISIS has been used for identification and quantitative phase analysis of archaeological pottery. Neutron diffraction yields mineral phase fractions which, in parallel with information obtained from other archaeometric examination techniques, can provide a fingerprint that can be used to identify provenance and reconstruct methods of manufacturing of an archaeological ceramic product. Phase fractions obtained from a 13th century Rhenish stoneware jar compare well with those obtained from a powder sample prepared from the same fragment. This indicates that reliable results can be obtained by illuminating a large piece or even an intact ceramic object making TOF neutron diffraction a truly non-destructive examination technique. In comparison to X-ray diffraction, information from the bulk sample rather than from surface regions is obtained. ROTAX allows for a simple experimental set-up, free of sample movements. Programmes of archaeological study on ROTAX involve Russian samples (Upper-Volga culture, 5000-2000 BC), Greek pottery, (Agora/Athens, 500-300 BC), and medieval German earthenware and stoneware ceramics (Siegburg waster heap, 13-15th century). (author)

  16. Isolation of a Bis-Iodurated Tetra-THF as a Trace Product from the Oxidation of Squalene with RuO4 and Its Double Ring Expansion to a Novel bis-THF-bis-THP Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Borbone

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel bis-iodurated polyether compound, based on an unprecedented tetra-THF backbone, has been isolated as a trace by-product of the oxidation of squalene with the catalytic system RuO2(cat./NaIO4. The double erythro configuration of the central portion of the molecule furnishes the first indirect support of the previously postulated pathway operating in the oxidative pentacyclization of the isoprenoid substrate. A bidirectional double oxidative bis-cyclization is invoked to explain the formation of this compound. The isolated substance was successfully subjected to a double rearrangement-ring expansion to give a novel bis-THF-bis-THP compound.

  17. An automatic control unit for A neutron diffraction crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Mostafa, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic transistorized unit has been designed and constructed to control the operation of the double axis crystal spectrometer installed in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The function of the automatic unit is to store the diffracted neutrons at a certain angle with respect to the direction of the incident neutron beam in a selected channel of a 1024-multichannel analyzer for a certain preadjusted time period. AT the end of this time period the unit rotates the spectrometer's arm to another angle, selects the next channel of the MCA and provides the measurement of the diffracted neutron for the same time period. Such a sequence is repeated automatically over all angles required for the neutron diffraction pattern of the sample under investigation. As a result, the stored information at the MCA provides the neutron diffraction pattern as a function of channel number, where each channel corresponds to a certain scattering angle. The stored distribution at MCA can be obtained through the analyzer read out unit. The designed automatic unit has the possibility of providing the neutron diffraction pattern using a 6-digit scaler and a printer

  18. Automatic control unit for A neutron diffraction crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Mostafa, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic transistorized unit has been designed and constructed to control the operation of the double axis crystal spectrometer installed in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The function of the automatic unit is to store the diffracted neutrons at a certain angle with respect to the direction of the incident neutron beam in a selected channel of a 1024-multichannel analyzer for a certain preadjusted time period. AT the end of this time period the unit rotates the spectrometer's arm to another angle, selects the next channel of the MCA and provides the measurement of the diffracted neutron for the same time period. Such a sequence is repeated automatically over all angles required for the neutron diffraction pattern of the sample under investigation. As a result, the stored information at the MCA provides the neutron diffraction pattern as a function of channel number, where each channel corresponds to a certain scattering angle. The stored distribution at MCA can be obtained through the analyzer read out unit. The designed automatic unit has the possibility of providing the neutron diffraction pattern using a 6-digit scaler and a printer.

  19. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  20. Workshop on industrial application of neutron diffraction. Stress measurement by neutron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Minakawa, N; Morii, Y; Oyama, Y

    2002-01-01

    This workshop was planned to make use of the neutron from the reactor and the pulse neutron source JSNS for the industrial world. Especially, this workshop focused on the stress measurement by the neutron diffraction and it was held on the Tokai JAERI from October 15 to 16, 2001. The participant total was 93 and 40 participated from the industrial world. The introduction of the residual stress development of measurement technique by the neutron diffraction method and a research of the measurement of the residual stress such as the nuclear reactor material, the ordinary structure material, the composite material, the quenching steel, the high strength material were presented and discussed in this workshop. Moreover, it was introduced for the industrial world that an internal stress measurement is important for development of new product or an improvement of a manufacturing process. The question from the industrial world about which can be measured the product form, the size, the measurement precision, the reso...

  1. Light diffraction through a feather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez García, Hugo;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a feather to study light diffraction, in a qualitative as well as in a quantitative manner. Experimental measurement of the separation between the bright spots obtained with a laser pointer allowed the determination of the space between feather's barbs and barbules. The results we have obtained agree satisfactorily with those corresponding to a typical feather. Due to the kind of materials, the related concepts and the experimental results, this activity becomes an excellent didactic resource suitable for studying diffraction, both in introductory undergraduate as well as in secondary school physics courses.

  2. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  3. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  4. Diffractive dissociation and new quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    We argue that the chiral limit of QCD can be identified with the strong (diffractive dissociation) coupling limit of reggeon field theory. Critical Pomeron scaling at high energy must then be directly related to an infra-red fixed-point of massless QCD and so requires a large number of flavors. This gives a direct argument that the emergence of diffraction-peak scaling, KNO scaling etc. at anti p-p colliders are evidence of a substantial quark structure still to be discovered

  5. Fast, inexpensive, diffraction limited cylindrical microlenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a technique for fabricating fast, well corrected cylindrical microlenses. With this technique we have made a number of different microlenses with dimensions and focal lengths in the range of few hundred μm, and diffraction limited numerical apertures as high as 0.9. The microlenses are specifically designed for applications where they can increase the radiance or otherwise enhance the optical characteristics of laser diode light. The fabrication method we use is very versatile, and the microlenses produced this way would be very inexpensive in production quantities. 6 refs., 4 figs

  6. Diet low in advanced glycation end products increases insulin sensitivity in healthy overweight individuals: a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Courten, Barbora; de Courten, Maximilian Pj; Soldatos, Georgia; Dougherty, Sonia L; Straznicky, Nora; Schlaich, Markus; Sourris, Karly C; Chand, Vibhasha; Scheijen, Jean Ljm; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Cooper, Mark E; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Walker, Karen Z; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-06-01

    The consumption of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has increased because of modern food processing and has been linked to the development of type 2 diabetes in rodents. We determined whether changing dietary AGE intake could modulate insulin sensitivity and secretion in healthy, overweight individuals. We performed a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial of diets in 20 participants [6 women and 14 men; mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 29.8 ± 3.7]. Isoenergetic- and macronutrient-matched diets that were high or low in AGE content were alternately consumed for 2 wk and separated by a 4-wk washout period. At the beginning and end of each dietary period, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and an intravenous glucose tolerance test were performed. Dietary, plasma and urinary AGEs N(€)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(€)-(carboxyethyl)lysin (CEL), and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimadazolidine (MG-H1) were measured with the use of mass spectrometry. Participants consumed less CML, CEL, and MG-H1 during the low-AGE dietary period than during the high-AGE period (all P diets (P = 0.001). Insulin sensitivity increased by 1.3 mg · kg(-1) · min(-1) after the low-AGE diet (P = 0.004), whereas it showed a tendency to decrease by 0.8 mg · kg(-1) · min(-1) after the high-AGE diet (P = 0.086). There was no difference in body weight or insulin secretion between diets (P = NS). A diet that is low in AGEs may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity. Hence, a restriction in dietary AGE content may be an effective strategy to decrease diabetes and cardiovascular disease risks in overweight individuals. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00422253. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Exclusive π0 Production on Longitudinally Polarized Proton Target with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Andrew [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive processes probe the internal structure of nucleons through measurements of structure functions and their ratios, which are sensitive to the chiral-even generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the chiral-odd transversity GPDs. The GPDs encode correlations of parton distributions in longitudinal momentum space and transverse impact parameter space and are accessible through the measurements of the xB and t dependence of meson production. The wide kinematic coverage of CLAS detector allowed measurements of exclusive π0 electroproduction in full azimuthal range. The target and double spin asymmetries for the deeply virtual exclusive π0 electroproduction were measured for the first time in the DIS region. The experiment was carried out at Hall B, Jefferson Lab using the longitudinally polarized electron beam with energy of up to 6 GeV and a dynamically polarized NH3 target with spins of free protons aligned along the beam axis. All four final-state particles from exclusive channel, electron, proton and two photons from π0 decay, were identified. The asymmetries were fitted according to their angular modulations in the hadronic center-of-mass system, and their moments were extracted. The data comparison with two handbag-based calculations involving the contribution from both chiral-even and chiral-odd GPDs was performed in wide kinematic range. The applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions within the framework of modified perturbative approach is discussed.

  8. A Double-Blind, Randomised Study Comparing the Skin Hydration and Acceptability of Two Emollient Products in Atopic Eczema Patients with Dry Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokic-Gallagher, Jasmina; Rosher, Phil; Oliveira, Gabriela; Walker, Jennine

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare professionals tend to recommend emollients based primarily on patient/consumer preference and cost, with cheaper options assumed to be therapeutically equivalent. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the effects on skin hydration of two emollients prescribed in the UK, Doublebase Dayleve™ gel (DELP) and a cheaper alternative, Zerobase Emollient™ cream (ZBC). This was a single-centre, randomised, double-blind, concurrent bi-lateral (within-patient) comparison in 18 females with atopic eczema and dry skin on their lower legs. DELP gel and ZBC cream were each applied to one lower leg twice daily for 4 days and on the morning only on day 5. The efficacy of both products was assessed by hydration measurements using a Corneometer CM825 probe (Courage-Khazaka Electronic). The measurements were made three times daily on days 1 to 5. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the change from baseline corneometer readings over the 5 days. Skin hydration using DELP gel was significantly higher than using ZBC cream (p skin hydration observed for DELP gel was substantial and long lasting. In contrast, for ZBC cream, there was no significant improvement of the cumulative skin hydration as measured by the AUC (p = 0.22). DELP gel achieved substantial, long-lasting and cumulative skin hydration, whilst ZBC cream achieved no measurable improvement in skin hydration compared to before treatment. Healthcare professionals should be aware that different emollients can perform differently. Dermal Laboratories Ltd. EudraCT number:2014-001026-16.

  9. The influence of texture on the strain measured by diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penning, P.; Brakman, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Strain, as determined by diffraction techniques, is calculated from its constituents. First, the fraction of the crystals that have the proper orientation for diffraction. One degree of freedom is present: the angle of rotation φ 2 '' about the scattering vector that the diffracting crystals have in common. The proper orientations, expressed in Euler angles, lie on a line ('trace') in orientation space. The density along the trace is asserted to be known as a Fourier series in φ 2 ''. Second, the strain in the diffracting crystals. The simplest possible models are discussed: the Voigt and Reuss approximations. The symmetries of the crystal (m3 or m3m) and of the orientation distribution function (o.d.f.) are taken into account. The dilatation in spacing of the reflecting planes is found as a Fourier series in φ 2 '' also. Only the zeroth, first and second harmonic (including phase angles: five parameters) play a part. The diffraction strain is the average over the angle φ 2 '' of the dilatation, weighted with the product of the orientation density and the square of the structure factor. For each contributing trace, the corresponding Fourier coefficients have to be multiplied and added to obtain the diffraction strain. The symmetry of the diffraction pole figure is derived. (orig.)

  10. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  11. Electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro-optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating is described. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro-optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating. (auth)

  12. Influence of diffractive interactions on cosmic ray air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.; Zepeda, A.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Sciutto, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of commonly used hadronic collision simulation packages is presented. The characteristics of the products of hadron-nucleus collisions are analyzed from a general perspective, but focusing on their correlation with diffractive processes. One of the purposes of our work is to give quantitative estimations of the impact that different characteristics of the hadronic models have on air shower observables. Several sets of shower simulations using different settings for the parameters controlling the diffractive processes are used to analyze the correlations between diffractivity and shower observables. We find that the relative probability of diffractive processes during the shower development have a non-negligible influence over the longitudinal profile as well as the distribution of muons at ground level. The implications on experimental data analysis are discussed

  13. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  14. Diffractive processes in pp collisions at 7 TeV measured with the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Brona, Grzegorz Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The differential diffractive cross section is measured as a function of $\\xi= M_X^2/s$ in the region dominated by single dissociation (SD) and double dissociation (DD), where $M_X$ is the mass of one of the two final-state hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. The cross section is also measured as a function of the width of the central rapidity gap in the region dominated by DD, as well as for events with a forward gap over 8.4 units of pseudorapidity. The total SD and DD cross sections are extracted. Single diffraction is one of the main uncertainties both, experimentally and in theoretical calculations, of the particle-production cross section in proton-lead collisions as measured at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV. Furthermore, the observation of a hard color-singlet exchange process in events with a large rapidity gap between two leading jets (jet-gap-jet) is reported. The fraction of jet-gap-jet to all dijet events is measured as a function of the sec...

  15. Fully double-logarithm-resummed cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albino, S.; Bolzoni, P.; Kniehl, B.A.; Kotikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the complete double logarithmic contribution to cross sections for semi-inclusive hadron production in the modified minimal-subtraction (MS-bar) scheme by applying dimensional regularization to the double logarithm approximation. The full double logarithmic contribution to the coefficient functions for inclusive hadron production in e + e - annihilation is obtained in this scheme for the first time. Our result agrees with all fixed order results in the literature, which extend to next-to-next-to-leading order.

  16. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  17. X-ray topography under conditions of monochromatic spherical wave diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristov, V.V.; Polovinkina, V.I.; Ibhikawa, Tetsuya; Kiduta, Seishi.

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray topographic scheme was developed in which there is a large distance between the X-ray source and the specimen. A monochromatic X-ray beam with an angular divergence 6 x 10 - 5 rad obtained by double successive diffraction in the (n 1 , +n 2 ) setting was used. This scheme enables diffraction focusing of a weakly absorbed wave field onto the exit surface of the crystal to be performed. Topographs of a wedge-shaped silicon crystal were obtained. Interference effects such as focusing, anomalous and ordinary Pendelloesung effects peculiar to X-ray spherical wave diffraction were observed in the topographs with high resolution. (author)

  18. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs

  19. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harroun, T A; Marquardt, D; Katsaras, J; Atkinson, J, E-mail: tharroun@brocku.ca

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled {alpha}-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  20. Diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verebryusov, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    In the framework of Regge scheme with supercritical pomeron a model is suggested for the NN-scattering amplitude which takes into account the contribution introduced to the intermediate state by diffraction dissociation (DD) processes. The DD amplitude is written in terms of the Deck model which has been previously applied to describing the main DD features. The calculated NN cross sections are compared with those obtained experimentally. Theoretical predictions for higher energy are presented

  1. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  2. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  3. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of advanced glycation end-products inhibitor in osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shabnam; Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan

    2013-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) play an important role in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of AGEs inhibitor (benfotiamine [50 mg]+pyridoxamine [50 mg]+methylcobalamin [500 µg]; Vonder [Cosme Farma Laboratories Limited, Goa, India]) in OA patients. A 24-week, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study in primary OA patients (n=30 [F/M=26/4; mean age, 57.26±2.16 y]) meeting the classification criteria of American College of Rheumatology, was conducted. Inflammatory disease activity scores on the Western Ontario and McMaster University (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index, Lequesne Index, and Pain scores were analyzed. Biomarkers: serum nitrite, AGEs, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, were also measured. Time taken to walk 20 m was also recorded. Patients were randomized to either AGEs inhibitor or placebo tablets as thrice-daily regimen. At 24 weeks, net decrease in pain score, -6.64±2.71 versus -8.20±1.28, P=0.003; total WOMAC score, -5.88±0.84 versus -8.26±1.24, P=0.013; Lequesne Index score, -0.60±0.06 versus -0.84±0.09, P=0.05; time taken for 20-m walk test, -5.0±1.39 versus -5.0±0.92 s, P=1.00, were observed in the placebo versus drug group, respectively. Net change in serum nitrite, -0.15±0.01 versus -0.79±0.12 µmol/L, P<0.001; AGEs, -0.12±0.02 versus -0.99±0.09, arbitrary florescence units, P=0.001; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, -0.69±0.12 versus -1.80±0.12 nmol/L, P<0.01; C-reactive protein, -0.12±0.35 versus -2.45±0.60 mg/L, P<0.01, were observed in the placebo versus drug group, respectively. This study shows the efficacy of an AGE inhibitor on decreasing pain and inflammation, and increasing daily activity and mobility in OA patients.

  5. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomusiak A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Tomusiak,1 Magdalena Strus,1 Piotr B Heczko,1 Paweł Adamski,2 Grzegorz Stefański,3 Aleksandra Mikołajczyk-Cichońska,3 Magdalena Suda-Szczurek3 1Department of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3IBSS BIOMED SA, Kraków, Poland Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. Patients and methods: The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4–6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag®, or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally. The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Results: Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits in both vaginal pH (P<0.05 and Nugent score (P<0.05, and a significant increase in the abundance of Lactobacillus between visit I and visits III and IV (P<0.05. Molecular typing revealed the presence of Lactobacillus strains originating from inVag in 82% of women taking the drug at

  6. Recent forward physics and diffraction results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074117

    2016-01-01

    Recent CMS results on forward physics and diffraction are reviewed. The differential diffractive cross section is measured as a function of $\\xi= M_X^2/s$ in the region dominated by single dissociation (SD) and double dissociation (DD), where $M_X$ is the mass of one of the two final-state hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. The total SD and DD cross sections are extracted. The observation of a hard color-singlet exchange process in events with a large rapidity gap between two leading jets (jet-gap-jet) is reported. The fraction of jet-gap-jet to all dijet events is measured as a function of the second leading jet transverse momentum and the size of the pseudorapidity gap. The measured fractions are compared with predictions as well as Tevatron data.

  7. Parameterization of neutron production double-differential cross section above several tens-MeV by the use of moving source model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    The moving source model based on the Maxwell-like energy distribution with Gaussian shape terms are employed for analyzing the neutron emission spectra from proton-induced spallation reaction. The parallelization of the double differential cross section is made for the experimental and calculated neutron data in the energy region from several-tens MeV to 3 GeV. (author)

  8. Constraints on the double-parton scattering cross section from same-sign W boson pair production in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. 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P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Chatterjee, K.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pauwels, K.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Khan, W. A.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Benettoni, M.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lujan, P.; Margoni, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Rossin, R.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Rossi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giannini, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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H.; Barney, D.; Bianco, M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chapon, E.; Chen, Y.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dobson, M.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fallavollita, F.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gilbert, A.; Gill, K.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karacheban, O.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. 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T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Reichmann, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Del Burgo, R.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Steen, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Bakirci, M. N.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. 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R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2018-02-01

    A first search for same-sign WW production via double-parton scattering is performed based on proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using dimuon and electron-muon final states. The search is based on the analysis of data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. No significant excess of events is observed above the expected single-parton scattering yields. A 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.32 pb is set on the inclusive cross section for same-sign WW production via the double-parton scattering process. This upper limit is used to place a 95% confidence level lower limit of 12.2 mb on the effective double-parton cross section parameter, closely related to the transverse distribution of partons in the proton. This limit on the effective cross section is consistent with previous measurements as well as with Monte Carlo event generator predictions.

  9. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Ventricle Menu Topics Topics FAQs Double Outlet Right Ventricle Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital heart disease. En español Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital ...

  10. Production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of two nanobodies against the Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain DBL6∊-FCR3 of the Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuchelen, Anneleen; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Gamain, Benoît; Loris, Remy; Nuland, Nico A. J. van; Ramboarina, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Two nanobodies generated against the VAR2CSA DBL6∊-FCR3 domain involved in pregnancy-associated malaria were selected, expressed, purified and crystallized. The VAR2CSA protein has been closely associated with pregnancy-associated malaria and is recognized as the main adhesin exposed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Chondroitin sulfate A was identified as the main host receptor in the placenta. Single-domain heavy-chain camelid antibodies, more commonly called nanobodies, were selected and produced against the DBL6∊-FCR3 domain of VAR2CSA. Crystals of two specific nanobodies, Nb2907 and Nb2919, identified as strong binders to DBL6∊-FCR3 and the full-length VAR2CSA exposed on the surface of FCR3 P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes, were obtained. Crystals of Nb2907 diffract to 2.45 Å resolution and belong to space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 136.1, b = 78.5, c = 103.4 Å, β = 118.8°, whereas Nb2919 crystals diffract to 2.15 Å resolution and belong to space group P4 3 2 1 2 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.7, c = 167.2 Å

  11. International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.R.; O'Connor, B.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The ICDD is a not-for-profit organisation comprising approximately 300 of the world's leading x-ray scientists. It is dedicated to collecting, editing, publishing and distributing powder diffraction data for the identification of crystalline materials. The membership of the ICDD consists of worldwide representation from academe, government and industry. It is our mission to continue as the world centre for quality x-ray powder diffraction data to meet the needs of the technical community. Through the combined efforts of the members and its staff of 40 at ICDD Headquarters, the organisation serves the x-ray analysis community (i) by producing the ICDD Powder Diffraction File (PDF) and other data base products for materials characterisation; (ii) through x-ray analysis education programs and conference management (including the Denver X-ray Conference); and (iii) through philanthropic initiatives such as scholarship support for postgraduate students working in the field. The current Release 2001 of the PDF (PDF-2) contains 87,500 measured patterns and 49,000 patterns calculated from the ICS