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Sample records for dot labeled dna

  1. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  2. High Sensitivity Detection of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Based on N-type Porous Silicon Microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Jie; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yanyu

    2017-01-01

    N-type macroporous silicon microcavity structures were prepared using electrochemical etching in an HF solution in the absence of light and oxidants. The CdSe/ZnS water-soluble quantum dot-labeled DNA target molecules were detected by monitoring the microcavity reflectance spectrum, which was characterized by the reflectance spectrum defect state position shift resulting from changes to the structures' refractive index. Quantum dots with a high refractive index and DNA coupling can improve the detection sensitivity by amplifying the optical response signals of the target DNA. The experimental results show that DNA combined with a quantum dot can improve the sensitivity of DNA detection by more than five times.

  3. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Li Xincang; Li Lu; Wang Jinxing; Jin Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10 -14 mol L -1 . Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  4. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xincang [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-01-24

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10{sup -14} mol L{sup -1}. Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  5. One-pot synthesis of strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS2 quantum dots for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ziping; Su, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    Herein, high quality DNA-CuInS 2 QDs are facilely synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal method with fluorescence quantum yield as high as 23.4%, and the strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS 2 QDs have been utilized as a novel fluorescent biosensor for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA. L-Cysteine (L-Cys) and a specific-sequence DNA are used as co-ligands to stabilize the CuInS 2 QDs. The specific-sequence DNA consists of two domains: phosphorothiolates domain (sulfur-containing variants of the usual phosphodiester backbone) controls the nanocrystal passivation and serves as a ligand, and the functional domain (non-phosphorothioates) controls the biorecognition. The as-prepared DNA-CuInS 2 QDs have high stability, good water-solubility and low toxicity. Under the optimized conditions, a linear correlation was established between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I 0 (I 0 is the original fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS 2 QDs, and I is the fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS 2 QDs/GO with the addition of various concentrations of anthrax lethal factor DNA) and the concentration of anthrax lethal factor DNA in the range of 0.029–0.733 nmol L −1 with a detection limit of 0.013 nmol L −1 . The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of anthrax lethal factor DNA sequence in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Because of low toxicity and fine biocompatibility, DNA-CuInS 2 QDs also hold potential applications in bioimaging. - Highlights: • Strongly fluorescent DNA-QDs were successfully prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal method with quantum yield up to 23.4%. • A biosensor for label-free detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA was established based on the as-prepared DNA-QDs. • The DNA sensor took advantage of the feature that ssDNA binds to GO with significantly higher affinity than dsDNA. • Good sensitivity and selectivity were obtained. • This method was utilized to detect

  6. One-pot synthesis of strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziping; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-10-26

    Herein, high quality DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs are facilely synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal method with fluorescence quantum yield as high as 23.4%, and the strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs have been utilized as a novel fluorescent biosensor for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA. L-Cysteine (L-Cys) and a specific-sequence DNA are used as co-ligands to stabilize the CuInS{sub 2} QDs. The specific-sequence DNA consists of two domains: phosphorothiolates domain (sulfur-containing variants of the usual phosphodiester backbone) controls the nanocrystal passivation and serves as a ligand, and the functional domain (non-phosphorothioates) controls the biorecognition. The as-prepared DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs have high stability, good water-solubility and low toxicity. Under the optimized conditions, a linear correlation was established between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I{sub 0} (I{sub 0} is the original fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs, and I is the fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs/GO with the addition of various concentrations of anthrax lethal factor DNA) and the concentration of anthrax lethal factor DNA in the range of 0.029–0.733 nmol L{sup −1} with a detection limit of 0.013 nmol L{sup −1}. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of anthrax lethal factor DNA sequence in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Because of low toxicity and fine biocompatibility, DNA-CuInS{sub 2} QDs also hold potential applications in bioimaging. - Highlights: • Strongly fluorescent DNA-QDs were successfully prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal method with quantum yield up to 23.4%. • A biosensor for label-free detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA was established based on the as-prepared DNA-QDs. • The DNA sensor took advantage of the feature that ssDNA binds to GO with significantly higher affinity than dsDNA. • Good sensitivity and selectivity were

  7. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  8. A quantum dot-aptamer beacon using a DNA intercalating dye as the FRET reporter: application to label-free thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-03-15

    A new quantum dot (QD)-aptamer (apt) beacon that acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3(B), is demonstrated with label-free thrombin detection. The beacon, denoted as QD-apt:B, is constructed by (1) coupling of a single-stranded thrombin aptamer to Qdot 565 via EDC/Sulfo-NHS chemistry and (2) staining the duplex regions of the aptamer on QD with excess BOBO-3 before thrombin binding. When mixing a thrombin sample with QD-apt:B, BOBO-3 is competed away from the beacon due to target-induced aptamer folding, which then causes a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission and achieves thrombin quantitation. In this work, the effects of Mg(2+), coupling time, and aptamer type on the beacon's performances are investigated and discussed thoroughly with various methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-color differential gel electrophoresis. Using the best aptamer beacon (HTQ37), we attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from nM to μM) of thrombin in buffer, and the beacon can sense nM-range thrombin in 15% diluted serum. Compared to the reported QD aptamer assays, our method is advantageous from the aspect of using a simple sensory unit design without losing the detection sensitivity. Therefore, we consider the QD-apt:B beacon a potential alternative to immuno-reagents and an effective tool to study nucleic acid folding on QD as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial activity, cytotoxicity and DNA binding studies of carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhonsi, Mariadoss Asha; Ananth, Devanesan Arul; Nambirajan, Gayathri; Sivasudha, Thilagar; Yamini, Rekha; Bera, Soumen; Kathiravan, Arunkumar

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, quantum dots (QDs) are one of the most promising nanomaterials in life sciences community due to their unexploited potential in biomedical applications; particularly in bio-labeling and sensing. In the advanced nanomaterials, carbon dots (CDs) have shown promise in next generation bioimaging and drug delivery studies. Therefore the knowledge of the exact nature of interaction with biomolecules is of great interest to designing better biosensors. In this study, the interaction between CDs derived from tamarind and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been studied by vital spectroscopic techniques, which revealed that the CDs could interact with DNA via intercalation. The apparent association constant has been deduced from the absorption spectral changes of ct-DNA-CDs using the Benesi-Hildebrand equation. From the DNA induced emission quenching experiments the apparent DNA binding constant of the CDs (Kapp) have also been evaluated. Furthermore, we have analyzed the antibacterial and antifungal activity of CDs using disc diffusion assay method which exhibited excellent activity against E. coli and C. albicans with inhibition zone in the range of 7-12 mm. The biocompatible nature of CDs was confirmed by an in vitro cytotoxicity test on L6 normal rat myoblast cells by using MTT assay. The cell viability is not affected till the high dosage of CDs (200 μg/mL) for >48 h. As a consequence of the work, future development of CDs for microbial control and DNA sensing among the various biomolecules is possible in view of emerging biofields.

  10. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  11. Highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction-free quantum dot-based quantification of forensic genomic DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Yu Kyung; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Min Jung; Han, Eunyoung; Han, Myun Soo; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Jong Eun; Song, Joon Myong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Genomic DNA quantification were performed using a quantum dot-labeled Alu sequence. ► This probe provided PCR-free determination of human genomic DNA. ► Qdot-labeled Alu probe-hybridized genomic DNAs had a 2.5-femtogram detection limit. ► Qdot-labeled Alu sequence was used to assess DNA samples for human identification. - Abstract: Forensic DNA samples can degrade easily due to exposure to light and moisture at the crime scene. In addition, the amount of DNA acquired at a criminal site is inherently limited. This limited amount of human DNA has to be quantified accurately after the process of DNA extraction. The accurately quantified extracted genomic DNA is then used as a DNA template in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for short tandem repeat (STR) human identification. Accordingly, highly sensitive and human-specific quantification of forensic DNA samples is an essential issue in forensic study. In this work, a quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled Alu sequence was developed as a probe to simultaneously satisfy both the high sensitivity and human genome selectivity for quantification of forensic DNA samples. This probe provided PCR-free determination of human genomic DNA and had a 2.5-femtogram detection limit due to the strong emission and photostability of the Qdot. The Qdot-labeled Alu sequence has been used successfully to assess 18 different forensic DNA samples for STR human identification.

  12. Functional characterization and axonal transport of quantum dot labeled BDNF

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Wenjun; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2012-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the growth, development and maintenance of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Exogenous BDNF activates its membrane receptors at the axon terminal, and subsequently sends regulation signals to the cell body. To understand how BDNF signal propagates in neurons, it is important to follow the trafficking of BDNF after it is internalized at the axon terminal. Here we labeled BDNF with bright, photostable quantum dot (QD-BDNF) a...

  13. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, R.A.; Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.

    1995-07-25

    A DNA sequencing method is described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in the lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radioisotope labels. 5 figs.

  14. DNA nanosensor based on biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhao Sheng; Shan, Xiao Yue; Chai, Lu Jing; Ma, Juan Juan; Chen, Jian Rong; Feng, Hui

    2014-10-15

    An ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes for DNA detection was reported. We take advantage of good biocompatibility and strong fluorescence of graphene quantum dots, base pairing specificity of DNA and unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to achieve the analysis of low concentrations of DNA. Graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield up to 0.20 were prepared and served as the fluorophore of DNA probe. FRET process between graphene quantum dots-labeled probe and oxidized carbon nanotubes is easily achieved due to their efficient self-assembly through specific π-π interaction. This nanosensor can distinguish complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection method based on this nanosensor possesses a broad linear span of up to 133.0 nM and ultralow detection limit of 0.4 nM. The constructed nanosensor is expected to be highly biocompatible because of all its components with excellent biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of CdSe quantum dot photoluminescence for security label on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaeni,, E-mail: isnaeni@lipi.go.id; Sugiarto, Iyon Titok [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Science, Building 442 Puspiptek Serpong, South Tangerang, Banten, Indonesia 15314 (Indonesia); Bilqis, Ratu; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro [Department of Physics, Diponegoro University, Jl. Prof. Soedarto, Tembalang, Semarang, Indonesia 50275 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    CdSe quantum dot has great potential in various applications especially for emitting devices. One example potential application of CdSe quantum dot is security label for anti-counterfeiting. In this work, we present a practical approach of security label on paper using one and two colors of colloidal CdSe quantum dot, which is used as stamping ink on various types of paper. Under ambient condition, quantum dot is almost invisible. The quantum dot security label can be revealed by detecting emission of quantum dot using photoluminescence and cnc machine. The recorded quantum dot emission intensity is then analyzed using home-made program to reveal quantum dot pattern stamp having the word ’RAHASIA’. We found that security label using quantum dot works well on several types of paper. The quantum dot patterns can survive several days and further treatment is required to protect the quantum dot. Oxidation of quantum dot that occurred during this experiment reduced the emission intensity of quantum dot patterns.

  16. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  17. The preparation of radioactivity labelled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballance, P.; Morgan, J.; McGregor, G.; Durkacz, B.

    1984-01-01

    The nick translation reaction, which uses the endonuclease enzyme to incorporate pieces of DNA into the genetic material of other organisms, is being used more and more in Molecular Biology research for the preparation of pure DNA labelled with 32 P. However results are presented which show that high radiation doses are received by the hands of nick translation workers. A Scheme of Work to reduce these doses is described. (author)

  18. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photoluminescence of patterned CdSe quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isnaeni,; Yulianto, Nursidik; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha

    2016-01-01

    We successfully developed a method utilizing colloidal CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on a piece of glossy paper. We deposited numbers and lines patterns of toluene soluble CdSe quantum dot using rubber stamper on a glossy paper. The width of line pattern was about 1-2 mm with 1-2 mm separation between lines. It required less than one minute for deposited CdSe quantum dot on glossy paper to dry and become invisible by naked eyes. However, patterned quantum dot become visible using long-pass filter glasses upon excitation of UV lamp or blue laser. We characterized photoluminescence of line patterns of quantum dot, and we found that emission boundaries of line patterns were clearly observed. The error of line size and shape were mainly due to defect of the original stamper. The emission peak wavelength of CdSe quantum dot was 629 nm. The emission spectrum of deposited quantum dot has full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 30-40 nm. The spectra similarity between deposited quantum dot and the original quantum dot in solution proved that our stamping method can be simply applied on glossy paper without changing basic optical property of the quantum dot. Further development of this technique is potential for anti-counterfeiting label on very important documents or objects.

  20. Photoluminescence of patterned CdSe quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaeni,, E-mail: isnaeni@lipi.go.id; Yulianto, Nursidik; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Building 442, Kawasan Puspiptek, South Tangerang,Banten 15314 Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    We successfully developed a method utilizing colloidal CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dot for anti-counterfeiting label on a piece of glossy paper. We deposited numbers and lines patterns of toluene soluble CdSe quantum dot using rubber stamper on a glossy paper. The width of line pattern was about 1-2 mm with 1-2 mm separation between lines. It required less than one minute for deposited CdSe quantum dot on glossy paper to dry and become invisible by naked eyes. However, patterned quantum dot become visible using long-pass filter glasses upon excitation of UV lamp or blue laser. We characterized photoluminescence of line patterns of quantum dot, and we found that emission boundaries of line patterns were clearly observed. The error of line size and shape were mainly due to defect of the original stamper. The emission peak wavelength of CdSe quantum dot was 629 nm. The emission spectrum of deposited quantum dot has full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 30-40 nm. The spectra similarity between deposited quantum dot and the original quantum dot in solution proved that our stamping method can be simply applied on glossy paper without changing basic optical property of the quantum dot. Further development of this technique is potential for anti-counterfeiting label on very important documents or objects.

  1. Quantum dots as optical labels for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Shubha, Likitha R; Bhatt, Praveena; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2014-07-15

    Considering the fact that polyphenols have versatile activity in-vivo, its detection and quantification is very much important for a healthy diet. Laccase enzyme can convert polyphenols to yield mono/polyquinones which can quench Quantum dots fluorescence. This phenomenon of charge transfer from quinones to QDs was exploited as optical labels to detect polyphenols. CdTe QD may undergo dipolar interaction with quinones as a result of broad spectral absorption due to multiple excitonic states resulting from quantum confinement effects. Thus, "turn-off" fluorescence method was applied for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols by using laccase. We observed proportionate quenching of QDs fluorescence with respect to polyphenol concentration in the range of 100 µg to 1 ng/mL. Also, quenching of the photoluminescence was highly efficient and stable and could detect individual and total polyphenols with high sensitivity (LOD-1 ng/mL). Moreover, proposed method was highly efficient than any other reported methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and selectivity. Therefore, a novel optical sensor was developed for the detection of polyphenols at a sensitive level based on the charge transfer mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Application of DNA labeling technology in forensic botany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znang, Xian; Li, Jing-Lin; Zhang, Xiang-Yu

    2008-12-01

    Forensic botany is a study of judicial plant evidence. Recently, researches on DNA labeling technology have been a mainstream of forensic botany. The article systematically reviews various types of DNA labeling techniques in forensic botany with enumerated practical cases, as well as the potential forensic application of each individual technique. The advantages of the DNA labeling technology over traditional morphological taxonomic methods are also summarized.

  3. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  4. Blue shift of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-labels upon DNA-hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palme Klaus

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Luminescence color multiplexing is one of the most intriguing benefits, which might occur by using semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs as labels for biomolecules. It was found, that the luminescence of QDs can be quenched, and replaced by a luminescence peak at approximately 460 nm on hybridization with certain regions of Arabidopsis thaliana tissue. This effect is site selective, and it is unclear whether it occurs due to an energy transfer process, or due to quenching and scattering of the excitation light. The article describes methods for phase-transfer of differently coloured, hydrophobically ligated QDs, coupling of DNA strands to the QD's surface, and hybridization of the labelled DNA to different cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana. The reason for the luminescence blue-shift was studied systematically, and narrowed down to the above mentioned causes.

  5. Concentrating and labeling genomic DNA in a nanofluidic array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Mir, Kalim U.

    2018-01-01

    , however, hinder the polymerase activity. We demonstrate a device and a protocol for the enzymatic labeling of genomic DNA arranged in a dense array of single molecules without attaching the enzyme or the DNA to a surface. DNA molecules accumulate in a dense array of pits embedded within a nanoslit due...... to entropic trapping. We then perform ϕ29 polymerase extension from single-strand nicks created on the trapped molecules to incorporate fluorescent nucleotides into the DNA. The array of entropic traps can be loaded with λ-DNA molecules to more than 90% of capacity at a flow rate of 10 pL min-1. The final...

  6. Influence of quantum dot labels on single molecule movement in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking results are very dependent on the probe that is used. In this study we have investigated the influence that functionalized quantum dots (QDs) have on the recorded movement in single molecule tracking experiments of plasma membrane species in live cells. Potential issues...... for simultaneous investigations of different plasma membrane species in order to discriminate the effect of the label from differences in movement of the target molecules....

  7. A non-genetic approach to labelling acute myeloid leukemia and bone marrow cells with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanwen; Tan, Dongming; Chen, Zheng; Hu, Chenxi; Mao, Zhengwei J; Singleton, Timothy P; Zeng, Yan; Shao, Xuejun; Yin, Bin

    2014-06-01

    The difficulty in manipulation of leukemia cells has long hindered the dissection of leukemia pathogenesis. We have introduced a non-genetic approach of marking blood cells, using quantum dots. We compared quantum dots complexed with different vehicles, including a peptide Tat, cationic polymer Turbofect and liposome. Quantum dots-Tat showed the highest efficiency of marking hematopoietic cells among the three vehicles. Quantum dots-Tat could also label a panel of leukemia cell lines at varied efficiencies. More uniform intracellular distributions of quantum dots in mouse bone marrow and leukemia cells were obtained with quantum dots-Tat, compared with the granule-like formation obtained with quantum dots-liposome. Our results suggest that quantum dots have provided a photostable and non-genetic approach that labels normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, in a cell type-, vehicle-, and quantum dot concentration-dependent manner. We expect for potential applications of quantum dots as an easy and fast marking tool assisting investigations of various types of blood cells in the future.

  8. Label-free fluorimetric detection of CEA using carbon dots derived from tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hong; Wang, Lan; Zhuo, Yan; Zhou, Zinan; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-12-15

    A facile-green strategy to synthesize carbon dots (CDs) with a quantum yield (QY) of nearly 13.9% has been built up, while tomato juice served as the carbon source. Interestingly, not only the precursor of CDs and the whole synthesis procedure were environmental-friendly, but this type of CDs also exhibited multiple advantages including high fluorescent QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity and satisfactory stability. Significantly, a label-free sensitive assay for detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in a continuous and recyclable way has been proposed on the basis of adsorption and desorption of aptamers by the surface of CDs through a competitive mechanism. To be specific, the richness of carboxyl groups of the CDs enabled strong adsorption of ssDNA to the surface of CDs through π-π stacking interactions, resulting in the effective fluorescence quenching by forming CDs-aptamer complexes. The stronger binding affinity between CEA and CEA-aptamer than the π-π stacking interactions has been taken advantage to achieve immediate recovery of the fluorescence of CDs once CEA was introduced. Thereby, quantitative evaluation of CEA concentration in a broad range from 1ngmL(-1) to 0.5ngmL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.3ngmL(-1) was realized in this way. This strategy can be applied in a recyclable way, broadening the sensing application of CDs with biocompatibility. Besides, the CDs were used for cell imaging, potentiating them towards diverse purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo study of immunogenicity and kinetic characteristics of a quantum dot-labelled baculovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Meng, Jin; Wang, Han; He, Man; Zhang, Fuxian; Liu, Yan; Hu, Bin; He, Zike; Hu, Qinxue; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials conjugated with biomacromolecules, including viruses, have great potential for in vivo applications. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the safety of nanoparticle-conjugated macromolecule biomaterials (Nano-mbio). Although a number of studies have assessed the risks of nanoparticles and macromolecule biomaterials in living bodies, only a few of them investigated Nano-mbios. Here we evaluated the in vivo safety profile of a quantum dot-conjugated baculovirus (Bq), a promising new Nano-mbio, in mice. Each animal was injected twice intraperitoneally with 50 μg virus protein labelled with around 3*10(-5)nmol conjugated qds. Control animals were injected with PBS, quantum dots, baculovirus, or a mixture of quantum dots and baculovirus. Blood, tissues and body weight were analysed at a series of time points following both the first and the second injections. It turned out that the appearance and behaviour of the mice injected with Bq were similar to those injected with baculovirus alone. However, combination of baculovirus and quantum dot (conjugated or simply mixed) significantly induced stronger adaptive immune responses, and lead to a faster accumulation and longer existence of Cd in the kidneys. Thus, despite the fact that both quantum dot and baculovirus have been claimed to be safe in vivo, applications of Bq in vivo should be cautious. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining the interaction between a nanoparticle-conjugated virus and a living body from a safety perspective, providing a basis for in vivo application of other Nano-mbios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 32P-labeling test for DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, K.; Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Covalent adducts formed by the reaction of DNA with chemical carcinogens and mutagens may be detected by a 32 P-labeling test. DNA preparations exposed to chemicals known to bind covalently to DNA [N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, dimethyl sulfate, formaldehyde, β-propiolactone, propylene oxide, streptozotocin, nitrogen mustard, and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] were digested to a mixture of deoxynucleoside 3'-monophosphates by incubation with micrococcal endonuclease (EC 3.1.31.1) and spleen exonuclease (EC 3.1.16.1). The digests were treated with [γ- 32 P]ATP and T4 polynucleotide kinase (ATP:5'-dephosphopolynucleotide 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.78) to convert the monophosphates to 5'- 32 P-labeled deoxynucleoside 3',5'-bis-phosphates. These compounds were then separated on polyethyl-eneimine-cellulose thin layers in ammonium formate and ammonium sulfate solutions. Autoradiograms of the chromatograms obtained by this high-resolution procedure showed the presence of nucleotides derived from chemically altered, as well as normal, DNA constituents. Maps from DNA exposed to any of the chemicals used exhibited a spot pattern typical for the particular chemical. This method detected a single adduct in 10 5 DNA nucleotides without requiring that the compound under investigation be radioactive and thus provides a useful test to screen chemicals for their capacity to damage DNA by covalent binding

  11. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  12. Electrochemical DNA sandwich assay with a lipase label for attomole detection of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferapontova, Elena; Hansen, Majken Nørgaard; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    2010-01-01

    A fast and sensitive electrochemical lipase-based sandwich hybridization assay for detection of attomole levels of DNA has been developed. A combination of magnetic beads, used for pre-concentration and bioseparation of the analyte with a lipase catalyst label allowed detection of DNA with a limi...

  13. A Fast, Sensitive and Label Free Electrochemical DNA Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Elling; Lee Yokeling; Chong Serchoong

    2006-01-01

    A label free and sensitive DNA/RNA silicon based electrochemical microsensor array was developed by using thin film of the conducting polymer polypyrrole doped with an oligonucleotide probe. The electrochemical potential pulse amperometry technique was used for a biowarfare pathogen target DNA detection. The electrical potential assistanted DNA hybridisation method was applied. The sensor signal was increased by increasing the electrical potential assistanted DNA hybridisation time. It was possible to detect 0.34pmol and 0.072fmol of complementary oligonucleotide target in 0.1ml in seconds by using unpolished and polished gold electrode respectively. The probe preparation was also in seconds time, comparing indirect electrochemical DNA sensor, it has a fast sensor preparation as well as sensor response and label free advantages. The silicon microfabrication technique was used for this sensor array fabrication, which holds the potential to integrate with sensor electrical circuits. The conducting polymer polypyrrole was electrochemically deposited on each electrode respectively which has a possibility to dope the different DNA probe into the individual electrode to form a sensor array

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots nanocomposite and its applications in cells labeling and in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; He, Zhe [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Guo, Changrun [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wanglp@jlu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu, Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.com [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Due to the unique optical and chemical features of quantum dots and the special structural advantages of carbon nanohorns, it is highly desirable to synthesize nanohorns/quantum dots nanocompsite which can be applied in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. Here, we report a new method which uses chitosan as connector to synthesize nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots fluorescent nanocomposite. Further more, the synthesized nanocomposite demonstrated strong red fluorescence and had been successfully used in Hela cells labeling and in vivo imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). -- Highlights: Carbon nanohorn/chitosan/QDs nanocomposite was prepared by covalent linkage The nanocomposite was successfully used in the labeling of HeLa cells The nanocomposite was used for in vivo imaging with C. elegans as animal mode.

  15. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek S. Jadhav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA–protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot–streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein–DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular

  16. Quantum dot labeling and tracking of cultured limbal epithelial cell transplants in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genicio, Nuria; Paramo, Juan Gallo; Shortt, Alex J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cultured human limbal epithelial cells (HLEC) have shown promise in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency but little is known about their survival, behaviour and long-term fate post transplantation. The aim of this research was to evaluate, in-vitro, quantum dot (QDot) technology as a tool for tracking transplanted HLEC. METHODS In-vitro cultured HLEC were labeled with Qdot nanocrystals. Toxicity was assessed using live-dead assays. The effect on HLEC function was assessed using colony forming efficiency assays and expression of CK3, P63alpha and ABCG2. Sheets of cultured HLEC labeled with Qdot nanocrystals were transplanted onto decellularised human corneo-scleral rims in an organ culture model and observed to investigate the behaviour of transplanted cells. RESULTS Qdot labeling had no detrimental effect on HLEC viability or function in-vitro. Proliferation resulted in a gradual reduction in Qdot signal but sufficient signal was present to allow tracking of cells through multiple generations. Cells labeled with Qdots could be reliably detected and observed using confocal microscopy for at least 2 weeks post transplantation in our organ culture model. In addition it was possible to label and observe epithelial cells in intact human corneas using the Rostock corneal module adapted for use with the Heidelberg HRA. CONCLUSIONS This work demonstrates that Qdots combined with existing clinical equipment could be used to track HLEC for up to 2 weeks post transplantation, however, our model does not permit the assessment of cell labeling beyond 2 weeks. Further characterisation in in-vivo models are required. PMID:26024089

  17. Efficient Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dots and Gold Nanoparticles Based on Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Lv, Jie; Jia, Zhenhong

    2017-05-10

    A novel assembled biosensor was prepared for detecting 16S rRNA, a small-size persistent specific for Actinobacteria. The mechanism of the porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal biosensor is based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through DNA hybridization, where QDs act as an emission donor and AuNPs serve as a fluorescence quencher. Results showed that the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of PS photonic crystal was drastically increased when the QDs-conjugated probe DNA was adhered to the PS layer by surface modification using a standard cross-link chemistry method. The PL intensity of QDs was decreased when the addition of AuNPs-conjugated complementary 16S rRNA was dropped onto QDs-conjugated PS. Based on the analysis of different target DNA concentration, it was found that the decrease of the PL intensity showed a good linear relationship with complementary DNA concentration in a range from 0.25 to 10 μM, and the detection limit was 328.7 nM. Such an optical FRET biosensor functions on PS-based photonic crystal for DNA detection that differs from the traditional FRET, which is used only in liquid. This method will benefit the development of a new optical FRET label-free biosensor on Si substrate and has great potential in biochips based on integrated optical devices.

  18. Detection of DNA via the fluorescence quenching of Mn-doped ZnSe D-dots/doxorubicin/DNA ternary complexes system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Niu, Lu; Su, Xingguang

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports a method for the detection of double-stranded DNA, based on Mn:ZnSe d-dots and intercalating agent doxorubicin (DOX). DOX can quench the photoluminescence (PL) of Mn:ZnSe d-dots through photoinduced electron transfer process, after binding with Mn:ZnSe d-dots. The addition of DNA can result in the formation of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX-DNA ternary complexes, the fluorescence of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX complexes would be further quenched by the addition of DNA, thus allowing the detection of DNA. The formation mechanism of the Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX-DNA ternary complexes was studied in detail in this paper. Under optimal conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of Mn:ZnSe d-dots-DOX system are perfectly described by Stern-Volmer equation with the concentration of hsDNA ranging from 0.006 μg mL(-1) to 6.4 μg mL(-1). The detection limit (S/N = 3) for hsDNA is 0.5 ng mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to the detection of DNA in synthetic samples and the results were satisfactory.

  19. Fluorescently labelled multiplex lateral flow immunoassay based on cadmium-free quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Sobolev, Aleksander M; Tessier, Mickael D; Hens, Zeger; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; De Saeger, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    A sensitive tool for simultaneous qualitative detection of two mycotoxins based on use of non-cadmium quantum dots (QDs) is presented for the first time. QDs have proven themselves as promising fluorescent labels for biolabeling and chemical analysis. With an increasing global tendency to regulate and limit the use of hazardous elements, indium phosphide (InP) QDs are highlighted as environmentally-friendly alternatives to the highly efficient and well-studied, but potentially toxic Cd- and Pb-based QDs. Here, we developed water-soluble InP QDs-based fluorescent nanostructures. They consisted of core/shell InP/ZnS QDs enrobed in a silica shell that allowed the water solubility (QD@SiO 2 ). Then we applied the QD@SiO 2 as novel, silica shell-encapsulated fluorescent labels in immunoassays for rapid multiplexed screening. Two mycotoxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, were simultaneously detected in maize and wheat, since the two QD@SiO 2 labelled conjugates emit at two different, individually detectable wavelengths. The cutoff values for the simultaneous determination were 50 and 500μgkg -1 for zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, respectively, in both maize and wheat. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to confirm the result. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Near-Infrared Ag2S Quantum Dots-Based DNA Logic Gate Platform for miRNA Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Tang, Yuguo; Wang, Bidou; Meng, Fanyu

    2016-08-02

    Dysregulation of miRNA expression is correlated with the development and progression of many diseases. These miRNAs are regarded as promising biomarkers. However, it is challenging to measure these low abundant molecules without employing time-consuming radioactive labeling or complex amplification strategies. Here, we present a DNA logic gate platform for miRNA diagnostics with fluorescence outputs from near-infrared (NIR) Ag2S quantum dots (QDs). Carefully designed toehold exchange-mediated strand displacements with different miRNA inputs occur on a solid-state interface, which control QDs release from solid-state interface to solution, responding to multiplex information on initial miRNAs. Excellent fluorescence emission properties of NIR Ag2S QDs certify the great prospect for amplification-free and sensitive miRNA assay. We demonstrate the potential of this platform by achieving femtomolar level miRNA analysis and the versatility of a series of logic circuits computation.

  1. Identification of quantum dots labeled metallothionein by fast scanning laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecna, Marie; Novotny, Karel; Krizkova, Sona; Blazkova, Iva; Kopel, Pavel; Kaiser, Jozef; Hodek, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2014-01-01

    The technique described in this paper allows detection of quantum dots (QDs) specifically deposited on the polystyrene surface by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Using LIBS, the distribution of QDs or their conjugates with biomolecules deposited on the surface can be observed, regardless of the fact if they exhibit fluorescence or not. QDs deposited on the specific surface of polystyrene microplate in the form of spots are detected by determination of the metal included in the QDs structure. Cd-containing QDs (CdS, CdTe) stabilized with mercaptopropionic (MPA) or mercaptosuccinic (MSA) acid, respectively, alone or in the form of conjugates with metallothionein (MT) biomolecule are determined by using the 508.58 nm Cd emission line. The observed absolute detection limit for Cd in CdTe QDs conjugates with MT in one spot was 3 ng Cd. Due to the high sensitivity of this technique, the immunoanalysis in combination with LIBS was also investigated. Cd spatial distribution in sandwich immunoassay was detected. - Highlights: • We describe determination of biomolecules labeled with quantum dots by LIBS. • LIBS and immunoassay are applied for the determination of metallothionein. • Metallothionein amount detected by LIBS is 10-times lower compared to ELISA

  2. Identification of quantum dots labeled metallothionein by fast scanning laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecna, Marie [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Novotny, Karel [Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Krizkova, Sona [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Blazkova, Iva [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kopel, Pavel [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2, CZ-616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Hodek, Petr [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Hlavova 2030/8, CZ-128 00 Prague,Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kizek, Rene [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-11-01

    The technique described in this paper allows detection of quantum dots (QDs) specifically deposited on the polystyrene surface by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Using LIBS, the distribution of QDs or their conjugates with biomolecules deposited on the surface can be observed, regardless of the fact if they exhibit fluorescence or not. QDs deposited on the specific surface of polystyrene microplate in the form of spots are detected by determination of the metal included in the QDs structure. Cd-containing QDs (CdS, CdTe) stabilized with mercaptopropionic (MPA) or mercaptosuccinic (MSA) acid, respectively, alone or in the form of conjugates with metallothionein (MT) biomolecule are determined by using the 508.58 nm Cd emission line. The observed absolute detection limit for Cd in CdTe QDs conjugates with MT in one spot was 3 ng Cd. Due to the high sensitivity of this technique, the immunoanalysis in combination with LIBS was also investigated. Cd spatial distribution in sandwich immunoassay was detected. - Highlights: • We describe determination of biomolecules labeled with quantum dots by LIBS. • LIBS and immunoassay are applied for the determination of metallothionein. • Metallothionein amount detected by LIBS is 10-times lower compared to ELISA.

  3. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  4. Automation of cDNA Synthesis and Labelling Improves Reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Klevebring

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several technologies, such as in-depth sequencing and microarrays, enable large-scale interrogation of genomes and transcriptomes. In this study, we asses reproducibility and throughput by moving all laboratory procedures to a robotic workstation, capable of handling superparamagnetic beads. Here, we describe a fully automated procedure for cDNA synthesis and labelling for microarrays, where the purification steps prior to and after labelling are based on precipitation of DNA on carboxylic acid-coated paramagnetic beads. Results. The fully automated procedure allows for samples arrayed on a microtiter plate to be processed in parallel without manual intervention and ensuring high reproducibility. We compare our results to a manual sample preparation procedure and, in addition, use a comprehensive reference dataset to show that the protocol described performs better than similar manual procedures. Conclusions. We demonstrate, in an automated gene expression microarray experiment, a reduced variance between replicates, resulting in an increase in the statistical power to detect differentially expressed genes, thus allowing smaller differences between samples to be identified. This protocol can with minor modifications be used to create cDNA libraries for other applications such as in-depth analysis using next-generation sequencing technologies.

  5. General method of preparation of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA fragments for NMR analysis of DNA structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rene, Brigitte; Masliah, Gregoire; Zargarian, Loussine; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Summary 13 C, 15 N labeling of biomolecules allows easier assignments of NMR resonances and provides a larger number of NMR parameters, which greatly improves the quality of DNA structures. However, there is no general DNA-labeling procedure, like those employed for proteins and RNAs. Here, we describe a general and widely applicable approach designed for preparation of isotopically labeled DNA fragments that can be used for NMR studies. The procedure is based on the PCR amplification of oligonucleotides in the presence of labeled deoxynucleotides triphosphates. It allows great flexibility thanks to insertion of a short DNA sequence (linker) between two repeats of DNA sequence to study. Size and sequence of the linker are designed as to create restriction sites at the junctions with DNA of interest. DNA duplex with desired sequence and size is released upon enzymatic digestion of the PCR product. The suitability of the procedure is validated through the preparation of two biological relevant DNA fragments

  6. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-02

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels.

  7. Nucleobase modification as redox DNA labelling for electrochemical detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2011), s. 5802-5814 ISSN 0306-0012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleotides * oligonucleotides * DNA * electrochemistry * redox labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 28.760, year: 2011

  8. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  9. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films.The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient

  10. Detection of KatG Gen Mutation on Mycobacterium Tuberculosis by Means of PCR-Dot Blot Hybridization with 32P Labeled Oligonucleotide Probe Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Lina R; Budiman Bela; Andi Yasmon

    2009-01-01

    Handling and controlling of tuberculosis, a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), is now complicated since there are many MTBs that are resistant against anti-tuberculosis drugs such as isoniazid. The drug resistance could occurred due to the inadequate and un-regular drug utilization that cause gene mutation of the drug target such as katG gene for isoniazid. The molecular biology techniques such as the PCR- dot blot hybridization with radioisotope ( 32 P) labeled oligonucleotide probe, has been reported as a technique that is more sensitive and rapid for detection of gene mutations related with drug resistances. Hence, the aim of this study was to apply the PCR- dot blot hybridization technique using 32 P labeled oligonucleotide probe for detection of single mutation at codon 315 of katG gene of MTBs that rise the isoniazid resistance. In this study, we used 89 sputum specimens and a standard MTB (MTB H 37 RV) as a control. DNA extractions were performed by the BOOM method and the phenol chloroform for sputum samples and standard MTB, respectively. Primers used for PCR technique were Pt8 and Pt9 and RTB59 and RTB36 for detecting tuberculosis causing Mycobacterium and the existence of katG gene, respectively. Both of the primers are specific for IS6110 region and katG gene, respectively. PCR products were detected by an agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe 315mu was performed to detect mutation at codon 315 of tested samples. Results of the PCR using primer Pt8 and Pt9 showed that all sputum specimens had positive results. Mutation detection by PCR- dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe 315mu, revealed that 11 of 89 tested samples had a mutation at their codon 315 of katG gene. Based upon these results, it is concluded that PCR-dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe is a technique that is rapid and highly specific and sensitive for detection of mutation at codon

  11. DataDotDNA: an alternative marking system for tortoises of genus Testudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Brugnola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was analyzed the effectiveness of one method of individual and unique marking, alternative to the application of microchip, on 17 specimens of Testudo hermanni through DataDotDNA technology. This technology has proven to be an effective system of marking of Testudo spp., answering the need for unambiguous identification of individuals. Further advantages are the easy application and reading, the long-term resistance as well as the difficulties of possible fraudulent tampering.

  12. Polyfluorophore Labels on DNA: Dramatic Sequence Dependence of Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yin Nah; Wilson, James N.

    2010-01-01

    We describe studies carried out in the DNA context to test how a common fluorescence quencher, dabcyl, interacts with oligodeoxynu-cleoside fluorophores (ODFs)—a system of stacked, electronically interacting fluorophores built on a DNA scaffold. We tested twenty different tetrameric ODF sequences containing varied combinations and orderings of pyrene (Y), benzopyrene (B), perylene (E), dimethylaminostilbene (D), and spacer (S) monomers conjugated to the 3′ end of a DNA oligomer. Hybridization of this probe sequence to a dabcyl-labeled complementary strand resulted in strong quenching of fluorescence in 85% of the twenty ODF sequences. The high efficiency of quenching was also established by their large Stern–Volmer constants (KSV) of between 2.1 × 104 and 4.3 × 105M−1, measured with a free dabcyl quencher. Interestingly, quenching of ODFs displayed strong sequence dependence. This was particularly evident in anagrams of ODF sequences; for example, the sequence BYDS had a KSV that was approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that of BSDY, which has the same dye composition. Other anagrams, for example EDSY and ESYD, also displayed different responses upon quenching by dabcyl. Analysis of spectra showed that apparent excimer and exciplex emission bands were quenched with much greater efficiency compared to monomer emission bands by at least an order of magnitude. This suggests an important role played by delocalized excited states of the π stack of fluorophores in the amplified quenching of fluorescence. PMID:19780115

  13. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  14. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  15. Transformation of cell-derived microparticles into quantum-dot-labeled nanovectors for antitumor siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Jian-Gang; Wu, Min; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Lv, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-12

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been recently recognized as critical intercellular information conveyors. However, further understanding of their biological behavior and potential application has been hampered by the limitations of current labeling techniques. Herein, a universal donor-cell-assisted membrane biotinylation strategy was proposed for labeling MPs by skillfully utilizing the natural membrane phospholipid exchange of their donor cells. This innovative strategy conveniently led to specific, efficient, reproducible, and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) labeling of MPs, thereby reliably conferring valuable traceability on MPs. By further loading with small interference RNA, QD-labeled MPs that had inherent cell-targeting and biomolecule-conveying ability were successfully employed for combined bioimaging and tumor-targeted therapy. This study provides the first reliable and biofriendly strategy for transforming biogenic MPs into functionalized nanovectors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ting [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Xuefeng, E-mail: zhuxf@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Zhou, Shenghai [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yang, Guang [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Gan, Wei [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yuan, Qunhui, E-mail: yuanqh@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • First application of a DNA derived fluorescent bio-dot for metal sensing. • Bio-dot was conveniently obtained via a mild thermal hydro-thermal synthesis. • Bio-dot was directly used for fluorescent sensing without further modification. • Bio-dot showed good fluorescent sensing property for Hg(II) and Ag(I). • Formation of T–Hg–T and C–Ag–C structures played key roles in sensing. - Abstract: Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0–0.5 μM and 0.5–6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0–10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%.

  17. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ting; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhou, Shenghai; Yang, Guang; Gan, Wei; Yuan, Qunhui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First application of a DNA derived fluorescent bio-dot for metal sensing. • Bio-dot was conveniently obtained via a mild thermal hydro-thermal synthesis. • Bio-dot was directly used for fluorescent sensing without further modification. • Bio-dot showed good fluorescent sensing property for Hg(II) and Ag(I). • Formation of T–Hg–T and C–Ag–C structures played key roles in sensing. - Abstract: Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0–0.5 μM and 0.5–6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0–10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%

  18. Labelling of HBV-DNA probe using reagent made in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanshi

    1991-01-01

    The labelling hepatitis Bvirus DNA (HBV-DNA) probe was studied by using reagent made in China. The results showed that: (1) The dNTPs with high specific activity was necessary for the labelling of nigh specific activity HBV-DNA probe; (2) reaction of labelling HBV-DNA probe was completed in a few minutes; (3) 0.37 MBq 3 H dTTP (specific activity 1.554TBq/mmol) was enough to label 1 μg HBV-DNA and the specific activity of probe reached 3.4 x 10 cpm/μg; (4) 7 MBqα- 32 P dATP (specific activity > 111 TBq/mmol) can label HBV-DNA probe to specific activity 1.35 x 10 cpm/μg. It was concluded that the reagent made in China can be used for the study in molecular biology

  19. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyahara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  20. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  1. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liuxiang@ahut.edu.cn; Cui, Ping, E-mail: cokecp@sohu.com

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cheap carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield were prepared. • The preparation process and surface functionalization on CQDs are rather facile. • Such functionalized CQDs can be attached to BSA covalently. • This predicts that some biomolecules can be labeled by the fluorescent CQDs. - Abstract: An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  2. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets by integrating dual-color graphene quantum dot nanoprobes and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Shan, Xiaoyue; Chai, Lujing; Chen, Jianrong; Feng, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets was achieved based on a biocompatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) platform through spontaneous assembly between dual-color GQD-based probes and CNTs and subsequently self-recognition between DNA probes and targets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A label-free silicon quantum dots-based photoluminescence sensor for ultrasensitive detection of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yinhui; Zhu, Gangbing; Liu, Chang; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Zhao, Jiangna; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-12-03

    Sensitive, rapid, and simple detection methods for the screening of extensively used organophosphorus pesticides and highly toxic nerve agents are in urgent demand. A novel label-free silicon quantum dots (SiQDs)-based sensor was designed for ultrasensitive detection of pesticides. This sensing strategy involves the reaction of acetylcholine chloride (ACh) with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to form choline that is in turn catalytically oxidized by choline oxidase (ChOx) to produce betaine and H2O2 which can quench the photoluminescence (PL) of SiQDs. Upon the addition of pesticides, the activity of AChE is inhibited, leading to the decrease of the generated H2O2, and hence the PL of SiQDs increases. By measuring the increase in SiQDs PL, the inhibition efficiency of pesticide to AChE activity was evaluated. It was found that the inhibition efficiency was linearly dependent on the logarithm of the pesticides concentration. Consequently, pesticides, such as carbaryl, parathion, diazinon, and phorate, were determined with the SiQDs PL sensing method. The lowest detectable concentrations for carbaryl, parathion, diazinon, and phorate reached 7.25 × 10(-9), 3.25 × 10(-8), 6.76 × 10(-8), and 1.9 × 10(-7) g/L, respectively, which were much lower than those previously reported. The detecting results of pesticide residues in food samples via this method agree well with those from high-performance liquid chromatography. The simple strategy reported here should be suitable for on-site pesticides detection, especially in combination with other portable platforms.

  4. One-pot synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots with good biocompatibility for cell labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Yan, Kun; Yang, Qiulian; Liu, Yanhua; Yan, Zhengyu; Chen, Jianqiu

    2017-12-01

    Here we report an easy and economical hydrothermal carbonization approach to synthesize the fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) that was developed using citric acid and triethanolamine as the precursors. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain the N-CDs with superior fluorescence performances. The as-prepared N-CDs are monodispersed sphere nanoparticles with good water solubility, and exhibited strong fluorescence, favourable photostability and excitation wavelength-dependent behavior. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular labeling of N-CDs were investigated using the rat glomerular mesangial cells. The results showed the N-CDs have more inconspicuous cytotoxicity and better biosafety in comparison with ZnSe quantum dots, although both targeted the cells successfully. Considering their admirable photostability, low toxicity and good compatibility, the as-obtained N-CDs could have potential applications in biosensors, cellular imaging, and other fields. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  6. Leishmania diagnostic and identification py using 32P labelled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Melo, Maria Norma de

    1999-10-01

    P 32 labelled DNA probes are valious instruments for the parasitic diseases by using hybridization reaction. In this paper we describe the methodology and present the foundations for the radioactive probes production, based on the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), for the Leishmania diagnostic an identification. We also describe the kDNA purification protocol from Leishmania reference cepa, the process of P 32 labelling of the kDNA by using the nick translation method, gathering, sample preparation and treatment, the optimum conditions for the hybridization reaction and the procedures for the autoradiography

  7. A flexible fluorescence correlation spectroscopy based method for quantification of the DNA double labeling efficiency with precision control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Sen; Tabaka, Marcin; Sun, Lili; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Holyst, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We developed a laser-based method to quantify the double labeling efficiency of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in a fluorescent dsDNA pool with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Though, for quantitative biochemistry, accurate measurement of this parameter is of critical importance, before our work it was almost impossible to quantify what percentage of DNA is doubly labeled with the same dye. The dsDNA is produced by annealing complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) labeled with the same dye at 5′ end. Due to imperfect ssDNA labeling, the resulting dsDNA is a mixture of doubly labeled dsDNA, singly labeled dsDNA and unlabeled dsDNA. Our method allows the percentage of doubly labeled dsDNA in the total fluorescent dsDNA pool to be measured. In this method, we excite the imperfectly labeled dsDNA sample in a focal volume of <1 fL with a laser beam and correlate the fluctuations of the fluorescence signal to get the FCS autocorrelation curves; we express the amplitudes of the autocorrelation function as a function of the DNA labeling efficiency; we perform a comparative analysis of a dsDNA sample and a reference dsDNA sample, which is prepared by increasing the total dsDNA concentration c (c > 1) times by adding unlabeled ssDNA during the annealing process. The method is flexible in that it allows for the selection of the reference sample and the c value can be adjusted as needed for a specific study. We express the precision of the method as a function of the ssDNA labeling efficiency or the dsDNA double labeling efficiency. The measurement precision can be controlled by changing the c value. (letter)

  8. Phosphorescent quantum dots/ethidium bromide nanohybrids based on photoinduced electron transfer for DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lin; Yu, Yuan-Hua

    2015-04-05

    Mercaptopropionic acid-capped Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots/ethidium bromide (EB) nanohybrids were constructed for photoinduced electron transfer (PIET) and then used as a room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) probe for DNA detection. EB could quench the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs by PIET, thereby forming Mn-doped ZnS QDs/EB nanohybrids and storing RTP. Meanwhile, EB could be inserted into DNA and EB could be competitively desorbed from the surface of Mn-doped ZnS QDs by DNA, thereby releasing the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Based on this mechanism, a RTP sensor for DNA detection was developed. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit for DNA was 0.045 mg L(-1), the relative standard deviation was 1.7%, and the method linear ranged from 0.2 to 20 mg L(-1). The proposed method was applied to biological fluids, in which satisfactory results were obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phosphorescent quantum dots/doxorubicin nanohybrids based on photoinduced electron transfer for detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yanming; Zhang, Zhifeng; Gong, Yan; Yan, Guiqin

    2014-09-15

    MPA-capped Mn-doped ZnS QDs/DXR nanohybrids (MPA: 3-mercaptopropionic acid; QDs: quantum dots; DXR: cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide) were constructed via photoinduced electron transfer (PIET) and then used as a room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) probe for detection of DNA. DXR as a quencher will quench the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs via PIET, thereby forming Mn-doped ZnS QDs/DXR nanohybrids and storing RTP. With the addition of DNA, it will be inserted into DXR and thus DXR will be competitively desorbed from the surface of Mn-doped ZnS QDs, thereby releasing the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Based on this, a new method for DNA detection was built. The sensor for DNA has a detection limit of 0.039 mg L(-1) and a linear range from 0.1 to 14 mg L(-1). The present QDs-based RTP method does not need deoxidants or other inducers as required by conventional RTP detection methods, and avoids interference from autofluorescence and the scattering light of the matrix that are encountered in spectrofluorometry. Therefore, this method can be used to detect the DNA content in body fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiplex competitive microbead-based flow cytometric immunoassay using quantum dot fluorescent labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hye-Weon; Kim, In S.; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► First time, duplex competitive bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay was developed using ODs. ► Antibody-coated QD detection probes and antigen-immobilized microspheres were synthesized. ► The two model target analytes were low molecular weight compounds of microbial and chemical origin. ► The determination of different water types was possible after simple filtration of samples. - Abstract: In answer to the ever-increasing need to perform the simultaneous analysis of environmental hazards, microcarrier-based multiplex technologies show great promise. Further integration with biofunctionalized quantum dots (QDs) creates new opportunities to extend the capabilities of multicolor flow cytometry with their unique fluorescence properties. Here, we have developed a competitive microbead-based flow cytometric immunoassay using QDs fluorescent labels for simultaneous detection of two analytes, bringing the benefits of sensitive, rapid and easy-of-manipulation analytical tool for environmental contaminants. As model target compounds, the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compound benzo[a]pyrene were selected. The assay was carried out in two steps: the competitive immunological reaction of multiple targets using their exclusive sensing elements of QD/antibody detection probes and antigen-coated microsphere, and the subsequent flow cytometric analysis. The fluorescence of the QD-encoded microsphere was thus found to be inversely proportional to target analyte concentration. Under optimized conditions, the proposed assay performed well within 30 min for the identification and quantitative analysis of the two environmental contaminants. For microcystin-LR and benzo[a]pyrene, dose–response curves with IC 50 values of 5 μg L −1 and 1.1 μg L −1 and dynamic ranges of 0.52–30 μg L −1 and 0.13–10 μg L −1 were obtained, respectively. Recovery was 92.6–106.5% for 5 types of water samples like bottled

  11. Switchable DNA interfaces for the highly sensitive detection of label-free DNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Scherer, Simon; Pringsheim, Erika; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tornow, Marc; Abstreiter, Gerhard

    2007-10-30

    We report a method to detect label-free oligonucleotide targets. The conformation of surface-tethered probe nucleic acids is modulated by alternating electric fields, which cause the molecules to extend away from or fold onto the biased surface. Binding (hybridization) of targets to the single-stranded probes results in a pronounced enhancement of the layer-height modulation amplitude, monitored optically in real time. The method features an exceptional detection limit of <3 x 10(8) bound targets per cm(2) sensor area. Single base-pair mismatches in the sequences of DNA complements may readily be identified; moreover, binding kinetics and binding affinities can be determined with high accuracy. When driving the DNA to oscillate at frequencies in the kHz regime, distinct switching kinetics are revealed for single- and double-stranded DNA. Molecular dynamics are used to identify the binding state of molecules according to their characteristic kinetic fingerprints by using a chip-compatible detection format.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of C@CdS dots in aqueous solution and their application in labeling human gastric carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Wei, E-mail: dongwei5873@126.com [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Chemistry (China); Zhou, Siqi [Fengtian Hospital Affiliated to Shenyang Medical College, ICU (China); Dong, Yan [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Experiment Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine Department (China); Wang, Jingwen; Liu, Shuang; Zhu, Pengxia [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Chemistry (China)

    2015-03-15

    Colloidal carbon spheres coated with cadmium sulfide nanoparticle quantum dots (C@CdS dots) with the particle size smaller than 50 nm were synthesized by an aqueous approach. The effects of different reaction times, temperatures, and pH values were carefully investigated to optimize the synthesis conditions. The as-prepared C@CdS dots were linked with mouse anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen antibody and goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgG) to directly and indirectly label fixed human gastric carcinoma cells, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the C@CdS dots was also tested using the human gastric carcinoma cells. No apparent cytotoxicity was observed, which suggested the potential application of the as-prepared C@CdS dots in bioimaging.

  13. Detection of irradiation induced modifications in foodstuff DNA using 32p post-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, B.M.; Swallow, A.J.; Margison, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    DNA post-labelling has been used successfully to detect damage to DNA caused by a range of damaging agents. The assay results in a fingerprint of changes induced in DNA which might, in principle, be useful as a test for the detection of the irradiation of foods. The authors present their DNA extraction and 32 p post-labelling methods from chicken or cooked prawn samples and their analysis method (High Performance liquid chromatography). It's hoped that these results could form the basis of a test to detect if foods have been irradiated

  14. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.A. [Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  15. In vitro and in vivo documentation of quantum dots labeled Trypanosoma cruzi--Rhodnius prolixus interaction using confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Denise; Gomes, Suzete A O; de Thomaz, André A; Almeida, Diogo B; Faustino, Wagner M; Fontes, Adriana; Stahl, Cecília V; Santos-Mallet, Jacenir R; Cesar, Carlos L

    2009-12-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are highly fluorescent nanocrystals markers that allow long photobleaching and do not destroy the parasites. In this paper, we used fluorescent core shell quantum dots to perform studies of live parasite-vector interaction processes without any observable effect on the vitality of parasites. These nanocrystals were synthesized in aqueous medium and physiological pH, which is very important for monitoring live cells activities, and conjugated with molecules such as lectins to label specific carbohydrates involved on the parasite-vector interaction. These QDs were successfully used for the study of in vitro and in vivo interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi and the triatomine Rhodnius prolixus. These QDs allowed us to acquire real time confocal images sequences of live T. cruzi-R. prolixus interactions for an extended period, causing no damage to the cells. By zooming to the region of interest, we have been able to acquire confocal images at the three to four frames per second rate. Our results show that QDs are physiological fluorescent markers capable to label living parasites and insect vector cells. QDs can be functionalized with lectins to specifically mark surface carbohydrates on perimicrovillar membrane of R. prolixus to follow, visualize, and understand interaction between vectors and its parasites in real-time.

  16. Selective detection of labeled DNA using an air-clad photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Hoiby, P.E.; Pedersen, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core.......Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core....

  17. Stepwise Assembly and Characterization of DNA Linked Two-Color Quantum Dot Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Han, Hyunjoo; Maye, Mathew M

    2015-07-14

    The DNA-mediated self-assembly of multicolor quantum dot (QD) clusters via a stepwise approach is described. The CdSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized and functionalized with an amphiphilic copolymer, followed by ssDNA conjugation. At each functionalization step, the QDs were purified via gradient ultracentrifugation, which was found to remove excess polymer and QD aggregates, allowing for improved conjugation yields and assembly reactivity. The QDs were then assembled and disassembled in a stepwise manner at a ssDNA functionalized magnetic colloid, which provided a convenient way to remove unreacted QDs and ssDNA impurities. After assembly/disassembly, the clusters' optical characteristics were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and the assembly morphology and stoichiometry was imaged via electron microscopy. The results indicate that a significant amount of QD-to-QD energy transfer occurred in the clusters, which was studied as a function of increasing acceptor-to-donor ratios, resulting in increased QD acceptor emission intensities compared to controls.

  18. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  19. Bioorthogonal Metabolic DNA Labelling using Vinyl Thioether-Modified Thymidine and o-Quinolinone Quinone Methide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubu, Amu; Li, Long; Ning, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lee, Seonghyun; Feng, Mengke; Li, Qiang; Lei, Xiaoguang; Jo, Kyubong; Tang, Xinjing

    2018-04-17

    Bioorthogonal metabolic DNA labeling with fluorochromes is a powerful strategy to visualize DNA molecules and their functions. Here, we report the development of a new DNA metabolic labeling strategy enabled by the catalyst-free bioorthogonal ligation using vinyl thioether modified thymidine and o-quinolinone quinone methide. With the newly designed vinyl thioether-modified thymidine (VTdT), we added labeling tags on cellular DNA, which could further be linked to fluorochromes in cells. Therefore, we successfully visualized the DNA localization within cells as well as single DNA molecules without other staining reagents. In addition, we further characterized this bioorthogonal DNA metabolic labeling using DNase I digestion, MS characterization of VTdT as well as VTdT-oQQF conjugate in cell nuclei or mitochondria. This technique provides a powerful strategy to study DNA in cells, which paves the way to achieve future spatiotemporal deciphering of DNA synthesis and functions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. DNA labeled during phosphonoacetate inhibition and following its reversal in herpesvirus infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Human embryonic lung cells were pre-equilibrated with phosphonoacetate and 32 P orthophosphate label, then infected with phosphonoacetate-sensitive herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1. Analyses of viral DNA produced in these cells showed the following. i) Viral DNA was synthesized in infected cells exposed to 100 μg of the drug per ml of medium but not in cells exposed to four-fold higher concentrations of the drug. ii) At 300 μg/ml a region of the DNA between 0.58 and 0.69 map units became transiently labeled, but the restriction endonuclease fragment containing these sequences migrated more slowly than the corresponding fragment from virion DNA. iii) Viral DNA extracted from infected cells 1.5 hours post drug withdrawal (300 μg/ml) was preferentially labeled in 2 regions of the genome mapping between 0.17 and 0.23 and 0.58-0.69 map units. This finding is in agreement with a report of Friedman et al. suggesting that HSV DNA contains two different sites if initiation. In addition a 4.8 x 10 6 molecular weight fragment was also preferentially labeled. This fragment could represent a smaller, aberrantly migrating fragment from the 0.17-0.27 map unit region of the DNA. iv) Viral DNA extracted from infected cells at longer intervals after drug withdrawal showed an increasing gradient of radioactivity progressively labeling the genome. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that viral DNA has at least two sites of initiation of DNA synthesis and that both sites are within the L component of the DNA. Alternatively, the results could be interpreted as two sites of localized synthesis (repair) that are detected at high concentrations of phosphonoacetate and immediately following reversal of inhibition of DNA synthesis. The results do not exclude the possibility that secondary sites in both L and S are utilized late in infection or in untreated cells. (Author)

  1. Radiation sensitization by an iodine-labelled DNA ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R F; Murray, V; D' Cunha, G; Pardee, M; Haigh, A; Hodgson, G S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Inst., Melbourne (Australia); Kampouris, E; Kelly, D P [Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia)

    1990-05-01

    An iodinated DNA ligand, iodoHoechst 33258, which binds in the minor groove of DNA, enhances DNA strand breakage and cell killing by UV-A irradiation. The sites of UV-induced strand breaks reflect the known sequence specificity of the ligand. (author).

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analysis for accurate determination of proportion of doubly labeled DNA in fluorescent DNA pool for quantitative biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sen; Sun, Lili; Wieczorek, Stefan A; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Holyst, Robert

    2014-01-15

    Fluorescent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules labeled at both ends are commonly produced by annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules, labeled with fluorescent dyes at the same (3' or 5') end. Because the labeling efficiency of ssDNA is smaller than 100%, the resulting dsDNA have two, one or are without a dye. Existing methods are insufficient to measure the percentage of the doubly-labeled dsDNA component in the fluorescent DNA sample and it is even difficult to distinguish the doubly-labeled DNA component from the singly-labeled component. Accurate measurement of the percentage of such doubly labeled dsDNA component is a critical prerequisite for quantitative biochemical measurements, which has puzzled scientists for decades. We established a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system to measure the percentage of doubly labeled dsDNA (PDL) in the total fluorescent dsDNA pool. The method is based on comparative analysis of the given sample and a reference dsDNA sample prepared by adding certain amount of unlabeled ssDNA into the original ssDNA solution. From FCS autocorrelation functions, we obtain the number of fluorescent dsDNA molecules in the focal volume of the confocal microscope and PDL. We also calculate the labeling efficiency of ssDNA. The method requires minimal amount of material. The samples have the concentration of DNA in the nano-molar/L range and the volume of tens of microliters. We verify our method by using restriction enzyme Hind III to cleave the fluorescent dsDNA. The kinetics of the reaction depends strongly on PDL, a critical parameter for quantitative biochemical measurements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dots to detect DNA and damage to DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulick A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Amitava Moulick,1,2 Vedran Milosavljevic,1,2 Jana Vlachova,1,2 Robert Podgajny,3 David Hynek,1,2 Pavel Kopel,1,2 Vojtech Adam1,2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mendel University, 2Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Abstract: CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dot (QD, one of the strongest and most highly luminescent nanoparticles, was directly synthesized in an aqueous medium to study its individual interactions with important nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine in detail. The results obtained from the optical analyses indicated that the interactions of the QDs with different nucleobases were different, which reflected in different fluorescent emission maxima and intensities. The difference in the interaction was found due to the different chemical behavior and different sizes of the formed nanoconjugates. An electrochemical study also confirmed that the purines and pyrimidines show different interactions with the core/shell QDs. Based on these phenomena, a novel QD-based method is developed to detect the presence of the DNA, damage to DNA, and mutation. The QDs were successfully applied very easily to detect any change in the sequence (mutation of DNA. The QDs also showed their ability to detect DNAs directly from the extracts of human cancer (PC3 and normal (PNT1A cells (detection limit of 500 pM of DNA, which indicates the possibilities to use this easy assay technique to confirm the presence of living organisms in extreme environments. Keywords: nanoparticles, nucleobases, biosensor, fluorescence, mutation

  4. An Investigation of the Height of Embossed Braille Dots for Labels on Pharmaceutical Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Graeme; Weston, Annette; Whittaker, Jennifer; Wilkins, Sarah Morley; Robinson, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    European legislation requires new pharmaceutical packaging to include both the name and strength of the drug in braille on boxes and bottles. Much of the braille on medical packaging is currently produced by an embossing process on boxes. The height of the dots that can be achieved through these methods is less than 0.3 mm. The physical dimensions…

  5. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of quantum dots for molecular computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Li, Zhi; Chen, Muzi; Ma, Nan

    2014-12-22

    Despite the widespread use of quantum dots (QDs) for biosensing and bioimaging, QD-based bio-interfaceable and reconfigurable molecular computing systems have not yet been realized. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of multi-color QDs is presented for the construction of a new class of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based QD computing systems. A complete set of seven elementary logic gates (OR, AND, NOR, NAND, INH, XOR, XNOR) are realized using a series of binary and ternary QD complexes operated by strand displacement reactions. The integration of different logic gates into a half-adder circuit for molecular computation is also demonstrated. This strategy is quite versatile and straightforward for logical operations and would pave the way for QD-biocomputing-based intelligent molecular diagnostics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Synthesis of radioactively labelled CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots for in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon M. Stachowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades of nanoparticles research, many nanomaterials have been developed for applications in the field of bio-labelling. For the visualization of transport processes in the body, organs and cells, luminescent quantum dots (QDs make for highly useful diagnostic tools. However, intercellular routes, bio-distribution, metabolism during degradation or quantification of the excretion of nanoparticles, and the study of the biological response to the QDs themselves are areas which to date have not been fully investigated. In order to aid in addressing those issues, CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were radioactively labelled, which allows quantification of the QD concentration in the whole body or in ex vivo samples by γ-counting. However, the synthesis of radioactively labelled QDs is not trivial since the coating process must be completely adapted, and material availability, security and avoidance of radioactive waste must be considered. In this contribution, the coating of CdSe/CdS QDs with a radioactive 65ZnS shell using a modified, operator-safe, SILAR procedure is presented. Under UV illumination, no difference in the photoluminescence of the radioactive and non-radioactive CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal solutions was observed. Furthermore, a down-scaled synthesis for the production of very small batches of 5 nmol QDs without loss in the fluorescence quality was developed. Subsequently, the radio-labelled QDs were phase transferred by encapsulation into an amphiphilic polymer. γ-counting of the radioactivity provided confirmation of the successful labelling and phase transfer of the QDs.

  8. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  9. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltas, Esra, E-mail: maltasesra@gmail.com [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Malkondu, Sait [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Uyar, Pembegul [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Selcuk University, Advanced Technology Research and Application Center, Konya (Turkey); Ozmen, Mustafa [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey)

    2015-03-01

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope.

  10. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltas, Esra; Malkondu, Sait; Uyar, Pembegul; Ozmen, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope

  11. Tail-labelling of DNA probes using modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates and terminal deoxynucleotidyl tranferase. Application in electrochemical DNA hybridization and protein-DNA binding assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pivoňková, Hana; Špaček, Jan; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2011), s. 1366-1371 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA tail- labelling * protein-DNA binding * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  12. Dual-Mode SERS-Fluorescence Immunoassay Using Graphene Quantum Dot Labeling on One-Dimensional Aligned Magnetoplasmonic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fengming; Zhou, Hongjian; Tan, Tran Van; Kim, Jeonghyo; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2015-06-10

    A novel dual-mode immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence was designed using graphene quantum dot (GQD) labels to detect a tuberculosis (TB) antigen, CFP-10, via a newly developed sensing platform of linearly aligned magnetoplasmonic (MagPlas) nanoparticles (NPs). The GQDs were excellent bilabeling materials for simultaneous Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL). The one-dimensional (1D) alignment of MagPlas NPs simplified the immunoassay process and enabled fast, enhanced signal transduction. With a sandwich-type immunoassay using dual-mode nanoprobes, both SERS signals and fluorescence images were recognized in a highly sensitive and selective manner with a detection limit of 0.0511 pg mL(-1).

  13. Luminescent passive-oxidized silicon quantum dots as biological staining labels and their cytotoxicity effects at high concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hanada, Sanshiro; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Hiruoka, Masaki; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Miyasaka, Ryosuke; Tilley, Richard D; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) hold some advantages over conventional organic fluorescent dyes. Due to these advantages, they are becoming increasingly popular in the field of bioimaging. However, recent work suggests that cadmium based QDs affect cellular activity. As a substitute for cadmium based QDs, we have developed photoluminescent stable silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) with a passive-oxidation technique. Si-QDs (size: 6.5 ± 1.5 nm) emit green light, and they have been used as biological labels for living cell imaging. In order to determine the minimum concentration for cytotoxicity, we investigated the response of HeLa cells. We have shown that the toxicity of Si-QDs was not observed at 112 μg ml -1 and that Si-QDs were less toxic than CdSe-QDs at high concentration in mitochondrial assays and with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Especially under UV exposure, Si-QDs were more than ten times safer than CdSe-QDs. We suggest that one mechanism for the cytotoxicity is that Si-QDs can generate oxygen radicals and these radicals are associated with membrane damages. This work has demonstrated the suitability of Si-QDs for bioimaging in lower concentration, and their cytotoxicity and one toxicity mechanism at high concentration

  14. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He, E-mail: mzhang_he@126.com; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  15. 18F- and 11C-labelling of quantum dots with n.c.a. [18F]fluoroethyltosylate and [11C]methyliodide. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, M.; Schildan, A.; Habermann, B.; Mishchenko, O.; Patt, J.T.; Sabri, O.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots functionalized on the outer surface with either amino- or carboxyl functions were labelled with [ 18 F]fluoroethyltosylate and [ 11 C]methyliodide in order to use the positron emitter-labelled fluorescence agents for multimodality imaging techniques, i.e. fluorescence imaging and positron emission tomography. 18 F-Labelling of both compounds was realized with yields up to 5% as determined by size exclusion chromatography, which is twice as much as reported in literature before [1]. 11 C-Labelling of amino- and carboxyl-QDs proceeded with good yields (up to 45 and 35%, respectively) under optimized reaction conditions. In general for both QD-types and both labelling agents the labelling yield increased with the amount of QDs used in the reaction as well as with reaction time and reaction temperature. (author)

  16. A novel electrochemical sensor for lead ion based on cascade DNA and quantum dots amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Shurong; Lu, Wei; Gu, Fang; Tong, Ping; Yan, Zhiming; Zhang, Lan

    2014-01-01

    A new enzyme-free and ultrasensitive electrochemical Pb 2+ biosensor was developed. By coupling the DNA-assisted cascade of hybridization reaction with the quantum dots (QDs) for signal amplification, a detection limit as low as 6.1 pM can be obtained for Pb 2+ . In this study, the “8-17” DNAzyme was used for specific recognition of Pb 2+ . In the presence of Pb 2+ , the DNAzyme was activated and cleaved the substrate strand. And then, the hybridization between the linker probe and signal probe was initiated, which resulted in formation of a long cascade DNA structure as well as assemble of numerous QDs at last. By the use of magnetic beads, the free signal probe can be easily removed by external magnetic field. After acid lysis, a great amount of redox cations can be released from the QDs and eventually result in significantly amplified electrochemical signals. This method is highly sensitive, selective and simple without the participation of any protein based enzyme (nuclease), thereby holds great potential for real sample analysis

  17. Labelling of histone H5 and its interaction with DNA. 1. Histone H5 labelling with fluorescein isothiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, M; Lerho, M; Houssier, C

    1990-06-01

    Histone H5 has been labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with particular attention to the reaction conditions (pH, reaction time and input FITC/H5 molar ratio) and to the complete elimination of non-covalently bound dye. We preferred to use reaction conditions which yielded non-specific uniform labelling rather than specific alpha-NH2 terminal labelling, in order to obtain higher sensitivity in further studies dealing with the detection of perturbation at the binding sites of H5 on DNA. FITC-labelled H5 was further characterized by absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and the fluorescein probe titrated in the 4-8 pH range. The structural integrity of H5 was found to be preserved after labelling. The positive electrostatic potential of the environment in which the FITC probe is embedded in the arginine/lysine-rich tails of H5 is believed to be responsible for the drop of pK of 1 unit found for H5-FITC as compared to free FITC. For the globular part of H5, the pK of covalently-bound FITC was only slightly lowered; this is a consequence of the much lower content in positively-charged amino-acid side chains in this region.

  18. Preparation of fluorescent-dye-labeled cDNA from RNA for microarray hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes how to prepare fluorescently labeled cDNA for hybridization to microarrays. It consists of two steps: first, a mixture of anchored oligo(dT) and random hexamers is used to prime amine-modified cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase using a modified deoxynucleotide with a reactive amine group (aminoallyl-dUTP) and an RNA sample as a template. Second, the cDNA is purified and exchanged into bicarbonate buffer so that the amine groups in the cDNA react with the dye N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, covalently joining the dye to the cDNA. The dye-coupled cDNA is purified again, and the amount of dye incorporated per microgram of cDNA is determined.

  19. Distribution of distances between DNA barcode labels in nanochannels close to the persistence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Reifenberger, Jeff G.; Gupta, Damini; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Sheats, Julian; Cao, Han; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2015-02-01

    We obtained experimental extension data for barcoded E. coli genomic DNA molecules confined in nanochannels from 40 nm to 51 nm in width. The resulting data set consists of 1 627 779 measurements of the distance between fluorescent probes on 25 407 individual molecules. The probability density for the extension between labels is negatively skewed, and the magnitude of the skewness is relatively insensitive to the distance between labels. The two Odijk theories for DNA confinement bracket the mean extension and its variance, consistent with the scaling arguments underlying the theories. We also find that a harmonic approximation to the free energy, obtained directly from the probability density for the distance between barcode labels, leads to substantial quantitative error in the variance of the extension data. These results suggest that a theory for DNA confinement in such channels must account for the anharmonic nature of the free energy as a function of chain extension.

  20. DNA-specific labelling by deoxyribonucleoside 5'-monophosphates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, M.; Faeth, W.W.; Toper, R.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of 5'-dTMP low-requiring strains is inhibited by exogenous 5'-dGMP and 5'-GMP at concentrations higher than 5 x 10 -4 M. Synthesis of nucleic acids ceases and cells remain fixed in their respective place in the cell cycle. At concentrations lower than 10 -5 M deoxyribonucleoside 5'-monophosphates may be employed for radioactive labelling, the label being preferentially used for DNA synthesis. Affinity to DNA of the 5'-dNMPs is in the order of 5'-dAMPS > 5'-dGMP > 5'-dCMP > 5'-dUMP. DNA-specific label is achieved with 5'-dAMP when the medium is supplemented with adenine and deoxyadenosine. (orig.) [de

  1. Cytotoxicity of an 125I-labelled DNA ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, T.C.; Lobachevsky, P.N.; Martin, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of a DNA-binding ligand [ 125 I]-Hoechst 33258 following incubation of K562 cells with the drug was investigated. The ability of a radical scavenger, dimethyl sulphoxide, to protect cells from the 125 I-decay induced cell death was also studied. Three different concentrations and specific activities of the drug were used to provide different ligand : DNA binding ratios. The results demonstrated a trend toward improved delivery of the ligand to the nucleus and to chromatin at higher ligand concentrations, with concomitant increased sensitivity to 125 I-decay induced cytotoxicity and decreased protection by dimethyl sulphoxide. This correlation of radiobiological parameters with subcellular drug distribution is consistent with the classical dogma that attributes cytotoxicity to DNA double-stranded breakage in the vicinity of the site of decay, where the high LET nature of the damage confers minimal sensitivity to radical scavenging

  2. A visible light photoelectrochemical sensor for tumor marker detection using tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene as labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhu; Li, Meng; Zhu, Yuanna; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive sandwich-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor for measurement of biomarkers on a gold nanoparticle-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrodeposition for point-of-care testing was developed by using a tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene nanocomposite (G-SnO2) as an excellent label with amplification techniques. The capture antibody (Ab1) was firstly immobilized on the gold nanoparticle-modified ITO electrode due to the covalent conjugation, then the antigen and the AuNP/PDDA-G-SnO2 nanocomposite nanoparticle labeled signal antibody (Ab2) were conjugated successively to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex through a specific interaction. Under irradiation with a common ultraviolet lamp (∼365 nm, price $50), the SnO2 NPs were excited and underwent charge-separation to yield electrons (e(-)) and holes (h(+)). As the holes were scavenged by ascorbic acid (AA), the electrons were transferred to the ITO electrode through RGO to generate a photocurrent. The photocurrents were proportional to the CEA concentrations, and the linear range of the developed immunosensor was from 0.005 to 10 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.036 pg mL(-1). The proposed sensor shows high sensitivity, stability, reproducibility, and can become a promising platform for other biomolecular detection.

  3. DNA probe labeling with digoxigenin-dUTP and its application in gene diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoyang

    1992-01-01

    DNA probe labeling by the randomly primed incorporation of digoxigenin-dUTP is reported. The sensitivity of color reaction and hybridization were 32 fg and 200 fg, respectively, and both were specific for the target. Single-copy and multi-copy gene fragments among 2 μg human genomic DNA were detected by β IVS II, Fr 3-42 and 3'HVR labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP. The results were consistent with a radioactive control assay. This method has been successfully used in the gene diagnosis of adult polycystic kidney disease

  4. Comparative study of colloidal gold and quantum dots as labels for multiplex screening tests for multi-mycotoxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foubert, Astrid, E-mail: astrid.foubert@hotmail.com; Beloglazova, Natalia V.; De Saeger, Sarah

    2017-02-22

    Quantum dots (QDs) and colloidal gold nanoparticles (CG) were evaluated as labels for multiplex lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) for determination of mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN) and T2/HT2-toxin (T2/HT2) in cereal matrices. Both developed assays were based on the same immunoreagents (except for the labels), therefore their analytical characteristics could be objectively compared. For both LFIAs antigens (DON-ovalbumin (OVA), ZEN-OVA and T2-OVA) and rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin were immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane as three test lines and one control line, respectively. Depending on the LFIA, monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against DON, ZEN and T2 were conjugated with CdSeS/ZnS QDs or CG. T2 and HT2 were detected by one test line (T2-OVA) with an anti-T2 mAb which showed 110% cross-reactivity with HT2. Both tests were developed in accordance with the legal limits and were developed in such a way that they had the same cut-off limits of 1000 μg kg{sup −1}, 80 μg kg{sup −1} and 80 μg kg{sup −1} for DON, ZEN and T2/HT2, respectively in order to allow a correct comparison. Applicability of these assays was demonstrated by analysis of naturally contaminated wheat samples. The results demonstrate that both the LFIAs can be used as rapid, cost-effective and convenient qualitative tool for on-site screening for simultaneous detection of DON, ZEN and HT2/T2 in wheat without special instrumentation. However, the QD-based LFIA consumed less immunoreagents and was more sensitive and economically beneficial. In addition, the results were easier to interpret, resulting in a lower false negative rate (<5%) which was in good agreement with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC regarding the performance of analytical methods intended for screening purposes. - Highlights: • Development of colloidal gold- and quantum dot-based multiplex lateral flow immunoassay. • Lateral flow immunoassays allow simultaneous detection of four mycotoxins.

  5. Charge transport through exciton shelves in cadmium chalcogenide quantum dot-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Singh, Vivek; Cha, Jennifer N.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-02-01

    Quantum dot (QD), or semiconductor nanocrystal, thin films are being explored for making solution-processable devices due to their size- and shape-tunable bandgap and discrete higher energy electronic states. While DNA has been extensively used for the self-assembly of nanocrystals, it has not been investigated for the simultaneous conduction of multiple energy charges or excitons via exciton shelves (ES) formed in QD-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films. Here, we present studies on charge conduction through exciton shelves, which are formed via chemically coupled QDs and DNA, between electronic states of the QDs and the HOMO-LUMO levels in the complementary DNA nucleobases. While several challenges need to be addressed in optimizing the formation of devices using QD-DNA thin films, a higher charge collection efficiency for hot-carriers and our detailed investigations of charge transport mechanism in these thin films highlight their potential for applications in nano-bioelectronic devices and biological transducers.

  6. Charge transport through exciton shelves in cadmium chalcogenide quantum dot-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Singh, Vivek [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Noh, Hyunwoo [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program and Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Cha, Jennifer N. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program and Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Nagpal, Prashant, E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado Boulder, 3415 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado Boulder, 2445 Kittredge Loop, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Quantum dot (QD), or semiconductor nanocrystal, thin films are being explored for making solution-processable devices due to their size- and shape-tunable bandgap and discrete higher energy electronic states. While DNA has been extensively used for the self-assembly of nanocrystals, it has not been investigated for the simultaneous conduction of multiple energy charges or excitons via exciton shelves (ES) formed in QD-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films. Here, we present studies on charge conduction through exciton shelves, which are formed via chemically coupled QDs and DNA, between electronic states of the QDs and the HOMO-LUMO levels in the complementary DNA nucleobases. While several challenges need to be addressed in optimizing the formation of devices using QD-DNA thin films, a higher charge collection efficiency for hot-carriers and our detailed investigations of charge transport mechanism in these thin films highlight their potential for applications in nano-bioelectronic devices and biological transducers.

  7. Charge transport through exciton shelves in cadmium chalcogenide quantum dot-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Singh, Vivek; Noh, Hyunwoo; Cha, Jennifer N.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dot (QD), or semiconductor nanocrystal, thin films are being explored for making solution-processable devices due to their size- and shape-tunable bandgap and discrete higher energy electronic states. While DNA has been extensively used for the self-assembly of nanocrystals, it has not been investigated for the simultaneous conduction of multiple energy charges or excitons via exciton shelves (ES) formed in QD-DNA nano-bioelectronic thin films. Here, we present studies on charge conduction through exciton shelves, which are formed via chemically coupled QDs and DNA, between electronic states of the QDs and the HOMO-LUMO levels in the complementary DNA nucleobases. While several challenges need to be addressed in optimizing the formation of devices using QD-DNA thin films, a higher charge collection efficiency for hot-carriers and our detailed investigations of charge transport mechanism in these thin films highlight their potential for applications in nano-bioelectronic devices and biological transducers

  8. Multiply osmium-labeled reporter probes for electrochemical DNA hybridization assays: detection of trinucleotide repeats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Kizek, René; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2004), s. 985-994 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42; GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemical sensors * DNA hybridization * DNA labeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.251, year: 2004

  9. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Trung, Tran; Tuan, Mai Anh; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when immerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  10. Detection of TTV-DNA in PBMC using digoxigenin labelled probe by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Qi Qige

    2002-01-01

    To determine TTV-DNA in PBMC in patients with viral hepatitis, a study of in situ hybridization using digoxigenin labelled probe by PCR method to the TTV ORF1 region was performed on PBMC. Results showed that the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA positive group in sera was 58.06 (18/31), and the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA negative group in sera was 27.59 (8/29). For TTV-DNA positive group detected by double- stranded probe, then we use negative- stranded probe to detect their replication. The detection rate was 22.2%(4/18). Conclusions: TTV can infect PBMC and replicate in PBMC

  11. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuong Dinh Tam; Mai Anh Tuan; Tran Trung; Nguyen Duc Chien

    2009-01-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when emerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  12. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phuong Dinh Tam; Mai Anh Tuan [International Training Institute for Materials Science (Viet Nam); Tran Trung [Department of Electrochemistry, Hung-Yen University of Technology and Education (Viet Nam); Nguyen Duc Chien [Institute of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: tr_trunghut@yahoo.com

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when emerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  13. Decoding DNA labels by melting curve analysis using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, József A; Fehér, Liliána Z; Puskás, László G

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic DNA has been used as an authentication code for a diverse number of applications. However, existing decoding approaches are based on either DNA sequencing or the determination of DNA length variations. Here, we present a simple alternative protocol for labeling different objects using a small number of short DNA sequences that differ in their melting points. Code amplification and decoding can be done in two steps using quantitative PCR (qPCR). To obtain a DNA barcode with high complexity, we defined 8 template groups, each having 4 different DNA templates, yielding 158 (>2.5 billion) combinations of different individual melting temperature (Tm) values and corresponding ID codes. The reproducibility and specificity of the decoding was confirmed by using the most complex template mixture, which had 32 different products in 8 groups with different Tm values. The industrial applicability of our protocol was also demonstrated by labeling a drone with an oil-based paint containing a predefined DNA code, which was then successfully decoded. The method presented here consists of a simple code system based on a small number of synthetic DNA sequences and a cost-effective, rapid decoding protocol using a few qPCR reactions, enabling a wide range of authentication applications.

  14. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled Lateral Flow Strips for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Gastric Cancer Carbohydrate Antigen 72-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Kan; Lu, Wenting; Qin, Weijian; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is an important biomarker associated closely with diagnosis and prognosis of early gastric cancer. How to realize quick, sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of CA72-4 in clinical specimens has become a great requirement. Herein, we reported a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow test strip combined with a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based reader was developed for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of CA72-4. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CA72-4 were employed. One of them was coated as a test line, while another mAb was labeled with quantum dots and coated onto conjugate pad. The goat anti-mouse IgG was immobilized as a control line. After sample was added, a sandwich structure was formed with CA72-4 and these two mAbs. The fluorescent signal from quantum dots (QD)-labeled mAb in sandwich structure was related to the amount of detected CA72-4. A CCD-based reader was used to realize quantitative detection of CA72-4. Results showed that developed QD-labeled lateral flow strips to detect CA72-4 biomarker with the sensitivity of 2 IU/mL and 10 min detection time. One hundred sera samples from clinical patients with gastric cancer and healthy people were used to confirm specificity of this strip method; results showed that established strip method own 100 % reproducibility and 100 % specificity compared with Roche electrochemiluminescence assay results. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-labeled lateral flow strips for detection of CA72-4 could realize rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of clinical samples and could own great potential in clinical translation in near future.

  15. Methoxyphenol and Dihydrobenzofuran as Oxidizable Labels for Electrochemical Detection of DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simonova, Anna; Balintová, Jana; Pohl, Radek; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 12 (2014), s. 1703-1712 ISSN 2192-6506 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA * electrochemistry * nucleotides * polymerase chain reactions * redox labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.997, year: 2014

  16. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogona...

  17. Label-free detection of biomolecular interaction — DNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    the molecule. In particular, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been already demonstrated suitable for food-safety control, label-free screening for various disease markers in bodily fluids, as well as for real-time continuous monitoring of drug levels in intensive care environment. We envisage...... of plasmon based biosensors to the study of the interaction of Antimicrobial peptide IL4 and DNA. Our results indicate high affinity binding between IL4 and DNA thereby preventing DNA replication and eventually killing the affected cell. We speculate that this is common for a large class of Antimicrobial...

  18. DNA-labeled micro- and nanoparticles: a new approach to study contaminant transport in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, C.; Wang, C.; Kocis, T. N.; Murphy, N. P.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Though our understanding of contaminant behavior in the subsurface has improved, our ability to measure and predict complex contaminant transport pathways at hillslope to watershed scales is still lacking. By utilizing bio-molecular nanotechnology developed for nano-medicines and drug delivery, we are able to produce DNA-labeled micro- and nanoparticles for use in a myriad of environmental systems. Control of the fabrication procedure allows us to produce particles of custom size, charge, and surface functionality to mimic the transport properties of the particulate contaminant or colloid of interest. The use of custom sequenced DNA allows for the fabrication of an enormous number of unique particle labels (approximately 1.61 x 1060 unique sequences) and the ability to discern between varied spatial and temporal applications, or the transport effect of varied particle size, charge, or surface properties. To date, this technology has been utilized to study contaminant transport from lab to field scales, including surface and open channel flow applications, transport in porous media, soil retention, and even subglacial flow pathways. Here, we present the technology for production and detection of the DNA-labeled particles along with the results from a current hillslope study at the Sierra Foothills Research and Extension Center (SFREC). This field study utilizes spatial and temporal variations in DNA-labeled particle applications to identify subsurface pollutant transport pathways through the four distinct soil horizons present at the SFREC site. Results from this and previous studies highlight the tremendous potential of the DNA-labeled particle technology for studying contaminant transport through the subsurface.

  19. Radioiodine labeled CdSe/CdS quantum dots. Lectin targeted dual probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Ozlet; Unak, Perihan; Medine, E. Ilker; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications; Sakarya, Serhan [Adnan Menderes Univ., Aydin (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bekis, Recep [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Timur, Suna [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Biochemistry Dept.

    2014-11-01

    CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QD) were synthesized and bioconjugated with Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectin (Lec). Mannose triflate and cysteamine molecules (MTC) were also utilized to prepare MTC-QDs and MTC-QDs-Lec probes as well as Lec bound QDs. Afterwards; potential use of these nanoparticles as radiolabeled fluorescence nano-probes for the cell imaging studies has been investigated. Biological activities of {sup 125}I{sup -}, {sup 125}I-MTC-QDs, MTC-QDs- Lec-{sup 125}I, QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I and Lec-{sup 125}I were examined on various cancer cell lines such as Caco-2, MCF-7 and A-549 in terms of cell incorporation. QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I exhibited the highest cell incorporation on whole cell lines. In addition, the QDs-Lec-{sup 131}I, was used for in vivo imaging. The whole body distribution of the radiolabeled QDs on New Zealand rabbits and Balb C mice were examined by taking dynamic and static images. Radioactivity cleared from the kidneys and the bladder, while significant amount radioactivity was retained in the heart and liver within 24 h.

  20. Using metal complex-labeled peptides for charge transfer-based biosensing with semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-02-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical and photonic properties and are highly sensitive to charge transfer in their surrounding environment. In this study we used synthetic peptides as physical bridges between CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and some of the most common redox-active metal complexes to understand the charge transfer interactions between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that QD emission underwent quenching that was highly dependent on the choice of metal complex used. We also found that quenching traces the valence or number of metal complexes brought into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. Monitoring of the QD absorption bleaching in the presence of the metal complex provided insight into the charge transfer mechanism. The data suggest that two distinct charge transfer mechanisms can take place. One directly to the QD core states for neutral capping ligands and a second to surface states for negatively charged capping ligands. A basic understanding of the proximity driven charge-transfer and quenching interactions allowed us to construct proteolytic enzyme sensing assemblies with the QD-peptide-metal complex conjugates.

  1. Detection of experimental pancreas necrosis by DNA-ase labelled with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tihanyi, Tibor; Duffek, Laszlo; Balint, Istvan; Flautner, Lajos

    1986-01-01

    Detection of pancreas necrosis was attempted in dog experiments. Strong association between pancreatic DNA-ase and actin molecules in vitro provided the theoretical basis for the procedure. Pancreatic DNA-ase labelled with 125 I was administered intravenously to dogs in which experimental pancreas necrosis was elicited. Accumulation ratio of radioactivity was above 20 in the necrotic pancreas whereas it varied between 1.6 and 5.6 in other tissues. After administration of 37 MBq 131 I labelled DNA-ase, accumulation of radioactivity could be clearly visualized in the necrotic portions of the removed pancreas by a gamma camera. The investigations will be extended in order to develop a clinically utilizable test. (L.E.)

  2. Formation of Hydroxymethyl DNA Adducts in Rats Orally Exposed to Stable Isotope Labeled Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Gul, Husamettin; Upton, Patricia B.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Swenberg, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Methanol is a large volume industrial chemical and widely used solvent and fuel additive. Methanol’s well known toxicity and use in a wide spectrum of applications has raised long-standing environmental issues over its safety, including its carcinogenicity. Methanol has not been listed as a carcinogen by any regulatory agency; however, there are debates about its carcinogenic potential. Formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, has been proposed to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of methanol. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen and actively targets DNA and protein, causing diverse DNA and protein damage. However, formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts arising from the metabolism of methanol have not been reported previously, largely due to the absence of suitable DNA biomarkers and the inability to differentiate what was due to methanol compared with the substantial background of endogenous formaldehyde. Recently, we developed a unique approach combining highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods and exposure to stable isotope labeled chemicals to simultaneously quantify formaldehyde-specific endogenous and exogenous DNA adducts. In this study, rats were exposed daily to 500 or 2000 mg/kg [13CD4]-methanol by gavage for 5 days. Our data demonstrate that labeled formaldehyde arising from [13CD4]-methanol induced hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in multiple tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The results also demonstrated that the number of exogenous DNA adducts was lower than the number of endogenous hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in all tissues of rats administered 500 mg/kg per day for 5 days, a lethal dose to humans, even after incorporating an average factor of 4 for reduced metabolism due to isotope effects of deuterium-labeled methanol into account. PMID:22157354

  3. Asynchronous Magnetic Bead Rotation (AMBR Microviscometer for Label-Free DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzi Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a label-free viscosity-based DNA detection system, using paramagnetic beads as an asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR microviscometer. We have demonstrated experimentally that the bead rotation period is linearly proportional to the viscosity of a DNA solution surrounding the paramagnetic bead, as expected theoretically. Simple optical measurement of asynchronous microbead motion determines solution viscosity precisely in microscale volumes, thus allowing an estimate of DNA concentration or average fragment length. The response of the AMBR microviscometer yields reproducible measurement of DNA solutions, enzymatic digestion reactions, and PCR systems at template concentrations across a 5000-fold range. The results demonstrate the feasibility of viscosity-based DNA detection using AMBR in microscale aqueous volumes.

  4. A label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of cardiac marker using graphene quantum dots (GQDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Satish K; Chen, Rui; Kukkar, Manil; Song, Chung Kil; Mutreja, Ruchi; Singh, Suman; Paul, Ashok K; Lee, Haiwon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash; Suri, C Raman

    2016-12-15

    A label-free immunosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been developed for the sensitive detection of a cardiac biomarker myoglobin (cMyo). Hydrothermally synthesized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been used as an immobilized template on screen printed electrodes for the construction of an impedimetric sensor platform. The GQDs-modified electrode was conjugated with highly specific anti-myoglobin antibodies to develop the desired immunosensor. The values of charge transfer resistance (Rct) were monitored as a function of varying antigen concentration. The Rct value of the immunosensor showed a linear increase (from 0.20 to 0.31kΩ) in the range of 0.01-100ng/mL cMyo. The specific detection of cMyo was also made in the presence of other competing proteins. The limit of detection for the proposed immunosensor was estimated as 0.01ng/mL which is comparable to the standard ELISA techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of Thrombin Based on Fluorescence Energy Transfer between Semiconducting Polymer Dots and BHQ-Labelled Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhang Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carboxyl-functionalized semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots were synthesized as an energy donor by the nanoprecipitation method. A black hole quenching dye (BHQ-labelled thrombin aptamers was used as the energy acceptor, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the aptamers and Pdots was used for fluorescence quenching of the Pdots. The addition of thrombin restored the fluorescence intensity. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the fluorescence of the system was restored to the maximum when the concentration of thrombin reached 130 nM, with a linear range of 0–50 nM (R2 = 0.990 and a detection limit of 0.33 nM. This sensor was less disturbed by impurities, showing good specificity and signal response to thrombin, with good application in actual samples. The detection of human serum showed good linearity in the range of 0–30 nM (R2 = 0.997, with a detection limit of 0.56 nM and a recovery rate of 96.2–104.1%, indicating that this fluorescence sensor can be used for the detection of thrombin content in human serum.

  6. Application on Gold Nanoparticles-Dotted 4-Nitrophenylazo Graphene in a Label-Free Impedimetric Deoxynivalenol Immunosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Edozie Sunday

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a new concept to construct a label-free electrochemical inhibition-based immunosensor for the detection of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON in cereal samples. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of tris(bipyridine ruthenium (II chloride was used as a marker enhanced with gold nanoparticles-dotted 4-nitrophenylazo functionalized graphene (AuNp/G/PhNO2 nanocatalyst mediated in Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized conditions, the formation of immunocomplexes inhibited electron flow and increased the charge transfer resistance of the sensing interface linearly. The change in impedance was proportional to DON concentrations in the range of 6–30 ng/mL with a sensitivity and detection limit of 32.14 ΩL/ng and 0.3 µg/mL, respectively, which compares favorably with the ELISA result. The proposed sensor had a stability of 80.3%, good precision and selectivity in DON standard solution containing different interfering agents, indicating promising application prospect for this strategy in designing impedimetric, electrochemiluminescent, voltammetric or amperometric sensors.

  7. Development of direct competitive biomimetic immunosorbent assay based on quantum dot label for determination of trichlorfon residues in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiurui; Jiang, Mingdi; Ju, Zeliang; Qiao, Xuguang; Xu, Zhixiang

    2018-06-01

    A direct competitive biomimetic immunosorbent assay method based on molecularly imprinted polymer was developed for the determination of trichlorfon. A CdSe/ZnS quantum dot label was used as the marker. The hydrophilic imprinted film was synthesized directly on the surface of a 96-well plate, and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analyses. The method exhibited high stability, selectivity, and sensitivity. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection and sensitivity of the biomimetic immunosorbent assay method were 9.0 μg L -1 and 5.0 mg L -1 (0.1 mg kg -1 and 62.5 mg kg -1 for vegetable sample), respectively. Low cross-reactivity values of 19.2% and 15.6% were obtained for the structural analogues. Spinach and rape samples spiked with trichlorfon were extracted and determined by this method with recoveries ranging from 83.6% to 91.1%. The method was applied for the detection of trichlorfon residues in leek and cucumber samples, and results correlated well with those obtained using GC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogonal...... light scatter. The method was optimized using the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and K-562. Samples of 10(5) ethanol-fixed cells were treated with pepsin/HCl and stained as a nuclear suspension with anti-BrdUrd antibody, FITC-conjugated secondary antibody, and propidium iodide. Labelled mitoses could...

  9. Silica coating of luminescent quantum dots prepared in aqueous media for cellular labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yunfei; Li, Yan, E-mail: yli@ecust.edu.cn; Zhong, Xinhua, E-mail: zhongxh@ecust.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile route based on modified Stöber method was used for the synthesis of silica coated QDs (QD@SiO{sub 2}) starting from aqueously prepared CdTe/CdS QDs. The resultant QD@SiO{sub 2} exhibited a significant increase in emission efficiency compared with that of the initial QDs, along with a small size (∼5 nm in diameter), great stability and low cytotoxicity, which makes it a good candidate as robust biomarker. - Highlights: • We present a facile modified Stöber method to prepare highly luminescent QD@SiO{sub 2}. • The PL efficiency of QDs increases significantly after silica coating. • QD@SiO{sub 2} exhibits small size (∼5 nm) and great dispersibility in aqueous solution. • QD@SiO{sub 2} presents extraordinary photo and colloidal stability. • The silica shell eliminates QD cytotoxicity, providing the access of bioconjugation. - Abstract: Silica coating is an effective approach for rendering luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with water dispersibility and biocompatibility. However, it is still challenging to prepare silica-coated QDs (QD@SiO{sub 2}) with high emission efficiency, small size and great stability in favor for bioapplication. Herein, we reported a modified Stöber method for silica coating of aqueously-prepared CdTe/CdS QDs. With the coexistence of Cd{sup 2+} and thioglycolic acid (TGA), a thin silica shell was formed around QDs by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The resultant QD@SiO{sub 2} with a small size (∼5 nm in diameter) exhibits significantly higher emission efficiencies than that of the initial QDs. Also, QD@SiO{sub 2} has extraordinary photo and colloidal stability (pH range of 5–13, 4.0 M NaCl solution). Protected by the silica shell, the cytotoxicity of QDs could be reduced. Moreover, the QD@SiO{sub 2} conjugated with folic acid (FA) presents high specific binding toward receptor-positive HeLa cells over receptor-negative A549 cells.

  10. Anticancer drug-DNA interactions measured using a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism based on luminescent quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jipei; Guo, Weiwei; Yang, Xiurong; Wang, Erkang

    2009-01-01

    A sensing system based on the photoinduced electron transfer of quantum dots (QDs) was designed to measure the interaction of anticancer drug and DNA, taking mitoxantrone (MTX) as a model drug. MTX adsorbed on the surface of QDs can quench the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs through the photoinduced electron-transfer process; and then the addition of DNA will bring the restoration of QDs PL intensity, as DNA can bind with MTX and remove it from QDs. Sensitive detection of MTX with the detection limit of 10 nmol L(-1) and a linear detection range from 10 nmol L(-1) to 4.5 micromol L(-1) was achieved. The dependence of PL intensity on DNA amount was successfully utilized to investigate the interactions between MTX and DNA. Both the binding constants and the sizes of binding site of MTX-DNA interactions were calculated based on the equations deduced for the PL recovery process. The binding constant obtained in our experiment was generally consistent with previous reports. The sensitive and speedy detection of MTX as well as the avoidance of modification or immobilization process made this system suitable and promising in the drug-DNA interaction studies.

  11. Label-Free Ag+ Detection by Enhancing DNA Sensitized Tb3+ Luminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Kleinke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of Ag+ on DNA sensitized Tb3+ luminescence was studied initially using the Ag+-specific RNA-cleaving DNAzyme, Ag10c. While we expected to observe luminescence quenching by Ag+, a significant enhancement was produced. Based on this observation, simple DNA oligonucleotide homopolymers were used with systematically varied sequence and length. We discovered that both poly-G and poly-T DNA have a significant emission enhancement by Ag+, while the absolute intensity is stronger with the poly-G DNA, indicating that a G-quadruplex DNA is not required for this enhancement. Using the optimized length of the G7 DNA (an oligo constituted with seven guanines, Ag+ was measured with a detection limit of 57.6 nM. The signaling kinetics, G7 DNA conformation, and the binding affinity of Tb3+ to the DNA in the presence or absence of Ag+ are also studied to reveal the mechanism of emission enhancement. This observation is useful not only for label-free detection of Ag+, but also interesting for the rational design of new biosensors using Tb3+ luminescence.

  12. Induction of DNA strand breaks in 14C-labelled cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundell-Bergman, S.; Johanson, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    Chinese hamster cells grown in vitro were labelled with 14 C-thymidine for 18 hours and after 3 hours in non-radioactive medium they were stored at 0 0 C for various periods ( 1 to 12 hours). During this treatment a number of DNA strand breaks were induced by 14 C decay which were not repaired at 0 0 C. The number of DNA strand breaks was determined using the DNA unwinding technique. At 0.5-1 dpm per cell a detectable number of DNA strand breaks were found. Treatment for six hours (1 dpm per cell) reduced the percentage of double-stranded DNA from 80 to 70%, corresponding to about 750 DNA strand breaks per cell. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks was studied after treatment for 12 hours at 0 0 C followed by incubation of the cells for various periods at 37 0 C. Most of the DNA strand breaks induced by 14 C decay at 0 0 C were repaired after incubation at 37 0 C for 15 minutes. Assuming an absorbed dose of 1.8 mGy per 14 C decay to the cell nucleus an RBE value close to 1 was found for internal irradiation from 14 C decay as compared with 60 Co-gamma irradiation. (author)

  13. "Multicolor" electrochemical labeling of DNA hybridization probes with osmium tetroxide complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Kostečka, Pavel; Trefulka, Mojmír; Havran, Luděk; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 3 (2007), s. 1022-1029 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004402; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0043; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/04/1325; GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK/42; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : DNA labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.287, year: 2007

  14. Fluorographic determination of /sup 3/H-labelled hepatitis B virus DNA and other viral DNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantschak, J; Meisel, H

    1986-01-01

    The radioactivity of aqueous samples of /sup 3/H-labelled DNA can easily be determined by a quantitative fluorographic assay. 25 samples were collected and fixed simultaneously onto a membrane filter. Their fluorographic film blackening is compared densitometrically or visually to that of standard samples. The lower limit of detection is 1.7 Bq (100 dpm). This procedure is very effective when dealing with high numbers of samples and presents an economically favorable alternative to scintillation counting. The efficiency of the method for the assay of different DNA polymerase activities (hepatitis B virus, bovine leukemia virus, bacteriophage T 4) could be demonstrated.

  15. Tyramine Hydrochloride Based Label-Free System for Operating Various DNA Logic Gates and a DNA Caliper for Base Number Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2017-07-05

    DNA is believed to be a promising candidate for molecular logic computation, and the fluorogenic/colorimetric substrates of G-quadruplex DNAzyme (G4zyme) are broadly used as label-free output reporters of DNA logic circuits. Herein, for the first time, tyramine-HCl (a fluorogenic substrate of G4zyme) is applied to DNA logic computation and a series of label-free DNA-input logic gates, including elementary AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic gates, as well as a two to one encoder, are constructed. Furthermore, a DNA caliper that can measure the base number of target DNA as low as three bases is also fabricated. This DNA caliper can also perform concatenated AND-AND logic computation to fulfil the requirements of sophisticated logic computing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Machine Learned Replacement of N-Labels for Basecalled Sequences in DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Eddie Y T; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Kremer, Stefan C

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a machine learning method that increases the number of identified bases in Sanger Sequencing. The system post-processes a KB basecalled chromatogram. It selects a recoverable subset of N-labels in the KB-called chromatogram to replace with basecalls (A,C,G,T). An N-label correction is defined given an additional read of the same sequence, and a human finished sequence. Corrections are added to the dataset when an alignment determines the additional read and human agree on the identity of the N-label. KB must also rate the replacement with quality value of in the additional read. Corrections are only available during system training. Developing the system, nearly 850,000 N-labels are obtained from Barcode of Life Datasystems, the premier database of genetic markers called DNA Barcodes. Increasing the number of correct bases improves reference sequence reliability, increases sequence identification accuracy, and assures analysis correctness. Keeping with barcoding standards, our system maintains an error rate of percent. Our system only applies corrections when it estimates low rate of error. Tested on this data, our automation selects and recovers: 79 percent of N-labels from COI (animal barcode); 80 percent from matK and rbcL (plant barcodes); and 58 percent from non-protein-coding sequences (across eukaryotes).

  17. Imaging and high-sensitivity quantification of chemiluminescent labeled DNA-blots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, G.

    1997-01-01

    The present thesis has for objective the development of both, methods of DNA labeling by chemiluminescence (via the catalytic activity of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase - AP) and an appropriate imaging system. Offering a competitive alternative to the detection of classical radio-labels in molecular-biological experiments of the blotting type, this technique should permit the realization of quantitative studies of gene expression at ultra-high sensitivity necessary in particular for differential-screening experiments. To reach our aim. we separated the project into three different parts. In a first step an imager based on a liquid-nitrogen-cooled CCD coupled to a standard optics (50 mm/fl.2) has been installed and characterized. This system offers a sensitive area of up to 625 cm 2 , a spatial resolution of 0.3-1 mm (depending on the field of view) and a sensitivity sufficient to detect 10 fg/mm 2 labeled DNA. In a second part, the chemiluminescent light-generation process in solution has been investigated to optimize the parameters temperature. pH and concentration of the substrate as well as the enzyme. The substrate offering the highest light yield (CDP-Star in addition with the enhancer EMERALD II) allows quantification of AP down to 10 -15 M within a dynamic range of 10 4 in solution. Finally. preparation, immobilization and detection of AP-labeled DNA probes (via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin-AP bridge) on nylon membranes has been optimized. A linear relation between the light intensities and the amount of DNA was observed in a range of 10 fg/mm 2 - 100 pg/mm 2 . Hybridization of the probes to bacterial cloned target-DNA has been addressed after examination of the best hybridization conditions. Our protocol includes the treatment of a proteinase, which resulted in a significantly lower background on the filter. The results of our investigations suggest that the main conditions for a reliable differential-screening experiment are fulfilled when using

  18. Biosensor for label-free DNA quantification based on functionalized LPGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helena M R; Moreira, Luis; Pereira, Leonor; Jorge, Pedro; Gouveia, Carlos; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Fernandes, José R A

    2016-10-15

    A label-free fiber optic biosensor based on a long period grating (LPG) and a basic optical interrogation scheme using off the shelf components is used for the detection of in-situ DNA hybridization. A new methodology is proposed for the determination of the spectral position of the LPG mode resonance. The experimental limit of detection obtained for the DNA was 62±2nM and the limit of quantification was 209±7nM. The sample specificity was experimentally demonstrated using DNA targets with different base mismatches relatively to the probe and was found that the system has a single base mismatch selectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiway study of hybridization in nanoscale semiconductor labeled DNA based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    donor-QD acceptor) upon hybridization with a label free target was monitored by two-dimensional photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (2D-PLE). Detection of a target oligonucleotide strand, using sandwiched nanoassembly in a separation-free format, was performed with the appearance of a new feature...... and model based analysis of 2D-PLE data was implemented by means of PAR-AFAC and hard trilinear decomposition (HTD), allowing to fit a proper model for FRET-based sandwich DNA hybridization systems. This study is the first successful application of a multiway chemometric technique to consider FRET based DNA...... hybridization in sandwiched nanoassemblies. A multi-equilibria model was properly fitted to the data and confirmed there is a competition between ternary and binary complex formation. Equilibrium constants of DNA hybridization in sandwiched nanoassemblies were estimated for the first time. Equilibrium constants...

  20. Cadmium sulfate and CdTe-quantum dots alter DNA repair in zebrafish (Danio rerio) liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Song; Cai, Qingsong [The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Chibli, Hicham [Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, QC H3A 2B4 (Canada); Allagadda, Vinay [The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Nadeau, Jay L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, QC H3A 2B4 (Canada); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Increasing use of quantum dots (QDs) makes it necessary to evaluate their toxicological impacts on aquatic organisms, since their contamination of surface water is inevitable. This study compares the genotoxic effects of ionic Cd versus CdTe nanocrystals in zebrafish hepatocytes. After 24 h of CdSO{sub 4} or CdTe QD exposure, zebrafish liver (ZFL) cells showed a decreased number of viable cells, an accumulation of Cd, an increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and an induction of DNA strand breaks. Measured levels of stress defense and DNA repair genes were elevated in both cases. However, removal of bulky DNA adducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER) was inhibited with CdSO{sub 4} but not with CdTe QDs. The adverse effects caused by acute exposure of CdTe QDs might be mediated through differing mechanisms than those resulting from ionic cadmium toxicity, and studying the effects of metallic components may be not enough to explain QD toxicities in aquatic organisms. - Highlights: • Both CdSO{sub 4} and CdTe QDs lead to cell death and Cd accumulation. • Both CdSO{sub 4} and CdTe QDs induce cellular ROS generation and DNA strand breaks. • Both CdSO{sub 4} and CdTe QDs induce the expressions of stress defense and DNA repair genes. • NER repair capacity was inhibited with CdSO{sub 4} but not with CdTe QDs.

  1. Determination for Enterobacter cloacae based on a europium ternary complex labeled DNA probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Ruan, Min; Qin, Pin-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    The fast detection and accurate diagnosis of the prevalent pathogenic bacteria is very important for the treatment of disease. Nowadays, fluorescence techniques are important tools for diagnosis. A two-probe tandem DNA hybridization assay was designed for the detection of Enterobacter cloacae based on time-resolved fluorescence. In this work, the authors synthesized a novel europium ternary complex Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) with intense luminescence, high fluorescence quantum yield and long lifetime before. We developed a method based on this europium complex for the specific detection of original extracted DNA from E. cloacae. In the hybridization assay format, the reporter probe was labeled with Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) on the 5'-terminus, and the capture probe capture probe was covalent immobilized on the surface of the glutaraldehyde treated glass slides. The original extracted DNA of samples was directly used without any DNA purification and amplification. The detection was conducted by monitoring the fluorescence intensity from the glass surface after DNA hybridization. The detection limit of the DNA was 5 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The results of the present work proved that this new approach was easy to operate with high sensitivity and specificity. It could be conducted as a powerful tool for the detection of pathogen microorganisms in the environment.

  2. Determination of cDNA encoding BCR/ABL fusion gene in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia using a novel FRET-based quantum dots-DNA nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Nasirian, Vahid; Barati, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Kashanian, Soheila

    2017-05-08

    In the present study, we developed a sensitive method based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the determination of the BCR/ABL fusion gene, which is used as a biomarker to confirm the clinical diagnosis of both chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). For this purpose, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were conjugated to amino-modified 18-mer oligonucleotide ((N)DNA) to form the QDs-(N)DNA nanosensor. In the presence of methylene blue (MB) as an intercalator, the hybridization of QDs-(N)DNA with the target BCR/ABL fusion gene (complementary DNA), brings the MB (acceptor) at close proximity of the QDs (donor), leading to FRET upon photoexcitation of the QDs. The enhancement in the emission intensity of MB was used to follow up the hybridization, which was linearly proportional to concentration of the target complementary DNA in a range from 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.25 × 10 -7  M. The detection limit of the proposed method was obtained to be 1.5 × 10 -10  M. Finally, the feasibility and selectivity of the proposed nanosensor was evaluated by the analysis of derived nucleotides from both mismatched sequences and clinical samples of patients with leukemia as real samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Labelling of the thymidine and deoxyctidine bases of DNA by (2-14C) deoxycytidine in cultured L1210 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, J.M.; Hoeraut, R.M.; Cysyk, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of cultured L1210 cells to (2- 14 C) deoxycytidine and analysis of radioactivity incorporated into DNA-pyrimidines revealed that 2.7-5.5-fold more radioactivity is incorporated into DNA-thymine than into cytosine bases. Thus, the pathway involving deamination of deoxycytidylate to deoxyuridylate and methylation to thymidylate is highly favoured over successive phosphorlation to dCTP. Several modified and endogenous pyrimidines altered the labelling of DNA-thymine and DNA-cytosine with (2- 14 C)-deoxycytidine. 3-deazauridine at 0.1 mM caused a 56% increase in the labelling of DNA-thymine. Both thymidine and 3-deazauridine (>=10 μM) increased the specific activity to DNA-cytosine by 4-fold. Cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) (>= 10 μM) reduced the labelling of both DNA-cytosine and DNA-thymine. Excess cytidine (0.1 mM) reduced the labelling of DNA-cytosine by 40%. Tetrahydrouridine at concentrations up to 1 mM had no effect. (author)

  4. Development of a sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor by 4-aminothiophenol self-assembled on electrodeposited nanogold electrode coupled with Au nanoparticles labeled reporter ssDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangjiu; Liu Lihua; Qi Xiaowei; Guo Yaqing; Sun Wei; Li Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor was fabricated by using the 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) self-assembled on electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (NG) modified electrode to anchor capture ssDNA sequences and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeled with reporter ssDNA sequences, which were further coupled with electroactive indicator of hexaammineruthenium (III) ([Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ ) to amplify the electrochemical signal of hybridization reaction. Different modified electrodes were prepared and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscope and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By using a sandwich model for the capture of target ssDNA sequences, which was based on the shorter probe ssDNA and AuNPs label reporter ssDNA hybridized with longer target ssDNA, the electrochemical behavior of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabricated electrochemical DNA sensor exhibited good distinguish capacity for the complementary ssDNA sequence and two bases mismatched ssDNA. The dynamic detection range of the target ssDNA sequences was from 1.4 × 10 −11 to 2.0 × 10 −9 mol/L with the detection limit as 9.5 × 10 −12 mol/L (3σ). So in this paper a new electrochemical DNA sensor was designed with gold nanoparticles as the immobilization platform and the signal amplifier simultaneously.

  5. A quantum dot-immunofluorescent labeling method to investigate the interactions between a crinivirus and its whitefly vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. K. Ng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful vector-mediated plant virus transmission entails an intricate but poorly understood interplay of interactions among virus, vector, and plant. The complexity of interactions requires continually improving/evaluating tools and methods for investigating the determinants that are central to mediating virus transmission. A recent study using an organic fluorophore (Alexa Fluor-based immunofluorescent localization assay demonstrated that specific retention of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV virions in the anterior foregut or cibarium of its whitefly vector is required for virus transmission. Continuous exposure of organic fluorophore to high excitation light intensity can result in diminished or loss of signals, potentially confounding the identification of important interactions associated with virus transmission. This limitation can be circumvented by incorporation of photostable fluorescent nanocrystals, such as quantum dots (QDs, into the assay. We have developed and evaluated a QD-immunofluorescent labeling method for the in vitro and in situ localization of LIYV virions based on the recognition specificity of streptavidin-conjugated QD605 (S-QD605 for biotin-conjugated anti-LIYV IgG (B-αIgG. IgG biotinylation was verified in a blot overlay assay by probing SDS-PAGE separated B-αIgG with S-QD605. Immunoblot analyses of LIYV using B-αIgG and S-QD605 resulted in a virus detection limit comparable to that of DAS-ELISA. In membrane feeding experiments, QD signals were observed in the anterior foregut or cibarium of virion-fed whitefly vectors but absent in those of virion-fed whitefly non-vectors. Specific virion retention in whitefly vectors corresponded with successful virus transmission. A fluorescence photobleaching assay of viruliferous whiteflies fed B-αIgG and S-QD605 vs. those fed anti-LIYV IgG and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated IgG revealed that QD signal was stable and deteriorated ∼7 to 8 fold slower than that of Alexa

  6. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Mohr, Anne; Goertz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar [RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute of Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering (Germany); Mueller-Newen, Gerhard [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Simon, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.simon@ac.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal({beta}1-4)GlcNAc({beta}1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA-di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  7. Control of electrochemical signals from quantum dots conjugated to organic materials by using DNA structure in an analog logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Yoo, Si-Youl; Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Ji-Young; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Various bio-logic gates have been studied intensively to overcome the rigidity of single-function silicon-based logic devices arising from combinations of various gates. Here, a simple control tool using electrochemical signals from quantum dots (QDs) was constructed using DNA and organic materials for multiple logic functions. The electrochemical redox current generated from QDs was controlled by the DNA structure. DNA structure, in turn, was dependent on the components (organic materials) and the input signal (pH). Independent electrochemical signals from two different logic units containing QDs were merged into a single analog-type logic gate, which was controlled by two inputs. We applied this electrochemical biodevice to a simple logic system and achieved various logic functions from the controlled pH input sets. This could be further improved by choosing QDs, ionic conditions, or DNA sequences. This research provides a feasible method for fabricating an artificial intelligence system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Prognostic Factors Following Flow-Cytometric DNA Analysis after Cytokeratin Labelling: I. Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Wimberger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In gynecologic oncology valid prognostic factors are necessary to estimate the course of disease and to define biologically similar subgroups for analysis of therapeutic efficacy. The presented study is a prospective study concerning prognostic significance of DNA ploidy and S‐phase fraction in breast cancer following enrichment of tumor cells by cytokeratin labelling. Epithelial cells were labeled by FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, 8, and CK 17 prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis in 327 fresh specimens of primary breast cancer. Univariate analysis in breast cancer detected the prognostic significance of DNA‐ploidy, S‐phase fraction and CV (coefficient of variation of G0G1‐peak of tumor cells for clinical outcome, especially for nodal‐negative patients. Multivariate analysis could not confirm prognostic evidence of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction. In conclusion, in breast cancer no clinical significance for determination of DNA‐parameters was found.

  9. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using transistors based on CVD grown graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Yin; Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Tse-Wei Wang, Jacob; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Lin, Cheng-Te; Li, Lain-Jong

    2013-03-15

    The high transconductance and low noise of graphene-based field-effect transistors based on large-area monolayer graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition are used for label-free electrical detection of DNA hybridization. The gate materials, buffer concentration and surface condition of graphene have been optimized to achieve the DNA detection sensitivity as low as 1 pM (10(-12) M), which is more sensitive than the existing report based on few-layer graphene. The graphene films obtained using conventional PMMA-assisted transfer technique exhibits PMMA residues, which degrade the sensing performance of graphene. We have demonstrated that the sensing performance of the graphene samples prepared by gold-transfer is largely enhanced (by 125%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic bead purification of labeled DNA fragments forhigh-throughput capillary electrophoresis sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkin, Christopher; Kapur, Hitesh; Smith, Troy; Humphries, David; Pollard, Martin; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor

    2001-09-15

    We have developed an automated purification method for terminator sequencing products based on a magnetic bead technology. This 384-well protocol generates labeled DNA fragments that are essentially free of contaminates for less than $0.005 per reaction. In comparison to laborious ethanol precipitation protocols, this method increases the phred20 read length by forty bases with various DNA templates such as PCR fragments, Plasmids, Cosmids and RCA products. Our method eliminates centrifugation and is compatible with both the MegaBACE 1000 and ABIPrism 3700 capillary instruments. As of September 2001, this method has produced over 1.6 million samples with 93 percent averaging 620 phred20 bases as part of Joint Genome Institutes Production Process.

  11. Self-reference and random sampling approach for label-free identification of DNA composition using plasmonic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lindsay M; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2018-05-09

    The analysis of DNA has led to revolutionary advancements in the fields of medical diagnostics, genomics, prenatal screening, and forensic science, with the global DNA testing market expected to reach revenues of USD 10.04 billion per year by 2020. However, the current methods for DNA analysis remain dependent on the necessity for fluorophores or conjugated proteins, leading to high costs associated with consumable materials and manual labor. Here, we demonstrate a potential label-free DNA composition detection method using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in which we identify the composition of cytosine and adenine within single strands of DNA. This approach depends on the fact that there is one phosphate backbone per nucleotide, which we use as a reference to compensate for systematic measurement variations. We utilize plasmonic nanomaterials with random Raman sampling to perform label-free detection of the nucleotide composition within DNA strands, generating a calibration curve from standard samples of DNA and demonstrating the capability of resolving the nucleotide composition. The work represents an innovative way for detection of the DNA composition within DNA strands without the necessity of attached labels, offering a highly sensitive and reproducible method that factors in random sampling to minimize error.

  12. Enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and adenosine triphosphate by dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Lin, Ying; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Chuanbin; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2014-06-15

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy has been well developed for the fabrication of various biosensing platforms for signal amplification. Herein, a novel enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensing platform for the detection of target DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was firstly proposed, in which three auxiliary DNA probes were ingeniously designed to construct the dendritic DNA concatamer via HCR strategy and used as hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) carrier for signal amplification. With the developed dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification strategy, the DNA biosensor could achieve an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and ATP with a superior detection limit as low as 5 aM and 20 fM, respectively, and also demonstrate a high selectivity for DNA and ATP detection. The currently proposed dendritic DNA concatamer opens a promising direction to construct ultrasensitive DNA biosensing platform for biomolecular detection in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine, which offers the distinct advantages of simplicity and cost efficiency owing to no need of any kind of enzyme, chemical modification or labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An Electrochemical DNA Biosensor for the Detection of Salmonella Using Polymeric Films and Electrochemical Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Serrano, Madeline

    Waterborne and foodborne diseases are one of the principal public health problems worldwide. Microorganisms are the major agents of foodborne illness: pathogens such as Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli, and parasites such as cryptosporidium. The most popular methods to detect Salmonella are based on culture and colony counting methods, ELISA, Gel electrophoresis and the polymerase chain reaction. Conventional detection methods are laborious and time-consuming, allowing for portions of the food to be distributed, marketed, sold and eaten before the analysis is done and the problem even detected. By these reasons, the rapid, easy and portable detection of foodborne organisms will facilitate the disease treatment. Our particular interest is to develop a nucleic acid biosensor (NAB) for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms in food and water samples. In this research, we report on the development of a NAB prototype using a polymer modified electrode surface together with sequences of different lengths for the OmpC gene from Salmonella as probes and Ferrocene-labeled target (Fc-ssDNA), Ferrocene-labeled tri(ethylene glycol) (Fc-PEG) and Ruthenium-Ferrocene (Ru-Fe) bimetallic complex as an electrochemical labels. We have optimized several PS films and anchored nucleic acid sequences with different lengths at gold and carbon surfaces. Non contact mode AFM and XPS were used to monitor each step of the NAB preparation, from polymer modification to oligos hybridization (conventional design). The hybridization reaction was followed electrochemically using a Fc-ssDNA and Fc-PEG in solution taking advantage of the morphological changes generated upon hybridization. We observed a small current at the potential for the Fe oxidation without signal amplification at +296 mV vs. Ag/AgCl for the Fc-ssDNA strategy and a small current at +524 mV for the Fc-PEG strategy. The immobilization, hybridization and signal amplification of Biotin- OmpC Salmonella genes

  14. C-Terminal Fluorescent Labeling Impairs Functionality of DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido; Hinrichsen, Inga; Passmann, Sandra; Adam, Ronja; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2). Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency. PMID:22348133

  15. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  16. Perturbation of DNA replication and cell cycle progression by commonly used [3H]thymidine labeling protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, C.A.; Lewis, E.D.; Schimke, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of tritiated thymidine incorporation on DNA replication was studied in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Rapidly eluting (small) DNA from cells labeled with 2 microCi of [ 3 H]thymidine per ml (200 microCi/mmol) for 60 min matured to a large nonelutable size within approximately 2 to 4 h, as measured by the alkaline elution technique. However, DNA from cells exposed to 10 microCi of [ 3 H]thymidine per ml (66 microCi/mmol) was more rapidly eluting initially and did not mature to a nonelutable size during subsequent incubation. Semiconservative DNA replication measured by cesium chloride gradient analysis of bromodeoxyuridine-substituted DNA was also found to be affected by the final specific activity of the [ 3 H]thymidine used in the labeling protocol. Dramatic cell cycle perturbations accompanied these effects on DNA replication, suggesting that labeling protocols commonly used to study DNA metabolism produce aberrant DNA replication and subsequent cell cycle perturbations

  17. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Yiping; Wang, T-H; Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics.

  18. Rapid on-site detection of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli by gold-labeled DNA strip sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjun; Lu, Jie; Ma, Wenwei; Xu, Chuanlai; Kuang, Hua; Zhu, Shuifang

    2011-06-15

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (AAC) is one of the most harmful diseases in cucurbit production. A rapid and sensitive DNA strip sensor was constructed based on gold nanoparticle-labeled oligonucleotide probes for the detection of AAC. Both the qualitative and semi-quantitative detections of target DNA were successfully achieved using the developed DNA strip sensor. The qualitative limit of detection (LOD) of the strip sensor was determined as 4 nM. The LOD for the semi-quantitative detection was calculated to be 0.48 nM in the range of 0-10 nM. The genomic DNA was detected directly using the DNA strip sensor without any further treatment. This DNA strip sensor is a potentially useful tool for rapid on-site DNA screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. New Detection Modality for Label-Free Quantification of DNA in Biological Samples via Superparamagnetic Bead Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Daniel C.; Li, Jingyi; Strachan, Briony C.; Begley, Matthew R.; Finkler, David; Bazydlo, Lindsay L.; Barker, N. Scott; Haverstick, Doris; Utz, Marcel; Landers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Combining DNA and superparamagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field produces multiparticle aggregates that are visually striking, and enables label-free optical detection and quantification of DNA at levels in the picogram per microliter range. DNA in biological samples can be quantified directly by simple analysis of optical images of microfluidic wells placed on a magnetic stirrer without DNA purification. Aggregation results from DNA/bead interactions driven either by the presence of a chaotrope (a nonspecific trigger for aggregation) or by hybridization with oligonucleotides on functionalized beads (sequence-specific). This paper demonstrates quantification of DNA with sensitivity comparable to that of the best currently available fluorometric assays. The robustness and sensitivity of the method enable a wide range of applications, illustrated here by counting eukaryotic cells. Using widely available and inexpensive benchtop hardware, the approach provides a highly accessible low-tech microscale alternative to more expensive DNA detection and cell counting techniques. PMID:22423674

  20. Multiplex electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor for determination of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus based on multicolor quantum dots and Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Xinyan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, Zihan; Chen, Shufan; Li, Yang [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Lu, Lehui [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130022 (China); Qu, Hongping [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Jilin Normal University, Siping, 136000 (China); Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, a novel multiplex electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor has been developed for determination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) based on multicolor CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The electrochemically synthesized graphene nanosheets (GNs) were selected as conducting bridge to anchor CdTe QDs{sub 551}-capture DNA{sub HBV} and CdTe QDs{sub 607}-capture DNA{sub HCV} on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Then, different concentrations of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} were introduced to hybrid with complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs-probe DNA{sub HBV} and Au NPs-probe DNA{sub HCV} were modified to the above composite film via hybrid with the unreacted complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs could quench the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity of CdTe QDs due to the inner filter effect. Therefore, the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} could be achieved by monitoring the ECL DNA sensor based on Au NPs-probe DNA/target DNA/CdTe QDs-capture DNA/GNs/GCE composite film. Under the optimum conditions, the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs{sub 551} and CdTe QDs{sub 607} and the concentration of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} have good linear relationship in the range of 0.0005–0.5 nmol L{sup −1} and 0.001–1.0 nmol L{sup −1} respectively, and the limit of detection were 0.082 pmol L{sup −1} and 0.34 pmol L{sup −1} respectively (S/N = 3). The DNA sensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and acceptable stability. The proposed DNA sensor has been employed for the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV} in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor has been developed for the determination of target DNA{sub HBV} and target DNA{sub HCV}. • The DNA sensor shows good sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. • The ECL provided a

  1. Site-Directed Spin-Labeling of Nucleic Acids by Click Chemistry. Detection of Abasic Sites in Duplex DNA by EPR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Snorri; Vogel, Stefan; Shelke, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    and the nitroxide spin label. The spin label was used to detect, for the first time, abasic sites in duplex DNA by X-band CW-EPR spectroscopy and give information about other structural deformations as well as local conformational changes in DNA. For example, reduced mobility of the spin label in a mismatched pair...... label out of the duplex and toward the solution. Thus, reposition of the spin label, when acting as a mercury(II)-controlled mechanical lever, can be readily detected by EPR spectroscopy. The ease of incorporation and properties of the new spin label make it attractive for EPR studies of nucleic acids...

  2. Synthesis of high specific activity tritium-labelled chloroethylcyclohexylnitrosourea and its application to the study of DNA modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, E.L. (State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Habraken, Yvette; Ludlum, D.B. (Massachusetts Univ., Worcester, MA (USA). Medical School)

    1991-02-01

    A small-scale synthesis of high specific activity, N-(2-chloro-2-{sup 3}H-ethyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-N-nitrosourea ({sup 3}H-CCNU) has been accomplished from tritium-labelled ethanolamine. The product is pure by TLC and HPLC analysis and has been used successfully to modify DNA. The overall yield on radioactivity including losses in HPLC purification is approximately 4 percent. The availability of this tritium-labelled compound makes studies of DNA repair and of cellular resistance to N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-N-nitrosourea possible. (author).

  3. Synthesis of high specific activity tritium-labelled chloroethylcyclohexylnitrosourea and its application to the study of DNA modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siew, E.L.; Habraken, Yvette; Ludlum, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    A small-scale synthesis of high specific activity, N-(2-chloro-2-[ 3 H-ethyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-N-nitrosourea ([ 3 H]-CCNU) has been accomplished from tritium-labelled ethanolamine. The product is pure by TLC and HPLC analysis and has been used successfully to modify DNA. The overall yield on radioactivity including losses in HPLC purification is approximately 4 percent. The availability of this tritium-labelled compound makes studies of DNA repair and of cellular resistance to N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-N-nitrosourea possible. (author)

  4. A dual-color flow cytometry protocol for the simultaneous detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium using aptamer conjugated quantum dots as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Yu, Ye; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun; Wang, Zhouping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Two bacteria were simultaneously detected using QD-apt as labels by flow cytometry. •QD-apt were used for recognition and fluorescence detection of two bacteria. •The method was applied successfully for bacteria detection in real samples. -- Abstract: A sensitive, specific method for the collection and detection of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated using quantum dots (QDs) as a fluorescence marker coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition element by flow cytometry. The aptamer sequences were selected using a bacterium-based SELEX strategy in our laboratory for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium that, when applied in this method, allows for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures including shrimp samples. Aptamer-modified QDs (QD-apt) were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously detect the target bacteria with high sensitivity using the fluorescence of the labeled QDs. The signal intensity is amplified due to the high photostability of QDs nanoparticles, resulting in improved sensitivity over methods using individual dye-labeled probes. This proposed method is promising for the sensitive detection of other pathogenic bacteria in food stuff if suitable aptamers are chosen. The method may also provide another potential platform for the application of aptamer-conjugated QDs in flow cytometry

  5. A dual-color flow cytometry protocol for the simultaneous detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium using aptamer conjugated quantum dots as labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Yu, Ye [Zhangjiagang Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Zhangjiangang 215600 (China); Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang, Zhouping, E-mail: wangzp@jiangnan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Two bacteria were simultaneously detected using QD-apt as labels by flow cytometry. •QD-apt were used for recognition and fluorescence detection of two bacteria. •The method was applied successfully for bacteria detection in real samples. -- Abstract: A sensitive, specific method for the collection and detection of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated using quantum dots (QDs) as a fluorescence marker coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition element by flow cytometry. The aptamer sequences were selected using a bacterium-based SELEX strategy in our laboratory for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium that, when applied in this method, allows for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures including shrimp samples. Aptamer-modified QDs (QD-apt) were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously detect the target bacteria with high sensitivity using the fluorescence of the labeled QDs. The signal intensity is amplified due to the high photostability of QDs nanoparticles, resulting in improved sensitivity over methods using individual dye-labeled probes. This proposed method is promising for the sensitive detection of other pathogenic bacteria in food stuff if suitable aptamers are chosen. The method may also provide another potential platform for the application of aptamer-conjugated QDs in flow cytometry.

  6. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  7. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  8. Biomimetic synthesis of needle-like fluorescent calcium phosphate/carbon dot hybrid composites for cell labeling and copper ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanshan; Lu, Shousi; Xu, Pingxiang; Ma, Yi; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Yuming; Gu, Wei; Xue, Ming

    2016-05-04

    Herein, we report a biomimetic method to synthesize needle-like calcium phosphate (CaP) with dimensions of ∼130 nm length and ∼30 nm width using carbon dots (CDs) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose as dual templates. In addition to acting as the template, the CDs enable the CaP/CDs hybrid composites to emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Moreover, the prepared CaP/CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells. The potential of these CaP/CDs as a fluorescent probe for cell labeling was tested. In addition, it was demonstrated that the CaP/CDs were capable of selective detection of copper ions in drinking water.

  9. National Bureau of Standards health physics radioactive material shipment survey, packaging, and labelling program under ICAO/IATA and DOT regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.R.; Slaback, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    NBS routinely ships many radionuclides in small to moderate activities, with many shipments containing mixtures of radionuclides in a variety of combinations. The ICAO/IATA shipping regulations (and the new DoT regulations on their model) specify individual shipping parameters for every radionuclide. As a result, quality control in the shipment of these radioactive packages has become difficult to maintain. The authors have developed a computer program that will guide a Health Physics technician through package surveys and give exact packaging and labelling instructions. The program is a 27 kilobyte user-friendly BASIC program that runs on an Epson-HX20 notebook computer with microcassette drive and 16 kilobyte memory expansion unit. This small computer is more manageable than the regulation books for which it will be substituted and will be used in routine radioactive shipments

  10. Comparative conventional- and quantum dot-labelling strategies for LPS binding site detection in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Londiwe Siphephise Mgcina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is recognized as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP and not only induces an innate immune response in plants, but also stimulates the development of characteristic defense responses. However, identification and characterization of a cell surface LPS-receptor/binding site, as described in mammals, remains elusive in plants. As an amphiphilic, macromolecular lipoglycan, intact LPS potentially contains three MAMP-active regions, represented by the O-polysaccharide chain, the core and the lipid A. Binding site studies with intact labelled LPS were conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and quantified using flow cytometry fluorescence changes. Qdots, which allow non-covalent, hydrophobic labelling were used as a novel strategy in this study and compared to covalent, hydrophilic labelling with Alexa 488. Affinity for LPS-binding sites was clearly demonstrated by concentration-, temperature- and time-dependent increases in protoplast fluorescence following treatment with the labelled LPS. Moreover, this induced fluorescence increase was convincingly reduced following pre-treatment with excess unlabeled LPS, thereby indicating reversibility of LPS binding. Inhibition of the binding process is also reported using endo- and exocytosis inhibitors. Here, we present evidence for the anticipated presence of LPS-specific binding sites in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and furthermore propose Qdots as a more sensitive LPS-labelling strategy in comparison to the conventional Alexa 488 hydrazide label for binding studies.

  11. Organophosphonate-based PNA-functionalization of silicon nanowires for label-free DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani-Scholz, Anna; Pedone, Daniel; Dubey, Manish; Neppl, Stefan; Nickel, Bert; Feulner, Peter; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2008-08-01

    We investigated hydroxyalkylphosphonate monolayers as a novel platform for the biofunctionalization of silicon-based field effect sensor devices. This included a detailed study of the thin film properties of organophosphonate films on Si substrates using several surface analysis techniques, including AFM, ellipsometry, contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray reflectivity, and current-voltage characteristics in electrolyte solution. Our results indicate the formation of a dense monolayer on the native silicon oxide that has excellent passivation properties. The monolayer was biofunctionalized with 12 mer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) receptor molecules in a two-step procedure using the heterobifunctional linker, 3-maleimidopropionic-acid-N-hydroxysuccinimidester. Successful surface modification with the probe PNA was verified by XPS and contact angle measurements, and hybridization with DNA was determined by fluorescence measurements. Finally, the PNA functionalization protocol was translated to 2 microm long, 100 nm wide Si nanowire field effect devices, which were successfully used for label-free DNA/PNA hybridization detection.

  12. One-step, green, and economic synthesis of water-soluble photoluminescent carbon dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw, and their bio-applications in labeling, imaging, and sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ming; Zhong, Ruibo; Gao, Haiyang; Li, Wanrong; Yun, Xiaoling; Liu, Jingran; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhao, Guofen; Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fengzhang1978@hotmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Water-soluble photoluminescent carbon dots can be synthesized simply by a green, economic and one-pot hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw with ∼20% yield, in addition to the compact size and robust photostability they are experimentally demonstrated for multiplexed applications such as sensing ions and labeling and imaging for inorganic nanostructures, cells and even nematodes. The converting biomass wastes to promising biocompatible nanomaterials could be a “one-stone-two-birds” strategy to other carbon-containing biomass waste for a highly effectively carbon recycling use and sustainable energy and environment future. - Highlights: • Photoluminescent carbon dots can be synthesized by wheat straw with about 20% yield. • Carbon dots can be used for both nonliving and living labeling, imaging, and sensing. • Carbon dots can be used as a fluorescent ink. - Abstract: The use of biomass as renewable and sustainable energy source has attracted the attention of politics and research and development (R&D) facilities around the world. Agricultural straw acts as a typical biowaste, which still needs highly effective recycling to save the biomass urgently at present. Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) are novel biocompatible nanomaterials that have been proved to be produced from many carbon-abundant materials and hold great promise for the modern nanobiomedicine. In order to realize a “one-stone-two-birds” strategy, we report a green, economic, one-pot method in this article for synthesizing photoluminescent C-dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), we show that the as-prepared C-dots are amorphous in structure and are mainly composed of carbon. Their tiny size (<2 nm), combined with the characteristic excitation-dependent relatively bright emission, and robust photostability made the C-dots a potential biocompatible nanomaterial for bio-applications. We

  13. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liping [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002 (China); Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting [Xiamen Huaxia College, Xiamen, 361024 (China); Chen, Xi, E-mail: xichen@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China)

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel “off-on” fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu{sup 2+} owing to the coordination reaction between Cu{sup 2+} and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu{sup 2+} to L-Cys via the Cu–S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1–10 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.5–50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu{sup 2+} and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. - Highlights: • The europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) have been successfully prepared. • Various characterizations results proved that Eu atoms were successfully introduced into graphene quantum dots. • The introduced Eu atoms changed the electron density and surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. • Eu-GQDs were used as an “off-on” fluorescent probe for Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine detection

  14. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  15. Lack of evidence from HPLC 32P-post-labelling for tamoxifen-DNA adducts in the human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, P L; Sardar, S; Crooks, N; Neven, P; Van Hoof, I; Ugwumadu, A; Bourne, T; Tomas, E; Hellberg, P; Hewer, A J; Phillips, D H

    1999-02-01

    Tamoxifen is associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer in women. It is also a potent carcinogen in rat liver and forms covalent DNA adducts in this tissue. A previous study exploring DNA adducts in human endometria, utilizing thin layer chromatography 32P-postlabelling, found no evidence for adducts in tamoxifen-treated women [Carmichael,P.L., Ugwumadu,A.H.N., Neven,P., Hewer,A.J., Poon,G.K. and Phillips,D.H. (1996) Cancer Res., 56, 1475-1479]. However, subsequent work utilizing HPLC 32P-post-labelling [Hemminki,K., Ranjaniemi,H., Lindahl,B. and Moberger,B. (1996) Cancer Res., 56, 4374-4377] suggested that very low levels could be detected. We have sought to investigate this question further by reproducing the HPLC methodology at two centres, and analysing endometrial DNA from 20 patients treated with 20 mg/day tamoxifen for between 22 and 65 months. Liver DNA isolated from tamoxifen-treated rats was used as a positive control. We found no convincing evidence for tamoxifen-derived DNA adducts in human endometrium. HPLC elution profiles of post-labelled DNA from tamoxifen-treated women were indistinguishable from those obtained with DNA from 14 untreated women and from six women taking toremifene, an analogue of tamoxifen.

  16. Label-Free Fluorescent Detection of Trypsin Activity Based on DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanocluster-Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Xia Zhuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is important during the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The detection of trypsin activity is currently limited because of the need for the substrate to be labeled with a fluorescent tag. A label-free fluorescent method has been developed to monitor trypsin activity. The designed peptide probe consists of six arginine molecules and a cysteine terminus and can be conjugated to DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs by Ag-S bonding to enhance fluorescence. The peptide probe can also be adsorbed to the surface of graphene oxide (GO, thus resulting in the fluorescence quenching of DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate because of Förster resonance energy transfer. Once trypsin had degraded the peptide probe into amino acid residues, the DNA-AgNCs were released from the surface of GO, and the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was restored. Trypsin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0–50.0 ng/mL with a concentration as low as 1 ng/mL. This label-free method is simple and sensitive and has been successfully used for the determination of trypsin in serum. The method can also be modified to detect other proteases.

  17. Sequence- and structure-dependent DNA base dynamics: Synthesis, structure, and dynamics of site and sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaltenstein, A.; Robinson, B.H.; Hopkins, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    A nitroxide spin-labeled analogue of thymidine (1a), in which the methyl group is replaced by an acetylene-tethered nitroxide, was evaluated as a probe for structural and dynamics studies of sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA. Residue 1a was incorporated into synthetic deoxyoligonucleotides by using automated phosphite triester methods. 1 H NMR, CD, and thermal denaturation studies indicate that 1a (T) does not significantly alter the structure of 5'-d(CGCGAATT*CGCG) from that of the native dodecamer. EPR studies on monomer, single-stranded, and duplexed DNA show that 1a readily distinguishes environments of different rigidity. Comparison of the general line-shape features of the observed EPR spectra of several small duplexes (12-mer, 24-mer) with simulated EPR spectra assuming isotropic motion suggests that probe 1a monitors global tumbling of small duplexes. Increasing the length of the DNA oligomers results in significant deviation from isotropic motion, with line-shape features similar to those of calculated spectra of objects with isotropic rotational correlation times of 20-100 ns. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled GT mismatch and a T bulge in long DNAs are distinct from those of spin-labeled Watson-Crick paired DNAs, further demonstrating the value of EPR as a tool in the evaluation of local dynamic and structural features in macromolecules

  18. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  19. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  20. Fluorescence single-molecule counting assays for protein quantification using epi-fluorescence microscopy with quantum dots labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dafeng; Liu Chunxia; Wang Lei; Jiang Wei

    2010-01-01

    A single-molecule counting approach for quantifying the antibody affixed to a surface using quantum dots and epi-fluorescence microscopy is presented. Modifying the glass substrates with carboxyl groups provides a hydrophilic surface that reacts with amine groups of an antibody to allow covalent immobilization of the antibody. Nonspecific adsorption of single molecules on the modified surfaces was first investigated. Then, quantum dots were employed to form complexes with surface-immobilized antibody molecules and used as fluorescent probes for single-molecule imaging. Epi-fluorescence microscopy was chosen as the tool for single-molecule fluorescence detection here. The generated fluorescence signals were taken by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device and were found to be proportional to the sample concentrations. Under optimal conditions, a linear response range of 5.0 x 10 -14 -3.0 x 10 -12 mol L -1 was obtained between the number of single molecules and sample concentration via a single-molecule counting approach.

  1. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-08-17

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS{sub 2} QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS{sub 2} QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (−NH{sub 2}), carboxyl groups (−COOH) and hydroxyl groups (−OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively “turned on”. Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I{sub 0} (I and I{sub 0} were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2–192.5 nmol L{sup −1}, And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L{sup −1}. Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. - Graphical abstract: A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan, CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A label-free near-infrared fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for detection of lectin was established. • The highly sensitive biosensor was based on the

  2. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS_2 quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS_2 QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS_2 QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (−NH_2), carboxyl groups (−COOH) and hydroxyl groups (−OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively “turned on”. Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I_0 (I and I_0 were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2–192.5 nmol L"−"1, And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L"−"1. Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. - Graphical abstract: A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan, CuInS_2 quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A label-free near-infrared fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for detection of lectin was established. • The highly sensitive biosensor was based on the inner filter effect of Au NPs on CM

  3. Permeability changes and incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of Chinese hamsters affected by MEA and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermekova, V.M.; Kondakova, N.V.; Levitman, M.Kh.; Saugabaeva, K.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1976-01-01

    Action of MEA and low temperature (20degC) on the incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of chinese hamsters has been studied. It has been found that each of the above-mentioned factors equally decreases the label uptake into the cell and DNA. It is concluded that MEA and low temperature do not substantially influence the rate of DNA synthesis

  4. Electrochemical label-free and sensitive nanobiosensing of DNA hybridization by graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahour, F; Shamsi, A

    2017-09-01

    Based on the strong interaction between single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) and graphene material, we have constructed a novel label-free electrochemical biosensor for rapid and facile detection of short sequences ss-DNA molecules related to hepatitis C virus 1a using graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode. The sensing mechanism is based on the superior adsorption of single-stranded DNA to GO over double stranded DNA (ds-DNA). The intrinsic guanine oxidation signal measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) has been used for duplex DNA formation detection. The probe ss-DNA adsorbs onto the surface of GO via the π- π* stacking interactions leading to a strong background guanine oxidation signal. In the presence of complementary target, formation of helix which has weak binding ability to GO induced ds-DNA to release from the electrode surface and significant variation in differential pulse voltammetric response of guanine bases. The results indicated that the oxidation peak current was proportional to the concentration of complementary strand in the range of 0.1 nM-0.5 μM with a detection limit of 4.3 × 10 -11  M. The simple fabricated electrochemical biosensor has high sensitivity, good selectivity, and could be applied as a new platform for a range of target molecules in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA with Parallel Strand Orientation: A Nanometer Distance Study with Spin Labels in the Watson-Crick and the Reverse Watson-Crick Double Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunnicke, Dorith; Ding, Ping; Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-10-29

    Parallel-stranded (ps) DNA characterized by its sugar-phosphate backbones pointing in the same direction represents an alternative pairing system to antiparallel-stranded (aps) DNA with the potential to inhibit transcription and translation. 25-mer oligonucleotides were selected containing only dA·dT base pairs to compare spin-labeled nucleobase distances over a range of 10 or 15 base pairs in ps DNA with those in aps DNA. By means of the copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen-Meldal-Sharpless alkyne-azide cycloaddition, the spin label 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl was clicked to 7-ethynyl-7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to yield 25-mer oligonucleotides incorporating two spin labels. The interspin distances between spin labeled residues were determined by pulse EPR spectroscopy. The results reveal that in ps DNA these distances are between 5 and 10% longer than in aps DNA when the labeled DNA segment is located near the center of the double helix. The interspin distance in ps DNA becomes shorter compared with aps DNA when one of the spin labels occupies a position near the end of the double helix.

  6. Effect of varying the exposure and 3H-thymidine labeling period upon the outcome of the primary hepatocyte DNA repair assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Mecca, D.J.; Naismith, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The results presented in this report demonstrate that an 18-20 hour exposure/ 3 H-thymidine DNA labeling period is superior to a 4 hour incubation interval for general genotoxicity screening studies in the rat primary hepatocyte DNA repair assay. When DNA damaging agents which give rise to bulky-type DNA base adducts such as 2-acetylaminofluorene, aflatoxin B1 and benzidine were evaluated, little or no difference was observed between the 4 hour or an 18-20-hour exposure/labeling period. Similar results were also noted for the DNA ethylating agent diethylnitrosamine. However, when DNA damaging chemicals which produce a broader spectrum of DNA lesions were studied, differences in the amount of DNA repair as determined by autoradiographic analysis did occur. Methyl methanesulfonate and dimethylnitrosamine induced repairable DNA damage that was detected at lower dose levels with the 18-20 hour exposure/labeling period. Similar results were also observed for the DNA cross-linking agents, mitomycin C and nitrogen mustard. Ethyl methanesulfonate produced only a marginal amount of DNA repair in primary hepatocytes up to a dose level of 10(-3) M during the 4 hour incubation period, whereas a substantial amount of DNA repair was detectable at a dose level of 2.5 X 10(-4) M when the 18-20 hour exposure/labeling period was employed. The DNA alkylating agent 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, which creates DNA base adducts that are slowly removed from mammalian cell DNA, induced no detectable DNA repair in hepatocytes up to a toxic dose level of 2 X 10(-5) M with the 4 hour exposure period, whereas a marked DNA repair response was observed at 10(-5) M when the 18-20 hour exposure/labeling period was used

  7. Label-free tungsten disulfide quantum dots as a fluorescent sensing platform for highly efficient detection of copper (II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuan; He Da-Wei; Wang Yong-Sheng; Hu Yin; Fu Chen; Li Xue

    2017-01-01

    A fluorescent probe for the sensitive and selective determination of copper ion (Cu 2+ ) is presented. It is based on the use of tungsten disulfide quantum dots (WS 2 QDs) which is independent of the pH of solution and emits strong blue fluorescence. Copper ions could cause aggregation of the WS 2 QDs and lead to fluorescence quenching of WS 2 QDs. The change of fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of Cu 2+ , and the limit of detection is 0.4 μM. The fluorescent probe is highly selective for Cu 2+ over some potentially interfering ions. These results indicate that WS 2 QDs, as a fluorescent sensing platform, can meet the selective requirements for biomedical and environmental application. (paper)

  8. N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosoureas covalently bound to nonionic and monocationic lexitropsin dipeptides. Synthesis, DNA affinity binding characteristics, and reactions with 32P-end-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, K.M.; Wurdeman, R.L.; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Faxian; Gold, B.

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of compounds that contain an N-alkyl-N-nitrosourea functionality linked to DNA minor groove binding bi- and tripeptides (lexitropsins or information-reading peptides) based on methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide subunits are described. The lexitropsins (lex) synthesized have either a 3-(dimethylamino)propyl or propyl substituent on the carboxyl terminus. The preferred DNA affinity binding sequences of these compounds were footprinted in 32 P-end-labeled restriction fragments with methidiumpropyl-EDTA·Fe(II), and in common with other structural analogues, e.g., distamycin and netropsin, these nitrosoureas recognize A-T-rich runs. The affinity binding of the compound with the dimethylamino terminus, which is ionized at near-neutral pH, appeared stronger than that observed for the neutral dipeptide. The sequence specificity for DNA alkylation by (2-chloroethyl)nitrosourea-lex dipeptides (Cl-ENU-lex), with neutral and charged carboxyl termini, using 32 P-end-labeled restriction fragments, was determined by the conversion of the adducted sites into single-strand breaks by sequential heating at neutral pH and exposure to base. The DNA cleavage sites were visualized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Linking the Cl-ENU moiety to minor groove binders is a viable strategy to qualitatively and quantitatively control the delivery and release of the ultimate DNA alkylating agent in a sequence-dependent fashion

  9. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu(2+) and L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel "off-on" fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu(2+) and l-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu(2+) owing to the coordination reaction between Cu(2+) and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu(2+) to L-Cys via the Cu-S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1-10 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.5-50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu(2+) and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Core–shell Fe3O4–Au magnetic nanoparticles based nonenzymatic ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunosensor using quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Weiyan; Zhang, Yan; Ge, Shenguang; Song, Xianrang; Huang, Jiadong; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles and P-GS@QDs were prepared to immobilize Ab 1 and Ab 2 respectively and combined to fabricate a novel sandwich-type ECL immunosensor for detecting CA125 at low concentration. Highlights: ► ECL immunosensor for CA125 based on a microfluidic strategy with a homemade ECL cell was proposed. ► Core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles were employed as the carriers of the primary antibodies. ► CdTe quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet were used for signal amplification. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel, low-cost electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor using core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) as the carriers of the primary antibody of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) was designed. Graphene sheet (GS) with property of good conductivity and large surface area was a captivating candidate to amplify ECL signal. We successively synthesized functionalized GS by loading large amounts of quantum dots (QDs) onto the poly (diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PDDA) coated graphene sheet (P-GS@QDs) via self-assembly electrostatic reactions, which were used to label secondary antibodies. The ECL immunosensors coupled with a microfluidic strategy exhibited a wide detection range (0.005–50 U mL −1 ) and a low detection limit (1.2 mU mL −1 ) with the help of an external magnetic field to gather immunosensors. The method was evaluated with clinical serum sample, receiving good correlation with results from commercially available analytical procedure

  11. One-step synthesis of DNA functionalized cadmium-free quantum dots and its application in FRET-based protein sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cuiling, E-mail: clzhang@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Ding, Caiping [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhou, Guohua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang, 524048 (China); Xue, Qin [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Xian, Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2017-03-08

    DNA functionalized quantum dots (QDs) are promising nanoprobes for the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensing. Herein, cadmium-free DNA functionalized Mn-doped ZnS (DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+}) QDs were successfully synthesized by one-step route. As-synthesized QDs show excellent photo-stability with the help of PAA and DNA. Then, we constructed a novel FRET model based on the QDs and WS{sub 2} nanosheets as the energy donor-acceptor pairs, which was successfully applied for the protein detection through the terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA assay. This work not only explores the potential bioapplication of the DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs, but also provides a platform for the investigation of small molecule-protein interaction. - Highlights: • The stable and cadmium-free DNA functionalized ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs were successfully synthesized through a facile one-step route. • We constructed a novel FRET system based on one-step synthesized DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs (donor) and WS{sub 2} nanosheets (acceptor). • The FRET-based strategy was applied for the detection of streptavidin and folate receptor by combining TPSMLD and Exo III.

  12. AgNPs-3D nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdSe quantum dot coupled with strand displacement amplification for sensitive biosensing of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Meng; Jie, Guifen; Tan, Lu; Niu, Shuyan

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy using Ag nanoparticles-3D (AgNPs-3D) nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) coupled with strand displacement amplification (SDA) for sensitive biosensing of DNA was successfully designed. The prepared CdSe QDs with intense ECL were assembled on the poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites modified electrode, then gold nanoparticles (NPs) as the quenching probe was conjugated to the QDs, ECL signal was efficiently quenched. The target DNA induced cycling SDA and generated a large number of DNA s1. The released DNA s1 could open the hairpin DNA with quenching probe. So the presence of low levels of target DNA can potentially result in a significant enhancement of ECL signal. Furthermore, large number of AgNPs were then in situ reduced in the 3D DNA skeleton on the electrode, which dramaticlly enhanced ECL signal of QDs owing to the excellent electrical conductivity, and the much amplified ECL signal change has a quantitative relation with the target DNA. So by combining the AgNPs-3D nanostructure and cycling SDA to achieve greatly amplified detection of DNA, the promising ECL strategy could provide a highly sensitive platform for various biomolecules and has a good prospect for clinical diagnosis in the future. - Graphical abstract: A novel strategy using AgNPs-3D nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdSe quantum dot coupled with DNA strand displacement amplification for sensitive biosensing of DNA was successfully designed, the proposed biosensor can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward nucleic acid detection in complex samples with an easy and rapid way. - Highlights: • AgNPs-3D nanostructure for enhancing ECL signal of CdSe QDs was successfully designed. • A new dual amplification strategy for detection of DNA by using AgNPs-3D nanostructure coupled with SDA was developed. • It is for the first time AgNPs-3D nanostructure

  13. Chemistry of the 8-Nitroguanine DNA Lesion: Reactivity, Labelling and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Katie J; McConville, Matthew; Williams, Kathryn R; Luzyanin, Konstantin V; O'Neil, Ian A; Cosstick, Richard

    2018-02-26

    The 8-nitroguanine lesion in DNA is increasingly associated with inflammation-related carcinogenesis, whereas the same modification on guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate generates a second messenger in NO-mediated signal transduction. Very little is known about the chemistry of 8-nitroguanine nucleotides, despite the fact that their biological effects are closely linked to their chemical properties. To this end, a selection of chemical reactions have been performed on 8-nitroguanine nucleosides and oligodeoxynucleotides. Reactions with alkylating reagents reveal how the 8-nitro substituent affects the reactivity of the purine ring, by significantly decreasing the reactivity of the N2 position, whilst the relative reactivity at N1 appears to be enhanced. Interestingly, the displacement of the nitro group with thiols results in an efficient and specific method of labelling this lesion and is demonstrated in oligodeoxynucleotides. Additionally, the repair of this lesion is also shown to be a chemically feasible reaction through a reductive denitration with a hydride source. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffino, R L; Mir, M; Samitier, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications. (paper)

  15. Quenching the chemiluminescence of acridinium ester by graphene oxide for label-free and homogeneous DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Huang, Guangming; Cui, Hua

    2013-11-13

    It was found that graphene oxide (GO) could effectively quench the chemiluminescence (CL) emission from a acridinium ester (AE)-hydrogen peroxide system. By taking advantage of this quenching effect, as a proof of concept, a label-free and homogeneous DNA assay was developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. In the absence of target DNA, both probe DNA and AE were absorbed on the surface of GO, producing a weak CL emission owing to the CL quenching effect of GO. However, in the presence of target DNA, a double-stranded structure of DNA was generated, leading to the release of the oligonucleotide from the GO surface. AE favors binding with double-stranded DNA, which will be released from the GO surface; thus, the quenching effect of GO will be no longer effective and a strong CL signal can be observed. This assay can detect M. tuberculosis DNA with a detection limit of 0.65 nM. This sensitivity is lower than that of previously reported electrochemical detection.

  16. Label-free DNA quantification via a 'pipette, aggregate and blot' (PAB) approach with magnetic silica particles on filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Liu, Qian; Alsamarri, Hussein; Lounsbury, Jenny A; Haversitick, Doris M; Landers, James P

    2013-03-07

    Reliable measurement of DNA concentration is essential for a broad range of applications in biology and molecular biology, and for many of these, quantifying the nucleic acid content is inextricably linked to obtaining optimal results. In its most simplistic form, quantitative analysis of nucleic acids can be accomplished by UV-Vis absorbance and, in more sophisticated format, by fluorimetry. A recently reported new concept, the 'pinwheel assay', involves a label-free approach for quantifying DNA through aggregation of paramagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field. Here, we describe a simplified version of that assay adapted for execution using only a pipet and filter paper. The 'pipette, aggregate, and blot' (PAB) approach allows DNA to induce bead aggregation in a pipette tip through exposure to a magnetic field, followed by dispensing (blotting) onto filter paper. The filter paper immortalises the extent of aggregation, and digital images of the immortalized bead conformation, acquired with either a document scanner or a cell phone camera, allows for DNA quantification using a noncomplex algorithm. Human genomic DNA samples extracted from blood are quantified with the PAB approach and the results utilized to define the volume of sample used in a PCR reaction that is sensitive to input mass of template DNA. Integrating the PAB assay with paper-based DNA extraction and detection modalities has the potential to yield 'DNA quant-on-paper' devices that may be useful for point-of-care testing.

  17. Atomic scissors: a new method of tracking the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled DNA in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ligasová

    Full Text Available A new method of the light microscopy detection of BrdU-labeled DNA in situ is described. It is based on the oxidative attack at the deoxyribose moiety by copper(I in the presence of oxygen, which leads to the abstraction of hydrogen atom from deoxyribose culminating in the elimination of the nucleobase, scission of the nucleic-acid strand and formation of frequent gaps. The gaps allow the reaction of the antibodies with the commonly used markers of replication (e.g. 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, which are otherwise masked. The method developed makes it possible to detect nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication efficiently. In most cases, it does not inhibit effective protein detections and in addition enables simultaneous localization of newly-synthesized RNA. The alternative presently-used methods result in protein denaturation and/or extensive DNA cleavage followed by the DNA-bound proteins peeling off.

  18. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of spin labelled double and single-strand DNA for EPR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, C; Danilāne, L; Oganesyan, V S

    2018-05-16

    We report the first application of fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to the prediction of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of spin labelled DNA. Models for two structurally different DNA spin probes with either the rigid or flexible position of the nitroxide group in the base pair, employed in experimental studies previously, have been developed. By the application of the combined MD-EPR simulation methodology we aimed at the following. Firstly, to provide a test bed against a sensitive spectroscopic technique for the recently developed improved version of the parmbsc1 force field for MD modelling of DNA. The predicted EPR spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones available from the literature, thus confirming the accuracy of the currently employed DNA force fields. Secondly, to provide a quantitative interpretation of the motional contributions into the dynamics of spin probes in both duplex and single-strand DNA fragments and to analyse their perturbing effects on the local DNA structure. Finally, a combination of MD and EPR allowed us to test the validity of the application of the Model-Free (M-F) approach coupled with the partial averaging of magnetic tensors to the simulation of EPR spectra of DNA systems by comparing the resultant EPR spectra with those simulated directly from MD trajectories. The advantage of the M-F based EPR simulation approach over the direct propagation techniques is that it requires motional and order parameters that can be calculated from shorter MD trajectories. The reported MD-EPR methodology is transferable to the prediction and interpretation of EPR spectra of higher order DNA structures with novel types of spin labels.

  19. Enhanced resolution of DNA restriction fragments: A procedure by two-dimensional electrophoresis and double-labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, M.; Au, L.C.; Ichikawa, N.; Ts'o, P.O.

    1990-01-01

    A probe-free method was developed to detect DNA rearrangement in bacteria based on the electrophoretic separation of twice-digested restriction fragments of genomic DNA into a two-dimensional (2-D) pattern. The first restriction enzyme digestion was done in solution, followed by electrophoresis of the restriction fragments in one dimension. A second restriction enzyme digestion was carried out in situ in the gel, followed by electrophoresis in a second dimension perpendicular to the first electrophoresis. The 2-D pattern provides for the resolution of 300-400 spots, which are defined and indexed by an x,y coordinate system with size markers. This approach has greatly increased the resolution power over conventional one-dimensional (1-D) electrophoresis. To study DNA rearrangement, a 2-D pattern from a test strain was compared with the 2-D pattern from a reference strain. After the first digestion, genomic DNA fragments from the test strain were labeled with 35S, while those from the reference strain were labeled with 32P. This was done to utilize the difference in the energy emission of 35S and 32P isotopes for autoradiography when two x-ray films were exposed simultaneously on top of the gel after the 2-D electrophoresis. The irradiation from the decay of 35S exposed only the lower film, whereas the irradiation from the decay of 32P exposed both the lower and upper films. Different DNA fragments existed in the test DNA compared with the reference DNA can be identified unambiguously by the differential two 2-D patterns produced on two films upon exposure to the 35S and 32P fragments in the same gel. An appropriate photographic procedure further simplified the process, allowing only the difference in DNA fragments between these two patterns to be shown in the map

  20. Multiplex electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor for determination of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus based on multicolor quantum dots and Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Xinyan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, Zihan; Chen, Shufan; Li, Yang; Lu, Lehui; Qu, Hongping; Su, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel multiplex electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor has been developed for determination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) based on multicolor CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The electrochemically synthesized graphene nanosheets (GNs) were selected as conducting bridge to anchor CdTe QDs_5_5_1-capture DNA_H_B_V and CdTe QDs_6_0_7-capture DNA_H_C_V on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Then, different concentrations of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V were introduced to hybrid with complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs-probe DNA_H_B_V and Au NPs-probe DNA_H_C_V were modified to the above composite film via hybrid with the unreacted complementary CdTe QDs-capture DNA. Au NPs could quench the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity of CdTe QDs due to the inner filter effect. Therefore, the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V could be achieved by monitoring the ECL DNA sensor based on Au NPs-probe DNA/target DNA/CdTe QDs-capture DNA/GNs/GCE composite film. Under the optimum conditions, the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs_5_5_1 and CdTe QDs_6_0_7 and the concentration of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V have good linear relationship in the range of 0.0005–0.5 nmol L"−"1 and 0.001–1.0 nmol L"−"1 respectively, and the limit of detection were 0.082 pmol L"−"1 and 0.34 pmol L"−"1 respectively (S/N = 3). The DNA sensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and acceptable stability. The proposed DNA sensor has been employed for the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor has been developed for the determination of target DNA_H_B_V and target DNA_H_C_V. • The DNA sensor shows good sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. • The ECL provided a convenient, low-cost, sensitive, and specific method for target DNA

  1. Toward Automatic Label-Free Whispering Gallery Modes Biodetection with a Quantum Dot-Coated Microsphere Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boissinot K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We explore a new calibration-free approach to biodetection based on whispering gallery modes (WGMs without a reference measure and relative shifts. Thus, the requirement to keep track of the sensor position is removed, and a freely moving population of fluorophore-doped polystyrene microspheres can now fulfill this role of sensing resonator. Breaking free from fixed surface-based biosensing promotes adhesion between the microsphere sensors and the analytes since both can now be thoroughly mixed. The 70-nm-wide spectrum of green fluorescent microbeads allows us to monitor over 20 WGMs simultaneously without needing evanescent light coupling into the microspheres, hence enabling remote sensing. Since the exact radius of each microsphere is unknown a priori, it requires algorithmic analyses to obtain a reliable result for the refractive index of a solution. We first test our approach with different solutions of alcohol in water obtaining 3 × 10−4 precision on the refractive index at lower concentrations. Then, the solutions of bacterial spores in water yield clear evidence of biodetection in the statistical analysis of WGMs from 50 microspheres. To extend the fluorescence spectral range of our WGM sensors, we present preliminary results on coating microspheres with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

  2. Fluorescent carbon dots nanosensor for label-free determination of vitamin B12 based on inner filter effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Longhua; Yang, Hongmei; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2018-03-01

    A simple and effective fluorescent assay for the determination of vitamin B12 was developed. In this study, carbon dots (CDs) were prepared by one-pot hydrothermal method and directly used as a fluorophore in the inner filter effect (IFE). Both of the maximum absorption peak of vitamin B12 and excitation maxima of CDs are located at 360 nm, hence, the excited light of CDs can be absorbed by vitamin B12, resulting in the fluorescence reduction of CDs. And the fluorescence intensity of CDs decreases with the increasing concentration of vitamin B12. This IFE-based sensing strategy shows a good linear relationship between the normalized fluorescence intensity and the concentration of vitamin B12 ranging from 0 to 60 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Furthermore, this proposed approach was successfully applied to vitamin B12 sensing in injections. This IFE sensing platform based on various fluorescent nanomaterials has a high promise for the detection of other biomolecules due to its inherent convenience.

  3. Label-free detection of kanamycin based on a G-quadruplex DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun-Peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This work was the first to report that the kanamycin-binding DNA aptamer (5'-TGG GGG TTG AGG CTA AGC CGA-3') can form stable parallel G-quadruplex DNA (G4-DNA) structures by themselves and that this phenomenon can be verified by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on these findings, we developed a novel label-free strategy for kanamycin detection based on the G4-DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay with thiazole orange (TO) as the fluorescence probe. In the proposed strategy, TO became strongly fluorescent upon binding to kanamycin-binding G4-DNA. However, the addition of kanamycin caused the displacement of TO from the G4-DNA-TO conjugate, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescent signal, which was inversely related to the kanamycin concentration. The detection limit of the proposed assay decreased to 59 nM with a linear working range of 0.1 μM to 20 μM for kanamycin. The cross-reactivity against six other antibiotics was negligible compared with the response to kanamycin. A satisfactory recovery of kanamycin in milk samples ranged from 80.1% to 98.0%, confirming the potential of this bioassay in the measurement of kanamycin in various applications. Our results also served as a good reference for developing similar fluorescent G4-DNA-based bioassays in the future.

  4. Labeling Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Hoechst 33342: Usability and Effects on Differentiation Potential and DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schendzielorz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs have been extensively studied in the field of stem cell research and possess numerous clinical applications. Cell labeling is an essential component of various experimental protocols and Hoechst 33342 (H33342 represents a cost-effective and easy methodology for live staining. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the labeling of rat ASCs with two different concentrations of H33342 (0.5 μg/mL and 5 μg/mL, with particular regard to usability, interference with cell properties, and potential DNA damage. Hoechst 33342 used at a low concentration of 0.5 μg/mL did not significantly affect cell proliferation, viability, or differentiation potential of the ASCs, nor did it cause any significant DNA damage as measured by the olive tail moment. High concentrations of 5 μg/mL H33342, however, impaired the proliferation and viability of the ASCs, and considerable DNA damage was observed. Undesirable colabeling of unlabeled cocultivated cells was seen in particular with higher concentrations of H33342, independent of varying washing procedures. Hence, H33342 labeling with lower concentrations represents a usable method, which does not affect the tested cell properties. However, the colabeling of adjacent cells is a drawback of the technique.

  5. Sensitive Bioanalysis Based on in-Situ Droplet Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of CdS Quantum Dots Label after Enhanced Cathodic Preconcentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Qin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a protocol of CdS-labeled sandwich-type amperometric bioanalysis with high sensitivity, on the basis of simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-enrichment of the CdS quantum dot biolabel and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV detection of Cd directly on the bioelectrode. We added a microliter droplet of 0.1 M aqueous HNO3 to dissolve CdS on the bioelectrode and simultaneously achieved the potentiostatic cathodic preconcentration of Cd by starting the potentiostatic operation before HNO3 addition, which can largely increase the ASV signal. Our protocol was used for immunoanalysis and aptamer-based bioanalysis of several proteins, giving limits of detection of 4.5 fg·mL−1 for human immunoglobulin G, 3.0 fg·mL−1 for human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 4.9 fg·mL−1 for human α-fetoprotein (AFP, and 0.9 fM for thrombin, which are better than many reported results. The simultaneous and sensitive analysis of CEA and AFP at two screen-printed carbon electrodes was also conducted by our protocol.

  6. Synthesis of highly fluorescent and thio-linkers stabilize gold quantum dots and nano clusters in DMF for bio-labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Shiva K., E-mail: srastogi@uidaho.edu [University of Idaho, Department of Chemistry (United States); Denn, Benjamin D.; Branen, A. Larry [University of Idaho, Coeur D' Alene, Biosensors and Nanotechnology Application Laboratory (BNAL) (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This study demonstrates a one versus two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold quantum dots (F-AuQDs) and nano clusters (F-AuNCs) functionalized with thiolated organic linkers using reduction of gold precursor in N,N Prime -dimethylformamide in 1 h of reaction. The F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs show fluorescence emission at 425 {+-} 5 nm upon excitation at 345 {+-} 5 nm of wavelength, with good water solubility and stability. Five different thiolated organic binary linkers consisting of various functional groups including: carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and aromatic amine, were conjugated with the F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs. The formation mechanism and functionalization of the F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs was characterized using UV-vis absorption spectra, UV-vis light, fluorescent emission spectra, pH, TEM, and FTIR. The fluorescence emission of the F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs is greatly dependent on the thio-linker. This novel one-step approach provides facile and fast synthesis of F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs over the two-step method, with less than 5 h of reaction and workup compared to more than 28 h of reaction for the two-step approach. These thio-linker functionalized F-AuQDs and F-AuNCs have a wide application in fluorescent labeling of biomolecules, optical devices, imaging, energy transfer, and biosensing.

  7. Beyond labels: A review of the application of quantum dots as integrated components of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors utilizing optical transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algar, W. Russ; Tavares, Anthony J. [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2010-07-12

    A comprehensive review of the development of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors using quantum dots (QDs) as integrated components is presented. In contrast to a QD that is selectively introduced as a label, an integrated QD is one that is present in a system throughout a bioanalysis, and simultaneously has a role in transduction and as a scaffold for biorecognition. Through a diverse array of coatings and bioconjugation strategies, it is possible to use QDs as a scaffold for biorecognition events. The modulation of QD luminescence provides the opportunity for the transduction of these events via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), charge transfer quenching, and electrochemiluminescence (ECL). An overview of the basic concepts and principles underlying the use of QDs with each of these transduction methods is provided, along with many examples of their application in biological sensing. The latter include: the detection of small molecules using enzyme-linked methods, or using aptamers as affinity probes; the detection of proteins via immunoassays or aptamers; nucleic acid hybridization assays; and assays for protease or nuclease activity. Strategies for multiplexed detection are highlighted among these examples. Although the majority of developments to date have been in vitro, QD-based methods for ex vivo biological sensing are emerging. Some special attention is given to the development of solid-phase assays, which offer certain advantages over their solution-phase counterparts.

  8. Multifunctional molecular imaging probes for estrogen receptors. 99mTc labeled diethylstilbestrol (DES) conjugated, cuinp quantum dot nanoparticles (DESCIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payam Moharrami; Perihan Unak; Ozge Kozgus Guldu; Medine, E.I.; Gul Gumuser; Elvan Sayit Bilgin; Omer Aras

    2017-01-01

    A theranostic nanoparticle was synthesized based on diethylstilbestrol conjugated with phosphate, copper, and indium (DESCIP) and labelled with 99m Tc which can be used for SPECT imaging of ER-enriched cancers. In vitro biological activity of 99m Tc-DESCIP was examined in breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), prostatic carcinoma cells (PC-3), and pulmonary epithelial cells (A-549). In vivo lymph node imaging was performed in normal and receptor blocked female New Zealand rabbits. Results demonstrated that 99m Tc-DESCIP and DESCIP has potential for imaging ER-enriched tumors such as breast and prostate tumors, and their metastases in the lung, as well as improving management for their therapies. (author)

  9. Co-isolation of in vivo 32P-labeled specific transcripts and DNA without phenol extraction of nuclease digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.; Hayes, C.; Brand, L.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for isolation and quantitation of specific intact transcripts, for which a hybridization probe is available, from 32 P-labeled bacterial cells. The RNA is extracted in the absence of R Nase activity by incorporating an inert, physically removable R Nase inhibitor throughout the spheroplasting, cell lysis, and pronase digestion steps. [/sup 32/P]RNA is separated from [ 32 P]DNA, without recourse to phenol extraction of DNase treatment, on a Cs 2 SO/sub 4-/HCONH 2 step gradient in which the precipitated RNA forms a sharp band. Specific transcripts are purified from [ 32 P]RNA by physical separation of the transcript and hybridization probe using gel-exclusion chromatography. The gentleness of this technique enables the co-isolation of DNA and can facilitate the analysis of covalently joined RNA-DNA replication intermediates

  10. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  11. Simple synthesis of carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D.; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer. The target tracers, X-[ 11 C]methoxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; [ 11 C]4a–d), were prepared from their corresponding precursors, X-hydroxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; 5a–d), with [ 11 C]CH 3 OTf through O-[ 11 C]methylation and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using a C-18 Sep-Pak Plus cartridge. The radiochemical yields decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB), from [ 11 C]CO 2 , were 40–60%. The specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 185–370 GBq/μmol. - Highlights: ► New chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► New carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► Simple solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was employed in radiosynthesis.

  12. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Cabin-Flaman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (D-SIMS imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C14N- recombinant ion and the use of the 13C:12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS.

  13. In-stem labelling allows visualization of DNA strand displacements by distinct fluorescent colour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrois, Sebastian; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-05-21

    The combination of thiazole orange (TO) and thiazole red (TR) as an internal pair of fluorescent DNA base surrogates ("DNA traffic lights") allows us to follow at least two consecutive DNA strand displacements in real time through a distinct fluorescence colour change from green to red and vice versa.

  14. Gold surface supported spherical liposome-gold nano-particle nano-composite for label free DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvana, M; Narayanan, J Shankara; Dharuman, V; Teng, W; Hahn, J H; Jayakumar, K

    2013-03-15

    Immobilization of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) liposome-gold nano-particle (DOPE-AuNP) nano-composite covalently on 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) on gold surface is demonstrated for the first time for electrochemical label free DNA sensing. Spherical nature of the DOPE on the MPA monolayer is confirmed by the appearance of sigmoidal voltammetric profile, characteristic behavior of linear diffusion, for the MPA-DOPE in presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) and [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) redox probes. The DOPE liposome vesicle fusion is prevented by electroless deposition of AuNP on the hydrophilic amine head groups of the DOPE. Immobilization of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) is made via simple gold-thiol linkage for DNA hybridization sensing in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-). The sensor discriminates the hybridized (complementary target hybridized), un-hybridized (non-complementary target hybridized) and single base mismatch target hybridized surfaces sensitively and selectively without signal amplification. The lowest target DNA concentration detected is 0.1×10(-12)M. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance (EIS), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques are used for DNA sensing on DOPE-AuNP nano-composite. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV) spectroscopic techniques are used to understand the interactions between the DOPE, AuNP and ssDNA. The results indicate the presence of an intact and well defined spherical DOPE-AuNP nano-composite on the gold surface. The method could be applied for fabrication of the surface based liposome-AuNP-DNA composite for cell transfection studies at reduced reagents and costs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP.

  16. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang

    2016-08-17

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence "turn off-on" biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS2 QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS2 QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (NH2), carboxyl groups (COOH) and hydroxyl groups (OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively "turned on". Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I0 (I and I0 were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2-192.5 nmol L(-1), And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L(-1). Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Label-free DNA hybridization detection and single base-mismatch discrimination using CE-ICP-MS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Sun, Shao-kai; Yang, Jia-lin; Jiang, Yan

    2011-12-07

    Detecting a specific DNA sequence and discriminating single base-mismatch is critical to clinical diagnosis, paternity testing, forensic sciences, food and drug industry, pathology, genetics, environmental monitoring, and anti-bioterrorism. To this end, capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method is developed using the displacing interaction between the target ssDNA and the competitor Hg(2+) for the first time. The thymine-rich capture ssDNA 1 is interacted with the competitor Hg(2+), forming an assembled complex in a hairpin-structure between the thymine bases arrangement at both sides of the capture ssDNA 1. In the presence of a target ssDNA with stronger affinity than that of the competitor Hg(2+), the energetically favorable hybridization between capture ssDNA 1 and the target ssDNA destroys the hairpin-structure and releases the competitor as free Hg(2+), which was then read out and accurately quantified by CE-ICP-MS assay. Under the optimal CE separation conditions, free Hg(2+) ions and its capture ssDNA 1 adduct were baseline separated and detected on-line by ICP-MS; the increased peak intensity of free Hg(2+) against the concentration of perfectly complementary target ssDNA was linear over the concentration range of 30-600 nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 8 nmol L(-1) (3s, n = 11) in the pre-incubated mixture containing 1 μmol L(-1) Hg(2+) and 0.2 μmol L(-1) capture ssDNA 1. This new assay method is simple in design since any target ssDNA binding can in principle result in free Hg(2+) release by 6-fold Hg(2+) signal amplification, avoiding oligonucleotide labeling or assistance by excess signal transducer and signal reporter to read out the target. Due to element-specific detection of ICP-MS in our assay procedure, the interference from the autofluorescence of substrata was eliminated.

  18. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Microneedle Functionalized with Polyethyleneimine and Nanotubes for Highly Sensitive, Label-Free Quantification of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Saadat-Moghaddam, Darius; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The accurate measure of DNA concentration is necessary for many DNA-based biological applications. However, the current methods are limited in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, human error, and contamination. Here, we present a microneedle functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for the highly sensitive quantification of DNA. The microneedle was fabricated using ultraviolet (UV) lithography and anisotropic etching, and then functionalized w...

  20. Large-scale detection of antigen-specific T cells using peptide-MHC-I multimers labeled with DNA barcodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    -major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers labeled with individual DNA barcodes to screen >1,000 peptide specificities in a single sample, and detect low-frequency CD8 T cells specific for virus- or cancer-restricted antigens. When analyzing T-cell recognition of shared melanoma antigens before and after adoptive...... cell therapy in melanoma patients, we observe a greater number of melanoma-specific T-cell populations compared with cytometry-based approaches. Furthermore, we detect neoepitope-specific T cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood from patients with non-small cell lung cancer...

  1. Benzofurazane as a New Redox Label for Electrochemical Detection of DNA: Towards Multipotential Redox Coding of DNA Bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balintová, Jana; Plucnara, Medard; Vidláková, Pavlína; Pohl, Radek; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 38 (2013), s. 12720-12731 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA polymerase * electrochemistry * nucleoside triphosphates * sequencing * voltammetry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.696, year: 2013

  2. Molecular verification on male sterile mutant after injected exogenous λDNA into wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jingcheng; Yu Yuanjie; Liu Fengzhen; Qi Yanfang; Shen Fafu

    2000-01-01

    A cytoplasmic male sterile mutant and then a stable CMS line named D-type sterile line were obtained after injected exogenous λDNA into wheat line 814527, and line 814527 could be its maintainer line. By using λDNA labelled with 32 P as probe, unlabelled λDNA as positive check, dot blotting of nuclear DNA and chloroplast DNA of receptor 814527, D-type sterile line and its hybrid F 1 with Lumai 14 were carried out. Positive dots appeared in nuclear DNA and chloroplast DNA of D-type sterile line and its hybrid F 1 , but did not appear in the receptor. It showed that fragments of exogenous λDNA existed in nuclear genome and chloroplast genome of D-type sterile line, and could be inherited stably. All these results, on a molecular level, proved the reliability of exogenous DNA injection

  3. A silicon-based electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive, specific, label-free and real-time DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Su, Shao; Wei, Xinpan; Zhong, Yiling; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-01-01

    We herein present a new kind of silicon-based electrochemical sensor using a gold nanoparticles-decorated silicon wafer (AuNPs@Si) as a high-performance electrode, which is facilely prepared via in situ AuNPs growth on a silicon wafer. Particularly significantly, the resultant electrochemical sensor is efficacious for label-free DNA detection with high sensitivity due to the unique merits of the prepared silicon-based electrode. Typically, DNA at remarkably low concentrations (1–10 fM) could be readily detected without requiring additional signal-amplification procedures, which is better than or comparable to the lowest DNA concentration ever detected via well-studied signal-amplification-assisted electrochemical sensors. Moreover, the silicon-based sensor features high specificity, allowing unambiguous discrimination of single-based mismatches. We further show that real-time DNA assembly is readily monitored via recording the intensity changes of current signals due to the robust thermal stability of the silicon-based electrode. The unprecedented advantages of the silicon-based electrochemical sensor would offer new opportunities for myriad sensing applications. (paper)

  4. Anthraquinone as a Redox Label for DNA: Synthesis, Enzymatic Incorporation, and Electrochemistry of Anthraquinone-Modified Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balintová, Jana; Pohl, Radek; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Vidláková, Pavlína; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 50 (2011), s. 14063-14073 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : anthraquinone * DNA * electrochemistry * nucleosides * oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.925, year: 2011

  5. Label-free and sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity via coupling DNA strand displacement reaction with enzymatic-aided amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rui; Tao, Mangjuan; Shi, Zhilu; Zhang, Xiafei; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoxin

    2015-11-15

    Several fluorescence signal amplification strategies have been developed for sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) activity, but they need fluorescence dye labeled DNA probe. We have addressed the limitation and report here a label-free strategy for sensitive detection of PNK activity by coupling DNA strand displacement reaction with enzymatic-aided amplification. A hairpin oligonucleotide (hpDNA) with blunt ends was used as the substrate for T4 PNK phosphorylation. In the presence of T4 PNK, the stem of hpDNA was phosphorylated and further degraded by lambda exonuclease (λ exo) from 5' to 3' direction to release a single-stranded DNA as a trigger of DNA strand displacement reaction (SDR). The trigger DNA can continuously displace DNA P2 from P1/P2 hybrid with the help of specific cleavage of nicking endonuclease (Nt.BbvCI). Then, DNA P2 can form G-quadruplex in the presence of potassium ions and quadruplex-selective fluorphore, N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM), resulting in a significant increase in fluorescence intensity of NMM. Thus, the accumulative release of DNA P2 led to fluorescence signal amplification for determining T4 PNK activity with a detection limit of 6.6×10(-4) U/mL, which is superior or comparative with established approaches. By ingeniously utilizing T4 PNK-triggered DNA SDR, T4 PNK activity can be specifically and facilely studied in homogeneous solution containing complex matrix without any external fluorescence labeling. Moreover, the influence of different inhibitors on the T4 PNK activity revealed that it also can be explored to screen T4 PNK inhibitors. Therefore, this label-free amplification strategy presents a facile and cost-effective approach for nucleic acid phosphorylation related research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA-length-dependent quenching of fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles with gold, graphene oxide and MoS2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Robertson, Neil; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2014-08-13

    We controlled the fluorescence emission of a fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle using three different nanomaterials with ultraefficient quenching capabilities. The control over the fluorescence emission was investigated via spacing introduced by the surface-functionalized single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA molecules were conjugated on different templates, either on the surface of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles or gold and nanographene oxide. The efficiency of the quenching was determined and compared with various fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle and nanoquencher combinations using DNA molecules with three different lengths. We have found that the template for DNA conjugation plays significant role on quenching the fluorescence emission of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles. We have observed that the size of the DNA controls the quenching efficiency when conjugated only on the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles by setting a spacer between the surfaces and resulting change in the hydrodynamic size. The quenching efficiency with 12mer, 23mer and 36mer oligonucleotides decreased to 56%, 54% and 53% with gold nanoparticles, 58%, 38% and 32% with nanographene oxide, 46%, 38% and 35% with MoS2, respectively. On the other hand, the presence, not the size, of the DNA molecules on the other surfaces quenched the fluorescence significantly with different degrees. To understand the effect of the mobility of the DNA molecules on the nanoparticle surface, DNA molecules were attached to the surface with two different approaches. Covalently immobilized oligonucleotides decreased the quenching efficiency of nanographene oxide and gold nanoparticles to ∼22% and ∼21%, respectively, whereas noncovalently adsorbed oligonucleotides decreased it to ∼25% and ∼55%, respectively. As a result, we have found that each nanoquencher has a powerful quenching capability against a fluorescent nanoparticle, which can be

  7. A Novel DNA Nanosensor Based on CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots and Synthesized Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticle-enhanced biosensors have been extensively researched, few studies have systematically characterized the roles of nanoparticles in enhancing biosensor functionality. This paper describes a successful new method in which DNA binds directly to iron oxide nanoparticles for use in an optical biosensor. A wide variety of nanoparticles with different properties have found broad application in biosensors because their small physical size presents unique chemical, physical, and electronic properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Of all nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are proving to be a versatile tool, an excellent case in point being in DNA bioassays, where magnetic nanoparticles are often used for optimization of the hybridization and separation of target DNA. A critical step in the successful construction of a DNA biosensor is the efficient attachment of biomolecules to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. To date, most methods of synthesizing these nanoparticles have led to the formation of hydrophobic particles that require additional surface modifications. As a result, the surface to volume ratio decreases and nonspecific bindings may occur so that the sensitivity and efficiency of the device deteriorates. A new method of large-scale synthesis of iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles which results in the magnetite particles being in aqueous phase, was employed in this study. Small modifications were applied to design an optical DNA nanosensor based on sandwich hybridization. Characterization of the synthesized particles was carried out using a variety of techniques and CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots were used as the reporter markers in a spectrofluorophotometer. We showed conclusively that DNA binds to the surface of ironoxide nanoparticles without further surface modifications and that these magnetic nanoparticles can be efficiently utilized as biomolecule carriers in biosensing devices.

  8. Synthesis and detection of 3'-OH terminal biotin-labeled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brakel, C.L.; Engelhardt, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nick translation has been used to prepare biotin-dUTP-containing DNA probes. These stable DNA probes have been identified, following hybridization to target DNA, by fluorescence using antibiotin antibodies or by enzyme reactions in which the enzyme has been linked to avidin or streptavidin. It is probable that this technology will be applicable to certain diagnostic determinations and that, with sufficient sensitivity, this technology might provide a system for obtaining rapid and specific diagnoses in situations presently requiring time-consuming growth assays. The sensitivity of this assay can be increased in two ways: (1) by increasing the amount of biotin contained in the DNA probes, and (2) by increasing the response to individual biotin molecules in the DNA probes. This report demonstrates that terminal deoxynucleotide transferase can be employed to increase the biotin content of DNA probes. We also introduce a new streptavidin-linked enzyme system that produces a greater response to biotinylated DNA probes than does streptavidin-linked horseradish peroxidase

  9. Rapid and label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Marisa; Viezzi, Sara; Mazerat, Sandra; Marks, Robert S; Vidic, Jasmina

    2018-02-15

    Diagnostic systems that can deliver highly specific and sensitive detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in food and water are of particular interest in many fields including food safety, biosecurity and control of outbreaks. Our aim was the development of an electrochemical method based on DNA hybridization to detect HAV. A ssDNA probe specific for HAV (capture probe) was designed and tested on DNAs from various viral and bacterial samples using Nested-Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (nRT-PCR). To develop the electrochemical device, a disposable gold electrode was functionalized with the specific capture probe and tested on complementary ssDNA and on HAV cDNA. The DNA hybridization on the electrode was measured through the monitoring of the oxidative peak potential of the indicator tripropylamine by cyclic voltammetry. To prevent non-specific binding the gold surface was treated with 3% BSA before detection. High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed the efficiency of electrode functionalization and on-electrode hybridization. The proposed device showed a limit of detection of 0.65pM for the complementary ssDNA and 6.94fg/µL for viral cDNA. For a comparison, nRT-PCR quantified the target HAV cDNA with a limit of detection of 6.4fg/µL. The DNA-sensor developed can be adapted to a portable format to be adopted as an easy-to- use and low cost method for screening HAV in contaminated food and water. In addition, it can be useful for rapid control of HAV infections as it takes only a few minutes to provide the results. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection

    KAUST Repository

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim

    2017-07-19

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1 pM – 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition.

  11. Structures of an Apo and a Binary Complex of an Evolved Archeal B Family DNA Polymerase Capable of Synthesising Highly Cy-Dye Labelled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Samantha A.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Holliger, Philipp; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10) of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP) in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent “CyDNA” densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide) reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers. PMID:23940661

  12. Voltammetric behavior of osmium-labeled DNA at mercury meniscus-modified solid amalgam electrodes. Detecting DNA hybridization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Heyrovský, Michael; Paleček, Emil

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2006), s. 186-194 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42; GA AV ČR IAA4004402; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR IBS5004355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : voltammetry * solid amalgam electrodes * DNA-osmium complex * hybridization * catalytic hydrogen evolution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.444, year: 2006

  13. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection

    KAUST Repository

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Wu, Dongqin; Ye, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Tra, Vu Thanh; Wei, Qiuping; Fu, Li; Yu, Aimin; Li, Lain-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Te

    2017-01-01

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a

  14. Identifying the Genotypes of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) with DNA Origami Label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Pan, Dun; Wen, Yanqin; Zhang, Honglu; Chao, Jie; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Shi, Yongyong

    2018-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotyping may profoundly affect the accurate diagnosis and antiviral treatment of viral hepatitis. Existing genotyping methods such as serological, immunological, or molecular testing are still suffered from substandard specificity and low sensitivity in laboratory or clinical application. In a previous study, a set of high-efficiency hybridizable DNA origami-based shape ID probes to target the templates through which genetic variation could be determined in an ultrahigh resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanomechanical imaging are established. Here, as a further confirmatory research to explore the sensitivity and applicability of this assay, differentially predesigned DNA origami shape ID probes are also developed for precisely HBV genotyping. Through the specific identification of visualized DNA origami nanostructure with clinical HBV DNA samples, the genetic variation information of genotypes can be directly identified under AFM. As a proof-of-concept, five genotype B and six genotype C are detected in 11 HBV-infected patients' blood DNA samples of Han Chinese population in the single-blinded test. The AFM image-based DNA origami shape ID genotyping approach shows high specificity and sensitivity, which could be promising for virus infection diagnosis and precision medicine in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Magnetic immunoassay using CdSe/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescent probes to detect the level of DNA methyltransferase 1 in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu F

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fei Yu,1,* Ya-min Xiong,1,* Song-cheng Yu,1 Lei-liang He,1 Shan-shan Niu,1 Yu-ming Wu,1 Jie Liu,1 Ling-bo Qu,2 Li-e Liu,1 Yong-jun Wu1 1College of Public Health, 2College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1, a dominant enzyme responsible for the transfer of a methyl group from the universal methyl donor to the 5-position of cytosine residues in DNA, is essential for mammalian development and closely related to cancer and a variety of age-related chronic diseases. DNMT1 has become a useful biomarker in early disease diagnosis and a potential therapeutic target in cancer therapy and drug development. However, till now, most of the studies on DNA methyltransferase (MTase detection have focused on the prokaryote MTase and its activity.Methods: A magnetic fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay (FLISA using CdSe/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescent probes was proposed for the rapid and sensitive detection of the DNMT1 level in this study. Key factors that affect the precision and accuracy of the determination of DNMT1 were optimized.Results: Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mL, the linear range was 0.1–1,500 ng/mL, the recovery was 91.67%–106.50%, and the relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-assays were respectively 5.45%–11.29% and 7.03%–11.25%. The cross-reactivity rates with DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b were only 4.0% and 9.4%, respectively. Furthermore, FLISA was successfully used to detect the levels of DNMT1 in human serum samples, and compared with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits. The results revealed that there was a good correlation between FLISA and commercial ELISA kits (correlation coefficient r=0.866, p=0.001. The linear scope of FLISA was broader than ELISA, and the measurement time was much shorter

  16. Imaging of transfection and intracellular release of intact, non-labeled DNA using fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petráková, Vladimíra; Benson, Veronika; Bunček, M.; Fišerová, Anna; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Cígler, Petr; Nesládek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 23 (2016), s. 12002-12012 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33094A; GA MŠk LM2015056 Grant - others:OP VK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0306 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61389005 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : single-particle tracking * resonance energy-transfer * sirna delivery * gene delivery * correlation spectroscopy * endosomal escape * mass-production * drug-delivery * quantum dots * living cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X); EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M); BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  17. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    sample using >1000 different peptide-MHC multimers labeled with individual DNA barcodes.After isolation of MHC multimer binding T cells their recognition are revealed by amplification andsequencing of the MHC multimer-associated DNA barcodes. The relative frequency of the sequencedDNA barcodes...... originating from a given peptide-MHC motif relates to the size of the antigenresponsiveT cell population. We have demonstrated the use of large panels of >1000 DNA barcodedMHC multimers for detection of rareT cell populations of virus and cancer-restricted origin in various tissues and compared...

  18. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-06-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin-spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes' positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids.

  19. Graphene electrode modified with electrochemically reduced graphene oxide for label-free DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Pan, Genhua; Avent, Neil D; Lowry, Roy B; Madgett, Tracey E; Waines, Paul L

    2015-10-15

    A novel printed graphene electrode modified with electrochemically reduced graphene oxide was developed for the detection of a specific oligonucleotide sequence. The graphene oxide was immobilized onto the surface of a graphene electrode via π-π bonds and electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide was achieved by cyclic voltammetry. A much higher redox current was observed from the reduced graphene oxide-graphene double-layer electrode, a 42% and 36.7% increase, respectively, in comparison with that of a bare printed graphene or reduced graphene oxide electrode. The good electron transfer activity is attributed to a combination of the large number of electroactive sites in reduced graphene oxide and the high conductivity nature of graphene. The probe ssDNA was further immobilized onto the surface of the reduced graphene oxide-graphene double-layer electrode via π-π bonds and then hybridized with its target cDNA. The change of peak current due to the hybridized dsDNA could be used for quantitative sensing of DNA concentration. It has been demonstrated that a linear range from 10(-7)M to 10(-12)M is achievable for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 gene with a detection limit of 1.58 × 10(-13)M as determined by three times standard deviation of zero DNA concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Part-per-trillion level detection of estradiol by competitive fluorescence immunoassay using DNA/dye conjugate as antibody multiple labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shengchao; Zhang, Qin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2008-08-22

    Fluorescent organic dyes are currently the standard signal-generating labels used in microarray quantification. However, new labeling strategies are needed to meet the demand for high sensitivity in the detection of low-abundance proteins and small molecules. In this report, a long-chain DNA/dye conjugate was used to attach multiple fluorescence labels on antibodies to improve signal intensity and immunoassay sensitivity. Compared with the 30 base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide used in our previous work [Q. Zhang, L.-H. Guo, Bioconjugate Chem. 18 (2007) 1668-1672], conjugation of a 219 bp DNA in solution with a fluorescent DNA binder SYBR Green I resulted in more than sixfold increase in signal intensity, consistent with the increase in bp number. In a direct immunoassay for the detection of goat anti-mouse IgG in a mouse IgG-coated 96-well plate, the long DNA conjugate label also produced higher fluorescence than the short one, accompanied by about 15-fold improvement in the detection limit. To demonstrate its advantage in real applications, the DNA/dye conjugate was employed in the competitive immunoassay of 17beta-estradiol, a clinically and environmentally important analyte. The biotin-terminated DNA was attached to biotinylated anti-estradiol antibody through the biotin/streptavidin/biotin bridge after the immuno-reaction was completed, followed by conjugation with SYBR Green I. The limit of detection for 17beta-estradiol is 1.9 pg mL(-1), which is 200-fold lower than the assay using fluorescein-labeled antibodies. The new multiple labeling strategy uses readily available reagents, and is also compatible with current biochip platform. It has great potential in the sensitive detection of protein and antibody microarrays.

  1. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Wu, Dongqin; Ye, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Tra, Vu Thanh; Wei, Qiuping; Fu, Li; Yu, Aimin; Li, Lain-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Te

    2018-01-15

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1pM to 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Labelling of Cells Engaged in DNA Synthesis: Autoradiography and BrdU Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder Søndergaard

    2010-01-01

    The cell cycle is divided in four phases: G1 phase, S phase (DNA-synthesis), G2 phase (together termed interphase) and M phase (mitosis). Cells that have ceased proliferation enter a state of quiescence called G0. M phase is itself composed of two tightly coupled processes: mitosis, in which...

  3. A Microneedle Functionalized with Polyethyleneimine and Nanotubes for Highly Sensitive, Label-Free Quantification of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat-Moghaddam, Darius; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2017-08-16

    The accurate measure of DNA concentration is necessary for many DNA-based biological applications. However, the current methods are limited in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, human error, and contamination. Here, we present a microneedle functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for the highly sensitive quantification of DNA. The microneedle was fabricated using ultraviolet (UV) lithography and anisotropic etching, and then functionalized with PEI and SWCNTs through a dip coating process. The electrical characteristics of the microneedle change with the accumulation of DNA on the surface. Current-voltage measurements in deionized water were conducted to study these changes in the electrical properties of the sensor. The sensitivity test found the signal to be discernable from the noise level down to 100 attomolar (aM), demonstrating higher sensitivity than currently available UV fluorescence and UV absorbance based methods. A microneedle without any surface modification only had a 100 femtomolar (fM) sensitivity. All measurement results were consistent with fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Synthesis of Hydrazone-Modified Nucleotides and Their Polymerase Incorporation onto DNA for Redox Labeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raindlová, Veronika; Pohl, Radek; Klepetářová, Blanka; Havran, Luděk; Šimková, Eva; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Pivoňková, Hana; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 8 (2012), s. 652-662 ISSN 2192-6506 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA * oligonucleotides * polymerase * hydrazones * nucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  5. Tamoxifen Forms DNA Adducts In Human Colon After Administration Of A Single [14C]-Labeled Therapeutic Dose.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K; Tompkins, E M; Boocock, D J; Martin, E A; Farmer, P B; Turteltaub, K W; Ubick, E; Hemingway, D; Horner-Glister, E; White, I H

    2007-05-23

    Tamoxifen is widely prescribed for the treatment of breast cancer and is also licensed in the U.S. for the prevention of this disease. However, tamoxifen therapy is associated with an increased occurrence of endometrial cancer in women and there is also evidence that it may elevate the risk of colorectal cancer. The underlying mechanisms responsible for tamoxifen-induced carcinogenesis in women have not yet been elucidated but much interest has focussed on the role of DNA adduct formation. We investigated the propensity of tamoxifen to bind irreversibly to colorectal DNA when given to ten women as a single [{sup 14}C]-labeled therapeutic (20 mg) dose, {approx}18 h prior to undergoing colon resections. Using the sensitive technique of accelerator mass spectrometry, coupled with HPLC separation of enzymatically digested DNA, a peak corresponding to authentic dG-N{sup 2}-tamoxifen adduct was detected in samples from three patients, at levels ranging from 1-7 adducts/10{sup 9} nucleotides. No [{sup 14}C]-radiolabel associated with tamoxifen or its major metabolites was detected. The presence of detectable CYP3A4 protein in all colon samples suggests this tissue has the potential to activate tamoxifen to {alpha}-hydroxytamoxifen, in addition to that occurring in the systemic circulation, and direct interaction of this metabolite with DNA could account for the binding observed. Although the level of tamoxifeninduced damage displayed a degree of inter-individual variability, when present it was {approx}10-100 times higher than that reported for other suspect human colon carcinogens such as PhIP. These findings provide a mechanistic basis through which tamoxifen could increase the incidence of colon cancers in women.

  6. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INNE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Lot 104-108, Tingkat 1, Block A, Taman Pertiwi Indah, Jalan Kangar-Alor Star, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M [Halal Products Research Institute, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bari, M F [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Seriab 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Islam, Kh N [Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hasan, M F, E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 {+-} 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 {sup 0}C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 {mu}g ml{sup -1} swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  7. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-01-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 0 C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 μg ml -1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  8. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Three miRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed simultaneously with high specificity, and the sensitivity of the method was comparable to radioactive detection (low femtomol range). The perspective of the developed method is highly multiplexed......In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn increasing attention due to their role in regulation of gene expression. Especially, their potential as biomarkers in disease diagnostics has motivated miRNA research, including the development of simple, accurate, and sensitive detection methods....... The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  9. Biological in vivo dosimetry with external measurement using a labelled DNA precursor (125iododeoxyuridine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porschen, W.; Zamboglou, N.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    The depression of the incorporation rate of ioddeoxyuridine in the whole body and in the bone marrow is a sensitive indicator for a whole-body-irradiation. It was found that the maximum effect occurs appr. 4 hours after the irradiation. This is why bone marrow cells were labelled with IDU in the test tube 4 hrs. after irradiation. This method showed an extraordinary sensitivity and resulted in reproducible effects occurring already with doses less than 5 rad. All dosemeter methods used until now have a lower sensitivity. (orig.) [de

  10. Low-cost label-free electrical detection of artificial DNA nanostructures using solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoon, Doo Hyun; Jung, Tae Soo; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2013-11-13

    A high-sensitivity, label-free method for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) was developed. Double-crossover (DX) DNA nanostructures with different concentrations of divalent Cu ion (Cu(2+)) were immobilized on an In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) back-channel surface, which changed the electrical performance of the IGZO TFTs. The detection mechanism of the IGZO TFT-based DNA biosensor is attributed to electron trapping and electrostatic interactions caused by negatively charged phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Furthermore, Cu(2+) in DX DNA nanostructures generates a current path when a gate bias is applied. The direct effect on the electrical response implies that solution-processed IGZO TFTs could be used to realize low-cost and high-sensitivity DNA biosensors.

  11. Radiation-induced DNA breaks detected by immuno labelling of poly(ADP-ribose) in CHO cells. Standardization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlet, P.; Bidon, N.; Noel, G.; Averbeck, D.; Salamero, J.; DeMurcia, G.

    1998-01-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase is an ubiquitous nuclear protein capable of binding specifically to DNA strand breaks. It synthesizes ADP-ribose polymers proportionally to DNA breaks. The actual method of reference to determine DNA double strand breaks is pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but this requires many cells. It thus appeared of interest to use poly (ADP-ribos)ylation to follow and estimate γ-ray-induced DNA fragmentation at the level of isolated cells after γ-irradiation in chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). The results obtained by the immuno-labelling technique of ADP-ribose polymers were compared to those obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. They show that poly (ADP-ribos)ylation reflects the occurrence of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. A clear relationship exists between the amount of ADP-ribose polymers detected and DNA double strand breaks after γ-irradiation. (authors)

  12. Label-Free Detection of Sequence-Specific DNA Based on Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters-Assisted Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Liang; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-06-17

    We have developed a label-free method for sequence-specific DNA detection based on surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer (SPEET) process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). DNA/AgNC string, prepared by a single-stranded DNA template encoded two emitter-nucleation sequences at its termini and an oligo spacer in the middle, was rationally designed to produce bright fluorescence emission. The proposed method takes advantage of two strategies. The first one is the difference in binding properties of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) toward AuNPs. The second one is SPEET process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and AuNPs, in which fluorescent DNA/AgNC string can be spontaneously adsorbed onto the surface of AuNPs and correspondingly AuNPs serve as "nanoquencher" to quench the fluorescence of DNA/AgNC string. In the presence of target DNA, the sensing probe hybridized with target DNA to form duplex DNA, leading to a salt-induced AuNP aggregation and subsequently weakened SPEET process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and AuNPs. A red-to-blue color change of AuNPs and a concomitant fluorescence increase were clearly observed in the sensing system, which had a concentration dependent manner with specific DNA. The proposed method achieved a detection limit of ∼2.5 nM, offering the following merits of simple design, convenient operation, and low experimental cost because of no chemical modification, organic dye, enzymatic reaction, or separation procedure involved.

  13. The use of DNase I, buffer gradient gel, and 35S label for DNA sequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of microcentrifuge tubes and mixing of sequencing reactions and brief centrifugation in racks rather than the original capillary tube method has made sequencing reactions relatively simple. Buffer gradient gels and 15 S label are simple means of increasing the rate of sequence analysis; they add little time to that required for determining the sequences of a given number of clones, need no elaborate equipment, and increase the amount of useful data per gel. The standard approach of running 2- and 4-hr gels generates about 300 bases of sequence. The above improvements allow the same number of bases to be read with more confidence from a single 50-cm gel for each clone sequenced due to the changed spacing between sharpened bands

  14. Hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) are associated with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, James F.; Davies, Simon J.; Dodd, Nicholas J.F. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter) have been reported to cause oxidative stress related effects, including inflammation, cytotoxicity and genomic instability, either alone or in the presence of UVA irradiation in mammalian studies. Despite the fact that the aquatic environment is often the ultimate recipient of all contaminants there is a paucity of data pertaining to the potential detrimental effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. Therefore, these investigations aimed to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on goldfish skin cells (GFSk-S1), either alone or in combination with UVA. Whilst neutral red retention (NRR) assay (a measure of lysosomal membrane integrity) was used to evaluate cell viability, a modified Comet assay using bacterial lesion-specific repair endonucleases (Endo-III, Fpg) was employed to specifically target oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies with different spin traps were carried out for qualitative analysis of free radical generation. For cell viability, TiO{sub 2} alone (0.1-1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) had little effect whereas co-exposure with UVA (0.5-2.0 kJ m{sup -2}) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease which was dependent on both the concentration of TiO{sub 2} and the dose of UVA administered. For the Comet assay, doses of 1, 10 and 100 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the absence of UVA caused elevated levels of Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating the oxidation of purine DNA bases (i.e. guanine) by TiO{sub 2}. UVA irradiation of TiO{sub 2}-treated cells caused further increases in DNA damage. ESR studies revealed that the observed toxic effects of nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} were most likely due to hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) formation.

  15. Fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (FL-MS-AFLP) analysis for quantitative determination of DNA methylation and demethylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Shinji; Shinmura, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Goto, Masanori; Suzuki, Koichi; Tanioka, Fumihiko; Tsuneyoshi, Toshihiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2008-04-01

    The PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method called the methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP) analysis is used for genome-wide scanning of methylation status. In this study, we developed a method of fluorescence-labeled MS-AFLP (FL-MS-AFLP) analysis by applying a fluorescence-labeled primer and fluorescence-detecting electrophoresis apparatus to the existing method of MS-AFLP analysis. The FL-MS-AFLP analysis enables quantitative evaluation of more than 350 random CpG loci per run. It was shown to allow evaluation of the differences in methylation level of blood DNA of gastric cancer patients and evaluation of hypermethylation and hypomethylation in DNA from gastric cancer tissue in comparison with adjacent non-cancerous tissue.

  16. A method for the determination of bacterial spore DNA content based on isotopic labelling, spore germination and diphenylamine assay; ploidy of spores of several Bacillus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, P.M.; Karamata, D.

    1992-01-01

    A reliable method for measuring the spore DNA content, based on radioactive DNA labelling, spore germination in absence of DNA replication and diphenylamine assay, was developed. The accuracy of the method, within 10 - 15%, is adequate for determining the number of chromosomes per spore, provided that the genome size is known. B subtilis spores were shown to be invariably monogenomic, while those of larger bacilli Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, often, if not invariably, contain two genomes. Attempts to modify the spore DNA content of B subtilis by altering the richness of the sporulation medium, the sporulation conditions (liquid or solid medium), or by mutation, were apparently unsuccessful. An increase of spore size with medium richness, not accompanied by an increase in DNA content, was observed. The implication of the apparently species-specific spore ploidy and the influence of the sporulation conditions on spore size and shape are discussed

  17. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  18. Quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouwenhoven, L.; Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum dots are man-made ''droplets'' of charge that can contain anything from a single electron to a collection of several thousand. Their typical dimensions range from nanometres to a few microns, and their size, shape and interactions can be precisely controlled through the use of advanced nanofabrication technology. The physics of quantum dots shows many parallels with the behaviour of naturally occurring quantum systems in atomic and nuclear physics. Indeed, quantum dots exemplify an important trend in condensed-matter physics in which researchers study man-made objects rather than real atoms or nuclei. As in an atom, the energy levels in a quantum dot become quantized due to the confinement of electrons. With quantum dots, however, an experimentalist can scan through the entire periodic table by simply changing a voltage. In this article the authors describe how quantum dots make it possible to explore new physics in regimes that cannot otherwise be accessed in the laboratory. (UK)

  19. Detection of norovirus virus-like particles using a surface plasmon resonance-assisted fluoroimmunosensor optimized for quantum dot fluorescent labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiba, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Yuki; Wang, Xiaomin; Shirato, Haruko; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Taniguchi, Koki; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2017-07-15

    A highly sensitive biosensor to detect norovirus in environment is desired to prevent the spread of infection. In this study, we investigated a design of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-assisted fluoroimmunosensor to increase its sensitivity and performed detection of norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs). A quantum dot fluorescent dye was employed because of its large Stokes shift. The sensor design was optimized for the CdSe-ZnS-based quantum dots. The optimal design was applied to a simple SPR-assisted fluoroimmunosensor that uses a sensor chip equipped with a V-shaped trench. Excitation efficiency of the quantum dots, degree of electric field enhancement by SPR, and intensity of autofluorescence of a substrate of the sensor chip were theoretically and experimentally evaluated to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. As the result, an excitation wavelength of 390nm was selected to excite SPR on an Al film of the sensor chip. The sandwich assay of norovirus VLPs was performed using the designed sensor. Minimum detectable concentration of 0.01ng/mL, which corresponds to 100 virus-like particles included in the detection region of the V-trench, was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The field effect transistor DNA biosensor based on ITO nanowires in label-free hepatitis B virus detecting compatible with CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Mohsen

    2018-05-15

    In this paper the field-effect transistor DNA biosensor for detecting hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) in label free approach has been fabricated. Because of ITO nanowires intensive conductance and functional modified surface, the probe immobilization and target hybridization were increased strongly. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurement showed that ITO nanowires were crystalline and less than 50nm in diameter. The single-stranded hepatitis B virus DNA (SS-DNA) was immobilized as probe on the Au-modified nanowires. The DNA targets were measured in a linear concentration range from 1fM to 10µM. The detection limit of the DNA biosensor was about 1fM. The time of the hybridization process for defined single strand was 90min. The switching ratio of the biosensor between "on" and "off" state was ~ 1.1 × 10 5 . For sensing the specificity of the biosensor, non-complementary, mismatch and complementary DNA oligonucleotide sequences were clearly discriminated. The HBV biosensor confirmed the highly satisfied specificity for differentiating complementary sequences from non-complementary and the mismatch oligonucleotides. The response time of the DNA sensor was 37s with a high reproducibility. The stability and repeatability of the DNA biosensor showed that the peak current of the biosensor retained 98% and 96% of its initial response for measurements after three and five weeks, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A graphene oxide-based sensing platform for the label-free assay of DNA sequence and exonuclease activity via long range resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yixuan; Tian, Jianniao; Chen, Sheng; Zhao, Yanchun; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Shulin

    2013-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was introduced as an efficient quencher for label-free and sensitive detection of DNA. Probe DNA (pDNA) was mixed with ethidium bromide (EB) and graphene oxide (GO). The interaction between EB and GO led to the fluorescent quenching. Upon the recognition of the target, EB was intercalated into duplex DNA and kept away from GO, which significantly hindered the long range resonance energy transfer (LrRET) from EB to GO and, thus, increased the fluorescence of EB. The changes in fluorescent intensity produced a novel method for sensitivity, and specificity detection of the target. Based on the structure-switching of aptamers, this strategy could be conveniently extended for detection of other biomolecules, which had been demonstrated by the detection of exonuclease activity.

  2. Initiation of simian virus 40 DNA replication in vitro: Pulse-chase experiments identify the first labeled species as topologically unwound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, P.A.; Seo, Yeon Soo; Hurwitz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A distinct unwound form of DNA containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin is produced in replication reactions carried out in mixtures containing crude fractions prepared from HeLa cells. This species, termed form U R , comigrates on chloroquine-containing agarose gels with the upper part of the previously described heterogeneous highly unwound circular DNA, form U. As with form U, formation of form U R is dependent upon the SV40 tumor (T) antigen. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that the first species to incorporate labeled deoxyribonucleotides comigrates with form U R . Restriction analyses of the products of the pulse-chase experiments show that initiation occurs at the SV40 origin and then proceeds outward in a bidirectional manner. These experiments establish form U R as the earliest detectable substrate for SV40 DNA replication and suggest that SV40 DNA replication initiates on an unwound species

  3. Engineering of DNA templated tri-functional nano-chain of Fecore–Aushell and a preliminary study for cancer cell labeling and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Mandal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Here DNA has been used as templating and self-assembling reagent to grow the chain like nanostructure. We have designed the composite in such a fashion that we obtained optical and magnetic properties together in a single biological material. Optical properties characterized by UV–visible absorption, Circular Dichroism (CD and their analysis show no denaturization of DNA. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM indicate formation of chain like structure of the nanoparticles. Particles were functionalized with folic acid for labeling and treatment of cancer cell.

  4. Radiometric study of the incorporation of labelled precursors of DNA, RNA and proteins in cell cultures inoculated with Herpes simplex virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundarov, S.; Todorov, S.; Kavaklova, L.; Tsilka, E.; Rangelova, S.; Dundarova, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of a comparative investigation of tritium-labelled thymidine, uridine and leucine incorporation in cells inoculated with HSV-1 and HSV-2. There were no essential differences in the dynamics of the biosynthesis processes in either type of herpes viruses. Viral infection led to a marked activation of DNA synthesis and progressive inhibition of overall RNA synthesis. The rate of labelled amino-acid incorporation remained almost unchanged. There was a gradual increase in 3 H-thymidine incorporation, reaching a minimum by the 12th-16th hour and a rapid decrese thereafter. After the 12th hour part of the thymidine already incorporated in DNA (the thymidine pool) starts leaving the cells as a result of increased cell membrane permeability. The rate of changes in the biosynthesis processes in HSV-inoculated cells depends on infection multiplicity. Even in high inoculation multiplicity the blockade of cell biosynthesis is incomplete which furnishes a better opportunity for HSV reproduction. (author)

  5. 3H-thymidine labelling of DNA of radiosensitive organs of rats irradiated under alpine conditions and after adaptation to hypoxia in the altitude chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusejnov, F.T.; Egorov, I.A.; Gladilin, K.L.; Farber, Yu.V.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary adaptation of rats of high altitude conditions (3200 m) and training in the altitude chamber at the same imitated altitude inhibit 3 H-thymidine labelling of thymus DNA both shortly (26 h) and later (20 and 30 days) after irradiation. Whether the thymidine incorporation is activated or delayed depends on conditions of pretreatment. The data obtained are discussed from the point of view of the raioprotective effect of preadaptation of animals to high-altitude hypoxia

  6. Voltammetric Study of dsDNA Modified by Multi-redox Label Based on N-methyl-4-hydrazino-7-nitrobenzofurazan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Raindlová, Veronika; Havran, Luděk; Barek, J.; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 129, May 20 (2014), s. 348-357 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA * redox labeling * N-methyl-4-hydrazino-7-nitrobenzofurazan * silver solid amalgam electrode * voltammetry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R) Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  7. Electrochemical behaviour of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazi(o)ne as multi-redox centre DNA label at mercury meniscus modified silver solid amalgam electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Raindlová, Veronika; Havran, Luděk; Pivoňková, Hana; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, SI (2014), s. 122-131 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0019; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA * Redox labeling * 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  8. Synthesis of Au NP@MoS2 Quantum Dots Core@Shell Nanocomposites for SERS Bio-Analysis and Label-Free Bio-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Fei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report a facile method using MoS2 quantum dots (QDs as reducers to directly react with HAuCl4 for the synthesis of Au nanoparticle@MoS2 quantum dots (Au NP@MoS2 QDs core@shell nanocomposites with an ultrathin shell of ca. 1 nm. The prepared Au NP@MoS2 QDs reveal high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS performance regarding sensitivity as well as the satisfactory SERS reproducibility and stability. The limit of detection of the hybrids for crystal violet can reach 0.5 nM with a reasonable linear response range from 0.5 μM to 0.5 nM (R2 ≈ 0.974. Furthermore, the near-infrared SERS detection based on Au NP@MoS2 QDs in living cells is achieved with distinct Raman signals which are clearly assigned to the various cellular components. Meanwhile, the distinguishable SERS images are acquired from the 4T1 cells with the incubation of Au NP@MoS2 QDs. Consequently, the straightforward strategy of using Au NP@MoS2 QDs exhibits great potential as a superior SERS substrate for chemical and biological detection as well as bio-imaging.

  9. Influence of different chelators (HYNIC, MAG3 and DTPA) on tumor cell accumulation and mouse biodistribution of technetium-99m labeled to antisense DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.M.; Liu, N.; Zhu, Z.-H.; Rusckowski, M.; Hnatowich, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have shown recently that cell accumulation in culture of antisense DNA is strongly influenced by the presence of a 99m Tc-MAG 3 group for radiolabeling. We have now compared the in vitro and mouse in vivo behavior of 99m Tc when radiolabeled to one antisense phosphorothioate DNA by three different methods. The 18-mer antisense DNA against the RIα subunit of PKA was conjugated via a primary amine on the 5'-end with the NHS esters of HYNIC and MAG 3 and by the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that the association rate constant for hybridization was unchanged for all three chelators as compared with that of the native DNA. Size exclusion HPLC showed rapid and quantitative protein binding for all three chelators upon incubation of labeled DNAs in 37 C serum and cell culture medium. However, in each case, radiolabeled and intact oligonucleotide was still detectable after 24 h. Cellular uptake was tested in an RIα mRNA-positive cancer cell line. The order of cellular accumulation of 99m Tc was DTPA>HYNIC(tricine)>MAG 3 , with the differences increasing with time between 4 and 24 h. The rate of 99m Tc egress from cells was found to be MAG 3 >HYNIC>DTPA, which may explain the order of cellular accumulation. The biodistribution in normal mice was heavily influenced by the labeling method and followed a pattern similar to that seen previously by us for peptides labeled with the same chelators. In conclusion, although these studies concerned only one antisense DNA in one cell line, the results suggest that the success of antisense imaging may depend, in part, on the method of radiolabeling. (orig.)

  10. Polypyrrole-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Ag (PPy-PEDOT-Ag) nanocomposite films for label-free electrochemical DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, S; Sumathi, C; Umar, Ahmad; Jae Kim, Sang; Wilson, J; Dharuman, V

    2013-09-15

    The electrochemical DNA hybridization sensing of bipolymer polypyrrole and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PPy-PEDOT) nanotubes functionalized with Ag nanoparticles has been investigated. The bipolymer nanotubes are prepared by simple chemical route and silver nanoparticles (Ag) further deposited over the PPy-PEDOT nanotubes to form PPy-PEDOT-Ag nanocomposite films. DNA labeled at 5'end using 6-mercapto-1-hexhane (HS-ssDNA) is immobilized on the PPy-PEDOT-Ag surface to form PPy-PEDOT-Ag-S-ssDNA and hybridization sensing is done in phosphate buffer. The presence of Ag nanoparticles (~28±5nm) well dispersed in the polymer composite with high surface area, high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity provides desirable microenvironment for the immobilization of probe DNA with controlled orientation leading to increased hybridization efficiency with target DNA. The morphological and structural characterizations by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirm the nanotube structure of composite polymer while Raman measurements indicate the efficient interactions between the PPy, PEDOT, Ag and HS-ssDNA. The sensor effectively discriminates different target DNA sequences with PPy-PEDOT-Ag-S-ssDNA substrate. The observed dynamic detection range is found between 1×10(-11)M and 1×10(-14)M with the lowest detection limit (3 σ/b) of 5.4×10(-15)M. This observed value is of higher sensitivity than that for MWCNT-Ag, PANi-Au, MWCNT-PPy-Au and PPy-PANi-Au composites reported previously. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Signal-on electrochemical assay for label-free detection of TdT and BamHI activity based on grown DNA nanowire-templated copper nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufang; Zhang, Qingqing; Xu, Lihua; Wang, Jiao; Rao, Jiajia; Guo, Zhiyong; Wang, Sui

    2017-11-01

    Electrochemical methods allow fast and inexpensive analysis of enzymatic activity. Here, a simple and yet efficient "signal-on" electrochemical assay for sensitive, label-free detection of DNA-related enzyme activity was established on the basis of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated extension strategy. TdT, which is a template-independent DNA polymerase, can catalyze the sequential addition of deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) at the 3'-OH terminus of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA); then, the TdT-yield T-rich DNA nanowires can be employed as the synthetic template of copper nanoclusters (CuNCs). Grown DNA nanowires-templated CuNCs (noted as DNA-CuNCs) were attached onto graphene oxide (GO) surface and exhibited unique electrocatalytic activity to H 2 O 2 reduction. Under optimal conditions, the proposed biosensor was utilized for quantitatively monitoring TdT activity, with the observed LOD of 0.1 U/mL. It also displayed high selectivity to TdT with excellent stability, and offered a facile, convenient electrochemical method for TdT-relevant inhibitors screening. Moreover, the proposed sensor was successfully used for BamHI activity detection, in which a new 3'-OH terminal was exposed by the digestion of a phosphate group. Ultimately, it has good prospects in DNA-related enzyme-based biochemical studies, disease diagnosis, and drug discovery. Graphical Abstract Extraordinary TdT-generated DNA-CuNCs are synthesized and act as a novel electrochemical sensing platform for sensitive detection of TdT and BamHI activity in biological environments.

  12. Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles based nonenzymatic ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunosensor using quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet as labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiyan; Zhang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Shenguang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Song, Xianrang [Cancer Research Center, Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan 250012 (China); Huang, Jiadong [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yan, Mei, E-mail: chm_yanm@ujn.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2013-04-03

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles and P-GS@QDs were prepared to immobilize Ab{sub 1} and Ab{sub 2} respectively and combined to fabricate a novel sandwich-type ECL immunosensor for detecting CA125 at low concentration. Highlights: ► ECL immunosensor for CA125 based on a microfluidic strategy with a homemade ECL cell was proposed. ► Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles were employed as the carriers of the primary antibodies. ► CdTe quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet were used for signal amplification. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel, low-cost electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor using core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) as the carriers of the primary antibody of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) was designed. Graphene sheet (GS) with property of good conductivity and large surface area was a captivating candidate to amplify ECL signal. We successively synthesized functionalized GS by loading large amounts of quantum dots (QDs) onto the poly (diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PDDA) coated graphene sheet (P-GS@QDs) via self-assembly electrostatic reactions, which were used to label secondary antibodies. The ECL immunosensors coupled with a microfluidic strategy exhibited a wide detection range (0.005–50 U mL{sup −1}) and a low detection limit (1.2 mU mL{sup −1}) with the help of an external magnetic field to gather immunosensors. The method was evaluated with clinical serum sample, receiving good correlation with results from commercially available analytical procedure.

  13. DNA methylation levels analysis in four tissues of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus based on fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) during aestivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye; Chen, Muyan; Storey, Kenneth B; Sun, Lina; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-03-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in regulating transcriptional change in response to environmental stimuli. In the present study, DNA methylation levels of tissues of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus were analyzed by the fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) technique over three stages of the aestivation cycle. Overall, a total of 26,963 fragments were amplified including 9112 methylated fragments among four sea cucumber tissues using 18 pairs of selective primers. Results indicated an average DNA methylation level of 33.79% for A. japonicus. The incidence of DNA methylation was different across tissue types in the non-aestivation stage: intestine (30.16%), respiratory tree (27.61%), muscle (27.94%) and body wall (56.25%). Our results show that hypermethylation accompanied deep-aestivation in A. japonicus, which suggests that DNA methylation may have an important role in regulating global transcriptional suppression during aestivation. Further analysis indicated that the main DNA modification sites were focused on intestine and respiratory tree tissues and that full-methylation but not hemi-methylation levels exhibited significant increases in the deep-aestivation stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear DNA synthesis rate and labelling index: effects of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals on its behaviour in the organism of growing CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amlacher, E.; Rudolph, C.

    1978-01-01

    Well known bioassays have been compared with the author's thymidine incorporation-screening system and other assays based on biochemical quantification of DNA synthesis as a possibility of identification of carcinogens. The partial inhibition of the whole DNA synthesis in a proliferating cell population after treatment with toxic and carcinogenic chemicals is an early common response especially in hepatectomized animal, livers caused by the effects of those substances. However, by quantitative evaluation of the nuclear DNA synthesis rate as a basic parameter, using autoradiographs of kidney and liver of juvenile growing CBA mice, it is possible to differentiate carcinogenic from non-carcinogenic chemicals by means of silver grain counting after 3 H-TdR incorporation. On the contrary, the whole DNA synthesis, expressed by the 3 H-labelling index (in per cent) of kidney and liver, did not permit such a differentiation in the experimental arrangement used. It could be demonstrated that carcinogenic compounds of different chemical classes partially inhibit the nuclear DNA synthesis rate significantly over a period of more than 24 hours. The tested non-carcinogenic compounds did not show this suppressive effect on the nuclear DNA synthesis rate. (author)

  15. Label-free, electrochemical detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus DNA with reduced graphene oxide-modified electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhijuan

    2011-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-modified glassy carbon electrode is used to detect the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) DNA by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Our experiments confirm that ssDNA, before and after hybridization with target DNA, are successfully anchored on the rGO surface. After the probe DNA, pre-adsorbed on rGO electrode, hybridizes with target DNA, the measured impedance increases dramatically. It provides a new method to detect DNA with high sensitivity (10-13M, i.e., 100 fM) and selectivity. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis Using Cytokeratin Labeling for Identification of Tumor Cells in Carcinomas of the Breast and the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kimmig

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric assessment of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction in malignant tumors is compromised by the heterogeneity of cell subpopulations derived from the malignant and surrounding connective tissue, e.g., tumor, stromal and inflammatory cells. To evaluate the effect on quality of DNA cell cycle analysis and determination of DNA ploidy, cytokeratin labeling of epithelial cells was used for tumor cell enrichment in breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer prior to DNA analysis. In a prospective study, tumor cell subpopulations of 620 malignant tumors were labeled by a FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, CK18 and CK 5, 6, 8 and CK 17, respectively prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis. Compared to total cell analysis, detection rate of DNA‐aneuploid tumors following cytokeratin labeling was increased from 62% to 76.5% in breast cancer, from 68% to 77% in ovarian cancer, from 60% to 80% in cervical cancer and from 30% to 53% in endometrial cancer. Predominantly in DNA‐diploid tumors, a significantly improved detection of S‐phase fraction of the tumor cells was shown due to the elimination of contaminating nonproliferating “normal cells”. S‐phase fraction following tumor cell enrichment was increased by 10% (mean following cytokeratin staining in ovarian and endometrial cancer, by 30% in breast cancer and even by 70% in cervical cancer compared to total cell analysis. Thus, diagnostic accuracy of DNA‐analysis was enhanced by cytokeratin labeling of tumor cells for all tumor entities investigated.

  17. In vitro and in vivo assay of radio-induced damage in Escherichia Coli, DNA labelled on thymidilic fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonicel, A.

    1977-01-01

    A technique of rapid assay for a particular and very important damage, N-formamido (DNA), is described. Using this technique, the importance of radio-induced DNA damage can be evaluated before the repair enzymatic system takes place [fr

  18. Highly selective manganese-doped zinc sulfide quantum dots based label free phosphorescent sensor for phosphopeptides in presence of zirconium (IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yan; Fan, Zhefeng

    2015-04-15

    We report a room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) sensor for phosphopeptides based on zirconium (IV)-modulated mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs). This sensor incorporates the advantages of the well-known Zr(4+)-phosphopeptide affinity pair and the RTP properties of doped QDs. The RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs capped with MPA can be effectively quenched by Zr(4+). The high affinity of phosphopeptides to Zr(4+) enables the dissociation of the ion from the surface of MPA-capped ZnS QDs, thereby forming a stable complex with phosphopeptides in the solution, and recovering the RTP of the QDs. The Zr(4+)-induced RTP quenching and subsequent phosphopeptide-induced RTP recovery for MPA-capped ZnS QDs provide a solid basis for the present RTP sensor based on QDs for the detection of phosphopeptides. The detection limit for phosphopeptides is 0.9ngmL(-1), the relative standard deviations is 2.5%, and the recovery of urine and serum samples with phosphopeptides addition rangs from 96% to 105% at optimal conditions. The proposed method was successfully applied to biological fluids and obtained satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Toehold strand displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA for enzyme-free and non-label sensitive fluorescent detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunying; Zhou, Wenjiao; Zhou, Ming; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2015-02-15

    Based on a new signal amplification strategy by the toehold strand displacement-driven cyclic assembly of G-quadruplex DNA, the development of an enzyme-free and non-label aptamer sensing approach for sensitive fluorescent detection of thrombin is described. The target thrombin associates with the corresponding aptamer of the partial dsDNA probes and liberates single stranded initiation sequences, which trigger the toehold strand displacement assembly of two G-quadruplex containing hairpin DNAs. This toehold strand displacement reaction leads to the cyclic reuse of the initiation sequences and the production of DNA assemblies with numerous G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binds to these G-quadruplex structures and generates significantly amplified fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of thrombin down to 5 pM. Besides, this method shows high selectivity towards the target thrombin against other control proteins. The developed thrombin sensing method herein avoids the modification of the probes and the involvement of any enzyme or nanomaterial labels for signal amplification. With the successful demonstration for thrombin detection, our approach can be easily adopted to monitor other target molecules in a simple, low-cost, sensitive and selective way by choosing appropriate aptamer/ligand pairs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel "dual-potential" electrochemiluminescence aptasensor array using CdS quantum dots and luminol-gold nanoparticles as labels for simultaneous detection of malachite green and chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaobin; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Huairong; Yan, Qing; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Hu, Futao; Yu, Hongwei; Jiang, Qianli

    2015-12-15

    A novel type of "dual-potential" electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor array was fabricated on a homemade screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) for simultaneous detection of malachite green (MG) and chloramphenicol (CAP) in one single assay. The SPCE substrate consisted of a common Ag/AgCl reference electrode, carbon counter electrode and two carbon working electrodes (WE1 and WE2). In the system, CdS quantum dots (QDs) were modified on WE1 as cathode ECL emitters and luminol-gold nanoparticles (L-Au NPs) were modified on WE2 as anode ECL emitters. Then the MG aptamer complementary strand (MG cDNA) and CAP aptamer complementary strand (CAP cDNA) were attached on CdS QDs and L-Au NPs, respectively. The cDNA would hybridize with corresponding aptamer that was respectively tagged with cyanine dye (Cy5) (as quenchers of CdS QDs) and chlorogenic acid (CA) (as quenchers of l-Au NPs) using poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) as a bridging agent. PEI could lead to a large number of quenchers on the aptamer, which increased the quenching efficiency. Upon MG and CAP adding, the targets could induce strand release due to the highly affinity of analytes toward aptamers. Meanwhile, it could release the Cy5 and CA, which recovered cathode ECL of CdS QDs and anode ECL of L-Au NPs simultaneously. This "dual-potential" ECL strategy could be used to detect MG and CAP with the linear ranges of 0.1-100 nM and 0.2-150 nM, with detection limits of 0.03 nM and 0.07 nM (at 3sB), respectively. More importantly, this designed method was successfully applied to determine MG and CAP in real fish samples and held great potential in the food analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Homogeneous immunoassay for the cancer marker alpha-fetoprotein using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and fluorescent dyes as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinjie; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes sensitive and selective homogeneous immunoassays for the liver cancer biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum by using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (SW-FCCS). Both competitive and sandwich immunoassay modes were applied, and AFP served as a model analyte. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (with a 655 nm emission peak) and the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 488 (520 nm emission) were chosen to label the antibodies in the sandwich mode, and the antibody and the antigen in the competitive mode. Under optimized conditions, the sandwich assay has a linear dynamic range that covers the 20 pM to 5.0 nM concentration range. The competitive assay, in turn, extends from 180 pM to 15.0 nM. The respective detection limits are 20 pM and 180 pM. The method was successfully applied to directly determine AFP in (spiked) clinical samples, and results were in good agreement with data obtained via ELISAs. (author)

  2. In situ DNA-RNA hybridization using in vitro 125I-labeled ribosomal RNA of higher plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Tadatoshi; Ishida, M.R.; Tanaka, Ryuso.

    1975-01-01

    In situ hybridization using 125 I-labeled ribosomal RNA was applied to plant cells. Cytoplasmic 25 s rRNA, which was eluted from acrylamide gels after electrophoretic separation, was labeled in vitro with carrier-free 125 I and hybridized with the interphase nuclei in root tips of Vicia faba. In most of the preparations, the nucleoli were more heavily labeled than the other regions within nuclei, and several types of grain distribution were observed on the nucleoli. From these results, it was confirmed that in situ hybridization using 125 I-labeled rRNA can be used very effectively to detect the annealing sites of different molecular species of rRNA within the nuclei of plant cells, for which it is not as easy to obtain high specific radioactive rRNA in vivo as it is in the case of cultured animal cells. (auth.)

  3. Base voltammetric characterization of phenylazide modified deoxycytidine - the potential DNA redox label enabling its post-synthetic modifications by "click-reactions"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Trošanová, Zuzana; Balintová, Jana; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 140-141 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /65./. 09.09.2013-13.09.2013, Tatranské Matliare] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA redox label * click-reaction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. Synthesis, characterization and use of Ru-Fc intercalation complex as an electrochemical label for the detection of pathogen-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Serrano, M; Rosado, A; Guadalupe, A R; Santana, D; Vega, E Z

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis of [Ru(Fe-Phen) 2 dppz](PF 6 ) 2 (Ru-Fe complex) for a label-free approach to detect DNA hybridization. The Ru-Fe complex showed oxidation signals at +608 mV and +1192 mV corresponding to the RuII/III and FeII/III centers, respectively. We used the Ru-Fe complex and the Ferrocene covalently attached to the target to monitor the hybridization event of a 70-mer oligo immobilized in 10.3KD NHS-PS-NHS. The lowest target detectable concentration for the DNA fragment was around 0.4 μM.

  5. Gamma-ray induced DNA breaks and repair studied by immuno-labelling of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidon, N.; Noel, G.; Averbeck, D.; Varlet, P.; Salamero, J.; DeMurcia, G.

    1998-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a nuclear ubiquitous enzyme capable of binding to DNA breaks. Chinese hamster ovary cells were (CHO-K1) cultured on slides and γ-irradiated ( 137 Cs) at a high (12.8 Gy/min) or medium dose rate (5 Gy/min), and immuno-labelling against (ADP-ribose) polymers immediately or three hours after irradiation. Quantification and localisation of γ-ray induced breaks was performed by confocal microscopy. The results show a dose effect relationship, a dose-rate effect and the signal disappearance after 3 hours at 37 deg.C. The presence of PARP activity appears to reflect γ-rays induced DNA fragmentation. (authors)

  6. Highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridisation by coupling the chemical reduction of a redox label to the electrode reaction of a solution phase mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoensawat, Umphan; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Somasundrum, Mithran; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2014-11-21

    We have described a highly sensitive method for detecting DNA hybridisation using a redox-labeled stem loop probe. The redox labels were poly(styrene-co-acrylic) (PSA) spheres of 454 nm diameter, modified by methylene blue (MB) deposited alternatively with poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate) (PSS) in a layer-by-layer process. Each PSA sphere carried approx. 3.7 × 10(5) molecules of MB, as determined optically. DIG-tagged stem loop probes were immobilised on screen printed electrodes bearing anti-DIG antibodies. Binding with the target enabled straightening of the stem loop, which made attachment to the MB-coated PSA spheres possible. For measuring the current from the direct reduction of MB by differential pulse voltammetry, a 30 mer DNA target common to 70 strains of Escherichia coli was calibrated across the range 1.0 fM to 100 pM (gradient = 3.2 × 10(-8) A (log fM)(-1), r(2) = 0.95, n = 60), with an LOD of ∼58 fM. By using Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a solution phase mediator for the MB reduction, we were able to lower the LOD to ∼39 aM (gradient = 5.95 × 10(-8) A (log aM)(-1), r(2) = 0.96, n = 30), which corresponds to the detection of 0.76 ag (∼50 molecules) in the 2 μL analyte sample. We hypothesise that the lowering of the LOD was due to the fact that not all the MB labels were able to contact the electrode surface.

  7. Fluorescent quenching-based quantitative detection of specific DNA/RNA using a BODIPY® FL-labeled probe or primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shinya; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Torimura, Masaki; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the quantitative detection of specific DNA or RNA molecules based on the finding that BODIPY® FL fluorescence was quenched by its interaction with a uniquely positioned guanine. This approach makes use of an oligonucleotide probe or primer containing a BODIPY® FL-modified cytosine at its 5′-end. When such a probe was hybridized with a target DNA, its fluorescence was quenched by the guanine in the target, complementary to the modified cytosine, and the quench rate was proportional to the amount of target DNA. This widely applicable technique will be used directly with larger samples or in conjunction with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify small DNA samples. PMID:11239011

  8. Detection of alien genetic introgressions in bread wheat using dot-blot genomic hybridisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, María-Dolores; Prieto, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Simple, reliable methods for the identification of alien genetic introgressions are required in plant breeding programmes. The use of genomic dot-blot hybridisation allows the detection of small Hordeum chilense genomic introgressions in the descendants of genetic crosses between wheat and H. chilense addition or substitution lines in wheat when molecular markers are difficult to use. Based on genomic in situ hybridisation, DNA samples from wheat lines carrying putatively H. chilense introgressions were immobilised on a membrane, blocked with wheat genomic DNA and hybridised with biotin-labelled H. chilense genomic DNA as a probe. This dot-blot screening reduced the number of plants necessary to be analysed by molecular markers or in situ hybridisation, saving time and money. The technique was sensitive enough to detect a minimum of 5 ng of total genomic DNA immobilised on the membrane or about 1/420 dilution of H. chilense genomic DNA in the wheat background. The robustness of the technique was verified by in situ hybridisation. In addition, the detection of other wheat relative species such as Hordeum vulgare , Secale cereale and Agropyron cristatum in the wheat background was also reported .

  9. Label-free room-temperature phosphorescence turn-on detection of tiopronin based on Cu{sup 2+}-modulated homocysteine-capped manganese doped zinc sulfide quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yan; Fan, Zhefeng, E-mail: crush_bc@163.com

    2015-04-15

    A label-free turn-on room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) sensor for tiopronin based on Cu{sup 2+}-modulated homocysteine (Hcy)-capped Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) was described in this paper. The RTP of Hcy-capped Mn-doped ZnS QDs can be effectively quenched by Cu{sup 2+} due to the binding of Cu{sup 2+} to the Hcy on the surface of the QDs and the electron transfer generated from the photoexcited QDs to Cu{sup 2+}. The high affinity of tiopronin to Cu{sup 2+} enables the dissociation of the ion from the surface of the QDs, thereby forming a stable complex with tiopronin in the solution, and recovering the RTP of the QDs. The Cu{sup 2+}-induced RTP quenching and subsequent tiopronin-induced RTP recovery for MPA-capped ZnS QDs provide a solid basis for the present RTP sensor based on QDs for the detection of tiopronin. The detection limit for tiopronin is 0.18 ng mL{sup −1}, the relative standard deviations is 1.9%, and the recovery of urine and serum samples with tiopronin addition range from 96% to 106% under optimal conditions. The proposed method was successfully applied to biological fluids and obtained satisfactory results. - Highlights: • The high water-solubility Mn-doped-QDs with good RTP property was synthesized. • The RTP intensity of the QDs could be effectively quenched by Cu{sup 2+} ions. • Cu{sup 2+} ions were selectively separated from the QDs by tiopronin. • The RTP of the Cu{sup 2+}-modulated QDs was restored by tiopronin. • The tiopronin sensor was applied to biological fluids with satisfactory results.

  10. Synthesis of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea linked to a methidium chloride analogue and its reactions with 32P-end-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konakahara, T.; Wurdeman, R.L.; Gold, B.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) analogue that is covalently linked to methidium nucleus (9) is described. At 37/degrees/C in pH 8.0 buffer 9 hydrolyzes via pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a calculated t/sub 1/2/ = 77 min. By use of polyacrylamide sequencing gels the formation of piperidine-labile N 7 -methylguanine adducts from the reaction of 9 and MNU with 5'- 32 P-end-labeled DNA restriction fragments is reported. DNA methylation by 9 in 10 mM Tris buffer is enhanced with increasing ionic strength (50-200 mM NaCl), which contrasts to the inhibition of MNU-induced cleavage with increasing salt. In addition, 9 methylates all G sites equally, while MNU shows a clear preference for d(G)/sub n/ (n ≥ 3) runs and an asymmetrical methylation pattern within these G-rich regions. The results are discussed in terms of the delivery of the MNU moiety to the DNA target by a non-sequence-specific intercalation process and the subsequent hydrolytic generation of a nondiffusible alkylating intermediate

  11. Label-free and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of microRNA based on long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Xian; Hong, Cheng-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) integrates the advantages of electrochemical detection and chemiluminescent techniques. The method has received particular attention because it is highly sensitive and selective, has a wide linear range but low reagent costs. The use of nanomaterials with their unique physical and chemical properties has led to new kinds of biosensors that exhibit high sensitivity and stability. Compared to other nanomaterials, DNA nanostructures are more biocompatible, more hydrophilic, and thus less prone to nonspecific adsorption onto the electrode surface. We describe here a label-free and ultrasensitive ECL biosensor for detecting a cancer-associated microRNA at a femtomolar level. We have designed two auxiliary probes that cause the formation of a long-range self-assembly in the form of a μm-long 1-dimensional DNA concatamer. These can be used as carriers for signal amplification. The intercalation of the ECL probe Ru(phen) 3 2+ into the grooves of the concatamers leads to a substantial increase in ECL intensity. This amplified sensor shows high selectivity for discriminating complementary target and other mismatched RNAs. The biosensor enables the quantification of the expression of microRNA-21 in MCF-7 cells. It also displays very low limits of detection and provides an alternative approach for the detection of RNA or DNA detection in diagnostics and gene analysis. (author)

  12. Gold nano particle decorated graphene core first generation PAMAM dendrimer for label free electrochemical DNA hybridization sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K; Rajesh, R; Dharuman, V; Venkatasan, R; Hahn, J H; Pandian, S Karutha

    2012-01-15

    A novel first generation (G1) poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM) with graphene core (GG1PAMAM) was synthesized for the first time. Single layer of GG1PAMAM was immobilized covalently on mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) monolayer on Au transducer. This allows cost effective and easy deposition of single layer graphene on the Au transducer surface than the advanced vacuum techniques used in the literature. Au nano particles (17.5 nm) then decorated the GG1PAMAM and used for electrochemical DNA hybridization sensing. The sensor discriminates selectively and sensitively the complementary double stranded DNA (dsDNA, hybridized), non-complementary DNA (ssDNA, un-hybridized) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) surfaces. Interactions of the MPA, GG1PAMAM and the Au nano particles were characterized by Ultra Violet (UV), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy (RS), Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Cyclic Voltmetric (CV), Impedance spectroscopy (IS) and Differntial Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) techniques. The sensor showed linear range 1×10(-6) to 1×10(-12) M with lowest detection limit 1 pM which is 1000 times lower than G1PAMAM without graphene core. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Base residue release from 3H-thymine labeled DNA in irradiated E. coli under conditions of enzyme inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    E. coli C and E. coli K12 cells were incorporated with ( 3 H-C-6)-thymine, irradiated with 60 Co-gamma rays, and then variously treated with EDTA and lysed with sodium lauryl sulfate. The 3 H-material released from DNA was then measured by Sephadex G-10 gel filtration. Because the focus of this work was the examination of the radiolytic lesions within the DNA, an attempt was made to exclude enzymatic contributions to in vivo product yields from these cells which were irradiated in the presence and absence of O 2

  14. Detection of minor and major satellite DNA in cytokinesis-blocked mouse splenocytes by a PRINS tandem labelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A; Tommasi, A M; Renzi, L

    1996-11-01

    A protocol for the simultaneous visualization of minor and major satellite DNA by primed in situ DNA synthesis (PRINS) was developed in cytokinesis-blocked murine splenocytes. After individuation of optimal experimental conditions, a micronucleus (MN) test was carried out by treating splenocytes in vitro with the clastogenic agent mitomycin C and the aneugenic compound Colcemid. It was found that PRINS gives highly reproducible results, also comparable with the literature on MN results obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Therefore the PRINS methodology may be proposed as a fast alternative to FISH for the characterization of induced MN.

  15. Atomic Scissors: A New Method of Tracking the 5-Bromo-2′-Deoxyuridine-Labeled DNA In Situ

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ligasová, Anna; Strunin, Dmytro; Liboska, Radek; Rosenberg, Ivan; Koberna, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2012), e52584/1-e52584/11 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA204/09/0973 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA replication * light microscopy detection * 5-bromo-2´-deoxyuridine * copper ions * oxidative DNA cleavage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  16. DOT's CAFE rulemaking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    Presentation discusses what DOT needs to consider in setting CAFE standards. How DOT's use of the CAFE Compliance and Effects Modeling System helps to analyze potential CAFE Standards. How DOT might approach the next round of CAFE standards for model...

  17. The intraclass correlation coefficient applied for evaluation of data correction, labeling methods and rectal biopsy sampling in DNA microarray experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, E.P.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Burema, J.; Keijer, J.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) can be used as a relatively simple statistical measure to assess methodological and biological variation in DNA microarray analysis. The ICC is a measure that determines the reproducibility of a variable, which can easily be calculated from

  18. Smart Sensing Based on DNA-Metal Interaction Enables a Label-Free and Resettable Security Model of Electrochemical Molecular Keypad Lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan; Han, Xu; Wang, Chenxu; Li, Yunhui; Li, Bingling; Duan, Hongwei

    2018-01-26

    Recently, molecular keypad locks have received increasing attention. As a new subgroup of smart biosensors, they show great potential for protecting information as a molecular security data processor, rather than merely molecular recognition and quantitation. Herein, label-free electrochemically transduced Ag + and cysteine (Cys) sensors were developed. A molecular keypad lock model with reset function was successfully realized based on the balanced interaction of metal ion with its nucleic acid and chemical ligands. The correct input of "1-2-3" (i.e., "Ag + -Cys-cDNA") is the only password of such molecular keypad lock. Moreover, the resetting process of either correct or wrong input order could be easily made by Cys, buffer, and DI water treatment. Therefore, our system provides an even smarter system of molecular keypad lock, which could inhibit illegal access of unauthorized users, holding great promise in information protection at the molecular level.

  19. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: correlation of 3H-DNA release from labeled bacteria and changes in numbers of viable organisms by mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Conventional methods of assessing antibacterial activities of macrophages by viable counting are limited by the precision of the statistics and are difficult to interpret quantitatively because of unrestrained extracellular growth of bacteria. An alternative technique based on the release of radioactive DNA from labeled bacteria has been offered as overcoming these drawbacks. To assess it for use with macrophages I have made a correlation with the conventional viable counting method using a mathematical model. Opsonized Listeria monocytogenes labeled with 3 H-thymidine were exposed to rat macrophages for periods up to 4 hr. Numbers of viable bacteria determined after sonication increased exponentially in the absence of live cells and this growth rate was progressively inhibited by increasing numbers of macrophages. After a lag period of 30-60 min soluble 3 H appeared in the supernatant, the amount increasing with time and numbers of macrophages. To correlate these data I developed a mathematical model that considered that changes in numbers of viable organisms were due to the difference between rates of 1) growth of extracellular bacteria and 2) killing within the macrophage. On the basis of this model curves of best fit to the viable counts data were used to predict the release of radioactivity, assuming that death of a bacterium led to the total release of its label. These predictions and the experimental data agreed well, the lag period of 30-60 min between death of the bacterium and release of radioactivity being consistent with intracellular digestion. Release of soluble radioactivity appears to be an accurate reflection of the number of bacteria killed within the macrophage

  20. Measurement of Endogenous versus Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA-Protein Crosslinks in Animal Tissues by Stable Isotope Labeling and Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yongquan; Yu, Rui; Hartwell, Hadley J; Moeller, Benjamin C; Bodnar, Wanda M; Swenberg, James A

    2016-05-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) arise from a wide range of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and formaldehyde. Importantly, recent identification of aldehydes as endogenous genotoxins in Fanconi anemia has provided new insight into disease causation. Because of their bulky nature, DPCs pose severe threats to genome stability, but previous methods to measure formaldehyde-induced DPCs were incapable of discriminating between endogenous and exogenous sources of chemical. In this study, we developed methods that provide accurate and distinct measurements of both exogenous and endogenous DPCs in a structurally specific manner. We exposed experimental animals to stable isotope-labeled formaldehyde ([(13)CD2]-formaldehyde) by inhalation and performed ultrasensitive mass spectrometry to measure endogenous (unlabeled) and exogenous ((13)CD2-labeled) DPCs. We found that exogenous DPCs readily accumulated in nasal respiratory tissues but were absent in tissues distant to the site of contact. This observation, together with the finding that endogenous formaldehyde-induced DPCs were present in all tissues examined, suggests that endogenous DPCs may be responsible for increased risks of bone marrow toxicity and leukemia. Furthermore, the slow rate of DPC repair provided evidence for the persistence of DPCs. In conclusion, our method for measuring endogenous and exogenous DPCs presents a new perspective for the potential health risks inflicted by endogenous formaldehyde and may inform improved disease prevention and treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2652-61. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. The DNA hybridization assay using single-walled carbon nanotubes as ultrasensitive, long-term optical labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Eung-Soo; Cao, Chengfan; Hong, Sanghyun; Jung, Hye-Jin; Cha, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Young-Jin; Baik, Seunghyun

    2006-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit strong Raman signals as well as fluorescence emissions in the near infrared region. Such signals do not blink or photobleach under prolonged excitation, which is an advantage in optical nano-biomarker applications. In this paper, we present single-stranded DNA conjugated SWNT probes to locate a particular sequence of DNA within a complex genome. Chromosomal DNAs of human fibroblasts and Escherichia coli are used as a target and a control, respectively. Southern blotting, which uses photostable Raman signals of nanotubes instead of fluorescent dyes, demonstrates excellent sensitivity and specificity of the probes. The results show that SWNTs may be used as generic nano-biomarkers for the precise detection of specific kinds of genes

  2. Ultrasensitive label-free detection of DNA hybridization by sapphire-based graphene field-effect transistor biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Zhang, Chao; Yue, Weiwei; Zou, Yan; Wang, Guiying; Liu, Huilan; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Mingzhen; Zhu, Zhanshou; Wang, Jihua

    2018-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention in biosensing applications for its unique properties. Because of one-atom layer structure, every atom of graphene is exposed to the environment, making the electronic properties of graphene are very sensitive to charged analytes. Therefore, graphene is an ideal material for transistors in high-performance sensors. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has been demonstrated the most successful method for fabricating large area graphene. However, the conventional CVD methods can only grow graphene on metallic substrate and the graphene has to be transferred to the insulating substrate for further device fabrication. The transfer process creates wrinkles, cracks, or tears on the graphene, which severely degrade electrical properties of graphene. These factors severely degrade the sensing performance of graphene. Here, we directly fabricated graphene on sapphire substrate by high temperature CVD without the use of metal catalysts. The sapphire-based graphene was patterned and make into a DNA biosensor in the configuration of field-effect transistor. The sensors show high performance and achieve the DNA detection sensitivity as low as 100 fM (10-13 M), which is at least 10 times lower than prior transferred CVD G-FET DNA sensors. The use of the sapphire-based G-FETs suggests a promising future for biosensing applications.

  3. A Eu(III) doped metal-organic framework conjugated with fluorescein-labeled single-stranded DNA for detection of Cu(II) and sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Han; Yan, Bing

    2017-10-02

    In this paper, Bio-MOF-1 is prepared as reported and then Eu 3+ is introduced into it via cation exchange method. A FAM-labeled ssDNA is chosen to fabricate with the obtained Eu 3+ @Bio-MOF-1. A luminescent hybrid material is assembled, which can exhibit the fluorescence of Eu 3+ and FAM simultaneously by adjusting the ratio of FAM-ssDNA and Eu 3+ @Bio-MOF-1. The sample is then used for the detecting of metal ions, results shows which has good selectively for Cu 2+ (LOD = 0.14 μM, 0-250 μM). The introduction of Cu 2+ can quench the fluorescence of FAM while the luminescent intensity of Eu 3+ enhancing. After the detection of Cu 2+ , the Cu 2+ involved hybrid system can then be further employed for the detection of S 2- (LOD = 1.3 μM, 0-50 μM). Low concentration of S 2- can make the luminescent intensity of Eu 3+ decrease gradually while high concentration of S 2- can further recover the luminescent of FAM, which is quenched by Cu 2+ . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dual-color immunofluorescent labeling with quantum dots of the diabetes-associated proteins aldose reductase and Toll-like receptor 4 in the kidneys of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu XM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin Liu,1,* Rui Hu,2,* Hongwei Lian,1,3 Yang Liu,4 Jing Liu,1 Jianwei Liu,1 Guimiao Lin,5 Liwei Liu,6 Xiaojian Duan,1 Ken-Tye Yong,2 Ling Ye1 1Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing Key Lab of Aging and Geriatrics, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore; 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, 4Department of Geriatric Nephrology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 5Key Lab of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medical Sciences, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 6School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Diabetes is one of the major chronic diseases diagnosed worldwide with a common complication of diabetic nephropathy (DN. There are multiple possible mechanisms associated with DN. Aldose reductase (AR and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 may be involved in the occurrence and development of DN. Here, we describe the distribution of AR and TLR4 in cells and renal tissues of diabetic rats through a quantum dot (QD-based immunofluorescence technique and conventional immunohistochemistry. As a new type of nanosized fluorophore, QDs have been recognized in imaging applications and have broad prospects in biomedical research. The results of the reported study demonstrate that both the AR and the TLR4 proteins were upregulated in the renal tissues of diabetic rats. Further, to explore the relationship between AR and TLR4 in the pathogenesis of DN, a dual-color immunofluorescent labeling technique based on QDs was applied, where the expressions of AR and TLR4 in the renal tissues of diabetic rats were simultaneously observed – for the first time, as far as we are aware. The optimized QD-based immunofluorescence technique has not only shown a satisfying

  5. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptidemajor histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    diversity of T cell recognition in humans. Consequently it has been impossible to comprehensively analyze T cell responsiveness in cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases. We present and validate a novel technology that enables parallel detection of numerous different peptide-MHC responsive T cells...... with combinatorial encoding of fluorescent-labeled MHC multimers. Finally, we have demonstrated that this technology can be applied for multiplex T cell detection both in limited biological samples, such as uncultured tumor material, and for simultaneous assessment of target recognition and functional capability...... of T cells. This technology enables true high-throughput detection of antigen-responsive T cells and will advance our understanding of immune recognition from model antigens to genomewide immune assessments on a personalized basis....

  6. Biological in vivo dosimetry with an external measuring technique under application of a labelled DNA-precursor (iodine-125-desoxyuridine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porschen, W.; Zamboglou, N.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    The depression of the incorporation rate of IDU in the whole body or in the bone marrow is a sensitive indicator for a whole-body irradiation. It was found that the maximum effect is observed some 4 hours after irradiation. For this reason, bone marrow cells were labelled in vitro with IDU 4 hours after whole-body irradiation. This method proved to be extraordinarily sensitive and resulted in reproducible effects which occurred already at doses below 5 rad. All the other biological methods of dosimetry known so far are less sensitive. Although the theory explaining these results is not yet fully clarified, this method of dosimetry appears to offer practical possibilities of application. (orig.) [de

  7. Core–shell quantum dots: Properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, D., E-mail: vasudevand@rediffmail.com [Electrodics and electrocatalysis division, CSIR-CECRI, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Gaddam, Rohit Ranganathan [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida 201301 (India); Trinchi, Adrian; Cole, Ivan [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton South MDC, 3169 (Australia)

    2015-07-05

    Fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) that find numerous applications in areas, such as bio labelling, sensors, lasers, light emitting diodes and medicine. Core–shell quantum dots were developed to improve the photoluminescence efficiency of single quantum dots. Capping their surface with organic ligands as well as their extraction into aqueous media enables their use in sensing applications. The current review highlights the importance and applications of core shell quantum dots as well as their surface modifications and applications in the field of medicine and as sensors for chemical and biochemical analysis.

  8. Core–shell quantum dots: Properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, D.; Gaddam, Rohit Ranganathan; Trinchi, Adrian; Cole, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) that find numerous applications in areas, such as bio labelling, sensors, lasers, light emitting diodes and medicine. Core–shell quantum dots were developed to improve the photoluminescence efficiency of single quantum dots. Capping their surface with organic ligands as well as their extraction into aqueous media enables their use in sensing applications. The current review highlights the importance and applications of core shell quantum dots as well as their surface modifications and applications in the field of medicine and as sensors for chemical and biochemical analysis

  9. Enabling biomedical research with designer quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Janczewski, D.; Dorokhin, D.V.; Han, M-Y; Vancso, Gyula J.; Navarro, Melba; Planell, Josep A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are a new class of semiconductor nanoparticulate luminophores, which are actively researched for novel applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this review, the recent progress in the design and applications of QD labels for in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells is presented.

  10. A universal DNA-based protein detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thua N N; Cui, Jinhui; Hartman, Mark R; Peng, Songming; Funabashi, Hisakage; Duan, Faping; Yang, Dayong; March, John C; Lis, John T; Cui, Haixin; Luo, Dan

    2013-09-25

    Protein immune detection requires secondary antibodies which must be carefully selected in order to avoid interspecies cross-reactivity, and is therefore restricted by the limited availability of primary/secondary antibody pairs. Here we present a versatile DNA-based protein detection system using a universal adapter to interface between IgG antibodies and DNA-modified reporter molecules. As a demonstration of this capability, we successfully used DNA nano-barcodes, quantum dots, and horseradish peroxidase enzyme to detect multiple proteins using our DNA-based labeling system. Our system not only eliminates secondary antibodies but also serves as a novel method platform for protein detection with modularity, high capacity, and multiplexed capability.

  11. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  12. Development and characterization of a magnetic bead-quantum dot nanoparticles based assay capable of Escherichia coli O157:H7 quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gha-Young [Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Son, Ahjeong, E-mail: ason@auburn.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2010-09-10

    The development and characterization of a magnetic bead (MB)-quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles based assay capable of quantifying pathogenic bacteria is presented here. The MB-QD assay operates by having a capturing probe DNA selectively linked to the signaling probe DNA via the target genomic DNA (gDNA) during DNA hybridization. The signaling probe DNA is labeled with fluorescent QD{sub 565} which serves as a reporter. The capturing probe DNA is conjugated simultaneously to a MB and another QD{sub 655}, which serve as a carrier and an internal standard, respectively. Successfully captured target gDNA is separated using a magnetic field and is quantified via a spectrofluorometer. The use of QDs (i.e., QD{sub 565}/QD{sub 655}) as both a fluorescence label and an internal standard increased the sensitivity of the assay. The passivation effect and the molar ratio between QD and DNA were optimized. The MB-QD assay demonstrated a detection limit of 890 zeptomolar (i.e., 10{sup -21} mol L{sup -1}) concentration for the linear single stranded DNA (ssDNA). It also demonstrated a detection limit of 87 gene copies for double stranded DNA (dsDNA) eaeA gene extracted from pure Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 culture. Its corresponding dynamic range, sensitivity, and selectivity were also presented. Finally, the bacterial gDNA of E. coli O157:H7 was used to highlight the MB-QD assay's ability to detect below the minimum infective dose (i.e., 100 organisms) of E. coli O157:H7 in water environment.

  13. Construction and applications of DNA probes for detection of polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading genotypes in toxic organic-contaminated soil environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, S.; Khan, A.; Rosenthal, N.

    1990-01-01

    Several DNA probes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading genotypes were constructed from PCB-degrading bacteria. These laboratory-engineered DNA probes were used for the detection, enumeration, and isolation of specific bacteria degrading PCBs. Dot blot analysis of purified DNA from toxic organic chemical-contaminated soil bacterial communities showed positive DNA-DNA hybridization with a 32P-labeled DNA probe (pAW6194, cbpABCD). Less than 1% of bacterial colonies isolated from garden topsoil and greater than 80% of bacteria isolated from PCB-contaminated soils showed DNA homologies with 32P-labeled DNA probes. Some of the PCB-degrading bacterial isolates detected by the DNA probe method did not show biphenyl clearance. The DNA probe method was found to detect additional organisms with greater genetic potential to degrade PCBs than the biphenyl clearance method did. Results from this study demonstrate the usefulness of DNA probes in detecting specific PCB-degrading bacteria, abundance of PCB-degrading genotypes, and genotypic diversity among PCB-degrading bacteria in toxic chemical-polluted soil environments. We suggest that the DNA probe should be used with caution for accurate assessment of PCB-degradative capacity within soils and further recommend that a combination of DNA probe and biodegradation assay be used to determine the abundance of PCB-degrading bacteria in the soil bacterial community

  14. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA 3 XA 3 G with the complement dCT 3 YT 3 G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G/center dot/C base pair become more stable than those containing only A/center dot/T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I/center dot/C /succ/ I/center dot/ A/succ/ I/center dot/T ∼ I/center dot/G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG)/center dot/d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.)

  15. Nonisotopic DNA probe techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kricka, Larry J

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this book is to bring together descriptions of the principal nonisotopic methods for DNA hybridization assays, together with experimental details of the methods, including labelling...

  16. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Katherine; Tellier, Michael; Murphy, Shona

    2018-02-27

    The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79). H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  17. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wood

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79. H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  18. Targeting human c-Myc promoter duplex DNA with actinomycin D by use of multi-way analysis of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Actinomycin D (Act D), an oncogenic c-Myc promoter binder, interferes with the action of RNA polymerase. There is great demand for high-throughput technology able to monitor the activity of DNA-binding drugs. To this end, binding of 7-aminoactinomycin D (7AAD) to the duplex c-Myc promoter...... pairs resulted in efficient energy transfer from drug to QD via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Multi-way analysis of the three-way data array obtained from titration experiments was performed by use of restricted Tucker3 and hard trilinear decomposition (HTD). These techniques enable...... the important advantage over univariate classical methods of enabling us to investigate the source of variance in the fluorescence signal of the DNA-drug complex. It was established that hard trilinear decomposition analysis of FRET-measured data overcomes the problem of rank deficiency, enabling calculation...

  19. Determination of the spectrum of beta-thalassemia genes in Spain by use of dot-blot analysis of amplified beta-globin DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Amselem, S; Nunes, V; Vidaud, M; Estivill, X; Wong, C; d'Auriol, L; Vidaud, D; Galibert, F; Baiget, M; Goossens, M

    1988-01-01

    We have delineated the molecular lesions causing beta-thalassemia in Spain, a country that has witnessed the passage of different Mediterranean populations over the centuries, in order to evaluate the extent of heterogeneity of these mutations and to make possible simplified prenatal diagnosis of the disorder in that country. The use of the polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) technique to preferentially amplify beta-globin DNA sequences that contain the most frequent beta-thalassemia mutations in...

  20. Electrochemiluminescent detection of Pb{sup 2+} by graphene/gold nanoparticles and CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Liping, E-mail: lipinglu@bjut.edu.cn; Guo, Linqing; Li, Jiao; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • An ECL sensor was fabricated based on the distance dependent between CdSe QDs and gold nanoparticles. • The ssDNA strands rich in G bases adopt the G4 conformation when Pb{sup 2+} is present in detection system. • AuNPs/RGO composite improved the performance of electron transfer of sensor. • The ECL sensor was used to detect Pb{sup 2+} concentration in an actual water sample with high sensitivity and selectivity. - Abstract: A highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent detection method for lead ions (Pb(II)) was fabricated based on the distance-dependent quenching of the electrochemiluminescence from CdSe quantum dots by nanocomposites of graphene and gold nanoparticles. Graphene/gold nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode through the constant potential method. Thiol-labeled DNA was then assembled on the surface of the electrode via gold−sulfur bonding, following which the amino-labeled terminal of the DNA was linked to carboxylated CdSe quantum dots by the formation of amide bonds. The 27-base aptamer was designed with two different domains: the immobilization and detection sequences. The immobilization sequence was paired with 12 complementary bases and immobilized on the gold electrode; the single-stranded detection sequence, rich in G bases, formed a G-quadruplex (G4) structure in the presence of Pb{sup 2+}. The formation of G4 shortens the distance between the CdSe quantum dots and the Au electrode, which decreases the electrochemiluminescent intensity in a linear fashion, proportional to the concentration of Pb(II). The linear range of the sensor was 10{sup −10} to 10{sup −8} mol/L (R = 0.9819) with a detection limit of 10{sup −10} mol/L. This sensor detected Pb(II) in real water samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Nonlinear Dot Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Nils; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Conventional dot plots use a constant dot size and are typically applied to show the frequency distribution of small data sets. Unfortunately, they are not designed for a high dynamic range of frequencies. We address this problem by introducing nonlinear dot plots. Adopting the idea of nonlinear scaling from logarithmic bar charts, our plots allow for dots of varying size so that columns with a large number of samples are reduced in height. For the construction of these diagrams, we introduce an efficient two-way sweep algorithm that leads to a dense and symmetrical layout. We compensate aliasing artifacts at high dot densities by a specifically designed low-pass filtering method. Examples of nonlinear dot plots are compared to conventional dot plots as well as linear and logarithmic histograms. Finally, we include feedback from an expert review.

  2. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Labels KidsHealth / For Teens / Food Labels What's in ... to have at least 95% organic ingredients. Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  3. Quantum Dot-Fullerene Based Molecular Beacon Nanosensors for Rapid, Highly Sensitive Nucleic Acid Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Kannegulla, Akash; Wu, Bo; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2018-05-15

    Spherical fullerene (C 60 ) can quench the fluorescence of a quantum dot (QD) through energy transfer and charge transfer processes, with the quenching efficiency regulated by the number of proximate C 60 on each QD. With the quenching property and its small size compared with other nanoparticle-based quenchers, it is advantageous to group a QD reporter and multiple C 60 -labeled oligonucleotide probes to construct a molecular beacon (MB) probe for sensitive, robust nucleic acid detection. We demonstrated a rapid, high-sensitivity DNA detection method using the nanosensors composed of QD-C 60 based MBs carried by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The assay was accelerated by first dispersing the nanosensors in analytes for highly efficient DNA capture resulting from short-distance 3-dimensional diffusion of targets to the sensor surface and then concentrating the nanosensors to a substrate by magnetic force to amplify the fluorescence signal for target quantification. The enhanced mass transport enabled a rapid detection (< 10 min) with a small sample volume (1-10 µl). The high signal-to-noise ratio produced by the QD-C 60 pairs and magnetic concentration yielded a detection limit of 100 fM (~106 target DNA copies for a 10 µl analyte). The rapid, sensitive, label-free detection method will benefit the applications in point-of-care molecular diagnostic technologies.

  4. Quantum dot nanoparticle conjugation, characterization, and applications in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Smita

    Quantum dot are semiconducting nanoparticles that have been used for decades in a variety of applications such as solar cells, LEDs and medical imaging. Their use in the last area, however, has been extremely limited despite their potential as revolutionary new biological labeling tools. Quantum dots are much brighter and more stable than conventional fluorophores, making them optimal for high resolution imaging and long term studies. Prior work in this area involves synthesizing and chemically conjugating quantum dots to molecules of interest in-house. However this method is both time consuming and prone to human error. Additionally, non-specific binding and nanoparticle aggregation currently prevent researchers from utilizing this system to its fullest capacity. Another critical issue that has not been addressed is determining the number of ligands bound to nanoparticles, which is crucial for proper interpretation of results. In this work, methods to label fixed cells using two types of chemically modified quantum dots are studied. Reproducible non-specific artifact labeling is consistently demonstrated if antibody-quantum dot conditions are less than optimal. In order to explain this, antibodies bound to quantum dots were characterized and quantified. While other groups have qualitatively characterized antibody functionalized quantum dots using TEM, AFM, UV spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, and in some cases have reported calculated estimates of the putative number of total antibodies bound to quantum dots, no quantitative experimental results had been reported prior to this work. The chemical functionalization and characterization of quantum dot nanocrystals achieved in this work elucidates binding mechanisms of ligands to nanoparticles and allows researchers to not only translate our tools to studies in their own areas of interest but also derive quantitative results from these studies. This research brings ease of use and increased reliability to

  5. Imaging GABAc Receptors with Ligand-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Tomlinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a methodology for labeling the GABAc receptor on the surface membrane of intact cells. This work builds upon our earlier work with serotonin-conjugated quantum dots and our studies with PEGylated quantum dots to reduce nonspecific binding. In the current approach, a PEGylated derivative of muscimol was synthesized and attached via an amide linkage to quantum dots coated in an amphiphilic polymer derivative of a modified polyacrylamide. These conjugates were used to image GABAC receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

  6. Isolation of RNA for dot hybridization by heparin-DNase I treatment of whole cell lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Z; Wu, C

    1987-08-15

    We have developed a new procedure for the rapid preparation of undegraded total RNA from cultured cells for specific quantitation by dot blotting analysis. Pelleted cells are resuspended in hypotonic solution containing a ribonuclease inhibitor and heparin and disrupted by freeze-thaw. Heparin is employed as an agent for nuclear lysis, dissociation of chromosomal protein, and release of mRNA from rough endoplasmic reticulum. We eliminate chromosomal DNA by digestion with DNase I and denature the RNA in the lysate with formaldehyde. After centrifugation to remove debris, the supernatant is used directly for dot blotting. All manipulations are performed in the same microfuge tube and recovery of RNA is quantitative. The procedure is especially useful for processing large numbers of samples. We illustrate its versatility by analysis of specific RNAs in Drosophila, rat, and human cell lines. In reconstruction experiments, less than 80 molecules per cell of a small RNA (beta-globin) can be detected under highly stringent hybridization conditions, using only moderately labeled double-stranded plasmid DNA probes and short film exposures.

  7. Whole genomic DNA probe for detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, R; Makkar, S R; Sela, M N; Stevens, R

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a DNA probe for Porphyromonas endodontalis. Pure cultures of P. endodontalis were grown in TYP medium, in an anaerobic chamber. DNA was extracted from the P. endodontalis and labeled using the Genius System by Boehringer Mannheim. The labeled P. endodontalis DNA was used in dot-blot hybridization reactions with homologous (P. endodontalis) and unrelated bacterial samples. To determine specificity, strains of 40 other oral bacterial species (e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, and Prevotella intermedia) were spotted and reacted with the P. endodontalis DNA probe. None of the panel of 40 oral bacteria hybridized with the P. endodontalis probe, whereas the blot of the homologous organism showed a strong positive reaction. To determine the sensitivity of the probe, dilutions of a P. endodontalis suspension of known concentration were blotted onto a nylon membrane and reacted with the probe. The results of our investigation indicate that the DNA probe that we have prepared specifically detects only P. endodontalis and can detect at least 3 x 10(4) cells.

  8. From DOT to Dotty

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    - Module types are interfaces, which can be abstracted. In this talk Martin will present DOT, a particularly simple calculus that can express systems following these principles. DOT has been developed as the foundation of the next version of Scala. He will also report on dotty, a new Scala compiler that implements the constructs of DOT in its core data structures and that uses the lessons learned to drive Scala’s evolution.

  9. Improved Immunoassay Sensitivity in Serum as a Result of Polymer-Entrapped Quantum Dots: 'Papaya Particles'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranzoni, A.; den Hamer, A.; Karoli, T.; Buechler, J.; Cooper, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent labels are widely employed in biomarker quantification and diagnostics, however they possess narrow Stokes shifts and can photobleach, limiting multiplexed detection applications and compromising sensitivity. In contrast, quantum dots do not photobleach and have much wider Stokes shifts,

  10. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic e...

  11. Development of Ionic Liquid Modified Disposable Graphite Electrodes for Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of DNA Hybridization Related to Microcystis spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Sengiz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (IL modified pencil graphite electrode (IL-PGEs was developed for electrochemical monitoring of DNA hybridization related to Microcystis spp. (MYC. The characterization of IL-PGEs was performed using microscopic and electrochemical techniques. DNA hybridization related to MYC was then explored at the surface of IL-PGEs using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV technique. After the experimental parameters were optimized, the sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to MYC was performed in the case of hybridization between MYC probe and its complementary DNA target, noncomplementary (NC or mismatched DNA sequence (MM, or and in the presence of mixture of DNA target: NC (1:1 and DNA target: MM (1:1.

  12. Transport in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deus, Fernanda; Continetino, Mucio

    2011-01-01

    Full text. In this work we study the time dependent transport in interacting quantum dot. This is a zero-dimensional nano structure system which has quantized electronic states. In our purpose, we are interested in studying such system in a Coulomb blockade regime where a mean-field treatment of the electronic correlations are appropriate. The quantum dot is described by an Anderson type of Hamiltonian where the hybridization term arises from the contact with the leads. We consider a time dependence of both the energy of the localized state in the quantum dot and of the hybridization-like term. These time dependent parameters, under certain conditions, induce a current in the quantum dot even in the absence of difference on the chemical potential of the leads. The approach to this non-equilibrium problem requires the use of a Keldysh formalism. We calculate the non- equilibrium Green's functions and obtain results for the average (equilibrium term) and the non-equilibrium values of the electronic occupation number in the dot. we consider the possibility of a magnetic solution, with different values for the average up and down spins in the quantum dot. Our results allow to obtain, for instance, the tunneling current through the dot. The magnetic nature of the dot, for a certain range of parameters should give rise also to an induced spin current through the dot

  13. Novel synthetic approach to asymmetric monocationic trimethine cyanine dyes derived from N-ethyl quinolinum moiety. Combined fluorescent and ICD probes for AT-DNA labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurutos, Atanas [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Crnolatac, Ivo; Orehovec, Iva [Laboratory for Study of Interactions of Biomacromolecules, Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gadjev, Nikolai [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Piantanida, Ivo, E-mail: pianta@irb.hr [Laboratory for Study of Interactions of Biomacromolecules, Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Deligeorgiev, Todor, E-mail: ohtak@chem.uni-sofia.bg [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-15

    Two asymmetric monocationic trimethine cyanine dyes were obtained via condensation reaction between 2-methylbenzothialolium salts containing various (aliphatic and benzyl) substituents on the nitrogen atom of the benzothiazolic chromophore, and 1-ethyl−4-(2-(phenylamine)vinyl)quinolin−1-ium iodide, by a novel improved method at room temperature under mild conditions. Both compounds bind non-covalently to double stranded DNA and RNA by micromolar affinity, but give highly selective fluorescent response>650 nm for only AT-DNA sequences at excess of DNA over dye, combined with equally AT-DNA selective ICD response at dye/DNA crowded conditions (r{sub [dye]/[AT-DNA]}>0.2)-namely ICD bands (attributed to dye-dimer formation) allow determination of AT-DNA at submicromolar concentrations. Selectivity was attributed to particular steric properties of AT-DNA minor groove in respect to other studied ds-DNA/RNA. Comparison of aliphatic- and benzyl- dye showed that only aliphatic- derivative revealed ICD band upon binding to AU-RNA major groove and short AT-sequences in mixed sequence (ct-)DNA.

  14. Quantum Dots: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  15. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution of...

  16. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution of...

  17. Synthesis of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Hunter

    2017-10-17

    Common approaches to synthesizing alloyed quantum dots employ high-cost, air-sensitive phosphine complexes as the selenium precursor. Disclosed quantum dot synthesis embodiments avoid these hazardous and air-sensitive selenium precursors. Certain embodiments utilize a combination comprising a thiol and an amine that together reduce and complex the elemental selenium to form a highly reactive selenium precursor at room temperature. The same combination of thiol and amine acts as the reaction solvent, stabilizing ligand, and sulfur source in the synthesis of quantum dot cores. A non-injection approach may also be used. The optical properties of the quantum dots synthesized by this new approach can be finely tuned for a variety of applications by controlling size and/or composition of size and composition. Further, using the same approach, a shell can be grown around a quantum dot core that improves stability, luminescence efficiency, and may reduce toxicity.

  18. Ag nanoclusters could efficiently quench the photoresponse of CdS quantum dots for novel energy transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yue; Liang, Yan-Yu; He, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-11-15

    Herein the influence of ultrasmall Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) against CdS quantum dots (QDs) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) nanosystem was exploited for the first time, based on which a novel PEC bioanalysis was successfully developed via the efficient quenching effect of Ag NCs against the CdS QDs. In a model system, DNA assay was achieved by using molecular beacon (MB) probes anchored on a CdS QDs modified electrode, and the MB probes contain two segments that can hybridize with both target DNA sequence and the label of DNA encapsulated Ag NCs. After the MB probe was unfolded by the target DNA sequence, the labels of oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag NCs would be brought in close proximity to the CdS QDs electrode surface, and efficient photocurrent quenching of QDs could be resulted from an energy transfer process that originated from NCs. Thus, by monitoring the attenuation in the photocurrent signal, an elegant and sensitive PEC DNA bioanalysis could be accomplished. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0pM to 10nM and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3pM. This work presents a feasible signaling principle that could act as a common basis for general PEC bioanalysis development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Bakhori, Noremylia; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2013-12-01

    An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD) has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA) via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10(-9) M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  20. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noremylia Mohd Bakhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10−9 M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  1. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  2. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M [Ithaca, NY; Edel, Joshua B [Brookline, MA; Samiee, Kevan T [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY

    2008-07-29

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  3. Peptide-mediated intracellular delivery of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B Christoffer

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have received a great amount of interest for use as fluorescent labels in biological applications. QDs are brightly fluorescent and very photostable, satisfying even imaging applications that require single molecule detection at high repetition rates over long periods of time...

  4. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Kateřina; Šebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 24 (2014), s. 5843-5852 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemical analysis * Labeled probes * Osmium complex Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  5. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  6. Amplification of a transcriptionally active DNA sequence in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, A.G.; Sazonov, A.E.; Spunde, A.Ya.; Gindilis, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present their findings of tissue-specific amplification of a DNA fragment actively transcribed in the human brain. This genome fragment was found in the library complement of cDNA of the human brain and evidently belongs to a new class of moderate repetitions of DNA with an unstable copying capacity in the human genome. The authors isolated total cell RNA from various human tissues (brain, placenta), and rat tissues (brain, liver), by the method of hot phenol extraction with guanidine thiocynate. The poly(A + ) RNA fraction was isolated by chromatography. Synthesis of cDNA was done on a matrix of poly(A + ) RNA of human brain. The cDNA obtained was cloned in plasmid pBR322 for the PstI site using (dC/dG) sequences synthesized on the 3' ends of the vector molecule and cDNA respectively. In cloning 75 ng cDNA, the authors obtained approximately 10 5 recombinant. This library was analyzed by the hybridization method on columns with two radioactive ( 32 P) probes: the total cDNA preparation and the total nuclear DNA from the human brain. The number of copies of the cloned DNA fragment in the genome was determined by dot hybridization. Restricting fragments of human and rat DNA genomes homologous to the cloned cDNA were identified on radio-autographs. In each case, 10 micrograms of EcoRI DNA hydrolyzate was fractionated in 1% agarose gel. The probe was also readied with RNA samples fractionated in agarose gel with formaldehyde and transferred to a nitrocellulose filter under weak vacuum. The filter was hybridized with 0.1 micrograms DNA pAG 02, labeled with ( 32 P) to a specific activity of 0.5-1 x 10 9 counts/min x microgram. The autograph was exposed with amplifying screens at -70 0 C for 2 days

  7. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  8. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  9. Quantum dot coating of baculoviral vectors enables visualization of transduced cells and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ying; Lo, Seong Loong; Zheng, Yuangang; Lam, Dang Hoang; Wu, Chunxiao; Han, Ming Yong; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The use of quantum dot (QD)-labeled viral vectors for in vivo imaging is not well investigated. •A new method to label enveloped baculovirus with glutathione-capped CdTe QDs is developed. •The labeling enables the identification of transduced, cultured cells based on fluorescence. •The labeling also allows evaluation of viral transduction in a real-time manner in living mice. •The method has the potential to assess viral vector-based gene therapy protocols in future. -- Abstract: Imaging of transduced cells and tissues is valuable in developing gene transfer vectors and evaluating gene therapy efficacy. We report here a simple method to use bright and photostable quantum dots to label baculovirus, an emerging gene therapy vector. The labeling was achieved through the non-covalent interaction of glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots with the virus envelope, without the use of chemical conjugation. The quantum dot labeling was nondestructive to viral transduction function and enabled the identification of baculoviral vector-transduced, living cells based on red fluorescence. When the labeled baculoviral vectors were injected intravenously or intraventricularly for in vivo delivery of a transgene into mice, quantum dot fluorescence signals allow us monitor whether or not the injected tissues were transduced. More importantly, using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that in vivo viral transduction could be evaluated in a real-time manner in living mice. Thus, our method of labeling a read-to-use gene delivery vector with quantum dots could be useful towards the improvement of vector design and will have the potential to assess baculovirus-based gene therapy protocols in future

  10. Private Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmačková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor Thesis titled Private labels deals with distribution strategy based on the introduction of private labels especially in retail chains. At the beginning it is focused on the general concept of private label offered by retailers, where is mentioned basic characteristics, history and structuring of distribution brands. Subsequently this thesis informs readers about the introduction of new special distribution brands, which focus primarily on the new consumption habits of customers....

  11. Investigation into the incorporation of H3-labelled thymidine into the DNA of a C3H-tumor after irradiation with 35 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfersdorff, J.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation effect on the DNA synthesis of an injected tumor in C 3 H-mice is studied. The tumor is a mammary adenocarcinoma injected into the neck of the animals. A betatron of Brown, Boverie and Cie. of the type Asklepitton 35 is used as radiation source for the generation of fast electrons with an energy of 35 MeV applied to the tumor in the animals through an annular tube of 4 cm in diameter, in the given doses. The tumor-doubling rate during the exponential growth phase is computed to be td = 3.65 days. During irradiation of the tumor, the DNA synthesis is determined by measuring the incorporation of H 3 TdR into the DNA. The results show that the radiation effect on the DNA synthesis is enhanced by every exposure, whereas the additional damage decreases and a recovery can be detected after the first two exposures according to the damage. This study confirms the results of former investigations on tissue cultures. The decisive effect of the radiation is the disturbance of DNA synthesis. Analogous effects can be expected in the irradiation of human tumor cells, though no conclusions can be drawn with regard to fractionation, due to the fast tumor doubling rate of 3.7 days. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Association of protein C23 with rapidly labeled nucleolar RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, A.H.; Olson, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    The association of nucleolar phosphoprotein C23 with preribosomal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles was examined in Novikoff hepatoma nucleoli. RNA was labeled with [ 3 H]uridine for various times in cell suspensions, and RNP particles were extracted from isolated nucleoli and fractionated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The majority of protein C23 cosedimented with fractions containing rapidly labeled RNA (RL fraction). To determine whether there was a direct association of RNA with protein C23, the RL fraction was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (254 nm) for short periods of time. After 2 min of exposure there was a 50% decrease in C23 as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, with no significant further decrease at longer times. When UV-treated fractions were subjected to phenol/chloroform extractions, as much as 30% of the labeled RNA was found in the phenol (protein) layer, indicating that RNA became cross-linked to protein. Similarly, there was an increase in protein C23 extracted into the water layer after irradiation. By SDS-PAGE analyses the cross-linked species migrated more slowly than protein C23, appearing as a smear detected either by [ 3 H]uridine radioactivity or by anti-C23 antibody. With anti-C23 antibodies, up to 25% of the labeled RNA was precipitated from the RL fraction. Dot-blot hybridizations, using cloned rDNA fragments as probes, indicated that the RNA in the RL fraction and the immunoprecipitated RNA contained sequences from 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA

  13. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Shan; Cao, Yuting; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    The CdTe quantum dots (QDs), graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G) and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4) for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1) on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4). Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G), which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2) to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA). The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor. PMID:23685872

  14. Aptamer and 5-fluorouracil dual-loading Ag2S quantum dots used as a sensitive label-free probe for near-infrared photoluminescence turn-on detection of CA125 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Gong, Jun; Huang, Wenxue

    2017-06-15

    In this article, Ag 2 S quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by a facile aqueous synthesis method, using thiourea as a new sulfur precursor. Based on electrostatic interactions, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) was combined with the aptamer of CA125 antigen to fabricate aptamer/5-Fu complex. The surface of as-prepared Ag 2 S QDs was modified with polyethylenimine, followed by combination with the aptamer/5-Fu complex to form Ag 2 S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids. During the combination of Ag 2 S QDs with aptamer/5-Fu complex, near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (PL) of QDs (peaked at 850nm) was markedly reduced under excitation at 625nm, attributed to photo-induced electron transfer from QDs to 5-Fu. However, the addition of CA125 induced obvious NIR PL recovery, which was ascribed to the strong binding affinity of CA125 with its aptamer, and the separation of aptamer/5-Fu complex from the surface of QDs. Hence, the Ag 2 S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids were developed as a novel NIR PL turn-on probe of CA125. In the concentration range of [CA125] from 0.1 to 10 6 ngmL -1 , there were a good linear relationship between NIR PL intensities of Ag 2 S QDs and Log[CA125], and a low limit of detection of 0.07ngmL -1 . Experimental results revealed the highly selective and sensitive NIR PL responses of this probe to CA125, over other potential interferences. In real human body fluids, this probe also exhibited superior analytical performance, together with high detection recoveries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amplified amperometric aptasensor for selective detection of protein using catalase-functional DNA-PtNPs dendrimer as a synergetic signal amplification label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Yuan, Yali; biXie, Shun; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we present a new strategy to construct an electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) based on the synergetic amplification of a three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale catalase (CAT) enzyme-functional DNA-platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) dendrimer through autonomous layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, polyamidoaminedendrimer (PAMAM) with a hyper-branched and three-dimensional structure was served as nanocarriers to coimmobilize a large number of PDGF-BB binding aptamer (PBA II) and ssDNA 1 (S1) to form PBA II-PAMAM-S1 bioconjugate. In the presence of PDGF-BB, the bioconjugate was self-assembled on the electrode by sandwich assay. Following that, the carried S1 propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between CAT-PtNPs-S1 and CAT-PtNPs-ssDNA 2 (S2) to form a 3D nanoscale CAT-functional PtNPs-DNA dendrimer, which successfully immobilized substantial CAT enzyme and PtNPs with superior catalysis activity. In this process, the formed negatively charged double-helix DNA could cause the intercalation of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) into the groove via electrostatic interactions. Thus, numerous RuHex redox probes and CAT were decorated inside/outside of the dendrimer. In the presence of H2O2 in electrolytic cell, the synergistic reaction of CAT and PtNPs towards electrocatalysis could further amplify electrochemical signal. Under optimal condition, the CAT-PtNPs-DNA dendrimer-based sensing system presented a linear dependence between the reduction peak currents and logarithm of PDGF-BB concentrations in the range of 0.00005-35 nM with a relatively low detection limit of 0.02 pM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  17. Aqueous Heck Cross-Coupling Preparation of Acrylate-Modified Nucleotides and Nucleoside Triphosphates for Polymerase Synthesis of Acrylate-Labeled DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daďová, Jitka; Vidláková, Pavlína; Pohl, Radek; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 19 (2013), s. 9627-9637 ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : nucleic-acids * enzymatic incorporation * protein interactions * functionalized DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.638, year: 2013

  18. Biochemistry and biomedicine of quantum dots: from biodetection to bioimaging, drug discovery, diagnostics, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Li, Pingfan; Li, Lin; Yang, Mei

    2018-07-01

    According to recent research, nanotechnology based on quantum dots (QDs) has been widely applied in the field of bioimaging, drug delivery, and drug analysis. Therefore, it has become one of the major forces driving basic and applied research. The application of nanotechnology in bioimaging has been of concern. Through in vitro labeling, it was found that luminescent QDs possess many properties such as narrow emission, broad UV excitation, bright fluorescence, and high photostability. The QDs also show great potential in whole-body imaging. The QDs can be combined with biomolecules, and hence, they can be used for targeted drug delivery and diagnosis. The characteristics of QDs make them useful for application in pharmacy and pharmacology. This review focuses on various applications of QDs, especially in imaging, drug delivery, pharmaceutical analysis, photothermal therapy, biochips, and targeted surgery. Finally, conclusions are made by providing some critical challenges and a perspective of how this field can be expected to develop in the future. Quantum dots (QDs) is an emerging field of interdisciplinary subject that involves physics, chemistry, materialogy, biology, medicine, and so on. In addition, nanotechnology based on QDs has been applied in depth in biochemistry and biomedicine. Some forward-looking fields emphatically reflected in some extremely vital areas that possess inspiring potential applicable prospects, such as immunoassay, DNA analysis, biological monitoring, drug discovery, in vitro labelling, in vivo imaging, and tumor target are closely connected to human life and health and has been the top and forefront in science and technology to date. Furthermore, this review has not only involved the traditional biochemical detection but also particularly emphasized its potential applications in life science and biomedicine. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  20. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Development of a dot blot assay using gene probes for the detection of enteroviruses in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Enteric viruses are viruses which replicate in the intestinal tract of man and animals. One mode of transmission for enteric viruses is the fecal-oral route. Drinking water which has been contaminated with sewage or sewage effluent has been implicated as a means for the spread of enteric viruses. Current methods for the detection of enteric viruses in water requires the use of animal cell culture. This technique has several drawbacks. More rapid techniques, such as fluorescent antibody or radioimmunoassay do not have the needed sensitivity to detect the low levels of virus found in contaminated water. An alternative technique for the detection of viruses in water was sought. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology now makes it possible to detect viruses without the use of cell culture or antibodies. Gene probes that hybridize to the RNA of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus were tested for their ability to detect different enteric viruses. The probes were labeled with 32 P dCTP and 32 P dATP to a specific activity greater then 1.0 x 10 9 cpm/ug DNA. One infectious unit of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus was detected using labeled cDNA probes. Upon comparison, the dot blot assay was as sensitive as tissue culture for the detection of poliovirus in beef extract, secondary effluent, and tap water. Environmental samples, such as secondary effluent, reclaimed wastewater and unchlorinated drinking water were also assayed for poliovirus and hepatitis A virus with the use of gene probes. The results presented here offer an alternative method for screening water samples for the presence of enteric viruses

  2. Aptamer-conjugated dendrimer-modified quantum dots for glioblastoma cells imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiming; Huang Peng; He Rong; Bao Chenchen; Cui Daxiang; Zhang Xiaomin; Ren Qiushi

    2009-01-01

    Targeted quantum dots have shown potential as a platform for development of cancer imaging. Aptamers have recently been demonstrated as ideal candidates for molecular targeting applications. In present work, polyamidoamine dendrimers were used to modify surface of quantum dots and improve their solubility in water solution. Then, dendrimer-modified quantum dots were conjugated with DNA aptamer, GBI-10, can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. The dendrimer-modified quantum dots exhibit water-soluble, high quantum yield, and good biocompatibility. Aptamer-conjugated quantum dots can specifically target U251 human glioblastoma cells. High-performance aptamer-conjugated dendrimers modified quantum dot-based nanoprobes have great potential in application such as cancer imaging.

  3. Fluorescence detection of DNA, adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and telomerase activity by zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX/G-quadruplex labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanxia; Sharon, Etery; Freeman, Ronit; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2012-06-05

    The zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) fluorophore binds to G-quadruplexes, and this results in the enhanced fluorescence of the fluorophore. This property enabled the development of DNA sensors, aptasensors, and a sensor following telomerase activity. The DNA sensor is based on the design of a hairpin structure that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence. Upon opening the hairpin by the analyte DNA, the resulting fluorescence of the ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex provides the readout signal for the sensing event (detection limit 5 nM). Addition of Exonuclease III to the system allows the recycling of the analyte and its amplified analysis (detection limit, 200 pM). The association of the ZnPPIX to G-quadruplex aptamer-substrate complexes allowed the detection of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP, detection limit 10 μM). Finally, the association of ZnPPIX to the G-quadruplex repeat units of telomers allowed the detection of telomerase activity originating from 380 ± 20 cancer 293T cell extract.

  4. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  5. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  6. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-12-05

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  7. Nucleic Acid Sandwich Hybridization Assay with Quantum Dot-Induced Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer for Pathogen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Chung; Huang, Yi-Han

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization assay with a quantum dot (QD)-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter system. Two label-free hemagglutinin H5 sequences (60-mer DNA and 630-nt cDNA fragment) of avian influenza viruses were used as the targets in this work. Two oligonucleotides (16 mers and 18 mers) that specifically recognize two separate but neighboring regions of the H5 sequences were served as the capturing and reporter probes, respectively. The capturing probe was conjugated to QD655 (donor) in a molar ratio of 10:1 (probe-to-QD), and the reporter probe was labeled with Alexa Fluor 660 dye (acceptor) during synthesis. The sandwich hybridization assay was done in a 20 μL transparent, adhesive frame-confined microchamber on a disposable, temperature-adjustable indium tin oxide (ITO) glass slide. The FRET signal in response to the sandwich hybridization was monitored by a homemade optical sensor comprising a single 400 nm UV light-emitting diode (LED), optical fibers, and a miniature 16-bit spectrophotometer. The target with a concentration ranging from 0.5 nM to 1 μM was successfully correlated with both QD emission decrease at 653 nm and dye emission increase at 690 nm. To sum up, this work is beneficial for developing a portable QD-based nucleic acid sensor for on-site pathogen detection. PMID:23211753

  8. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  9. Quantum Dot Nanobioelectronics and Selective Antimicrobial Redox Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel Martin

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have engendered a great deal of interest in applying them for applications ranging from solid state physics to bio-imaging. One class of nanomaterials, known collectively as quantum dots, are defined as semiconducting crystals which have a characteristic dimension smaller than the excitonic radius of the bulk material which leads to quantum confinement effects. In this size regime, excited charge carriers behave like prototypical particles in a box, with their energy levels defined by the dimensions of the constituent particle. This is the source of the tunable optical properties which have drawn a great deal of attention with regards to finding appropriate applications for these materials. This dissertation is divided into multiple sections grouped by the type of application explored. The first sectoin investigates the energetic interactions of physically-coupled quantum dots and DNA, with the goal of gaining insight into how self-assembled molecular wires can bridge the energetic states of physically separated nanocrystals. Chapter 1 begins with an introduction to the properties of quantum dots, the conductive properties of DNA, and the common characterization methods used to characterize materials on the nanoscale. In Chapter 2 scanning tunneling measurements of QD-DNA constructs on the single particle level are presented which show the tunable coupling between the two materials and their resulting hybrid electronic structure. This is expanded upon in Chapter 3 where the conduction of photogenerated charges in QD-DNA hybrid thin films are characterized, which exhibit different charge transfer pathways through the constituent nucleobases depending on the energy of the incident light and resulting electrons. Complementary investigations of energy transfer mediated through DNA are presented in Chapter 4, with confirmation of Dexter-like transfer being facilitated through the oligonucleotides. The second section quantifies the

  10. Labelling patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at how diagnostic radiographers label their patients. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; the way in which radiographers label their patients, is explored in this article. It was found from the study that within the department studied the diagnostic radiographers labelled or categorised their patients based on the information that they had. This information is used to form judgements and these judgements were used to assist the radiographers in dealing with the many different people that they encountered in their work. This categorisation and labelling of the patient appears to assist the radiographer in their decision-making processes about the examination to be carried out and the patient they are to image. This is an important aspect of the role of the diagnostic radiographer. - Highlights: • I have studied the culture in one imaging department. • Radiographers label or categorise their patients. • These labels/categories are used to manage the patient. • This is an important aspect of the way in which radiographers work.

  11. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  12. The dynamics of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation during amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Amelogenesis is a multistep process that relies on specific temporal and spatial signaling networks between the dental epithelium and mesenchymal tissues. Epigenetic modifications of key developmental genes in this process may be closely linked to a network of molecular events. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in amelogenesis remains unclear. Here, we have uncovered the spatial distributions of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) to determine epigenetic events in the mandibular incisors of mice. Immunohistochemistry and dot blotting showed that 5-hmC in ameloblasts increased from the secretory stage to the later maturation stage. We also demonstrated the distribution of 5-mC-positive ameloblasts with punctate nuclear labeling from sometime after the initiation of the secretory stage to the later maturation stage; however, dot blotting failed to detect this change. No obvious alteration of 5-mC/5-hmC staining in odontoblasts and dental pulp cells was observed. Concomitant with quantitative expression data, immunohistochemistry showed that maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells and subsequently decreased at later stages of development. Meanwhile, de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b and DNA demethylase Tet family genes were universally expressed, except Tet1 that was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells. Thus, DNMT1 may sustain the undifferentiated status of dental epithelial cells through the maintenance of DNA methylation, while the hydroxylation of 5-mC may occur through the whole differentiation process by TET activity. Taken together, these data indicate that the dynamic changes of 5-mC and 5-hmC may be critical for the regulation of amelogenesis.

  13. Quantum dots and nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Herman Sander

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), also known as semiconducting nanoparticles, are promising zero-dimensional advanced materials because of their nanoscale size and because they can be engineered to suit particular applications such as nonlinear optical devices (NLO), electro-optical devices, and computing applications. QDs can be joined to polymers in order to produce nanocomposites which can be considered a scientific revolution of the 21st century. One of the fastest moving and most exciting interfaces of nanotechnology is the use of QDs in medicine, cell and molecular biology. Recent advances in nanomaterials have produced a new class of markers and probes by conjugating semiconductor QDs with biomolecules that have affinities for binding with selected biological structures. The nanoscale of QDs ensures that they do not scatter light at visible or longer wavelengths, which is important in order to minimize optical losses in practical applications. Moreover, at this scale, quantum confinement and surface effects become very important and therefore manipulation of the dot diameter or modification of its surface allows the properties of the dot to be controlled. Quantum confinement affects the absorption and emission of photons from the dot. Thus, the absorption edge of a material can be tuned by control of the particle size. This paper reviews developments in the myriad of possibilities for the use of semiconductor QDs associated with molecules producing novel hybrid nanocomposite systems for nanomedicine and bioengineering applications.

  14. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at Quantum Dot 2010 (QD2010). The conference was held in Nottingham, UK, on 26-30 April 2010. The conference addressed topics in research on: 1. Epitaxial quantum dots (including self-assembled and interface structures, dots defined by electrostatic gates etc): optical properties and electron transport quantum coherence effects spin phenomena optics of dots in cavities interaction with surface plasmons in metal/semiconductor structures opto-electronics applications 2. Novel QD structures: fabrication and physics of graphene dots, dots in nano-wires etc 3. Colloidal quantum dots: growth (shape control and hybrid nanocrystals such as metal/semiconductor, magnetic/semiconductor) assembly and surface functionalisation optical properties and spin dynamics electrical and magnetic properties applications (light emitting devices and solar cells, biological and medical applications, data storage, assemblers) The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Maurice Skolnick (Chair) Alexander Tartakovskii (Programme Chair) Pavlos Lagoudakis (Programme Chair) Max Migliorato (Conference Secretary) Paola Borri (Publicity) Robert Taylor (Proceedings) Manus Hayne (Treasurer) Ray Murray (Sponsorship) Mohamed Henini (Local Organiser) International Advisory Committee: Yasuhiko Arakawa (Tokyo University, Japan) Manfred Bayer (Dortmund University, Germany) Sergey Gaponenko (Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk, Belarus) Pawel Hawrylak (NRC, Ottawa, Canada) Fritz Henneberger (Institute for Physics, Berlin, Germany) Atac Imamoglu (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) Paul Koenraad (TU Eindhoven, Nethehrlands) Guglielmo Lanzani (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Jungil Lee (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea) Henri Mariette (CNRS-CEA, Grenoble, France) Lu Jeu Sham (San Diego, USA) Andrew Shields (Toshiba Research Europe, Cambridge, UK) Yoshihisa Yamamoto (Stanford University, USA) Artur

  15. Development of a biotinylated DNA probe for detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, R.E.; Arakawa, C.K.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Landolt, M.L.; Winton, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonrad~oact~ve DNA probe assay was developed to detect and ~dent~fy infect~ous hernatopoiet~c necrosls virus (IHNV) uslng a dot blot format The probe a synthet~c DNA oligonucleot~de labeled enzymatlcally w~th biotln hybnd~zed spec~f~cally w~th nucleocaps~d mRNA extracted from Infected cells early In the vlrus repl~cation cycle A rap~d guan~dln~um th~ocyanate based RNA extraction method uslng RNAzol B and rn~crocentrifuge tubes eff~c~ently pioduced h~gh qual~ty RNA from 3 commonly used f~sh cell llnes, CHSE-214, CHH-1, and EPC The probe reacted with 6 d~verse ~solates of IHNV, but d~d not react \

  16. Chemiprobe, a nonradioactive system for labeling nucleic acid. Principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, I; Reinhartz, A; Hyman, H C; Razin, S; Herzberg, M

    1989-01-01

    The Chemiprobe Kit provides a complete system for nonradioactive labeling of DNA probes and their detection in hybridization studies. The system is highly sensitive, permitting the detection of 0.2-0.4 pg DNA which allows detection of a single gene sequence in 0.5-1 microgram of bacterial DNA or in 3-5 micrograms of mammalian DNA. In this paper the authors show that the rRNA genes of M. capricolum can be detected by using only 50 ng/ml of sulfonated probe cloned from another mycoplasma, M. pneumoniae. The Chemiprobe system has been successfully used in the detection of the single copy human gene for glucocerobrosidase from total embryonic DNA by hybridization to a specific sulfonated cDNA. 5 x 10(4) M. pneumoniae cells can be detected either free or mixed with sputum using a standard dot blot technique: mycoplasma cells were lysed by a mucolytic agent, denaturated by NaOH, immobilized on a nylon membrane filter, and then hybridized with pPN4, a plasmid DNA probe specific for M. pneumoniae. The resulting hybrids were then detected by the standard Chemiprobe procedure. A new kit based on the Chemiprobe system has been designed especially for the detection of mycoplasmas in tissue culture. This kit has been tested on 70 random samples collected from tissue culture fluids from 11 different sources. Of these, 42 were found to be contaminated by the Chemiprobe procedure, whereas 41 were found to be contaminated by classical microbiological methods. No false negatives were found.

  17. Real-time colorimetric detection of DNA methylation of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings for cervical cancer screening with thiol-labeled PCR primers and gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin Huang,1,2 Yu-Ligh Liou,1,2 Ya-Nan Kang,3 Zhi-Rong Tan,1,2 Ming-Jing Peng,1,2 Hong-Hao Zhou1,2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 2Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Background: DNA methylation can induce carcinogenesis by silencing key tumor suppressor genes. Analysis of aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor genes can be used as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for cancer. In this study, we propose a colorimetric method for the detection of DNA methylation of the paired box gene 1 (PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings obtained from 42 patients who underwent cervical colposcopic biopsy. Methods: A thiolated methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP primer was used to generate MSP products labeled with the thiol group at one end. After bisulfite conversion and MSP amplification, the unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs were placed in a reaction tube and NaCl was added to induce aggregation of bare AuNPs without generating polymerase chain reaction products. After salt addition, the color of AuNPs remained red in the methylated PAX1 gene samples because of binding to the MSP-amplified products. By contrast, the color of the AuNP colloid solution changed from red to blue in the non-methylated PAX1 gene samples because of aggregation of AuNPs in the absence of the MSP-amplified products. Furthermore, PAX1 methylation was quantitatively detected in cervical scrapings of patients with varied pathological degrees of cervical cancer. Conventional quantitative MSP (qMSP was also performed for comparison. Results: The two methods showed a significant correlation of the methylation frequency of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings with severity of cervical cancer (n=42, P<0.05. The results of the

  18. Quantum Dot-based Immunohistochemistry for Pathological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are novel light emitting semiconductor nanocrystals with diameter ranging from 2 to 20 nm. In comparison with traditional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, QDs possess unique optical properties including extremely high fluorescence efficiency and minimal photobleaching which make them emerge as a new class of fluorescent labels for molecular imaging and biomedical analysis. Herein, recent advances in fundamental mechanisms and pathological applications of QD were reviewed.

  19. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Urara; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Hirano, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH 2 ). The CHPNH 2 -QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging

  20. Cellular uptake, nuclear localization and cytotoxicity of 125I-labelled DNA minor groove binding ligands in K562, human erythroleukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, T.C.; Lobachevsky, P.N.; Martin, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Iodine-125 decays by orbital electron capture and internal conversion resulting in the emission of numerous Auger electrons which produce a highly localised radiochemical damage in the immediate vicinity of the site of decay. Given the requirement to deliver 125 I to the nuclear DNA, a minor groove binding bibenzimidazole, 125 I-iodoHoechst 33258 was investigated. It has been noted that this analogue may be prone to de-iodination in vitro and in vivo, given the presence of an orthoiodophenol moiety which is analogous to that in thyroxins. Therefore, an 125 I -iodoHoechst analogue without the hydroxyl group was also studied. The 125 I -iodoHoechst 33258 analogue was prepared by direct iodination of Hoechst 33258 and 125 I iodoHoechst was prepared by demetallation of a trimethylstannyl precursor. DNA binding studies indicated that both iodo-analogues bind to calf thymus DNA, K D = 89 ± 30nM, n = 0.018 bp - 1 for iodoHoechst 33258 and K D = 121 ± 31nM, n = 0.024 bp -1 for iodoHoechst. Similarly, nuclear localization following incubation with 5μM of either ligand at 37 deg C was observed in K562 cells by fluorescence microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the kinetics of drug uptake and efflux in K562 cells. The results indicated that when 10 6 cells were incubated with 5μM ligand at 37 deg C, the uptake reached a plateau at approximately 43 minutes for iodoHoechst 33258 and approximately 52 minutes for iodoHoechst. Ligand efflux results indicated two-phase kinetics. The initial phase which involves 50-60% of drug was characterised by a half-life time (t 1/2 ) of 55.4 minutes for efflux of iodoHoechst 33258 and a t 1/2 of 10.3 minutes for efflux of iodoHoechst, at 37 deg C. Furthermore, the results suggested that the DNA binding sites in a 10 6 cell/ml suspension were saturated by incubation with 3μM iodoHoechst 33258 and 5μM iodoHoechst. In the initial cytotoxicity experiments using 125 I-iodoHoechst 33258, K562 cells were incubated for 1

  1. Stable isotope labeling-mass spectrometry analysis of methyl- and pyridyloxobutyl-guanine adducts of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone in p53-derived DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Mathur; Wang, Gang; Jones, Roger; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2005-02-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is a primary target in smoking-induced lung cancer. Interestingly, p53 mutations observed in lung tumors of smokers are concentrated at guanine bases within endogenously methylated (Me)CG dinucleotides, e.g., codons 157, 158, 245, 248, and 273 ((Me)C = 5-methylcytosine). One possible mechanism for the increased mutagenesis at these sites involves targeted binding of metabolically activated tobacco carcinogens to (Me)CG sequences. In the present work, a stable isotope labeling HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS approach was employed to analyze the formation of guanine lesions induced by the tobacco-specific lung carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) within DNA duplexes representing p53 mutational "hot spots" and surrounding sequences. Synthetic DNA duplexes containing p53 codons 153-159, 243-250, and 269-275 were prepared, where (Me)C was incorporated at all physiologically methylated CG sites. In each duplex, one of the guanine bases was replaced with [1,7,NH(2)-(15)N(3)-2-(13)C]-guanine, which served as an isotope "tag" to enable specific quantification of guanine lesions originating from that position. After incubation with NNK diazohydroxides, HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis was used to determine the yields of NNK adducts at the isotopically labeled guanine and at unlabeled guanine bases elsewhere in the sequence. We found that N7-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine and N7-[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)but-1-yl]guanine lesions were overproduced at the 3'-guanine bases within polypurine runs, while the formation of O(6)-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine and O(6)-[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)but-1-yl]-2'-deoxyguanosine adducts was specifically preferred at the 3'-guanine base of 5'-GG and 5'-GGG sequences. In contrast, the presence of 5'-neighboring (Me)C inhibited O(6)-guanine adduct formation. These results indicate that the N7- and O(6)-guanine adducts of NNK are not overproduced at the endogenously methylated CG dinucleotides within the p53 tumor suppressor gene

  2. Super-resolution optical DNA Mapping via DNA methyltransferase-directed click chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vranken, Charlotte; Deen, Jochem; Dirix, Lieve

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to optical DNA mapping, which enables near single-molecule characterization of whole bacteriophage genomes. Our approach uses a DNA methyltransferase enzyme to target labelling to specific sites and copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition to couple a fluorophore...... to the DNA. We achieve a labelling efficiency of ∼70% with an average labelling density approaching one site every 500 bp. Such labelling density bridges the gap between the output of a typical DNA sequencing experiment and the long-range information derived from traditional optical DNA mapping. We lay...... the foundations for a wider-scale adoption of DNA mapping by screening 11 methyltransferases for their ability to direct sequence-specific DNA transalkylation; the first step of the DNA labelling process and by optimizing reaction conditions for fluorophore coupling via a click reaction. Three of 11 enzymes...

  3. Specific dot-immunobinding assay for detection and enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo, R.; Jerez, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A specific and very sensitive dot-immunobinding assay for the detection and enumeration of the bioleaching microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was developed. Nitrocellulose spotted with samples was incubated with polyclonal antisera against whole T. ferrooxidans cells and then in 125 I-labeled protein A or 125 I-labeled goat antirabbit immunoglobulin G; incubation was followed by autoradiography. Since a minimum of 10 3 cells per dot could be detected, the method offers the possibility of simultaneous processing of numerous samples in a short time to monitor the levels of T. ferrooxidans in bioleaching operations

  4. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  5. Quantum Dot Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnischtzke, Laura A.

    We report on several experiments using single excitons confined to single semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Electric and magnetic fields have previously been used as experimental knobs to understand and control individual excitons in single quantum dots. We realize new ways of electric field control by changing materials and device geometry in the first two experiments with strain-based InAs QDs. A standard Schottky diode heterostructure is demonstrated with graphene as the Schottky gate material, and its performance is bench-marked against a diode with a standard gate material, semi-transparent nickel-chromium (NiCr). This change of materials increases the photon collection rate by eliminating absorption in the metallic NiCr layer. A second set of experiments investigates the electric field response of QDs as a possible metrology source. A linear voltage potential drop in a plane near the QDs is used to describe how the spatially varying voltage profile is also imparted on the QDs. We demonstrate a procedure to map this voltage profile as a preliminary route towards a full quantum sensor array. Lastly, InAs QDs are explored as potential spin-photon interfaces. We describe how a magnetic field is used to realize a reversible exchange of information between light and matter, including a discussion of the polarization-dependence of the photoluminesence, and how that can be linked to the spin of a resident electron or hole. We present evidence of this in two wavelength regimes for InAs quantum dots, and discuss how an external magnetic field informs the spin physics of these 2-level systems. This thesis concludes with the discovery of a new class of quantum dots. As-yet unidentified defect states in single layer tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) are shown to host quantum light emission. We explore the spatial extent of electron confinement and tentatively identify a radiative lifetime of 1 ns for these single photon emitters.

  6. The DNA relaxation activity and covalent complex accumulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be assayed in Escherichia coli: application for identification of potential FRET-dye labeling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrenica Maria V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MtTOP1 and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I have highly homologous transesterification domains, but the two enzymes have distinctly different C-terminal domains. To investigate the structure-function of MtTOP1 and to target its activity for development of new TB therapy, it is desirable to have a rapid genetic assay for its catalytic activity, and potential bactericidal consequence from accumulation of its covalent complex. Results We show that plasmid-encoded recombinant MtTOP1 can complement the temperature sensitive topA function of E. coli strain AS17. Moreover, expression of MtTOP1-G116 S enzyme with the TOPRIM mutation that inhibits DNA religation results in SOS induction and loss of viability in E. coli. The absence of cysteine residues in the MtTOP1 enzyme makes it an attractive system for introduction of potentially informative chemical or spectroscopic probes at specific positions via cysteine mutagenesis. Such probes could be useful for development of high throughput screening (HTS assays. We employed the AS17 complementation system to screen for sites in MtTOP1 that can tolerate cysteine substitution without loss of complementation function. These cysteine substitution mutants were confirmed to have retained the relaxation activity. One such mutant of MtTOP1 was utilized for fluorescence probe incorporation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement with fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Conclusions The DNA relaxation and cleavage complex accumulation of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be measured with genetic assays in E. coli, facilitating rapid analysis of its activities, and discovery of new TB therapy targeting this essential enzyme.

  7. Quantum dot solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamefula, U.C.; Sulaiman, M.Y.; Sopian, K.; Ibarahim, Z.; Ibrahim, N.; Alghoul, M.A.; Haw, L.C.; Yahya, M.; Amin, N.; Mat, S.; Ruslan, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The much awaited desire of replacing fossil fuel with photovoltaic will remain a fairy tale if the myriad of issues facing solar cell development are marginalized. Foremost in the list is the issue of cost. Silicon has reached a stage where its use on large scale can no longer be lavishly depended upon. The demand for high grade silicon from the microelectronics and solar industries has soared leading to scarcity. New approach has to be sought. Notable is the increased attention on thin films such as cadmium telluride, copper indium gallium diselenide, amorphous silicon, and the not so thin non-crystalline family of silicon. While efforts to address the issues of stability, toxicity and efficiency of these systems are ongoing, another novel approach is quietly making its appearance - quantum dots. Quantum dots seem to be promising candidates for solar cells because of the opportunity to manipulate their energy levels allowing absorption of a wider solar spectrum. Utilization of minute quantity of these nano structures is enough to bring the cost of solar cell down and to ascertain sustainable supply of useful material. The paper outlines the progress that has been made on quantum dot solar cells. (author)

  8. A review on syntheses, properties, characterization and bioanalytical applications of fluorescent carbon dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Pengli; Lu, Xiuhua; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Yuhan; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) are a kind of fluorescent nanoparticles that are strongly fluorescent, non-blinking, and can be easily synthesized at low cost. Their emission color can be tuned by varying the excitation wavelength. Their properties make them strong competitors to semiconductor quantum dots. Synthetic approaches for C-dots can be classified into two categories, viz. top-down and bottom-up methods. Surface passivated and functionalized C-dots can be utilized to sense pH values, metal ions and organic molecules. Owing to their low cytotoxicity, biocompatibility and impressive photostability, long-term observations become possible. C-dots also show promise as labels and for bioimaging. This review (with 142 refs.) is divided into several sections. The first covers commonly used methods for preparation of C-dots including laser ablation, arc discharge, electrochemical methods, pyrolytic processes, template based methods, microwave assisted methods, chemical oxidation methods, reverse micelle based methods, etc. The first section also covers methods for surface functionalization and passivation. We continue by discussing the spectroscopic properties and other physical and chemical properties of C-dots (fluorescence, up-conversion fluorescence, methods for enhancing photoluminescence, effects of pH value, cytotoxicity, etc.). Another section covers the characterization including TEM and XRD. Applications in biology are summarized and subdivided into in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, chemical probe, quantitation of biomacromolecules, but also in drug delivery, photoacoustic imaging and anticancer therapy. We finally discuss current challenges and perspectives in this promising field. (author)

  9. DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Eric A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2010-08-02

    DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) is a powerful technique for identifying active microorganisms that assimilate particular carbon substrates and nutrients into cellular biomass. As such, this cultivation-independent technique has been an important methodology for assigning metabolic function to the diverse communities inhabiting a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Following the incubation of an environmental sample with stable-isotope labelled compounds, extracted nucleic acid is subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation and subsequent gradient fractionation to separate nucleic acids of differing densities. Purification of DNA from cesium chloride retrieves labelled and unlabelled DNA for subsequent molecular characterization (e.g. fingerprinting, microarrays, clone libraries, metagenomics). This JoVE video protocol provides visual step-by-step explanations of the protocol for density gradient ultracentrifugation, gradient fractionation and recovery of labelled DNA. The protocol also includes sample SIP data and highlights important tips and cautions that must be considered to ensure a successful DNA-SIP analysis.

  10. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S.

    1989-01-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe [5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)] is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection

  11. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  12. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention......The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  13. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  14. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  15. Silicon quantum dots: surface matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnalová, K.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Kůsová, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 17 (2014), 1-28 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon quantum dots * quantum dot * surface chemistry * quantum confinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  16. Phosphorene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Mazumder, Madhulika; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional material, has been a subject of recent investigations. In the present study, we have prepared blue fluorescent phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) by liquid phase exfoliation of black phosphorus in two non-polar solvents, toluene and mesitylene. The average particle sizes of PQDs decrease from 5.0 to 1.0 nm on increasing the sonicator power from 150 to 225 W. The photoluminescence spectrum of the PQDs is red-shifted in the 395-470 nm range on increasing the excitation-wavelength from 300 to 480 nm. Electron donor and acceptor molecules quench the photoluminescence, with the acceptors showing more marked effects.

  17. Radiobiology with DNA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.; Argentini, M.; Guenther, I.; Koziorowski, J.; Larsson, B.; Nievergelt-Egido, M.C.; Salt, C.; Wyer, L.; Dos Santos, D.F.; Hansen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: labelling of DNA ligands and other tumour-affinic compounds with 4.15-d 124 I, radiotoxicity of Hoechst 33258 and 33342 and of iodinated Hoechst 33258 in cell cultures, preparation of 76 Br-, 123 I-, and 221 At-labelled 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine, chemical syntheses of boron derivatives of Hoechst 33258.III., Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

  18. Green biosynthesis of biocompatible CdSe quantum dots in living Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Qian, Jing; Su, Yilong; Ai, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shengmei; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-01-01

    A green and efficient biosynthesis method to prepare fluorescence-tunable biocompatible cadmium selenide quantum dots using Escherichia coli cells as biological matrix was proposed. Decisive factors in biosynthesis of cadmium selenide quantum dots in a designed route in Escherichia coli cells were elaborately investigated, including the influence of the biological matrix growth stage, the working concentration of inorganic reactants, and the co-incubation duration of inorganic metals to biomatrix. Ultraviolet-visible, photoluminescence, and inverted fluorescence microscope analysis confirmed the unique optical properties of the biosynthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots. The size distribution of the nanocrystals extracted from cells and the location of nanocrystals foci in vivo were also detected seriously by transmission electron microscopy. A surface protein capping layer outside the nanocrystals was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, which were supposed to contribute to reducing cytotoxicity and maintain a high viability of cells when incubating with quantum dots at concentrations as high as 2 μM. Cell morphology observation indicated an effective labeling of living cells by the biosynthesized quantum dots after a 48 h co-incubation. The present work demonstrated an economical and environmentally friendly approach to fabricating highly fluorescent quantum dots which were expected to be an excellent fluorescent dye for broad bio-imaging and labeling. (papers)

  19. Detection of Marek's disease virus DNA in Japanese quail susceptible to atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrzak, R.; Shih, J.C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) was demonstrated as an etiological agent which causes atherosclerosis in the chicken. Since herpes viruses are ubiquitous, incidences of viral atherogenesis in humans and other animals were speculated. In this laboratory, the atherosclerosis susceptible (SUS) and resistant (RES) Japanese quail were developed as the animal model for atherosclerosis research. The susceptibility of the animal might be due to an infection of MDV or a related quail herpes virus (QHV). An initial attempt to isolate viruses from quail and an agar gel precipitin test for MDC were not positive. A DNA hybridization technique was used to determine whether the MDC-DNA existed in the quail cell. The gene library of MDV EcoRl DNA fragments was used to prepare the DNA probe, labeled with [ 32 P] by nick translation. Dot hybridizations were carried out by mixing the MDV-DNA probe with DNAs isolated from quail tissues. A high stringent condition was used. From this experiment it was found that the tissues from the SUS quail were hybridization positive, but most of them from RES quail were negative. When aortas were compared, the severe atherosclerotic had a strong hybridization (3-4 cop. of genome/cell) whereas the others hybridized moderately (1 cop./cell). It was concluded that genes from MDV or a QHV indeed existed in Japanese quail

  20. Graphene-palladium nanowires based electrochemical sensor using ZnFe2O4-graphene quantum dots as an effective peroxidase mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ding, Ya-nan; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2014-12-10

    We proposed an electrochemical DNA sensor by using peroxidase-like magnetic ZnFe2O4-graphene quantum dots (ZnFe2O4/GQDs) nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic label. Aminated graphene and Pd nanowires were successively modified on glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate as well as increased the amount of immobilized capture ssDNA (S1). The nanohybrid ZnFe2O4/GQDs was prepared by assembling the GQDs on the surface of ZnFe2O4 through a photo-Fenton reaction, which was not only used as a mimic enzyme but also as a carrier to label complementary ssDNA (S3). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically activity of nano-sized GQDs and ZnFe2O4, the nanohybrid possessed highly-efficient peroxidase-like catalytic activity which could produce a large current toward the reduction of H2O2 for signal amplification. Thionine was used as an excellent electron mediator. Compared with traditional enzyme labels, the mimic enzyme ZnFe2O4/GQDs exhibited many advantages such as environment friendly and better stability. Under the optimal conditions, the approach provided a wide linear range from 10(-16) to 5×10(-9) M and low detection limit of 6.2×10(-17) M. The remarkable high catalytic capability could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based assay systems. The new, robust and convenient assay systems can be widely utilized for the identification of other target molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Label triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Label Triangulation (LT) with neutrons allows the investigation of the quaternary structure of biological multicomponent complexes under native conditions. Provided that the complex can be fully separated into and reconstituted from its single - protonated and deuterated - components, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can give selective information on shapes and pair distances of these components. Following basic geometrical rules, the spatial arrangement of the components can be reconstructed from these data. LT has so far been successfully applied to the small and large ribosomal subunits and the transcriptase of E. coli. (author)

  2. DNA-based Nanoconstructs for the Detection of Ions and Biomolecules with Related Raman/SERS Signature Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Kimber L.

    The utilization of DNA aptamers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of ions and biomolecules was investigated. In recent years, there have been many studies based on the use of DNA and RNA aptamers, which are single stranded oligonucleotides capable of binding to biomolecules, other molecules, and ions. In many of these cases, the conformational changes of these DNA and RNA aptamers are suitable to use fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) or nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) techniques to detect such analytes. Coupled with this growth in such uses of aptamers, there has been an expanded use of semiconductor quantum dots as brighter, longer-lasting alternatives to fluorescent dyes in labeling and detection techniques of interest in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) and a zinc aptamer were used to detect mercury, lead, zinc, and cadmium. These probes were tested in a liquid assay as well as on a filter paper coupon. Biomolecules were also studied and detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), including DNA aptamers and C-reactive protein (CRP). Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for sensor development, label-free detection, and has the potential for remote sensing. Raman spectra provide information on the vibrational modes or phonons, between and within molecules. Therefore, unique spectral fingerprints for single molecules can be obtained. SERS is accomplished through the use of substrates with nanometer scale geometries made of metals with many free electrons, such as silver, gold, or copper. In this research silver SERS substrates were used to study the SERS signature of biomolecules that typically produce very weak Raman signals.

  3. Printer model for dot-on-dot halftone screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Raja

    1995-04-01

    A printer model is described for dot-on-dot halftone screens. For a given input CMYK signal, the model predicts the resulting spectral reflectance of the printed patch. The model is derived in two steps. First, the C, M, Y, K dot growth functions are determined which relate the input digital value to the actual dot area coverages of the colorants. Next, the reflectance of a patch is predicted as a weighted combination of the reflectances of the four solid C, M, Y, K patches and their various overlays. This approach is analogous to the Neugebauer model, with the random mixing equations being replaced by dot-on-dot mixing equations. A Yule-Neilsen correction factor is incorporated to account for light scattering within the paper. The dot area functions and Yule-Neilsen parameter are chosen to optimize the fit to a set of training data. The model is also extended to a cellular framework, requiring additional measurements. The model is tested with a four color xerographic printer employing a line-on-line halftone screen. CIE L*a*b* errors are obtained between measurements and model predictions. The Yule-Neilsen factor significantly decreases the model error. Accuracy is also increased with the use of a cellular framework.

  4. A label-free ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of viable Salmonella enteritidis using enzyme-induced cascade two-stage toehold strand-displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Ma, Suzhen; Men, Shuai; Li, Qingzhou; Yang, Xin; Wang, Hongning; Zhang, Anyun

    2016-06-15

    The harm of Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis ) to public health mainly by contaminating fresh food and water emphasizes the urgent need for rapid detection techniques to help control the spread of the pathogen. In this assay, an newly designed capture probe complex that contained specific S. enteritidis-aptamer and hybridized signal target sequence was used for viable S. enteritidis recognition directly. In the presence of the target S. enteritidis, single-stranded target sequences were liberated and initiated the replication-cleavage reaction, producing numerous G-quadruplex structures with a linker on the 3'-end. And then, the sensing system took innovative advantage of quadratic linker-induced strand-displacement for the first time to release target sequence in succession, leading to the cyclic reuse of the target sequences and cascade signal amplification, thereby achieving the successive production of G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binded to these G-quadruplex structures and generated significantly enhanced fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of S. enteritidis down to 60 CFU/mL with a linear range from 10(2) to 10(7)CFU/mL. By coupling the cascade two-stage target sequences-recyclable toehold strand-displacement with aptamer-based target recognition successfully, it is the first report on a novel non-label, modification-free and DNA extraction-free ultrasensitive fluorescence biosensor for detecting viable S. enteritidis directly, which can discriminate from dead S. enteritidis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantum dots trace lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Alex L C; Gupta, Neeru; Zhang Zhexue; Yuecel, Yeni H, E-mail: yucely@smh.ca [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, M5T 2S8 (Canada)

    2011-10-21

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, often associated with elevated eye pressure. Currently, all glaucoma treatments aim to lower eye pressure by improving fluid exit from the eye. We recently reported the presence of lymphatics in the human eye. The lymphatic circulation is known to drain fluid from organ tissues and, as such, lymphatics may also play a role in draining fluid from the eye. We investigated whether lymphatic drainage from the eye is present in mice by visualizing the trajectory of quantum dots once injected into the eye. Whole-body hyperspectral fluorescence imaging was performed in 17 live mice. In vivo imaging was conducted prior to injection, and 5, 20, 40 and 70 min, and 2, 6 and 24 h after injection. A quantum dot signal was observed in the left neck region at 6 h after tracer injection into the eye. Examination of immunofluorescence-labelled sections using confocal microscopy showed the presence of a quantum dot signal in the left submandibular lymph node. This is the first direct evidence of lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye. The use of quantum dots to image this lymphatic pathway in vivo is a novel tool to stimulate new treatments to reduce eye pressure and prevent blindness from glaucoma.

  6. Quantum dots trace lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Alex L C; Gupta, Neeru; Zhang Zhexue; Yuecel, Yeni H

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, often associated with elevated eye pressure. Currently, all glaucoma treatments aim to lower eye pressure by improving fluid exit from the eye. We recently reported the presence of lymphatics in the human eye. The lymphatic circulation is known to drain fluid from organ tissues and, as such, lymphatics may also play a role in draining fluid from the eye. We investigated whether lymphatic drainage from the eye is present in mice by visualizing the trajectory of quantum dots once injected into the eye. Whole-body hyperspectral fluorescence imaging was performed in 17 live mice. In vivo imaging was conducted prior to injection, and 5, 20, 40 and 70 min, and 2, 6 and 24 h after injection. A quantum dot signal was observed in the left neck region at 6 h after tracer injection into the eye. Examination of immunofluorescence-labelled sections using confocal microscopy showed the presence of a quantum dot signal in the left submandibular lymph node. This is the first direct evidence of lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye. The use of quantum dots to image this lymphatic pathway in vivo is a novel tool to stimulate new treatments to reduce eye pressure and prevent blindness from glaucoma.

  7. Synthesis and properties of core–shell fluorescent hybrids with distinct morphologies based on carbon dots

    KAUST Repository

    Markova, Zdenka; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Safarova, Klara; Polakova, Katerina; Tucek, Jiri; Medrik, Ivo; Siskova, Karolina; Petr, Jan; Krysmann, Marta; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent core-shell nanohybrids with the shells derived from carbon dots and cores differing in the chemical nature and morphology were synthesized. Hybrid nanoparticles combine fluorescence with other functionalities such as magnetic response on a single platform. These hybrids can be used in various bioapplications as demonstrated with labeling of stem cells. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  8. Visualization of plasma membrane compartmentalization by high-speed quantum dot tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have imaged plasma membrane molecules labeled with quantum dots in live cells using a conventional wide-field microscope with high spatial precision at sampling frequencies of 1.75 kHz. Many of the resulting single molecule trajectories are sufficiently long (up to several...

  9. Improved thermal cycling durability and PCR compatibility of polymer coated quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun Zhe; Guan Yifu; Zhao Xiaoyun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots have experienced rapid development in imaging, labeling and sensing in medicine and life science. To be suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, we have tested QD thermal cycling durability and compatibility, which have not been addressed in previous reports. In this study, we synthesized CdSe/ZnS QDs with a surface modification with high-MW amphiphilic copolymers and observed that Mg 2+ ions in the PCR reaction could induce the QDs to precipitate and reduce their fluorescence signal significantly after thermal cycling. To overcome this problem, we used mPEG2000 to conjugate the QD surface for further protection, and found that this modification enables QDs to endure 40 thermal cycles in the presence of other components essential for PCR reactions. We have also identified that QDs have different effects on rTaq and Ex Taq polymerization systems. A high QD concentration could apparently reduce the PCR efficiency, but this inhibition was relieved significantly in the Ex PCR system as the concentration of Ex Taq polymerase was increased. Real-time PCR amplification results showed that QDs could provide a sufficiently measurable fluorescence signal without excessively inhibiting the DNA amplification. Based on this improved thermal cycling durability and compatibility with the PCR system, QDs have the potential to be developed as stable fluorescent sensors in PCR and real-time PCR amplification. (paper)

  10. Biocompatible Water Soluble Polyacrylic Acid Coated CdSe/Cu Quantum Dot Conjugates for Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Ola M; Okasha, Aly; Hosni, Hany M; El-Hag Ali, Amr

    2018-01-01

    Biocompatible polyacrylic acid functionalized CdSe/Cu quantum dot conjugates were synthesized to be used for biomolecules detection. The study results demonstrate the conjugation of the 2.5-3 nm QD with gram negative bacteria with a low detection limit of 28 cfu/ml. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity was correlated to bacterial count, cellular proteins and exopolysaccharides in the tested samples. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) images showed significant QD uptake within the cells, both cytoplasm and DNA were the predominant targeted biomolecules, higher fluorescent uptake was shown in gram negative bacteria than that observed for gram positive bacteria. Moreover, PL showed that there was a distinction between live and dead cells as well as gram negative and gram positive cells. Cell viability was not affected even after 6 days (100% viability) rendering it a non-toxic QD. The method is simple and is performed in a single step within approximately 10 min as compared to multi-step protocols for classical microbial count or fluorescent dye staining. All the above results indicate that the CdSe/Cu-PAA QDs are suitable for biomolecule detection, bio-labeling and bioimaging applications.

  11. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  12. Graphene based quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H G; Hu, H; Pan, Y; Mao, J H; Gao, M; Guo, H M; Du, S X; Greber, T; Gao, H-J

    2010-08-04

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  13. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows: 1......) QD blinking and bleaching statistics, 2) the use of QDs in high speed single particle tracking with a special focus on how to design the biofunctional coatings of QDs which enable specific targeting to single proteins or lipids of interest, 3) a hybrid lipid-DNA analogue binding QDs which allows...... for tracking single lipids in lipid bilayers, 4) two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of QDs and 5) optical trapping and excitation of single QDs. In all of these applications, the focus is on the single particle sensitivity level of QDs. The high applicability of QDs in live cell imaging...

  14. PennDOT : fact book

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    PennDOT was created in 1970 when the former : Department of Highways was merged with transportation related : functions from the Departments of Revenue, : Commerce, Community Affairs and Military Affairs. With : an annual budget of about $5.4 billion...

  15. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishnoi, Dimple [Department of Physics, S. S. Jain Subodh PG College, Jaipur, Rajasthan Pin-302004 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including “waste heat” from the sun’s energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  16. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  17. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  18. Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-08-07

    A method is described whereby quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can be used for correlative immunocytochemical studies of human pathology tissue using widefield fluorescence light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To demonstrate the protocol we have immunolabeled ultrathin epoxy sections of human somatostatinoma tumor using a primary antibody to somatostatin, followed by a biotinylated secondary antibody and visualization with streptavidin conjugated 585 nm cadmium-selenium (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The sections are mounted on a TEM specimen grid then placed on a glass slide for observation by widefield fluorescence light microscopy. Light microscopy reveals 585 nm QD labeling as bright orange fluorescence forming a granular pattern within the tumor cell cytoplasm. At low to mid-range magnification by light microscopy the labeling pattern can be easily recognized and the level of non-specific or background labeling assessed. This is a critical step for subsequent interpretation of the immunolabeling pattern by TEM and evaluation of the morphological context. The same section is then blotted dry and viewed by TEM. QD probes are seen to be attached to amorphous material contained in individual secretory granules. Images are acquired from the same region of interest (ROI) seen by light microscopy for correlative analysis. Corresponding images from each modality may then be blended to overlay fluorescence data on TEM ultrastructure of the corresponding region.

  19. The quantum mechanical description of the dot-dot interaction in ionic colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, P.C.; Qu, Fanyao

    2007-01-01

    In this study the dot-dot interaction in ionic colloids is systematically investigated by self-consistently solving the coupled Schroedinger and Poisson equations in the frame of finite difference method (FDM). In a first approximation the interacting two-dot system (dimer) is described using the picture of two coupled quantum wells. It was found that the dot-dot interaction changes the colloid characteristic by changing the hopping coefficient (t) and consequently the nanodot surface charge density (σ). The hopping coefficient and the surface charge density were investigated as a function of the dot size and dot-dot distance

  20. Enzymatic Ligation of Large Biomolecules to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Schaffert, David Henning

    2013-01-01

    The ability to synthesize, characterize, and manipulate DNA forms the foundation of a range of advanced disciplines including genomics, molecular biology, and biomolecular engineering. In particular for the latter field, DNA has proven useful as a structural or functional component in nanoscale s....... As a proof of principle, parallelly labeled oligonucleotides were used to produce nanopatterned DNA origami structures, demonstrating rapid and versatile incorporation of non-DNA components into DNA nanoarchitectures....

  1. Understanding Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy eating for girls Understanding food labels Understanding food labels There is lots of info on food ... need to avoid because of food allergies. Other food label terms top In addition to the Nutrition ...

  2. Quantum Dots: Proteomics characterization of the impact on biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, Stefano; Boschi, F.; Calderan, L.; Sbarbati, A.; Osculati, F.

    2009-05-01

    Over the past few years, Quantum Dots have been tested in most biotechnological applications that use fluorescence, including DNA array technology, immunofluorescence assays, cell and animal biology. Quantum Dots tend to be brighter than conventional dyes, because of the compounded effects of extinction coefficients that are an order of magnitude larger than those of most dyes. Their main advantage resides in their resistance to bleaching over long periods of time (minutes to hours), allowing the acquisition of images that are crisp and well contrasted. This increased photostability is especially useful for three-dimensional (3D) optical sectioning, where a major issue is bleaching of fluorophores during acquisition of successive z-sections, which compromises the correct reconstruction of 3D structures. The long-term stability and brightness of Quantum Dots make them ideal candidates also for live animal targeting and imaging. The vast majority of the papers published to date have shown no relevant effects on cells viability at the concentration used for imaging applications; higher concentrations, however, caused some issues on embryonic development. Adverse effects are due to be caused by the release of cadmium, as surface PEGylation of the Quantum Dots reduces these issues. A recently published paper shows evidences of an epigenetic effect of Quantum Dots treatment, with general histones hypoacetylation, and a translocation to the nucleus of p53. In this study, mice treated with Quantum Dots for imaging purposes were analyzed to investigate the impact on protein expression and networking. Differential mono-and bidimensional electrophoresis assays were performed, with the individuation of differentially expressed proteins after intravenous injection and imaging analysis; further, as several authors indicate an increase in reactive oxygen species as a possible mean of damage due to the Quantum Dots treatment, we investigated the signalling pathway of APE1/Ref1, a

  3. Quantum Dots: Proteomics characterization of the impact on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi-Mucelli, Stefano; Osculati, F; Boschi, F; Calderan, L; Sbarbati, A

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, Quantum Dots have been tested in most biotechnological applications that use fluorescence, including DNA array technology, immunofluorescence assays, cell and animal biology. Quantum Dots tend to be brighter than conventional dyes, because of the compounded effects of extinction coefficients that are an order of magnitude larger than those of most dyes. Their main advantage resides in their resistance to bleaching over long periods of time (minutes to hours), allowing the acquisition of images that are crisp and well contrasted. This increased photostability is especially useful for three-dimensional (3D) optical sectioning, where a major issue is bleaching of fluorophores during acquisition of successive z-sections, which compromises the correct reconstruction of 3D structures. The long-term stability and brightness of Quantum Dots make them ideal candidates also for live animal targeting and imaging. The vast majority of the papers published to date have shown no relevant effects on cells viability at the concentration used for imaging applications; higher concentrations, however, caused some issues on embryonic development. Adverse effects are due to be caused by the release of cadmium, as surface PEGylation of the Quantum Dots reduces these issues. A recently published paper shows evidences of an epigenetic effect of Quantum Dots treatment, with general histones hypoacetylation, and a translocation to the nucleus of p53. In this study, mice treated with Quantum Dots for imaging purposes were analyzed to investigate the impact on protein expression and networking. Differential mono-and bidimensional electrophoresis assays were performed, with the individuation of differentially expressed proteins after intravenous injection and imaging analysis; further, as several authors indicate an increase in reactive oxygen species as a possible mean of damage due to the Quantum Dots treatment, we investigated the signalling pathway of APE1/Ref1, a

  4. DNA tetrahedral scaffolds-based platform for the construction of electrochemiluminescence biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Mei-Xing; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-04-15

    Proximal metallic nanoparticles (NPs) could quench the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emission of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) due to Förster energy transfer (FRET), but at a certain distance, the coupling of light-emission with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) result in enhanced ECL. Thus, the modification strategies and distances control between QDs and metallic NPs are critical for the ECL intensity of QDs. In this strategy, a SPR enhanced ECL sensor based on DNA tetrahedral scaffolds modified platform was reported for the detection of telomerase activity. Due to the rigid three-dimensional structure, DNA tetrahedral scaffolds grafting on the electrode surface could accurately modulate the distance between CdS QDs and luminol labelled gold nanoparticles (L-Au NPs), meanwhile provide an enhanced spatial dimension and accessibility for the assembly of multiple L-Au NPs. The ECL intensities of both CdS QDs (-1.25V vs. SCE) and luminol (+0.33V vs. SCE) gradually increased along with the formation of multiple L-Au NPs at the vertex of DNA tetrahedral scaffolds induced by telomerase, bringing in a dual-potential ECL analysis. The proposed method showed high sensitivity for the identification of telomerase and was successfully applied for the differentiation of cancer cells from normal cells. This work suggests that DNA tetrahedral scaffolds could serve as an excellent choice for the construction of SPR-ECL system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, Denver Leonard John

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining potential. In this so-called 'Wigner' regime the ground-state electronic charge density is localised near positions of classical electrostatic minima and the interacting electronic spectrum consists of well separated spin multiplets. In the strongly correlated regime the structure of low-energy multiplets is explained by mapping onto lattice models with extended-Hubbard and Heisenberg effective Hamiltonians. The parameters for these effective models are calculated within a Hartree approximation and are shown to reproduce well the exact results obtained by numerical diagonalisation of the full interacting Hamiltonian. Comparison is made between square dots and quantum rings with full rotational symmetry. In the very low-density regime, direct diagonalisation becomes impractical due to excessive computer time for convergence. In this regime a numerical renormalisation group method is applied to one-dimensional dots, enabling effective spin-interactions to be

  6. Aqp5 is a new transcriptional target of Dot1a and a regulator of Aqp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Wu

    Full Text Available Dot1l encodes histone H3 K79 methyltransferase Dot1a. Mice with Dot1l deficiency in renal Aqp2-expressing cells (Dot1l(AC develop polyuria by unknown mechanisms. Here, we report that Aqp5 links Dot1l deletion to polyuria through Aqp2. cDNA array analysis revealed and real-time RT-qPCR validated Aqp5 as the most upregulated gene in Dot1l(AC vs. control mice. Aqp5 protein is barely detectable in controls, but robustly expressed in the Dot1l(AC kidneys, where it colocalizes with Aqp2. The upregulation of Aqp5 is coupled with reduced association of Dot1a and H3 dimethyl K79 with specific subregions in Aqp5 5' flanking region in Dot1l(AC vs. control mice. In vitro studies in IMCD3, MLE-15 and 293Tcells using multiple approaches including real-time RT-qPCR, luciferase reporter assay, cell surface biotinylation assay, colocalization, and co-immunoprecipitation uncovered that Dot1a represses Aqp5. Human AQP5 interacts with AQP2 and impairs its cell surface localization. The AQP5/AQP2 complex partially resides in the ER/Golgi. Consistently, AQP5 is expressed in none of 15 normal controls, but in all of 17 kidney biopsies from patients with diabetic nephropathy. In the patients with diabetic nephropathy, AQP5 colocalizes with AQP2 in the perinuclear region and AQP5 expression is associated with impaired cellular H3 dimethyl K79. Taken together, these data for the first time identify Aqp5 as a Dot1a potential transcriptional target, and an Aqp2 binding partner and regulator, and suggest that the upregulated Aqp5 may contribute to polyuria, possibly by impairing Aqp2 membrane localization, in Dot1l(AC mice and in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Enhancing the Sensitivity of DNA Microarray Using Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles: Detection of Human Papilloma Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrichi, F.; Riccò, R.; Meneghello, A.; Pierobon, R.; Canton, G.; Cretaio, E.

    2010-10-01

    DNA microarray is a high-throughput technology used for detection and quantification of nucleic acid molecules and others of biological interest. The analysis is based on the specific hybridization between probe sequences deposited in array and a target ss-DNA amplified by PCR and functionalized by a fluorescent dye. Organic labels have well known disadvantages like photobleaching and low signal intensities, which put a limitation to the lower amount of DNA material that can be detected. Therefore for trace analysis the development of more efficient biomarkers is required. With this aim we present in this paper the synthesis and application of alternative hybrid nanosystems obtained by incorporating standard fluorescent molecules into monodisperse silica nanoparticles. Efficient application to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus is demonstrated. This virus is associated to the formation of cervical cancer, a leading cause of death by cancer for women worldwide. It is shown that the use of the novel biomarkers increases the optical signal of about one order of magnitude with respect to the free dyes or quantum dots in conventional instruments. This is due to the high number of molecules that can be accommodated into each nanoparticle, to the reduced photobleaching and to the improved environmental protection of the dyes when encapsulated in the silica matrix. The cheap and easy synthesis of these luminescent particles, the stability in water, the surface functionalizability and bio-compatibility make them very promising for present and future bio-labeling and bio-imaging applications.

  8. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  9. Biocompatibility of quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS ) in human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongping; Zeng, Guangwei; Wang, Caie; Wang, Huasheng; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia; Li, Dongpeng; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-06-01

    Amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAM-dMSCs) are a potential source of mesenchymal stem cells which could be used to repair skin damage. The use of mesenchymal stem cells to repair skin damage requires safe, effective and biocompatible agents to evaluate the effectiveness of the result. Quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS are semiconductor nanocrystals with broad excitation and narrow emission spectra, which have been considered as a new chemical and fluorescent substance for non-invasively labeling different cells in vitro and in vivo. This study investigated the cytotoxic effects of QDs on hAM-dMSCs at different times following labeling. Using 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 μL between quantum dots, labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells were collected on days 1, 2 and 4 and observed morphological changes, performed an MTT cell growth assay and flow cytometry for mesenchymal stem cells molecular markers. Quantum dot concentration 0.75 μg/mL labeled under a fluorescence microscope, cell morphology was observed, The MTT assay showed cells in the proliferative phase. Flow cytometry expression CD29, CD31, CD34, CD44, CD90, CD105 and CD106. Within a certain range of concentrations between quantum dots labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells has good biocompatibility.

  10. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  11. Effect of shells on photoluminescence of aqueous CdTe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Zhimin; Yang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Size-tunable CdTe coated with several shells using an aqueous solution synthesis. CdTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots exhibited high PL efficiency up to 80% which implies the promising applications for biomedical labeling. - Highlights: • CdTe quantum dots were fabricated using an aqueous synthesis. • CdS, ZnS, and CdS/ZnS shells were subsequently deposited on CdTe cores. • Outer ZnS shells provide an efficient confinement of electron and hole inside the QDs. • Inside CdS shells can reduce the strain on the QDs. • Aqueous CdTe/CdS/ZnS QDs exhibited high stability and photoluminescence efficiency of 80%. - Abstract: CdTe cores with various sizes were fabricated in aqueous solutions. Inorganic shells including CdS, ZnS, and CdS/ZnS were subsequently deposited on the cores through a similar aqueous procedure to investigate the effect of shells on the photoluminescence properties of the cores. In the case of CdTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots, the outer ZnS shell provides an efficient confinement of electron and hole wavefunctions inside the quantum dots, while the middle CdS shell sandwiched between the CdTe core and ZnS shell can be introduced to obviously reduce the strain on the quantum dots because the lattice parameters of CdS is situated at the intermediate-level between those of CdTe and ZnS. In comparison with CdTe/ZnS core–shell quantum dots, the as-prepared water-soluble CdTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots in our case can exhibit high photochemical stability and photoluminescence efficiency up to 80% in an aqueous solution, which implies the promising applications in the field of biomedical labeling

  12. Dynamic behavior of DNA replication domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, E. M.; Stap, J.; Strackee, J.; van Driel, R.; Aten, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Like many nuclear processes, DNA replication takes place in distinct domains that are scattered throughout the S-phase nucleus. Recently we have developed a fluorescent double-labeling procedure that allows us to visualize nascent DNA simultaneously with "newborn" DNA that had replicated earlier in

  13. Record Charge Carrier Diffusion Length in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids via Mutual Dot-To-Dot Surface Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Graham H; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-06-03

    Through a combination of chemical and mutual dot-to-dot surface passivation, high-quality colloidal quantum dot solids are fabricated. The joint passivation techniques lead to a record diffusion length for colloidal quantum dots of 230 ± 20 nm. The technique is applied to create thick photovoltaic devices that exhibit high current density without losing fill factor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Isotopically labelled pyrimidines and purines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, A.T.; Bally, I.

    1987-01-01

    Among the three diazines, pyrimidine is by far the most important one because its derivatives uracil, thymine and cytosine are constituents of the ubiquitous deoxynucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Other derivatives of pyrimidine without condensed rings include barbiturates, alloxan, orotic acid and thiamine or vitamin B 1 . From the polycyclic derivatives of pyrimidine such as pteridine, alloxazine, and purine, the latter, through its derivatives adenine and guanine complete the list of bases which occur in DNA and RNA: in addition, other purine derivatives such as hypoxanthine, xanthine, theobromine, theophylline, caffeine and uric acid are important natural products with biological activity. The paper presents methods for preparing isotopically labeled pyrimidines as well as purine derivatives. For convenience, the authors describe separately carbon-labeled with radioisotopes 11 C (T 1/2 = 20.3 min) and 14 C (T 1/2 = 5736 years) or the stable isotope 13 C (natural abundance 1.1%) and then hydrogen-labeled systems with the radioisotope 3 H ≡ T (T 1/2 = 12.346 years) or with the stable isotope 2 H ≡ D (natural abundance 0.015%). We do not separate stable from radioactive isotopes because the synthetic methods are identical for the same element; however, the introduction of hydrogen isotopes into organic molecules is often performed by reactions such as isotope exchange which cannot take place in the case of carbon isotopes

  15. TRF1 and TRF2 use different mechanisms to find telomeric DNA but share a novel mechanism to search for protein partners at telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Buncher, Noah; Kaur, Parminder; E, Longjiang; Zhang, Yiyun; Gibson, Greg; You, Changjiang; Watkins, Simon C; Piehler, Jacob; Opresko, Patricia L; Kad, Neil M; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Human telomeres are maintained by the shelterin protein complex in which TRF1 and TRF2 bind directly to duplex telomeric DNA. How these proteins find telomeric sequences among a genome of billions of base pairs and how they find protein partners to form the shelterin complex remains uncertain. Using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled TRF1 and TRF2, we study how these proteins locate TTAGGG repeats on DNA tightropes. By virtue of its basic domain TRF2 performs an extensive 1D search on nontelomeric DNA, whereas TRF1's 1D search is limited. Unlike the stable and static associations observed for other proteins at specific binding sites, TRF proteins possess reduced binding stability marked by transient binding (∼ 9-17 s) and slow 1D diffusion on specific telomeric regions. These slow diffusion constants yield activation energy barriers to sliding ∼ 2.8-3.6 κ(B)T greater than those for nontelomeric DNA. We propose that the TRF proteins use 1D sliding to find protein partners and assemble the shelterin complex, which in turn stabilizes the interaction with specific telomeric DNA. This 'tag-team proofreading' represents a more general mechanism to ensure a specific set of proteins interact with each other on long repetitive specific DNA sequences without requiring external energy sources.

  16. Detection of influenza A virus based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from quantum dots to carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Junping [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Huimin, E-mail: zhaohuim@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Meng; Chen Yaqiong; Quan Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum dots-ssDNA probe was designed for the determination of virus DNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of quantum dots was effectively quenched by carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of target H5N1 DNA restored the quenched fluorescence of quantum dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method exhibited high sensitivity and good selectivity for H5N1 DNA. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple and sensitive approach for H5N1 DNA detection was described based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from quantum dots (QDs) to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system, in which the QDs (CdTe) modified with ssDNA were used as donors. In the initial stage, with the strong interaction between ssDNA and oxCNTs, QDs fluorescence was effectively quenched. Upon the recognition of the target, the effective competitive bindings of it to QDs-ssDNA occurred, which decreased the interactions between the QDs-ssDNA and oxCNTs, leading to the recovery of the QDs fluorescence. The recovered fluorescence of QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of the target in the range of 0.01-20 {mu}M with a detection limit of 9.39 nM. Moreover, even a single-base mismatched target with the same concentration of target DNA can only recover a limited low fluorescence of QDs, illustrating the good anti-interference performance of this QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system. This FRET platform in the QDs-ssDNA/oxCNTs system was facilitated to the simple, sensitive and quantitative detection of virus nucleic acids and could have a wide range of applications in molecular diagnosis.

  17. Single domain antibody–quantum dot conjugates for ricin detection by both fluoroimmunoassay and surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, George P. [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Glaven, Richard H. [Nova Research, Inc., 1900 Elkin Street, Suite 230, Alexandria, VA 22308 (United States); Algar, W. Russ [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Susumu, Kimihiro [Optical Sciences Division, Code 5600, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sotera Defense Solutions, Annapolis Junction, MD 20701 (United States); Stewart, Michael H. [Optical Sciences Division, Code 5600, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Medintz, Igor L. [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Goldman, Ellen R., E-mail: ellen.goldman@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Anti-ricin single domain antibodies (sdAb) were self-assembled on quantum dots (QDs). •Conjugates were prepared using dihydrolipoic acid-capped CdSe–ZnS core–shell QDs. •The sdAb–QD conjugates functioned in fluoroimmunoassays for ricin detection. •The conjugates provided signal amplification in surface plasmon resonance assays. •Conjugates provided sensitive detection compared to unconjugated sdAb reporters. -- Abstract: The combination of stable biorecognition elements and robust quantum dots (QDs) has the potential to yield highly effective reporters for bioanalyses. Llama-derived single domain antibodies (sdAb) provide small thermostable recognition elements that can be easily manipulated using standard DNA methods. The sdAb was self-assembled on dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) ligand-capped CdSe–ZnS core–shell QDs made in our laboratory through the polyhistidine tail of the protein, which coordinated to zinc ions on the QD surface. The sdAb–QD bioconjugates were then applied in both fluorometric and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassays for the detection of ricin, a potential biothreat agent. The sdAb–QD conjugates functioned in fluoroimmunoassays for the detection of ricin, providing equivalent limits of detection when compared to the same anti-ricin sdAb labeled with a conventional fluorophore. In addition, the DHLA-QD–sdAb conjugates were very effective reporter elements in SPR sandwich assays, providing more sensitive detection with a signal enhancement of ∼10-fold over sdAb reporters and 2–4 fold over full sized antibody reporters. Commercially prepared streptavidin-modified polymer-coated QDs also amplified the SPR signal for the detection of ricin when applied to locations where biotinylated anti-ricin sdAb was bound to target; however, we observed a 4-fold greater amplification when using the DHLA-QD–sdAb conjugates in this format.

  18. Single domain antibody–quantum dot conjugates for ricin detection by both fluoroimmunoassay and surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, George P.; Glaven, Richard H.; Algar, W. Russ; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Medintz, Igor L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Anti-ricin single domain antibodies (sdAb) were self-assembled on quantum dots (QDs). •Conjugates were prepared using dihydrolipoic acid-capped CdSe–ZnS core–shell QDs. •The sdAb–QD conjugates functioned in fluoroimmunoassays for ricin detection. •The conjugates provided signal amplification in surface plasmon resonance assays. •Conjugates provided sensitive detection compared to unconjugated sdAb reporters. -- Abstract: The combination of stable biorecognition elements and robust quantum dots (QDs) has the potential to yield highly effective reporters for bioanalyses. Llama-derived single domain antibodies (sdAb) provide small thermostable recognition elements that can be easily manipulated using standard DNA methods. The sdAb was self-assembled on dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) ligand-capped CdSe–ZnS core–shell QDs made in our laboratory through the polyhistidine tail of the protein, which coordinated to zinc ions on the QD surface. The sdAb–QD bioconjugates were then applied in both fluorometric and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassays for the detection of ricin, a potential biothreat agent. The sdAb–QD conjugates functioned in fluoroimmunoassays for the detection of ricin, providing equivalent limits of detection when compared to the same anti-ricin sdAb labeled with a conventional fluorophore. In addition, the DHLA-QD–sdAb conjugates were very effective reporter elements in SPR sandwich assays, providing more sensitive detection with a signal enhancement of ∼10-fold over sdAb reporters and 2–4 fold over full sized antibody reporters. Commercially prepared streptavidin-modified polymer-coated QDs also amplified the SPR signal for the detection of ricin when applied to locations where biotinylated anti-ricin sdAb was bound to target; however, we observed a 4-fold greater amplification when using the DHLA-QD–sdAb conjugates in this format

  19. Issues in Data Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Roddy; Cox, Cate; Martin, Jeam-Claude; Batliner, Anton; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Karpouzis, Kostas; Cowie, Roddy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Petta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Labelling emotion databases is not a purely technical matter. It is bound up with theoretical issues. Different issues affect labelling of emotional content, labelling of the signs that convey emotion, and labelling of the relevant context. Linked to these are representational issues, involving time

  20. DNA-DNA hybridization determined in micro-wells using covalent attachment of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Angen, Øystein; Mutters, R.

    2000-01-01

    The present study was aimed at reducing the time and labour used to perform DNA-DNA hybridizations for classification of bacteria at the species level. A micro-well-format DNA hybridization method was developed and validated. DNA extractions were performed by a small-scale method and DNA...... was sheared mechanically into fragments of between 400 and 700 bases. The hybridization conditions were calibrated according to DNA similarities obtained by the spectrophotometric method using strains within the family Pasteurellaceae, Optimal conditions were obtained with 300 ng DNA added per well and bound...... by covalent attachment to NucleoLink. Hybridization was performed with 500 ng DNA, 5% (w/w) of which was labelled with photo-activatable biotin (competitive hybridization) for 2.5 h at 65 degrees C in 2 x SSC followed by stringent washing with 2 x SSC at the same temperature. The criteria for acceptance...

  1. Mixed Map Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Löffler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Point feature map labeling is a geometric visualization problem, in which a set of input points must be labeled with a set of disjoint rectangles (the bounding boxes of the label texts. It is predominantly motivated by label placement in maps but it also has other visualization applications. Typically, labeling models either use internal labels, which must touch their feature point, or external (boundary labels, which are placed outside the input image and which are connected to their feature points by crossing-free leader lines. In this paper we study polynomial-time algorithms for maximizing the number of internal labels in a mixed labeling model that combines internal and external labels. The model requires that all leaders are parallel to a given orientation θ ∈ [0, 2π, the value of which influences the geometric properties and hence the running times of our algorithms.

  2. A homogeneous assay for highly sensitive detection of CaMV35S promoter in transgenic soybean by förster resonance energy transfer between nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and Ag nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqi; Sun, Li [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Qian, Jing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Wang, Chengke [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Liu, Qian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Han, En [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Hao, Nan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Zhang, Liuping [Sinograin Zhenjiang Grains & Oils Quality Testing Center Co., Ltd., Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Cai, Jianrong, E-mail: jrcai@ujs.edu.cn [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Wang, Kun, E-mail: wangkun@ujs.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a novel homogeneous assay for DNA quantitative analysis based on förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was developed for cauliflwer mosaic virus 35s (CaMV35S) promoter of transgenic soybean detection. The homogenous FRET of fluorescence signal was fabricated by DNA hybridization with probe modified nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which acted the donor-acceptor pairs for the first time. The highly efficient FRET and unique properties of the NGQDs made the proposed FRET system as a functionalized detection platform for labelling of DNA. Upon the recognition of specific target DNA (tDNA), the FRET between NGQDs and AgNPs was triggered to produce fluorescence quenching, which could be used for tDNA detection. The fabricated homogeneous FRET assay displayed a wide linear range of 0.1–500.0 nM and a low limit of detection 0.03 nM for the detection of CaMV35S (S/N = 3). This proposed biosensor revealed high specificity to detect tDNA, with acceptable intra-assay precision and excellent stability. This method was successfully applied to identify the real sample of 0.5% containing transgenic soybean, which achieved the most of national law regulations. This assay was further validated by polymerase chain reaction as the genetically modified organisms, suggesting that the proposed FRET system is a feasible tool for the further daily genetically modified organism detection. - Highlights: • Both NGQDs and AgNPs were selected as the novel FRET donor-acceptor pairs. • The proposed homogeneous FRET assay was developed for CaMV35S detection. • The resulting method could identify 0.5% containing transgenic soybean sample. • This assay was inexpensive, simple and highly sensitive.

  3. A homogeneous assay for highly sensitive detection of CaMV35S promoter in transgenic soybean by förster resonance energy transfer between nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and Ag nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqi; Sun, Li; Qian, Jing; Wang, Chengke; Liu, Qian; Han, En; Hao, Nan; Zhang, Liuping; Cai, Jianrong; Wang, Kun

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a novel homogeneous assay for DNA quantitative analysis based on förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was developed for cauliflwer mosaic virus 35s (CaMV35S) promoter of transgenic soybean detection. The homogenous FRET of fluorescence signal was fabricated by DNA hybridization with probe modified nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which acted the donor-acceptor pairs for the first time. The highly efficient FRET and unique properties of the NGQDs made the proposed FRET system as a functionalized detection platform for labelling of DNA. Upon the recognition of specific target DNA (tDNA), the FRET between NGQDs and AgNPs was triggered to produce fluorescence quenching, which could be used for tDNA detection. The fabricated homogeneous FRET assay displayed a wide linear range of 0.1-500.0 nM and a low limit of detection 0.03 nM for the detection of CaMV35S (S/N = 3). This proposed biosensor revealed high specificity to detect tDNA, with acceptable intra-assay precision and excellent stability. This method was successfully applied to identify the real sample of 0.5% containing transgenic soybean, which achieved the most of national law regulations. This assay was further validated by polymerase chain reaction as the genetically modified organisms, suggesting that the proposed FRET system is a feasible tool for the further daily genetically modified organism detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A homogeneous assay for highly sensitive detection of CaMV35S promoter in transgenic soybean by förster resonance energy transfer between nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and Ag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yaqi; Sun, Li; Qian, Jing; Wang, Chengke; Liu, Qian; Han, En; Hao, Nan; Zhang, Liuping; Cai, Jianrong; Wang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel homogeneous assay for DNA quantitative analysis based on förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was developed for cauliflwer mosaic virus 35s (CaMV35S) promoter of transgenic soybean detection. The homogenous FRET of fluorescence signal was fabricated by DNA hybridization with probe modified nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which acted the donor-acceptor pairs for the first time. The highly efficient FRET and unique properties of the NGQDs made the proposed FRET system as a functionalized detection platform for labelling of DNA. Upon the recognition of specific target DNA (tDNA), the FRET between NGQDs and AgNPs was triggered to produce fluorescence quenching, which could be used for tDNA detection. The fabricated homogeneous FRET assay displayed a wide linear range of 0.1–500.0 nM and a low limit of detection 0.03 nM for the detection of CaMV35S (S/N = 3). This proposed biosensor revealed high specificity to detect tDNA, with acceptable intra-assay precision and excellent stability. This method was successfully applied to identify the real sample of 0.5% containing transgenic soybean, which achieved the most of national law regulations. This assay was further validated by polymerase chain reaction as the genetically modified organisms, suggesting that the proposed FRET system is a feasible tool for the further daily genetically modified organism detection. - Highlights: • Both NGQDs and AgNPs were selected as the novel FRET donor-acceptor pairs. • The proposed homogeneous FRET assay was developed for CaMV35S detection. • The resulting method could identify 0.5% containing transgenic soybean sample. • This assay was inexpensive, simple and highly sensitive.

  5. DNA adducts in senescent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Perturbations in DNA repair and other metabolic processes during development and aging might affect the steady-state level of genomic damage. The persistence or accumulation of DNA lesions in postmitotic cells could have a significant impact on proper cellular function, interfering with gene regulation for example. To test the notion that DNA damage increases as a function of age in non-dividing cells, DNA was purified from heart tissue of C57BL/6Nia mice at different ages and analyzed by post labeling techniques to detect DNA adducts. In the present experiments, four-dimensional, thin-layer chromatography was used to isolate aromatic adducts that were labeled with carrier-free (γ- 32 P) ATP under DNA-P excess conditions. The complexity and frequency of aromatic adducts varied between DNA samples. Several adducts were present in all preparations and were clearly more abundant in nucleotide maps of mature and old heart DNA. However, a direct correlation with age was not observed. In contrast, experiments in which aromatic adducts were first isolated by phase-transfer to 1-butanol, then labeled with excess (γ- 32 P)ATP indicated that there was an age-related increase in these adducts. The results are consistent with their earlier studies that showed alkyl adducts increased during aging of mouse myocardium and suggest that a common repair pathway might be involved

  6. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T 1 =20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T 1 ∝B -5 has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T 1 ∝T -1 . The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T 1 h in the microsecond range, therefore, comparable with

  7. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  8. Quantum optics with single quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiller, Valery; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    A single radiative transition in a single-quantum emitter results in the emission of a single photon. Single quantum dots are single-quantum emitters with all the requirements to generate single photons at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. It is also possible to generate more than single photons with single quantum dots. In this paper we show that single quantum dots can be used to generate non-classical states of light, from single photons to photon triplets. Advanced solid state structures can be fabricated with single quantum dots as their active region. We also show results obtained on devices based on single quantum dots

  9. Large quantum dots with small oscillator strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Schlereth, T.W.; Höfling, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of excitons confined in large InGaAs quantum dots by recording the spontaneous emission decay rate while systematically varying the distance between the quantum dots and a semiconductor-air interface. The size of the quantum dots...... is measured by in-plane transmission electron microscopy and we find average in-plane diameters of 40 nm. We have calculated the oscillator strength of excitons of that size assuming a quantum-dot confinement given by a parabolic in-plane potential and a hard-wall vertical potential and predict a very large...... intermixing inside the quantum dots....

  10. The interaction between d-dot's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Masaki; Machida, Masahiko; Koyama, Tomio; Ishida, Takekazu; Kato, Masaru

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the interaction between two square d-dot's. The d-dot is the nano-scaled superconducting composite structure that is made of a d-wave superconducting dot embedded in the s-wave superconducting matrix. In the numerical calculation, using the finite element method, we solved the two-components Ginzburg-Landau equation self-consistently. We obtained two kinds of solutions, which can be considered as ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations, when two d-dot's are separated parallel and diagonally. Also we discuss the applicability of d-dot's as an artificial spin system where the interactions can be controlled by the fabrication

  11. Quantum Dot Platform for Single-Cell Molecular Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel S.

    preparation and specimen labeling, requiring no advanced technical skills and being directly applicable for a wide range of molecular profiling studies. Utilization of quantum dot platform for single-cell molecular profiling promises to greatly benefit both biomedical research and clinical diagnostics by providing a tool for addressing phenotypic heterogeneity within large cell populations, opening access to studying low-abundance events often masked or completely erased by batch processing, and elucidating biomarker signatures of diseases critical for accurate diagnostics and targeted therapy.

  12. Accurate quantification of microRNA via single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs.

  13. Accurate Quantification of microRNA via Single Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Origami Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs. PMID:23990889

  14. Accurate quantification of microRNA via single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Feng, Xiaolu; Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs.

  15. Nuclear Spins in Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erlingsson, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the hyperfine interaction between the many lattice nuclear spins and electron spins localized in GaAs quantum dots. This interaction is an intrinsic property of the material. Despite the fact that this interaction is rather weak, it can, as shown in this thesis,

  16. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Zbořil, Radek; Petr, Jan; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Krysmann, Marta; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  19. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of

  20. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo

    1996-01-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy

  1. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy.

  2. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    . In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  3. Synthesizing labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    A metabolic study is presented of the chemical reactions provided by isotopic labeling and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled D-glucose, a 6-carbon sugar, involves adding a labeled nitrile group to the 5-carbon sugar D-arabinose by reaction with labeled hydrogen cyanide. The product of this reaction is then reduced and hydrolyzed to a mixture of the labeled sugars. The two sugars are separated by absorption chromotography. The synthesis of 13 C-labeled L-tyrosine, an amino acid, is also presented

  4. One-pot synthesis of stable water soluble Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hao; Gao Xue; Liu Siyu; Su Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Department of Analytical Chemistry (China)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper, Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell-doped quantum dots (d-dots) with 3-mercaptopropionic acid as the stabilizer are successfully synthesized through a simple one-pot synthesis procedure in aqueous solution. The average diameter of Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots is about 2.9 nm, which is lager than that of Mn:ZnSe cores (about 1.9 nm). The optical features and structure of the obtained Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots have been characterized by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photostability against UV irradiation and chemical stability against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} etching have been studied, and the results showed that the prepared Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots are more stable than CdTe quantum dots prepared in aqueous solution. Finally, the resulting core/shell quantum dots are used as fluorescent label in human osteoblast-like HepG2 cell imaging.

  5. Modeling of the quantum dot filling and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameen, Tarek A.; El-Batawy, Yasser M.; Abouelsaood, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    A generalized drift-diffusion model for the calculation of both the quantum dot filling profile and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors is proposed. The confined electrons inside the quantum dots produce a space-charge potential barrier between the two contacts, which controls the quantum dot filling and limits the dark current in the device. The results of the model reasonably agree with a published experimental work. It is found that increasing either the doping level or the temperature results in an exponential increase of the dark current. The quantum dot filling turns out to be nonuniform, with a dot near the contacts containing more electrons than one in the middle of the device where the dot occupation approximately equals the number of doping atoms per dot, which means that quantum dots away from contacts will be nearly unoccupied if the active region is undoped

  6. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); School of Engineering and Technology, ITM University, Gurgaon-122017 (India); Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Malhotra, Bansi Dhar, E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2015-05-11

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic–based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium–tin–oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10{sup −15} M to 10{sup −11} M.

  7. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-01

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10-15 M to 10-11 M.

  8. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-01-01

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic–based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium–tin–oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10 −15 M to 10 −11 M

  9. Identification of cDNA clones expressing immunodiagnostic antigens from Trichinella spiralis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, D.; Gamble, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA expression library was built in lambda gt11 phage using poly A mRNA isolated from Trichinella spiralis muscle stage larvae. This library was screened with rabbit antibodies to parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products and greater than 180 clones were isolated. Thirteen clones producing highly immunogenic protein antigens were plaque purified and rescreened with pig antisera to T.spiralis, Trichuris suis or Ascaris suum to identify clones producing epitopes specific to T.spiralis ES products, only. Two clones, TsAc-2 and TsAc-8, which displayed strong interactions with pig antisera to T. spiralis were lysogenized in E. coli Y1089 and the protein extracted. Western blots of the crude fusion proteins revealed molecular weights of 133 kD and 129 kD, respectively. Northern blot analysis of total RNA with 32 P labelled cDNA:lambda gt11 probes indicated single RNA transcripts for each clone with molecular sizes corresponding to 800-850 nucleotides. dscDNA inserts were estimated by southern blot analysis to be 500 bp and 340 bp, respectively, with no cross-hybridization observed between the cloned sequences. Dot blots using pig sera to screen crude fusion protein preparations, total bacterial protein (negative controls) and crude worm extract or ES products from T.spiralis, T.suis and A.suum (positive controls) corroborated the specificity and sensitivity of these clones as potential diagnostic antigens for swine trichinellosis

  10. On-chip transduction of nucleic acid hybridization using spatial profiles of immobilized quantum dots and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Anthony J; Noor, M Omair; Vannoy, Charles H; Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2012-01-03

    The glass surface of a glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel was modified to develop a solid-phase assay for quantitative determination of nucleic acids. Electroosmotic flow (EOF) within channels was used to deliver and immobilize semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), and electrophoresis was used to decorate the QDs with oligonucleotide probe sequences. These processes took only minutes to complete. The QDs served as energy donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for transduction of nucleic acid hybridization. Electrokinetic injection of fluorescent dye (Cy3) labeled oligonucleotide target into a microfluidic channel and subsequent hybridization (within minutes) provided the proximity for FRET, with emission from Cy3 being the analytical signal. The quantification of target concentration was achieved by measurement of the spatial length of coverage by target along a channel. Detection of femtomole quantities of target was possible with a dynamic range spanning an order of magnitude. The assay provided excellent resistance to nonspecific interactions of DNA. Further selectivity of the assay was achieved using 20% formamide, which allowed discrimination between a fully complementary target and a 3 base pair mismatch target at a contrast ratio of 4:1. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Single molecule localization imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization and semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Lu, Ju; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ruohu; Cui, Yiping

    2018-07-13

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is a powerful tool for imaging biological targets at the nanoscale. In this report, we present SMLM imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The FISH probes were fabricated by decorating CdSSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with telomere or centromere complementary DNA strands. SMLM imaging experiments using commercially available peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes labeled with organic fluorophores were also conducted to demonstrate the advantages of using QDs FISH probes. Compared with the PNA probes, the QDs probes have the following merits. First, the fluorescence blinking of QDs can be realized in aqueous solution or PBS buffer without thiol, which is a key buffer component for organic fluorophores' blinking. Second, fluorescence blinking of the QDs probe needs only one excitation light (i.e. 405 nm). While fluorescence blinking of the organic fluorophores usually requires two illumination lights, that is, the activation light (i.e. 405 nm) and the imaging light. Third, the high quantum yield, multiple switching times and a good optical stability make the QDs more suitable for long-term imaging. The localization precision achieved in telomeres and centromeres imaging experiments is about 30 nm, which is far beyond the diffraction limit. SMLM has enabled new insights into telomeres or centromeres on the molecular level, and it is even possible to determine the length of telomere and become a potential technique for telomere-related investigation.

  12. Quantum dots as mineral- and matrix-specific strain gages for bone biomechanical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peizhi; Xu, Jiadi; Morris, Michael; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David

    2009-02-01

    We report the use of quantum dots (Qdots) as strain gages in the study of bone biomechanics using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have developed solid state NMR sample cells for investigation of deformations of bone tissue components at loads up to several Mega Pascal. The size constraints of the NMR instrumentation limit the bone specimen diameter and length to be no greater than 2-3 mm and 30 mm respectively. Further, magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR experiments require the use of non-metallic apparatus that can be rotated at kilohertz rates. These experimental constraints preclude the use of standard biomechanical measurement systems. In this paper we explore the use of quantum dot center of gravity measurement as a strain gage technology consistent with the constraints of solid state NMR. We use Qdots that bind calcium (625 nm emission) and collagen (705 nm emission) for measurement of strain in these components. Compressive loads are applied to a specimen in a cell through a fine pitch screw turned with a mini-torque wrench. Displacement is measured as changes in the positions of arrays of quantum dots on the surface of a specimen. Arrays are created by spotting the specimen with dilute suspensions of Qdots. Mineral labeling is achieved with 705 nm carboxylated dots and matrix labeling with 565 nm quantum dots conjugated to collagen I antibodies. After each load increment the new positions of the quantum dots are measured by fluorescence microscopy. Changes in Qdot center of gravity as a function of applied load can be measured with submicron accuracy.

  13. Genetic recombination in escherichia coli and its relationship with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, O.

    1974-01-01

    Relationship of DNA replication with genetic recombination in Escherichia Coli was investigated by mating Hfr donors labelled with H 3 -thymine, C 13 and N 15 to C 13 N 15 labelled recipients. The DNA extracted from the zygotes was analysed on CsCl density gradients. The results show that all of the biparentally labelled DNA arises from the single strand insertions of the donor DNA. (M.G.B.)

  14. Quadra-quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called ‘‘Droplet Epitaxy” has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390°C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7–8×10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200°C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or , which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  15. Graphene–palladium nanowires based electrochemical sensor using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots as an effective peroxidase mimic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ding, Ya-nan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Shenguang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yan, Mei, E-mail: chm_yanm@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was developed by assembling the GQDs on the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction. • The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited higher peroxidase-like activity and better stability than each individual and HRP. • An electrochemical sensor was fabricated using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic to detect DNA. • Graphene and Pd nanowires were modified on the glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate. - Abstract: We proposed an electrochemical DNA sensor by using peroxidase-like magnetic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs) nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic label. Aminated graphene and Pd nanowires were successively modified on glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate as well as increased the amount of immobilized capture ssDNA (S1). The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was prepared by assembling the GQDs on the surface of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction, which was not only used as a mimic enzyme but also as a carrier to label complementary ssDNA (S3). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically activity of nano-sized GQDs and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the nanohybrid possessed highly-efficient peroxidase-like catalytic activity which could produce a large current toward the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for signal amplification. Thionine was used as an excellent electron mediator. Compared with traditional enzyme labels, the mimic enzyme ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited many advantages such as environment friendly and better stability. Under the optimal conditions, the approach provided a wide linear range from 10{sup −16} to 5 × 10{sup −9} M and low detection limit of 6.2 × 10{sup −17} M. The remarkable high catalytic capability could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based assay systems. The new, robust and convenient assay systems

  16. Graphene–palladium nanowires based electrochemical sensor using ZnFe2O4–graphene quantum dots as an effective peroxidase mimic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ding, Ya-nan; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The nanohybrid ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs was developed by assembling the GQDs on the ZnFe 2 O 4 through a photo-Fenton reaction. • The ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs exhibited higher peroxidase-like activity and better stability than each individual and HRP. • An electrochemical sensor was fabricated using ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic to detect DNA. • Graphene and Pd nanowires were modified on the glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate. - Abstract: We proposed an electrochemical DNA sensor by using peroxidase-like magnetic ZnFe 2 O 4 –graphene quantum dots (ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs) nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic label. Aminated graphene and Pd nanowires were successively modified on glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate as well as increased the amount of immobilized capture ssDNA (S1). The nanohybrid ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs was prepared by assembling the GQDs on the surface of ZnFe 2 O 4 through a photo-Fenton reaction, which was not only used as a mimic enzyme but also as a carrier to label complementary ssDNA (S3). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically activity of nano-sized GQDs and ZnFe 2 O 4 , the nanohybrid possessed highly-efficient peroxidase-like catalytic activity which could produce a large current toward the reduction of H 2 O 2 for signal amplification. Thionine was used as an excellent electron mediator. Compared with traditional enzyme labels, the mimic enzyme ZnFe 2 O 4 /GQDs exhibited many advantages such as environment friendly and better stability. Under the optimal conditions, the approach provided a wide linear range from 10 −16 to 5 × 10 −9 M and low detection limit of 6.2 × 10 −17 M. The remarkable high catalytic capability could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based assay systems. The new, robust and convenient assay systems can be widely utilized for the identification of other target molecules

  17. Baculovirus replication: characterization of DNA and proteins synthesized by a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Lymantria dispar, the gypsy moth, in a homologous cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClintock, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    A multiple-embedded nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (LdMNPV), is used for biological control. However, LdMNPV has low natural virulence and a long infection cycle in relation to other NPVs. Therefore, the replicative cycle of LdMNPV was investigated using a homologous cell line, IPLB-LD-652Y. Based on analyses of virus growth curves LdMNPV nonoccluded virus and polyhedral inclusion bodies appeared approximately 20 and 50 hr postinfection (p.i.), respectively. LdMNPV polypeptides, identified by autoradiography of [ 35 S]-methionine labeled fractions in SDS-PAGE, were synthesized in sequential phases: (1) an early α phase of replication (4 polypeptides from 4 to 12 hr p.i.), (2) an intermediate β phase (20 polypeptides from 12 to 24 hr p.i.), and a late γ phase (4 polypeptides from 24 to 28 hr p.i.). In infected cells at least four polypeptides were post-translational cleaved and/or modified. Pulse-labeling with [ 3 H]-mannose, [ 3 H]-N-acetyl-glucosamine or [ 32 P]-monosodium phosphate revealed several viral polypeptides which were glycosylated and/or phosphorylated. DNA:DNA dot hybridization experiments suggested that LdMNPV DNA synthesis was initiated between 12 to 16 hr p.i., increasing significantly thereafter

  18. Post-PCR detection of nucleic acids using metalloporphyrin labels and time-resolved fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, Desmond J.; O'Sullivan, Paul J.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorescent platinum(II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) was evaluated in post-PCR detection of nucleic acids by time-resolved fluorescence (TR-F) using three common formats. PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide primers and PtCP-dUTP were incorporated in a PCR to produce labelled amplified target -173 or 305 bp DNA. Alternatively, aminoallyl-dUTP was incorporated in a PCR and the product was subsequently labelled with PtCP. The resulting PCR mixtures containing labelled dsDNA were separated on 1.5% agarose gels and then analysed by ethidium bromide staining and by direct detection of PtCP label on a commercial TR-F plate reader Victor 2 (Perkin Elmer Life Sciences) used in scanning mode. In all cases label incorporation and high yields of amplified DNA were observed. Direct TR-F detection of PtCP-labelled DNA from a gel provided high sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, with limits of detection in the range of 9-22 pg for all three formats. The sensitivity achieved with PtCP label was considerably better than that achieved with ethidium bromide staining (∼1 ng of dsDNA) or with conventional fluorescent label FITC. Neither the FITC label nor ethidium bromide staining interfered with PtCP detection, thus allowing multiplexed detection

  19. Optical properties and the use of CdSe quantum dot for biolabeling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Hong Nhung; Nguyen Thi Van; Vu Xuan Hoa; Pham Minh Tan; Tong Kim Thuan; Tran Thi Thu Thuy; Jean Claude Brochon; Patrick Tauc

    2008-01-01

    The quantum dots CdSe type Qtracker 565 and 605 of Quantum Dot Company have been investigated by size, chemical structure and optical properties. The Qtracker 605 QDs were introduced into Lipomyces Starkeyi yeast cells. It was found that for the young cells (36 h of culture), the labeling QDs are mainly located in vacuoles, and the emission remains narrow with the maximum is clearly around 605 nm. For age cells (96 h of culture), the labeling QDs are concentrated in the cell cytoplasm, the emission is broaden with the maximum shifted to 580 nm. The live cell image was still observed after two months of introduction. The Qtracker 605 QDs were also successfully introduced into mouse blood cancerous cells. (author)

  20. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  1. Robust Active Label Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Sha, Fei; Igel, Christian

    2018-01-01

    for the noisy data lead to different active label correction algorithms. If loss functions consider the label noise rates, these rates are estimated during learning, where importance weighting compensates for the sampling bias. We show empirically that viewing the true label as a latent variable and computing......Active label correction addresses the problem of learning from input data for which noisy labels are available (e.g., from imprecise measurements or crowd-sourcing) and each true label can be obtained at a significant cost (e.g., through additional measurements or human experts). To minimize......). To select labels for correction, we adopt the active learning strategy of maximizing the expected model change. We consider the change in regularized empirical risk functionals that use different pointwise loss functions for patterns with noisy and true labels, respectively. Different loss functions...

  2. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  3. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  4. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  5. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  6. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  7. [Dot1 and Set2 Histone Methylases Control the Spontaneous and UV-Induced Mutagenesis Levels in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, T N; Evstiukhina, T A; Peshekhonov, V T; Chernenkov, A Yu; Korolev, V G

    2016-03-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, the DOT1 gene product provides methylation of lysine 79 (K79) of hi- stone H3 and the SET2 gene product provides the methylation of lysine 36 (K36) of the same histone. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutants suppress the UV-induced mutagenesis to an equally high degree. The dot1 mutation demonstrated statistically higher sensitivity to the low doses of MMC than the wild type strain. The analysis of the interaction between the dot1 and rad52 mutations revealed a considerable level of spontaneous cell death in the double dot1 rad52 mutant. We observed strong suppression of the gamma-in- duced mutagenesis in the set2 mutant. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutations decrease the sponta- neous mutagenesis rate in both single and d ouble mutants. The epistatic interaction between the dot1 and set2 mutations and almost similar sensitivity of the corresponding mutants to the different types of DNA damage allow one to conclude that both genes are involved in the control of the same DNA repair pathways, the ho- mologous-recombination-based and the postreplicative DNA repair.

  8. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...

  9. Labelling subway lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, M.A.; Iturriaga, C.; Márquez, A.; Portillo, J.R.; Reyes, P.; Wolff, A.; Eades, P.; Takaoka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Graphical features on map, charts, diagrams and graph drawings usually must be annotated with text labels in order to convey their meaning. In this paper we focus on a problem that arises when labeling schematized maps, e.g. for subway networks. We present algorithms for labeling points on a line

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.