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Sample records for doses ocupacionais devido

  1. Occupational doses due to photoneutrons in medical linear accelerators rooms; Doses ocupacionais devido a neutrons em salas de aceleradores lineares de uso medico

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    Soares, Alessandro Facure Neves de Salles

    2006-04-15

    Medical linear accelerators, with maximum photon energies above 10 MeV, are becoming of common use in Brazil. Although desirable in the therapeutic point of view, the increase in photon energies causes the generation of undesired neutrons, which are produced through nuclear reactions between photons and the high Z target nuclei of the materials that constitute the accelerator head. In this work, MCNP simulation was undertaken to examine the neutron equivalent doses around the accelerators head and at the entrance of medical linear accelerators treatment rooms, some of them licensed in Brazil by the National Regulatory Agency (CNEN). The simulated neutron dose equivalents varied between 2 e 26 {mu} Sv/Gy{sub RX}, and the results were compared with calculations performed with the use of some semi-empirical equations found in literature. It was found that the semi-empirical equations underestimate the simulated neutron doses in the majority of the cases, if compared to the simulated values, suggesting that these equations must be revised, due to the increasing number of high energy machines in the country. (author)

  2. Occupational doses in neuroendocrine tumors by using {sup 177}Lu DOTATATE; Doses ocupacionais em tratamento de tumores neuroendocrinos utilizando {sup 17'}7Lu DOTATATE

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    Costa, Gustavo Coelho Alves; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: gustavo@ird.gov.b, E-mail: lidia@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper investigated the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (abdominal tumors) using of {sup 177}Lu DOTATATE radiopharmaceutical which is a type of treatment presently used in the experimental form in Brazil and, therefore, not contemplated in norms or specific use. This research studied the occupational doses of this treatment and suggested guidelines or rules of procedures viewing the radiological protection of workers involved and the public. The treatment were followed up by using two types of radiation detection, one a scintillator and a Geiger-Muller, and the measurements were performed in a public hospital at Rio de Janeiro and the other in a private hospital at Sao Paulo. It was observed that the equivalent occupational doses can variate from 160 {mu}Sv to 450 {mu}Sv, in function of operator, of stage of manipulation, and of the administration method, which can be through the use of infusion pump or manual injection. The use of infusion pump is highly recommended and the hospitalization of the patient until the dose rate measured at 1 m does not surpass 20 {mu}Sv/h

  3. Absorbed dose due to radioiodine therapy by organs of patients with hyperthyroidism; Dose absorvida em orgaos de pacientes com hipertiroidismo devido a radioiodoterapia

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    Lima, F.F.; Khoury, H.J.; Bertelli Neto, L. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil); Laboratorios CERPE, Recife, PE (Brazil); Bertelli Neto, L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    The dose absorbed by organs of patients with hyperthyroidism treated with {sup 131} I was estimated by using the MIRDOSE computer program and data from ICRP-53. The calculation were performed using effective half-life and uptake average values, which were determined for 17 patients treated with 370 MBq and 555MBq of {sup 131} I. The results shown that the dose in the thyroid, for a 370 MBq administrated activity, was of 99 Gy and 49.5 Gy for 60 g and 80 g thyroid respectively. The average dose estimated in other organs were relatively low, presenting values lower than 0.1 Gy in the kidneys, bone marrow and ovaries and 0.19 Gy in the stomach.

  4. Dose calculation for {sup 40}K ingestion in samples of beans using spectrometry and MCNP; Calculo de dose devido a ingestao de {sup 40}K em amostras de feijao utilizando espectrometria e MCNP

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    Garcez, R.W.D.; Lopes, J.M.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: marqueslopez@yahoo.com.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/PEN/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia; Domingues, A.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Lima, M.A.F. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia

    2014-07-01

    A method based on gamma spectroscopy and on the use of voxel phantoms to calculate dose due to ingestion of {sup 40}K contained in bean samples are presented in this work. To quantify the activity of radionuclide, HPGe detector was used and the data entered in the input file of MCNP code. The highest value of equivalent dose was 7.83 μSv.y{sup -1} in the stomach for white beans, whose activity 452.4 Bq.Kg{sup -1} was the highest of the five analyzed. The tool proved to be appropriate when you want to calculate the dose in organs due to ingestion of food. (author)

  5. Dose evaluation due to the effluent liberation by medical installations at city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Avaliacao de doses devido a liberacao de efluentes por instalacoes medicas na cidade do Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Jane; Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: jshu@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: erochedo@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CODIN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Nucleares; Heilbron, Paulo F.L., E-mail: paulo@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (COREJ/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Rejeitos; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-10-26

    This paper, the city of Rio de Janeiro was taken as a case study. It was processed deterministic and probabilistic simulations vor evaluation of the dose in two exposure sceneries, one of them referring to public members exposure and the other relative to exposure of sewage sanitary treatment plant workers. The results showed that at present the doses for inhabitants of the city and operators of treatment station are lower to dose limit established for the public, the approach presently in use in Brazil is not sufficient to accomplish whit international requirements and the regulation should be revised to be adopted specific values for each radionuclide

  6. Reconstructive dosimetry and radiation doses evaluation of members of the public due to radiological accident in industrial radiography; Dosimetria reconstrutiva e avaliacao de dose de individuos do publico devido a acidente radiologico em radiografia industrial

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    Lima, Camila Moreira Araujo de

    2016-07-01

    Radiological accidents have occurred mainly in the practices recognized as high risk radiological and classified by the IAEA as Categories 1 and 2, and highlighted the radiotherapy, industrial irradiators and industrial radiography. In Brazil, since there were five major cases in industrial radiography, which involved 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public, causing localized radiation lesions on the hands and fingers. One of these accidents will be the focus of this work. In this accident, a {sup 192}Ir radioactive source was exposed for more than 8 hours in the workplace inside a company, exposing radiation workers, individuals of the public and people from the surrounding facilities, including children of a school. The radioactive source was also handled by a security worker causing severe radiation injuries in the hand and fingers. In this paper, the most relevant and used techniques of reconstructive dosimetry internationally are presented. To estimate the radiation doses received by exposed individuals in various scenarios of radiological accident in focus, the following computer codes were used: Visual Monte Carlo Dose Calculation (VMC), Virtual Environment for Radiological and Nuclear Accidents Simulation (AVSAR) and RADPRO Calculator. Through these codes some radiation doses were estimated, such as, 33.90 Gy in security worker's finger, 4.47 mSv in children in the school and 55 to 160 mSv for workers in the company during the whole day work. It is intended that this work will contribute to the improvement of dose reconstruction methodology for radiological accidents, having then more realist radiation doses. (author)

  7. A methodology to establish the appearance of cancer cases due to radiation dose in compressed breast; Uma metodologia para comprovar o aparecimento de casos de cancer devido a dose de radiacao na mama comprimida

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    Feital, Joao Carlos Da Silva; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Hugo Geraldo Da, E-mail: jfeital@ird.gov.br, E-mail: delgado@ird.gov.br, E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br, E-mail: hfonseca@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    It is known that more than 20% of the world's population will contract some type of cancer. In Brazil, with the exception of skin cancer (non melanoma) the breast cancer ranks first among the higher frequency of tumours among women and in general, although the methods of detection are advancing in the year 2010 took place about 13 thousand deaths in about 50,000 cases, probably due to late detection of these neoplasm. New cases of breast cancer in a given population can be proven from absorbed dose quantity, calculated for the compressed breast, due to the risk by means of exposure to x rays in this radiodiagnostic practices. Methodology: Exposures were held in an ionization chamber and the other quantities required were obtained to the screen-film equipment of mammography. Results: Also experimental results were of compressed breast an equivalent dose of ( 1.82 mSv {+-} 0.2%) or (3.64 mSv {+-} 0.2%) for both projections, i.e. medium lateral oblique and cranio caudal. The experimental value obtained here is consistent with the calculated results and published in the literature for analog and CR equipment. Conclusion: From the result of dose equivalent in the breast, one can say that there will be effectively attesting as to the appearance of new cases of cancer if approximately 80 million women are exposed to radiation emitted by mammographers. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays; Coeficientes de conversao para calculo de doses devidos a radiografias odontologicas utilizando o metodo de Monte Carlo

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    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  9. Collective dose estimation in Portuguese population due to medical exams of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine; Estimativa da dose coletiva na populacao portuguesa devido a exames medicos de radiologia de diagnostico e de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal). Instituto Superior Tecnico; Sousa, M. Carmen de [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Coimbra (Portugal); Paulo, Graciano; Santos, Joana [Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saude de Coimbra (Portugal); Pascoal, Ana [Kings College Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Kings Health Partners; Cardoso, Gabriela; Santos, Ana isabel [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Lanca, Isabel [Administracao Regional de Saude, Coimbra (Portugal); Matela, Nuno [Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias. Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica; Janeiro, Luis [Escola superior de Saude da Cruz Vermelha Portuguesa, Lisboa (Portugal); Sousa, Patrick [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Lisboa (Portugal); Carvoeiras, Pedro; Parafita, Rui [Medical Consult, SA, Lisboa (Portugal); Simaozinho, Paula [Administracao Regional de Saude, Faro (Portugal)

    2013-11-01

    In order to assess the exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation due to medical examinations of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, a working group, consisting of 40 institutions, public and private, was created to evaluation the coletive dose in the Portuguese population in 2010. This work was conducted in collaboration with the Dose Datamed European consortium, which aims to assess the exposure of the European population to ionizing radiation due to 20 diagnostic radiology examinations most frequent in Europe (the 'TOP 20') and nuclear medicine examinations. We obtained an average value of collective dose of Almost-Equal-To 1 mSv/caput, which puts Portugal in the category of countries medium to high exposure to Europe. We hope that this work can be a starting point to bridge the persistent lack of studies in the areas referred to in Portugal, and to enable the characterization periodic exposure of the Portuguese population to ionizing radiation in the context of medical applications.

  10. Ergonomia e as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem

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    Alexandre,Neusa Maria Costa

    1998-01-01

    Esse trabalho discute determinadas condições ergonômicas do trabalho que causam lesões no sistema músculo-esquelético da coluna vertebral, relacionando-as com as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem.

  11. Classification of areas considering equivalent doses due to radon, indoors in the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN); Classificação de áreas considerando as doses equivalentes devido a radônio, em ambientes fechados no Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear (IDQBRN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbach, Mayara N.; Soares, Alexandre B., E-mail: mayaraarbach@gmail.com, E-mail: alexandrebaso@globo.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Rex N.; Cardoso, Domingos D’ O.; Júnior, Walter José. G., E-mail: rexnazare@ime.eb.br, E-mail: domin@ime.eb.br, E-mail: walter_guimaraes@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The human being is subject to several sources of natural radiation, mainly radon, belonging to the radioactive decay chain of uranium and thorium. At the study site, approximately 3.3 tons of uranium with natural concentration are stored. This fact, which generated the concern about the occupational dose levels of the IOE's of the facility, because its effective dose will have the increase due to the equivalent dose from the exposure to radon. The measurements took place: in the uranium deposit; in an adjoining room and at the control point. According to the norm CNEN - NN 3.01 and considering the existing radon concentrations in the three environments it was concluded that: the uranium deposit room is considered a controlled area; the control point a free area and the contiguous room, a supervised area.

  12. Determination of the equivalent doses due to the ingestion of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series presents in drinking waters of the region of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil; Determinacao das doses equivalentes devido a ingestao de radionuclideos das series do uranio e torio presentes em aguas de consumo do municipio de Santa Luzia, estado da Paraiba

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    Pastura, Valeria F. da S., E-mail: vpastura@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DRSN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioprotecao e Seguranca Nuclear. Coordenacao de Materias Primas e Minerais; Campos, Thomas F. da C.; Petta, Reinaldo A., E-mail: thomascampos@geologia.ufrn.b, E-mail: petta@geologia.ufrn.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (LARANA/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Radioatividade Natural

    2011-10-26

    This paper determined the original dose equivalents from radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in a drinking water of well which is supplied to the population of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil. The collected waters are near to the mineralized phlegmatic bodies in rose quartz and amazonite feldspar. Radiometric measurements performed on the feldspar vein point out counting ratios surrounding 30000 cps and the analysis of collected samples of minerals presented tenors for the {sup 226}Ra and {sup 219}Pb varying from 0.50 to 2.30 Bq/sw. For determination of concentration of radionuclides U{sub Total}, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 219}Pb, found in the not desalinated, two methods were used, spectrophotometry with arsenazo and radiochemistry, both realized in the CNEN-LAPOC laboratories. For the calculation of dose equivalent it was taken into consideration the following parameters: the dose coefficients for incorporation by ingestion for public individuals with ages over 17 years (Norma CNEN-NN-3.01, Regulatory Position 3.01/011) and daily ingestion of 4 liters of water, which is over the recommended by the WHO of 2L/day - 1993. The obtained values were compared with the reference value for compromised dose equivalent established by WHO for evaluate the risk potential to the health of population, by ingestion. The radionuclide concentrations in the wells varies from 0.054 to 0.21 Bq/L, resulting dose equivalents of 3.94 x 10{sup -3} mSv/year and 0.17 mSv/year in the studied population

  13. The use of steel and lead shieldings in radiotherapy rooms and its comparison with respect to neutrons doses at patients; Comparacao de blindagens de aco e de chumbo usadas em salas de radioterapia quanto a dose devido a neutrons depositada em pacientes

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    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G., E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H*(10){sub n}, within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5x5cm{sup 2}, 10x10cm{sup 2}, 20x20cm{sup 2}, 30x30cm{sup 2} and 40x40cm{sup 2} openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H*(10){sub n} at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation.

  14. Riscos ocupacionais em UTI: proteção específica

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    Maria da Natividade Abreu da Costa

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Aponta os riscos ocupacionais que a equipe multiprofissional se expõe diariamente. Na tentativa de minimizar os riscos existentes são traçadas medidas de proteção especffica que se estendem desde a planta física ao preparo técnico dos funcionários. São utilizadas como variáveis o trinomio ambiente/paciente/equipe de enfermagem, relacionando assim os riscos e a proteção específica.

  15. Ergonomia e as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem Ergonomics and the occupacional activities of the nursing staff

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    Neusa Maria Costa Alexandre

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho discute determinadas condições ergonômicas do trabalho que causam lesões no sistema músculo-esquelético da coluna vertebral, relacionando-as com as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem.This paper discusses some of the ergonomics conditions that contribute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders of the vertebral column and relates these conditions to the occupational activities of the nursing staff.

  16. Riscos ocupacionais autorreferidos por trabalhadores de uma indústria de produção de fertilizantes – RS – Brasil

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    Liane Silveira da Rosa; Leticia Machado Pereira; Leticia Silveira Cardoso; Marta Regina Cezar-Vaz; Valdecir Zavarese da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: descrever a exposição a riscos ocupacionais autorreferida por trabalhadores de uma indústria de fertilizantes sólido e líquido no Extremo Sul do Rio Grande do Sul – Brasil. Método: estudo descritivo, realizado com 78 trabalhadores, dos quais 49 atuavam no setor de produção e 29 no de movimentação e ensaque. Produziu-se uma análise quantitativa, aplicando-se a estatística descritiva para apresentar as características dos trabalhadores e a exposição aos riscos ocupacionais autorreferi...

  17. Os papéis ocupacionais de mulheres com aneroxia nervosa

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    Leila Maria Quiles Quiles-Cestari

    2011-01-01

    A anorexia nervosa (AN) é um dos principais tipos de transtornos alimentares, caracterizado por uma limitação dietética auto-imposta pelo paciente, com temor intenso de engordar, recusa em manter o peso na faixa normal mínima e alteração na percepção da forma e do tamanho corporais. Geralmente apresenta graves complicações de saúde devido a seu estado nutricional e comorbidades psiquiátricas que dificultam o tratamento. Por esses aspectos, pacientes com AN tendem a apresentar dificuldades na ...

  18. Transtorno de Estresse Pós-Traumático (TEPT em Bombeiros de Belo Horizonte, Brasil: Prevalência e Fatores Ocupacionais Associados

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    Eduardo de Paula Lima

    Full Text Available RESUMOO objetivo do presente estudo foi estimar a prevalência (últimos 30 dias de Transtorno de Estresse Pós-Traumático (TEPT e investigar se variáveis ocupacionais estão associadas ao desfecho em bombeiros de Belo Horizonte, Brasil. Estudo transversal foi realizado em 2011. Dentre 794 elegíveis, 711 (89,5% participaram. Informações foram obtidas por questionário de autorrelato: variáveis sociodemográficas e ocupacionais, saúde e eventos extralaborais adversos. A prevalência de TEPT foi 6,9%. Variáveis ocupacionais contribuíram para explicar o desfecho no modelo final (regressão logística multivariável: fatores psicosssociais do trabalho, eventos traumáticos ocupacionais, tempo de trabalho e absenteísmo. Idade, problemas de saúde mental no passado e eventos adversos extralaborais também foram associados ao TEPT. Os resultados são discutidos considerando os pressupostos do Modelo Demanda-Controle.

  19. Riscos ocupacionais de uma indústria calçadista sob a ótica dos trabalhadores

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    Fernanda Reinher da Luz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo identificar os riscos ocupacionais de uma indústria calçadista sob a ótica dos trabalhadores, bem como as medidas preventivas adotadas por eles contra os riscos. Realizou-se um estudo qualitativo, descritivo. A amostra foi composta por quinze trabalhadores. Os dados foram coletados por entrevista semiestruturada e analisados à luz da análise de conteúdo. Foram respeitados os aspectos éticos e a pesquisa foi aprovada pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Universidade Regional do Noroeste do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os resultados apontam que os trabalhadores são conhecedores dos riscos do seu processo de trabalho, faziam uso de medidas de proteção individual e a empresa disponibilizava dispositivos de segurança, informando e realizando, periodicamente, visitas aos setores, na perspectiva de desenvolver ações educativas.

  20. Análise dos fatores de riscos ocupacionais do trabalho de enfermagem sob a ótica dos enfermeiros

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    Nei Santos Duarte

    Full Text Available Estudo com abordagem quantitativa e descritiva, com objetivo de identificar, na percepção dos enfermeiros chefes de unidades de internação de um hospital universitário, os riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos. A população foi composta de 30 enfermeiros, chefes de unidade de internação. Na coleta de dados, utilizou-se um questionário estruturado proposto no Guia de Avaliação de Riscos nos Locais de Trabalho de Boix e Vogel (1997, adaptado para a aplicação em estabelecimentos de saúde por Mauro (2001. Os resultados evidenciaram que os fatores de riscos atuam sobre os trabalhadores, propiciando um ambiente desfavorável para a realização das atividades, podendo comprometer a saúde e a vida profissional destes. As variáveis predominantes foram o ambiente e a manutenção preventiva inadequados e os equipamentos de proteção individual e coletiva insuficientes e/ou inadequadamente utilizados pelos profissionais, constrangimentos ergonômicos pela manipulação de carga e postura corporal inadequadas na realização das tarefas, e ritmo de trabalho acelerado pela falta de recursos material e humano. Ressalta-se que a pesquisa proporcionou um diagnóstico referente aos riscos presentes nos ambientes de trabalho da enfermagem, proporcionando um modo operatório eficaz com menor risco de acidentes no processo de trabalho, ambientes menos insalubres e maior satisfação para o profissional e os clientes.

  1. ACIDENTES OCUPACIONAIS COM PROFISSIONAIS DA EQUIPE DE ENFERMAGEM DE UM HOSPITAL DO VALE DO PARAÍBA PAULISTA

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    Vanessa de Brito Poveda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se descrever o perfil dos acidentes ocupacionais ocorridos com a equipe de enfermagem de um Hospital do Médio Vale do Paraíba Paulista, de dezembro de 2007 a novembro de 2008, analisando o conhecimento do profissional quanto ao seguimento sorológico, adoção das medicações prescritas, número de abandonos e identificação de alterações sociais oriundas do acidente. Trata-se de um estudo de natureza quantitativa e qualitativa. Os dados foram coletados por meio de um questionário semiestruturado, baseado no Manual do Ministério da Saúde sobre Recomendações para o Atendimento e Acompanhamento de Exposição Ocupacional a Material Biológico HIV e Hepatites B e C (2004 e a Ficha de Comunicação de Acidente de Trabalho. Os resultados foram analisados na forma descritiva e matemática estatística e as entrevistas submetidas à análise de conteúdo. Foram entrevistados 10 profissionais, dentre estes, cinco (50% vivenciaram o segundo acidente, sendo sete (70% ocasionados por material perfurocortante, sete (70% conheciam a importância da medicação antiretroviral, quatro (40% iniciaram a terapêutica e dois (20% finalizaram o tratamento e todos os profissionais vivenciaram sentimentos perturbadores diante da possibilidade de terem sido infectados pelo HIV. Conclui-se que a implantação de ações educativas aos profissionais de enfermagem é necessária para melhor entendimento aos riscos de exposição ocupacional.

  2. Estudo sobre riscos ocupacionais, biológicos e químicos, em laboratórios de uma universidade pública brasileira, 2012-2013

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    Monica Maria Campolina Teixeira Stehling

    2013-01-01

    Estudo observacional, transversal, analítico e qualiquantitativo. A comunidade pesquisada foi composta por pesquisadores, professores, graduandos, pós-graduandos, estagiários e funcionários. Na primeira etapa da tese objetivou-se verificar fatores associados à ocorrência de acidentes, através de levantamento de dados sobre riscos ocupacionais,biológicos e químicos, com questionamentos sobre Equipamentos de Proteção Individual, Manuais de Biossegurança, Protocolos de Atendimento ao Acidentado ...

  3. Riscos ocupacionais e gestão ergonómica em postos de trabalho com utilização de equipamento informático

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Signalda de Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Os riscos ocupacionais têm sido uma problemática nos postos de trabalho dotados de visor. Esta problemática carece de um estudo mais aprofundado, uma vez que a prevenção contínua contribui para o sucesso dos locais de trabalho. Este estudo pretende descrever a incidência/prevalência dos riscos laborais a que os profissionais cuja atividade requer o uso de equipamento de informática estão expostos. O objeto de estudo concentra a recolha de várias informações nos colaboradores, d...

  4. Public exposure due to the transport of radiopharmaceuticals; Exposicao do publico devido ao transporte de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Demerval L.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.; Sanches, Matias P.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A., E-mail: dlrodri@ipen.b, E-mail: janetegc@ipen.b, E-mail: msanches@ipen.b, E-mail: gsordi@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper estimate the radiological impact resulting from radiopharmaceuticals transport from the IPEN to some destinations defined a priori. So, doses were estimated in the public individuals, which are in the streets and vehicles that transit near the public transport, alongside the itinerary went through by packages, during the realization of radiopharmaceuticals transport

  5. Riscos ocupacionais para o câncer de laringe: um estudo caso-controle Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer: a case-control study

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    Sergio Guerra Sartor

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O tabagismo e o consumo de álcool são os fatores de risco mais bem estabelecidos para o câncer de laringe. Com relação aos fatores ocupacionais, o único carcinógeno estabelecido é a exposição a névoas de ácidos inorgânicos fortes. Entretanto, asbesto, pesticidas, tintas, gases de combustão de gasolina e diesel e poeiras, entre outros, aparecem na literatura como agentes ocupacionais que aumentam o risco de câncer de laringe. Um estudo caso-controle de base hospitalar foi conduzido para investigar fatores de risco ocupacionais para câncer de laringe. Foram coletadas informações detalhadas sobre tabagismo, consumo de álcool e história ocupacional de 122 casos de câncer de laringe e 187 controles pareados por freqüência (segundo sexo e idade. Encontrou-se risco aumentado de câncer de laringe nos indivíduos com exposição à sílica cristalina livre respirável (OR = 1,83; IC95%: 1,00-3,36, à fuligem (de carvão mineral, coque, madeira, óleo combustível (OR = 1,78; IC95%: 1,03-3,03, a fumos em geral (OR = 2,55; IC95%: 1,14-5,67 e a animais vivos (OR = 1,80; IC95%: 1,02-3,19.The most solidly established risk factors for laryngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol. As for occupational factors, the only established carcinogen is exposure to strong inorganic acid mists. However, asbestos, pesticides, paints, gasoline, diesel engine emissions, dusts, and other factors have been reported in the literature as occupational agents that increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to investigate occupational risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Detailed data on smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history were collected for 122 laryngeal cancers and 187 controls matched by frequency (according to sex and age. Laryngeal cancer was associated with exposure to respirable free crystalline silica (OR = 1.83; 95%CI: 1.00-3.36, soot (from coal, coke, fuel oil, or wood (odds ratio - OR = 1

  6. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa Los papeles ocupacionales de mujeres con anorexia nervosa Os papéis ocupacionais de mulheres com anorexia nervosa

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    Leila Maria Quiles-Cestari

    2012-04-01

    configuram os papéis ocupacionais de pessoas com anorexia nervosa. A casuística foi composta por 11 mulheres adultas, diagnosticadas em tratamento no grupo de assistência em transtornos alimentares de um hospital de Ribeirão Preto, Brasil, e por um grupo-controle. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos, antropométricos e aplicada a Lista de Identificação de Papéis Ocupacionais. Os resultados mostraram que houve alteração significativa nas mulheres com anorexia nervosa, com perda de papéis em relação ao padrão de desempenho do papel de trabalhador, voluntário, amigo e passatempo/amador, corroborando os prejuízos psicossociais decorrentes desse transtorno mental. A avaliação dos papéis ocupacionais no tratamento dos transtornos alimentares é estratégia importante para o planejamento de atividades de Terapia Ocupacional, fornecendo subsídios para a construção de espaços mais saudáveis, onde o fazer cria possibilidades de resgate dos papéis ocupacionais, independência e autonomia.

  7. Percepção de Pais e Terapeutas Ocupacionais sobre o Brincar da Criança com Paralisia Cerebral

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    Camila Miranda Almeida da SILVA

    Full Text Available RESUMO: crianças com paralisia cerebral (PC apresentam déficit motor e podem ter poucas vivências sensório-motoras, o que interfere em sua principal atividade: o brincar. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar a percepção de pais e de terapeutas ocupacionais sobre o comportamento lúdico de crianças com PC. O estudo foi desenvolvido com 25 crianças com PC utilizando os instrumentos Entrevista Inicial com os Pais e a Avaliação do Comportamento Lúdico das crianças destinados a terapeutas ocupacionais. Os resultados apontaram um índice de concordância que variou de 8% a 93% quanto ao interesse geral da criança pelas outras pessoas; 88% a 100% na categoria interesse geral da criança pelo ambiente sensorial, de 84 a 96% na categoria interesses e capacidades lúdicas; e, de 68% a 100% na categoria características da atitude lúdica. Os instrumentos utilizados foram capazes de identificar o comportamento lúdico de crianças com PC e podem auxiliar na delimitação de objetivos e plano terapêutico com abordagem centrada no cliente. Com este estudo verificou-se que as crianças com PC, independentemente de sua gravidade motora, demonstram atitude, ação e interesse pelo brincar, condizendo com a proposta da abordagem do Modelo Lúdico.

  8. Suggestion of an inverse relationship between perception of occupational risks and work-related injuries Sugestão de uma associação inversa entre percepção de riscos ocupacionais e acidentes do trabalho

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    Ricardo Cordeiro

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Worker perception of risk influences worker behavior and consequently exposure to risks. However, an inverse relationship between perception of occupational risks and work-related injuries has not yet been clearly established. A matched case-control was performed aiming to investigate possible differences in perception of occupational risks between workers who had suffered occupational injuries and those who had not. Cases were defined as all 93 workers from a large metallurgical factory in southeastern Brazil, who had suffered occupational injuries during the year 1996. Controls were 372 workers who had not suffered occupational injuries, matched on the basis of the factory sector and jobs performed. Assessment of occupational risk perception was performed by asking the workers to fill out a questionnaire consisting of questions on specific risks related to problems in work relations, work per se, and mode of production. The findings suggest that the degree of perception that workers with occupational injuries have of some occupational risks is lower than that of their non-injured coworkers.A percepção que o trabalhador tem dos riscos ocupacionais a que está exposto, influencia seu comportamento e sua própria exposição a riscos. Entretanto, uma relação inversa entre percepção de riscos ocupacionais e acidentes do trabalho, embora especulada, não foi ainda claramente estabelecida. Este é um estudo caso-controle objetivando investigar a existência de diferenças na percepção de riscos ocupacionais entre trabalhadores acidentados e não acidentados. Os casos foram todos os 93 trabalhadores de uma grande metalúrgica de Botucatu, que sofreram acidentes do trabalho no ano de 1996. Para cada caso foram aleatoriamente alocados quatro controles não acidentados, emparelhados segundo a seção de trabalho e a função do trabalhador acidentado na semana do acidente. A mensuração da percepção de riscos ocupacionais de casos e controles

  9. Escala de auto-eficácia para atividades ocupacionais: construção e estudos exploratórios

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    Maiana Farias Oliveira Nunes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo visou a construção e validação de uma escala de avaliação da auto-eficácia para atividades ocupacionais e as fontes de auto-eficácia associadas (EAAOc, para uso em Orientação Profissional. O processo de construção foi iniciado pela revisão teórica, tendo passado por testagem piloto, análise de especialistas e verificação da estrutura e da consistência interna. Participaram 333 adolescentes matriculados no ensino médio de escolas públicas e particulares do estado de São Paulo-Brasil. Foram observadas evidências de validade de conteúdo favoráveis, por meio da alta concordância entre juízes e expectativa teórica. A solução fatorial de três fatores apresentou maior coerência teórica, com os fatores Experiência Pessoal Direta, Aprendizagem Vicária e Persuasão Verbal, com alphas de Cronbach 0,88; 0,62 e 0,72, respectivamente. São discutidas possibilidades de uso e limitações da EAAOc.

  10. Microaspersores entupidos devido a problemas de ferro na água Microsprinkler clogged due to iron problems in the water

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    Túlio Assunção Pires Ribeiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Um dos aspectos relevantes a ser considerado no manejo da irrigação é a uniformidade de distribuição de água pelo sistema. Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar a eficiência da cloração com a utilização de hipoclorito de sódio na desobstrução de microaspersores devido à utilização de águas com elevado teor de ferro. Um sistema com dez meses de uso apresentava setores com vazões de 5% a 57% menores que a vazão de projeto. Foi feito o tratamento químico da água de irrigação, utilizando-se hipoclorito de sódio com 12% de cloro livre na dosagem de 100 mg L-1 e ácido sulfúrico, na concentração de 98%, para manter o pH da água de irrigação em torno de 4,5. O resultado indicou que houve aumento significativo nas vazões médias dos microaspersores em todos os setores avaliados e diminuição na variação da vazão dos mesmos com relação à estimada no projeto.An important aspect to be considered in irrigation managment is the uniformity distribution of water through the irrigation system. This research had the objective to evaluate the efficiency of chlorination in the use of sodium hypochlorite in clearing of microsprinkler due to the presence of high iron concentration in water. The equipment with less than a year of use presenting sectors with 5% and 57% lower flow than the original project flow. The chemical treatment of water irrigation utilized sodium hypochlorite with 12% free chlorine on 100mg L-1 concentration, and sulphuric acid 98% to maintain the pH of water irrigation about 4.5. The result demonstrated a significant increase in the average flow of the microsprinkler's variation in all evaluted setors, and decrease in their flow variation related to the estimated in the project.

  11. Associações entre auto-eficácia para atividades ocupacionais e interesses em adolescentes Associations between self-efficacy to occupational activities and interests in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiana Farias Oliveira Nunes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi analisar a relação entre a auto-eficácia para atividades ocupacionais e suas fontes e interesses, construtos importantes no contexto da Orientação Profissional. Participaram da pesquisa 289 adolescentes, do estado de São Paulo, que responderam a Escala de Auto-eficácia para Atividades Ocupacionais-EAAOc e o Self-Directed Search e 107 alunos que responderam a EAAOc e a Escala de Aconselhamento Profissional. Houve correlações significativas entre auto-eficácia e interesses (r entre - 0,25 e 0,27. A auto-eficácia Realista e Social, juntamente com a variável sexo, apresentou capacidade preditiva significativa para os respectivos tipos de interesses. É discutida a coerência da associação entre os tipos de auto-eficácia para atividades ocupacionais e os respectivos tipos de interesses.The aim of this study was to analyze the association between self-efficacy for occupational activities and its sources and interest, which are important constructs for Vocational Guidance. Two hundred eighty nine adolescents answered the Self-efficacy Scale for Occupational Activities (SSOA and the Self-Directed Search, and 107 answered the SSOA and the Professional Counseling Scale. All participants lived in São Paulo at the moment of the survey. There were significant correlations between self-efficacy and interests (r ranging from -0.25 to 0.27. Realistic and Social self-efficacy combined with gender showed a significant predictive power to their respective types of interest. We discussed the coherence between self-efficacy for occupational activities and their respective interests.

  12. NOVAS PERSPECTIVAS DA RESPONSABILIDADE PROCESSUAL NO BRASIL: O PRINCÍPIO DA BOA-FÉ OBJETIVA E O DEVIDO PROCESSO LEGAL

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    Thiago Rodrigues de Pontes Bomfim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo busca, inicialmente, demonstrar o caráter normativo dos princípios constitucionais, bem como seu papel no que acaba por se transformar em uma nova ordem processual, para, por fim, uma vez reconhecido o caráter de princípio jurídico à boa-fé objetiva, situar seu fundamento constitucional em um novo conceito de devido processo legal.

  13. O INSTITUTO DO INQUÉRITO CIVIL VISTO COMO FORMA E MEIO IMPORTANTE PARA PACIFICAR AS DEMANDAS COLETIVAS E A DISCUSSÃO DE SEU DEVIDO PROCESSO CONSTITUCIONAL

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    Francisco das Chagas da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é abordar as peculiaridades do inquérito civil no direito brasileiro sob a ótica dos princípios que embasam o devido processo legal. Introduzido pela lei da Ação Civil Pública, o Inquérito Civil é um instituto de titularidade do Ministério Público voltado a auxiliar a pacificação dos conflitos coletivos, servindo de fundamento para a propositura de ações coletivas e de firmação do termo de ajustamento de conduta (TAC, mecanismos processuais e extraprocessuais que tem como finalidade a defesa de interesses difusos, coletivos e individuais homogêneos. Durante todo o desenvolvimento desta pesquisa foram analisadas diversas obras literárias dos mais variados autores da área do direito processual civil, do direito processual do trabalho e do direito constitucional, além da apreciação de dados oriundos da jurisprudência pátria, bem como revistas e periódicos da área jurídica pertinentes ao tema aqui desenvolvido. O trabalho está dividido numa apreciação sobre o devido processo constitucional e nos princípios norteadores do processo. Depois será desenvolvida uma análise acerca da natureza jurídica do inquérito civil e, por fim, uma discussão acerca do contraditório nesse procedimento administrativo, verificando as argumentações doutrinárias que negam a aplicação deste princípio.

  14. Atitude frente à dor em trabalhadores de atividades ocupacionais distintas: uma aproximação da psicologia cognitivo-comportamental Attitude of workers with chronic pain in different occupational activities: an approach of the cognitive-behaviorist psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica A. G. de Lima

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo apresenta o perfil da atitude frente à dor em trabalhadores inseridos em atividades ocupacionais distintas com diagnóstico de LER/DORT acompanhados pelo Centro de Estudos da Saúde do Trabalhador do Estado da Bahia (CESAT/Ba. Foram entrevistados 65 trabalhadores numa amostra de conveniência. Utilizou-se como instrumento o Inventário de Atitudes Frente à Dor, na versão reduzida IAD, adaptado para língua portuguesa, contando com sete domínios ou escalas: cura médica, controle, solicitude, incapacidade, medicação, emoção e dano físico. Na análise procedeu-se a comparação das médias das escalas do IAD-breve entre as atividades ocupacionais e as variáveis socioculturais. A comparação das escalas entre as atividades ocupacionais, sexo e limitação para o trabalho revela diferenças entre as médias do domínio dano físico numa direção mais desfavorável para os industriários, sexo masculino e menor limitação para o trabalho e nos domínios emoção e controle mais favorável entre os praticantes de religião. Esses achados apontam para a possibilidade de utilização dessa abordagem para uma melhor compreensão da complexidade do fenômeno da dor crônica, assim como a necessidade de expandir o conceito da assistência e reabilitação desses trabalhadores tendo como referência um modelo de cuidado integral.This study presents the attitude of workers in different activities (bank workers, checkout workers and industrial workers with chronic pain related to the Repetition Strain Injures (RSI diagnosed in an occupational outpatient clinic - Centro de Estudos da Saúde do Trabalhador (CESAT, in the State of Bahia, Brazil. Sixty five workers from a convenience sample were interviewed, using the short version of the Survey of Pain Attitude, adapted to the Portuguese language. This questionnaire contains seven domains: control, emotion, disability, physical impairment, medication, solicitude, medical cure. Student

  15. Riscos e doenças ocupacionais relacionados ao exercício da anestesiologia Riesgos y enfermedades ocupacionales relacionados con el ejercicio de la anestesiología Occupational hazards and diseases related to the practice of anesthesiology

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    Daniel Volquind

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O exercício da anestesiologia não é isento de riscos para o anestesiologista. Considerada um local de trabalho insalubre em razão dos riscos potenciais que oferece, a sala de operações (SO é o local no qual o anestesiologista passa a maior parte do tempo. Nesta revisão, propomos uma análise dos riscos ocupacionais aos quais estão expostos os anestesiologistas em sua prática diária. CONTEÚDO: Apresentamos a classificação dos riscos e suas relações com as doenças ocupacionais. CONCLUSÃO: O controle dos riscos ocupacionais, aos quais os anestesiologistas são expostos diariamente, se faz necessário para o desenvolvimento de um local de trabalho adequado e com riscos reduzidos para a boa prática da anestesiologia. Isso contribui para a diminuição do absenteísmo, a melhora da assistência prestada ao paciente e da qualidade de vida do anestesiologista.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: El ejercicio de la anestesiología no está exento de riesgos para el anestesiólogo. Considerado como un local de trabajo insalubre a causa de los riesgos potenciales a que conlleva, el quirófano es el local en donde el anestesiólogo pasa la mayor parte del tiempo. En esta revisión, proponemos un análisis de los riesgos ocupacionales a los que están expuestos los anestesiólogos en su práctica diaria. CONTENIDO: Presentamos una clasificación de los riesgos y sus relaciones con las enfermedades ocupacionales. CONCLUSIONES: El control de los riesgos ocupacionales a los que están expuestos los anestesiólogos diariamente es necesario para lograr un local de trabajo adecuado y con riesgos reducidos para la buena práctica de la anestesiología, lo que contribuye para la disminución del absentismo, la mejoría de la asistencia prestada al paciente y de la calidad de vida del anestesiólogo.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The practice of anesthesiology is not without risks to the anesthesiologist. The operating room (OR, in

  16. Profissionais de saúde mental: estresse e estressores ocupacionais stress e estressores ocupacionais em saúde mental Profesionales de la salud mental: estrés y estresores ocupacionalesestrés y estresores ocupacionales en salud mental Mental health professionals: stress and occupational stressors stress and occupational stressors of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia de Oliveira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Os profissionais de saúde mental se encontram particularmente vulneráveis ao estresse, em vista das características do trabalho que desempenham. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar manifestações de estresse, autopercepção de estresse e fatores estressantes do trabalho em profissionais de serviços substitutivos de saúde mental. Participaram 25 trabalhadores com pelo menos seis meses de atuação profissional. Aplicaram-se os instrumentos Inventário de Sintomas de Estresse para Adultos de Lipp e Roteiro Complementar. Os dados quantitativos foram tratados por meio de estatística descritiva, e os demais, analisados qualitativamente. Verificou-se que 36,0% dos profissionais apresentavam manifestação de estresse e que 44,0% deles se percebiam sob estresse. Condições de trabalho e relacionamento no trabalho foram os fatores mais frequentemente associados à percepção de estar sob estresse. Concluiu-se que os profissionais vivenciam estressores associados às mudanças relativas ao paradigma psicossocial de atenção, o que mostra a necessidade de intervenção direcionada ao desenvolvimento de estratégias de enfrentamento às situações ocupacionais estressoras.Los profesionales de la salud mental se encuentran particularmente vulnerables al estrés, teniendo en vista las características del trabajo que desempeñan. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar manifestación de estrés, auto percepción de estrés y factores estresantes del trabajo en profesionales de servicios sustitutivos de salud mental. Participaron 25 trabajadores actuantes hace por lo menos seis meses. Se aplicaron los instrumentos Inventario de Síntomas de Estrés para Adultos de Lipp y Guión Complementario. Los datos cuantitativos fueron tratados por medio de estadística descriptiva y los demás, analizados cualitativamente. Se verificaron 36,0% de los profesionales con manifestación de estrés y 44,0% percibiéndose bajo estrés. Condiciones de trabajo y relaci

  17. Frequência de problemas vocais autorreferidos e fatores ocupacionais associados em professores da educação básica de Londrina, Paraná, Brasil

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    Michelle Moreira Abujamra Fillis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar a prevalência da percepção de problemas vocais frequentes em professores da educação básica e investigar os fatores ocupacionais associados. Estudo transversal, realizado mediante entrevistas de 967 professores atuantes em 20 escolas estaduais de Londrina, Paraná, Brasil. A percepção de problemas vocais frequentes foi de 25,7%. Análises ajustadas mostraram associação desses problemas com características do vínculo de trabalho (≥ 40 horas/semana, percepção ruim da remuneração e dos benefícios de saúde, características do ambiente de trabalho (quantidade de alunos por sala, exposição a pó de giz e micro-organismos, aspectos psicológicos (menor realização profissional, baixa oportunidade de expressar opiniões, pior relacionamento com superiores e equilíbrio entre vida profissional e pessoal e situações de violência (insultos e assédio moral. A percepção de transtornos vocais frequentes afeta um em cada quatro professores da educação básica e está associada a diversas características da atividade docente, tanto estruturais como referentes ao processo de trabalho.

  18. Poluentes do ar e internações devido a doenças cardiovasculares em São José do Rio Preto, Brasil

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    Kátia Cristina Cota Mantovani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O presente estudo teve como objetivo estimar os efeitos de poluentes ambientais sobre o número de internações por doenças cardiovasculares. Foi um estudo ecológico com dados de internações hospitalares de residentes em São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brasil, com diagnóstico nas categorias de I-00 a I-99, entre 01/10/11 e 30/09/12. Os poluentes analisados foram partículas finas (PM2,5, ozônio, monóxido de carbono, óxido de nitrogênio e dióxido de nitrogênio. Foram estimados pelo modelo CCATT-BRAMS. O uso do modelo aditivo de regressão de Poisson foi utilizado para estimar associação entre a exposição ao PM2,5 e internação por doença cardiovascular. Foram calculados os excessos de internação e os gastos por estas doenças. Observou-se que a exposição ao PM2,5 no quinto dia após a exposição (lag 5 foi significativo para internação e aumentou em 15 ppts segundo incremento de 10µg /m3 na concentração de PM2,5. Foram identificadas 650 internações evitáveis com custos da ordem de R$ 1,9 milhão. Desse modo, foi possível identificar associação entre exposição ao PM2,5 e internações devido a doenças cardiovasculares em cidades de médio porte como São José do Rio Preto fornecendo subsídios aos gestores municipal e regional de Saúde.

  19. Internamento devido a PAC por Streptococcus pneumoniae - Avaliação de factores de mortalidade Streptococcus pneumoniae - caused CAP in hospitalised patients: mortality predictors

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    Sandra Figueiredo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da gravidade perante qualquer caso de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é de suma importância, pois dela decorrem decisões como a necessidade de internamento e o tratamento empírico inicial. Os autores apresentam um estudo retrospectivo, que incluiu doentes internados devido a pneumonia por Streptococcus pneumoniae durante o ano de 2006, no Hospital de São João. A confirmação etiológica de infecção foi feita por isolamentos no sangue, líquido pleural, secreções traqueobrônquicas, lavado brônquico, lavado broncoalveolar e pesquisa de antigenúria. Foram analisados os factores de risco e avaliados, com base nas normas PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index e da British Thoracic Society (BTS - CURB-65. A análise estatística foi efectuada utilizando teste T para amostras independentes e ANOVA, usando o programa de análise estatística SPSS 14.0. Foram incluídos 104 doentes com idade mediana de 63 anos, sendo 67,3% do sexo masculino. O estudo revelou existir uma associação com significado estatístico entre os resultados de PSI e CURB-65 e a evolução para a mortalidade. Apesar da melhoria dos meios diagnósticos e profilácticos, e da terapêutica antibiótica, a pneumonia pneumocócica permanece uma entidade de grande morbilidade e mortalidade. O valor preditivo das normas PSI e CURB-65 foi confirmado nesta população de doentes, documentando uma correlação entre o número de factores de risco e a evolução da doença.Probably the most important decision in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP is patient site of care. Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae-caused CAP admitted to our hospital between 1st January and 31st December 2006 were retrospectively analysed. Samples of blood, sputum, bronchial and bronchoalveolar lavage and urine were collected for microbiological testing using standard culture techniques and urine antigen detection. Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI and British Thoracic Society

  20. Evaluation of occupational exposure during the exploration and physical processing of monazite; Avaliacao das exposicoes ocupacionais durante as etapas de exploracao e beneficiamento fisico da monazita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Joao Torres de

    2006-07-01

    In Brazil the most important concentrations of monazite sands occur in the beaches and sandbanks that extend throughout the coast, from the State of Rio Grande do Norte down to the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Nowadays, the most important Brazilian monazite concentrations - considered as being the fourth worldwide reservoir of rare-earth elements - are located at the north seacoast of the State of Rio de Janeiro, near Buena town. At this location the Brazilian Nuclear Industries - INB - manages an industrial complex for prospecting, mining and physical separation and concentration of monazite sands. Among the elements present at the monazite sands there are the radioelements thorium and uranium, which make the monazite sand a radioactive mineral. Monazite is constituted basically of 62% in TR{sub 2}0{sub 3} (rare-earth oxides), 5,5% of thorium in Th0{sub 2} (thorium oxide) and 0,25% of uranium in U{sub 3}0{sub 8} (uranium oxide). The general objective of the present work was to estimate the occupational doses at the industrial complex for prospecting, mining and physical separation and concentration of monazite sands located at Buena, at the north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The occupational exposures occur mainly through the inhalation of airbone dust particles of mineraIs containing thorium and uranium, during the prospection and physical separation and concentration of monazite. To evaluate the impact of the occupational exposures during the physical separation and concentration of monazite, it was necessary to evaluate the effective equivalent doses due to thorium contamination of the air and the exposures due to the daughter radionuclides from the natural series of uranium and thorium. The results obtained at the present work showed that, although occupational doses are within the annual dose limits established by the Brazilian regulatory authority - CNEN - in some of the working places within the industrial complex the concentrations of

  1. Riscos ocupacionais na legislação trabalhista brasileira: destaque para aqueles relativos à saúde e à voz do professor Occupational risks in the Brazilian labor legislation: highlight on those related to teacher's health and voice

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    Emilse Aparecida Merlin Servilha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a legislação a respeito de riscos ocupacionais, com destaque para aqueles relacionados à saúde e à voz do professor. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de pesquisa bibliográfica, de caráter qualitativo, que considerou as políticas públicas sobre Saúde e Segurança no Trabalho. As Normas Regulamentadoras foram lidas e seus conteúdos analisados e organizados por categorias, com recorte para aqueles referentes ao ambiente escolar. RESULTADOS: As 33 normas focalizam os fatores de risco, níveis de tolerância e controle para saúde e segurança no trabalho. Os agentes ambientais nocivos são múltiplos e suas especificidades, como concentração e frequência, determinam o nível de tolerância à exposição. Na escola, os riscos ambientais como ruído, poeira, temperatura e iluminação inadequadas, dentre outros, estão presentes, porém em grau leve. O tratamento acústico, de iluminação e de ventilação é indicado para controle desses riscos. Os documentos mostram situações de agravos à saúde dos trabalhadores em graus de risco muito maiores do que aqueles da docência. Não há explicitação de fatores inerentes à organização do trabalho e os cuidados com a voz limitam-se à profissão de teleoperador, o que pode servir de referência para o professor. CONCLUSÃO: A legislação trabalhista é ampla ao abarcar a diversidade de condições de trabalho e garantir a saúde dos trabalhadores. A docência apresenta riscos ocupacionais à saúde mais leves do que outras profissões; contudo, os fatores organizacionais do trabalho, assim como os distúrbios de voz, muito frequentes na docência, carecem de maior atenção da legislação no Brasil.PURPOSE: To analyze the legislation regarding occupational risks, highlighting those related to teacher's health and voice. METHODS: A bibliographic search of qualitative nature regarding the public policies about Health and Security at Work was carried out. The Regulatory

  2. Nasal septum resection due congenital thickness in foalsRessecção de septo nasal devido ao espessamento congênito em potros

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    Antônio Felipe Paulino de Figueiredo Wouk

    2012-04-01

    ão foi possível introduzir o equipamento na cavidade nasal devido à estenose bilateral. O exame radiográfico confirmou o aumento na espessura do septo nasal. Os animais foram submetidos à cirurgia de ressecção de septo. Para promover uma melhor condição respiratória a traqueostomia foi realizada nos dois potros antes da cirurgia. A técnica cirúrgica utilizada foi modificado da técnica descrita anteriormente DOYLE (2005. Inicialmente foi realizada a trepanação do osso nasal para osteotomia da porção caudal do septo, com auxilio de osteótomo modificado, sendo os limites dorsais e ventrais do septo removidos com uso de fio serra protegido por guias metálicos. Após a recuperação cirúrgica, nos dois casos, o exame clínico mostrou que o fluxo de ar estava normal e sem ruídos permitindo aos potros respirar normalmente. A traqueostomia cicatrizou por segunda intenção. Após oito meses os dois animais respiravam confortavelmente, estando aptos à atividade física. O exame histopatológico não demonstrou sinais de inflamação, neoplasia ou outro tipo de alteração histológica relacionada aos septos, sugerindo espessamento congênito.

  3. Internamento devido a PAC por Streptococcus pneumoniae – Avaliação de factores de mortalidade

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    Sandra Figueiredo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A avaliação da gravidade perante qualquer caso de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é de suma importância, pois dela decorrem decisões como a necessidade de internamento e o tratamento empírico inicial. Os autores apresentam um estudo retrospectivo, que incluiu doentes internados devido a pneumonia por Streptococcus pneumoniae durante o ano de 2006, no Hospital de São João. A confirmação etiológica de infecção foi feita por isolamentos no sangue, líquido pleural, secreções traqueobrônquicas, lavado brônquico, lavado broncoalveolar e pesquisa de antigenúria. Foram analisados os factores de risco e avaliados, com base nas normas PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index e da British Thoracic Society (BTS -CURB-65. A análise estatística foi efectuada utilizando teste T para amostras independentes e ANOVA, usando o programa de análise estatística SPSS 14.0.Foram incluídos 104 doentes com idade mediana de 63 anos, sendo 67,3% do sexo masculino. O estudo revelou existir uma associação com significado estatístico entre os resultados de PSI e CURB-65 e a evolução para a mortalidade.Apesar da melhoria dos meios diagnósticos e profilácticos, e da terapêutica antibiótica, a pneumonia pneumocócica permanece uma entidade de grande morbilidade e mortalidade. O valor preditivo das normas PSI e CURB-65 foi confirmado nesta população de doentes, documentando uma correlação entre o número de factores de risco e a evolução da doença.Rev Port Pneumol 2008; XIV (5: 601-615 Abstract: Probably the most important decision in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP is patient site of care. Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae-caused CAP admitted to our hospital between 1st January and 31st December 2006 were retrospectively analysed. Samples of blood, sputum, bronchial and bronchoalveolar lavage and urine were collected for

  4. Contexto da atenção à saúde mental: percepção de terapeutas ocupacionais sobre a avaliação / Context of mental health care: perceptions of occupational therapists about the evaluation

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    Mariana Felício de Godoy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação constitui etapa essencial no processo terapêutico ocupacional, entretanto, a produção de conhecimento sobre esta temática no cenário nacional é ainda escassa. Este trabalho tem por objetivo analisar a percepção de terapeutas ocupacionais sobre os processos de avaliação que realizam nos serviços que atuam na atenção à saúde mental de um município do interior de São Paulo, Brasil. Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, descritivo e de natureza qualitativa. Para tanto, foram analisados relatos pertinentes ao material coletado em campo, resultante da realização de 14 entrevistas semiestruturadas com os terapeutas ocupacionais, assim como a aplicação de questionário contendo perguntas abertas e fechadas. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram que os terapeutas ocupacionais eram prioritariamente do sexo feminino, com média idade de 35 anos. Atuavam em diferentes serviços da Rede de Atenção Psicossocial do município - Centros de Atenção Psicossocial tipo, III, álcool e outras drogas, Serviço de Geração de Renda e Enfermaria de Psiquiatria em Hospital Geral. Constatou-se que os profissionais utilizavam diversas estratégias avaliativas, embora não utilizassem instrumentos padronizados e validados específicos da Terapia Ocupacional. Os entrevistados referiram avaliar os usuários em diferentes momentos (triagem, acolhimento e ao longo do processo de acompanhamento e ressaltaram a importância da avaliação em outros contextos, no caso, o domicílio. As principais demandas dos usuários identificadas nos processos avaliativos relacionavam-se às dificuldades de realização nas atividades cotidianas. A análise dos resultados obtidos evidenciou a necessidade de que outros estudos possam ser desenvolvidos contribuindo assim para o oferecimento de um cuidado cada vez mais qualificado.Abstract The evaluation is an essential step in the occupational therapeutic process, however, the production of knowledge about

  5. Modelo operário e percepção de riscos ocupacionais e ambientais: o uso exemplar de estudo descritivo The "worker model" and perception of environmental and occupational risks: the optimal use of a descriptive study

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    Luiz A. Facchini

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar os riscos resultantes da exposição a produtos químicos, de trabalhadores de indústria química e farmacêutica. Realizou-se estudo descritivo, através do modelo operário (MO, onde o acesso aos trabalhadores significava uma parte essencial do método e a única forma de neutralizar a impossibilidade de acesso ao local de trabalho. Reconstruíam-se as atividades dos setores de trabalho e identificaram-se as principais substâncias químicas utilizadas, as queixas mais referidas, os danos potenciais e os principais riscos ambientais, concluindo pela precariedade das condições gerais de trabalho. Com os resultados confirmados, ficou evidenciada a importância do MO e sua utilidade metodológica, levando trabalhadores a conseguir das autoridades que a empresa fosse vistoriada. A mobilização dos trabalhadores, através de denúncias nos meios de comunicação, ajudou a formar uma consciência popular dos riscos ocupacionais e ambientais daquela atividade produtiva.An attempt was made to identify the risks resulting from exposure to the chemicals to which workers are exposed as well as from the poor working conditions to which they are subject in a chemical and pharmaceutical factory. A descriptive study based on the "workers model" - a methodological approach developed in Italy in the 60's, was carried out. Such a study requires direct contact with the workers and has the advantage of overcoming the difficulty of gaining access to their work-place. The activities of the different departments of the plant were reconstructed and the main chemicals used, the main physical complaints, the potencial harms and the main environmental risks identified. The repon on the harmful working conditions produced was used by the workers as a means of pressing the authorities into carrying out an inspection of the plant concerned to verify its accuracy. The report's findings have been confirmed and demonstrate the usefulness of the

  6. Riscos ocupacionais entre trabalhadores de enfermagem de uma unidade de terapia intensiva Riesgos ocupacionales entre trabajadores de enfermeria de una unidad de cuidados intensivos Occupational risks among a nursing staff working in an intensive care unit

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    Vera Médice Nishide

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo descritivo no qual foram identificados os principais riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos os trabalhadores de enfermagem de uma unidade de terapia intensiva. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista individual, utilizando-se roteiro estruturado. Constatou-se que os trabalhadores estão expostos a riscos de acidentes relacionados aos procedimentos de assistência aos pacientes e ao ambiente laboral. Foi observado que a maioria dos trabalhadores utilizavam luvas, máscaras e aventais como barreiras de proteção, e um baixo percentual, óculos de sobrepor como medida de segurança. Concluiu-se que são necessárias mudanças no ambiente de trabalho para minimizar os riscos em procedimentos de assistência e no ambiente laboral, além de treinamento, conscientização de práticas seguras e fornecimento de dispositivos de segurança aos trabalhadores.Estudio descriptivo en el cual fueron identificados los principales riesgos ocupacionales a los que están expuestos los trabajadores de enfermería de una unidad de cuidados intensivos. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de una entrevista individual, utilizándose un esquema estructurado. Se constató que los trabajadores están expuestos a riesgos de accidentes relacionados a los procedimientos de asistencia a los pacientes y al ambiente laboral. Fue observado que la mayoría de los trabajadores usaban guantes, máscaras y delantales como barreras de protección y un bajo porcentaje usaban anteojos de protección como medida de seguridad. El estudio dejó como conclusión la necesidad de modificaciones en el ambiente de trabajo para minimizar los riesgos en procedimientos de asistencia y del ambiente laboral, aparte del entrenamiento, concientización de prácticas seguras y ofrecimiento de dispositivos de seguridad a los trabajadores.This is a descriptive study that detected the main occupational risks to which the nursing staff working in an intensive care unit are exposed

  7. Prevalência de exposições ocupacionais de cirurgiões-dentistas e auxiliares de consultório dentário a material biológico Prevalence of occupational exposures to potentially infectious materials among dentists and dental assistants

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    Leila Posenato Garcia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Os cirurgiões-dentistas e auxiliares de consultório dentário trabalham em condições que favorecem a ocorrência de exposições ocupacionais a material biológico. Os objetivos do presente estudo são: determinar a prevalência de exposições ocupacionais ao longo da vida profissional e no ano anterior a este estudo, identificar as circunstâncias das exposições e verificar se existe relação entre sua ocorrência e o uso de equipamentos de proteção individual. Participaram do estudo 289 dentistas e 104 auxiliares do município de Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil. Os dados foram coletados por meio de questionário auto-aplicável. A prevalência de exposições ocupacionais na vida profissional foi maior entre os dentistas (94,5% do que entre os auxiliares (80,8%, ao passo que, no ano anterior, foi similar entre dentistas (39,1% e auxiliares (39,4%. Todavia, considerando as exposições ocorridas no ano anterior, as lesões percutâneas foram mais freqüentes nos auxiliares (95,2% do que nos dentistas (60,7%. O uso constante de óculos de proteção foi estatisticamente associado com menor ocorrência de respingos nos olhos de dentistas (p = 0,004. São recomendadas medidas educativas visando a reduzir a freqüência de exposições ocupacionais na população estudada.Dentists and dental assistants work in conditions that favor the occurrence of occupational exposures to potentially infectious materials. The aims of this study are: to determine the prevalence of occupational exposures throughout professional life and in the previous year, to identify the circumstances of exposures, and to verify if there exists a relationship between their occurrence and the use of personal protective equipment. 289 dentists and 104 dental assistants from the city of Florianópolis, Brazil, participated in this study. Data were collected through self-report questionnaires. The prevalence of occupational exposures throughout professional life

  8. Clinical and pathological aspects of multicentric hemangiosarcoma in a Pinscher dog Sinais neurológicos multifocais devido ao hemangiossarcoma multicêntrico em um cão Pinscher: aspectos clínicos e patológicos

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    B.D.C. Martins

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old female Pinscher dog was presented with a history of lameness and pain in hind limbs for one week which acutely progressed to non-ambulatory paraparesis. The dog had been apathetic and anorexic during the six days prior to presentation. The neurological findings were compatible with upper motor neuron signs to the left hind limb due to a spinal cord compressive mass on the twelfth thoracic vertebral body. On the other hand, signs of lower motor neurons to the right hind limb were due to a mass with a pathological fracture in the right proximal femur, compressing the sciatic nerve. A histopathological analysis of all organs revealedthe proliferation of endothelial cells showingin filtrative growth and organization into vascular structures with a solid pattern. In addition, immunohistochemycal analysis revealed low proliferation index and citoplasmatic positivity for CD-31, confirming the vascular nature of the neoplasm. Clinical, histopathological and immunophenotipical findings were consistent with hemangiosarcoma.Uma cadela Pinscher de três anos de idade foi atendida em Hospital Veterinário Escola com histórico de dor nos membros pélvicos com progressão aguda para paraparesia não ambulatória. O animal estava apático e anoréxico há seis dias. Os achados neurológicos foram compatíveis com sinais de lesão de neurônios motores superiores para o membro pélvico esquerdo devido a uma massa no 12º corpo vertebral comprimindo a medula espinhal. Por outro lado, foram observados sinais de lesão de neurônios motores inferiores para o membro pélvico direito devido a uma fratura patológica no colo proximal do fêmur direito que comprimiu o nervo isquiático. Análises histopatológicas de todos os órgãos revelaram proliferação de células endoteliais com crescimento infiltrativo e organização sólida em estruturas vasculares. Adicionalmente, a análise imuno-histoquímica revelou baixa proliferação e marca

  9. Associação de variáveis meteorológicas com os afastamentos do trabalho devido a doenças respiratórias: um estudo entre trabalhadores dos correios de Santa Catarina

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    Daniel Pires Bitencourt

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As doenças do aparelho respiratório (DAR em trabalhadores são, com frequência, atribuídas ao ambiente de trabalho ou ao tipo de atividade. Poucos estudos relacionam as DAR com as condições de tempo. OBJETIVO: Este artigo tem como objetivo identificar a existência desta relação através da comparação da taxa de afastamento do trabalho com as médias mensais de variáveis meteorológicas. MÉTODOS: Para tanto, calculou-se a correlação dos afastamentos com as médias mensais de temperatura e umidade, com os valores mínimos mensais de temperatura e umidade e com a maior queda de temperatura em 24h ocorrida no mês. A série de dados meteorológicos com melhor correlação foi dividida em quartis (25% para identificar os valores típicos de afastamento em situações extremas de temperatura ou umidade. Os afatamentos por DAR foram calculados em trabalhadores dos Correios de Santa Catarina e os dados meteorológicos foram obtidos da reanálise de modelos numéricos. O período analisado compreendeu janeiro de 2001 a dezembro de 2007, totalizando 84 meses. RESULTADOS: Os afastamentos do trabalho devido às DAR obtiveram melhor associação, em ordem de importância, com a temperatura média do mês, a temperatura mínima do mês e o maior declínio de temperatura do mês. Todas essas correlações obtiveram significância estatística de 0,1%. A umidade do ar não demonstrou associação com a taxa de afastamento. CONCLUSÃO: Conclui-se que as maiores taxas de afastamento do trabalho devido às DAR ocorrem nos meses mais frios e secos.

  10. Mortalidade por cirrose, câncer hepático e transtornos devidos ao uso de álcool: Carga Global de Doenças no Brasil, 1990 e 2015

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    Ana Paula Souto Melo

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Introdução: O uso de álcool é um dos principais fatores de risco preveníveis para mortalidade ou incapacidade prematuras. Objetivo: Descrever as estimativas de mortalidade e anos de vida perdidos por morte prematura (YLL por cirrose, câncer hepático e transtornos devidos ao uso de álcool no Brasil e suas unidades da federação (UFs, em 1990 e 2015. Métodos: Estudo descritivo com dados do estudo de Carga Global de Doenças (2015 e do Sistema de Informações sobre Mortalidade (SIM. Modelos estatísticos foram empregados para obter estimativas corrigidas de mortalidade pelas causas selecionadas. As taxas de mortalidade foram padronizadas por idade (TMPI. Resultados: Em 1990, foram estimados 16.226 óbitos para as 3 condições (17,0/100 mil habitantes, enquanto em 2015 foram 28.337 (15,7/100 mil habitantes. Houve redução da mortalidade (por 100 mil habitantes por cirrose (de 11,4 para 9,5 e estabilidade por câncer hepático (1,5 e 1,9 e transtornos devidos ao uso de álcool (4,1 e 4,3. As TMPI foram 5,1 vezes maiores entre os homens, e as 5 UFs com maiores TMPI e YLL foram da Região Nordeste: Sergipe, Ceará, Pernambuco, Paraíba e Alagoas. As taxas de mortalidade e de YLL pelas três condições estudadas ascenderam no ranking das causas de óbito, em ambos os sexos, exceto a cirrose no feminino. Conclusão: As três condições estudadas são responsáveis por importante carga de mortalidade prematura no Brasil, principalmente entre homens e residentes na região nordeste. Esses resultados reforçam a necessidade de políticas públicas para o enfrentamento ao consumo nocivo do álcool no Brasil.

  11. Riscos ocupacionais para trabalhadores de Unidades Básicas de Saúde: revisão bibliográfica Riesgos ocupacionales para trabajadores de Unidades Básicas de Salud: revisión bibliográfica Occupational risks for public health workers in Brazil: a systematic review of the literature

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    Mônica Bonagamba Chiodi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo buscar evidências científicas na literatura nacional sobre os riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos os trabalhadores que atuam na Saúde Pública. Estudo bibliográfico efetuado nos últimos 15 anos na base de dados LILACS, DEDALUS e Banco de Teses da Universidade de São Paulo. Foram encontradas 279 publicações enfocando os riscos ocupacionais, sendo que apenas 12 (4,3% abordaram os riscos ocupacionais em Saúde Pública, os quais eram voltados a Unidades Básicas de Saúde, Unidades Básicas e Distritais de Saúde e Núcleos de Saúde da Família. Os resultados permitiram constatar que os riscos psicossociais foram evidenciados em todas as pesquisas, seguido pelo risco biológico (66,7%. O tema merece maior atenção dos pesquisadores para o diagnóstico da situação laboral e para a formulação de medidas preventivas para a promoção da saúde desses trabalhadores.En este estudio se tuvo como objetivo buscar evidencias científicas en la literatura nacional sobre los riesgos ocupacionales a los que están expuestos los trabajadores que actúan en la Salud Pública. Se trata de un estudio bibliográfico efectuado en la base de datos LILACS, DEDALUS y Banco de Tesis de la Universidad de Sao Paulo, de los últimos 15 años. Se encontraron 279 publicaciones que enfocaban los riesgos ocupacionales, de las cuales apenas 12 (4,3% abordaban los riesgos ocupacionales en Salud Pública, voltados a Unidades Básicas de Salud, Unidades Básicas y Distritales de Salud y Núcleos de Salud de la Familia. Los resultados permitieron constatar que los riesgos psicosociales fueron evidenciados en todas las investigaciones, seguido por el riesgo biológico (66,7%. El tema merece mayor atención de los investigadores para el diagnóstico de la situación laboral y la formulación de medidas preventivas para la promoción de la salud de esos trabajadores.To determine scientific evidence in the Brazilian literature about

  12. Riscos ocupacionais em um setor de hemodiálise na perspectiva dos trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem Riesgos ocupacionales en una unidad de hemodialisis en el perspectiva de los trabajadores del equipo de enfermería Occupational risks in a unit of hemodialysis in the perspective of the workers of the nursing team

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    Michele Karla Damacena da Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo descritivo exploratório, de abordagem qualitativa, teve como objetivos descrever os riscos ocupacionais no contexto dos trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem em uma unidade de hemodiálise, analisar o conhecimento do trabalhador da equipe de enfermagem acerca das medidas de proteção e segurança em uma unidade de hemodiálise e discutir o conhecimento do trabalhador da equipe de enfermagem sobre os riscos ocupacionais e as implicações para a saúde do trabalhador. O cenário foi um hospital universitário do município do Rio de Janeiro. Os sujeitos foram 26 trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem do setor de hemodiálise. Foi utilizada entrevista semiestruturada. O projeto foi aprovado por Comitê de Ética. Resultados: os trabalhadores detêm o conhecimento sobre os riscos ocupacionais e sobre as medidas de proteção e segurança, apesar de nem sempre aplicá-las na sua prática profissional. Foram citados como as principais implicações à saúde os problemas respiratórios, de coluna e as doenças contagiosas.Estudio descriptivo exploratorio, de abordaje cualitativo, que tenía como objetivo describir los riesgos ocupacionales en el contexto de los trabajadores del equipo de enfermería en una unidad de hemodialisis, analizar el conocimiento del trabajador del equipo de enfermería a respecto de las medidas de protección y seguridad en una unidad de hemodialisis y discutir el conocimiento del trabajador del equipo de enfermería sobre los riesgos ocupacionales y las implicaciones para la salud del trabajador. El escenario fue un Hospital Universitario de la ciudad de Rio de Janeiro (Brasil. Los sujetos fueron 26 trabajadores del equipo de enfermería del sector de hemodialisis. Fue utilizada la entrevista semi-estructurada. El proyecto fue aprobado por el Comité de Ética. Resultados: los trabajadores retienen el conocimiento sobre los riesgos ocupacionales y sobre las medidas de protección y seguridad, aunque ni siempre

  13. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  14. Chemical treatment to unclogg dripper irrigation systems due to biological problems Desentupimento de um sistema de irrigação por gotejamento devido a problema de origem biológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Assunção Pires Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Many producers use drippers for trickle irrigation systems for flower production in the field and in protected environments. A frequent problem in this type of irrigation system is the clogging of drippers, which is directly related to water quality and filtering system efficiency. The objective of this study was to conduct an experimental investigation to evaluate the efficiency of using nitric acid and sodium hypochlorite to unclogg drippers due to the use of water with high algae content. The evaluation was conducted in six, 4216 m² greenhouses, each with two sectors comprised of ten spaces or lines, totaling 12 sectors of a dripper irrigation system in a rose producing property of Holambra, State of SP, Brazil. Chemical and physical analyses and the bacteriological count in water were carried out in the three water sources that supply the irrigation system to check the factors causing the clogging. Evaluations were carried out on water distribution uniformity in all sectors before and after chemical treatment in order to evaluate efficiency. The treatment improved water distribution uniformity and a lead to a reduction in the coefficient of variation (CV for dripper flow in all sectors. There was a good correlation between CV and the water distribution uniformity index. Therefore, this is an excellent method to be used to unclogg drippers due to biological problems.Muitos produtores usam gotejadores para irrigação localizada em produção de flores no campo e em ambientes protegidos. Um problema freqüente neste tipo de irrigação é o entupimento dos gotejadores, que está diretamente relacionado à qualidade da água e à deficiência de filtração do sistema. Este trabalho teve como objetivo fazer uma investigação experimental para avaliar a eficiência da utilização de ácido nítrico e de hipoclorito de sódio na desobstrução de gotejadores entupidos, devido à utilização de águas com elevado teor de matéria de origem

  15. Pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome: case report and literature review Retinopatia pigmentar devido a síndrome de Bardet-Biedl: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jesuino de Oliveira Andrade

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. This syndrome was first described by Laurence and Moon in 1866 and additional cases were described by Bardet and Biedl between 1920 and 1922. The main features are obesity, polydactyly, pigmentary retinopathy, learning disabilities, various degrees of intellectual impairment, hypogonadism, and renal abnormalities. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of 4 of the 5 cardinal features. The authors present a typical case of pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome and made a brief commentary about the disease's cardinal manifestations.A síndrome de Bardet-Biedl (BBS é uma desordem autossômica recessiva rara, com heterogeneidade clínica e genética. Esta síndrome foi descrita pela primeira vez por Laurence e Moon em 1866 e outros casos foram descritos por Bardet e Biedl entre 1920 e 1922. As principais características são obesidade, polidactilia, retinopatia pigmentar, dificuldades de aprendizagem, graus de deficiência intelectual diversos, hipogonadismo e anomalias renais. Síndrome de Bardet-Biedl é fenotipicamente e geneticamente heterogêneos. O diagnóstico clínico baseia-se na presença de quatro dos cinco sinais principais da síndrome. Os autores apresentam um caso típico de retinopatia pigmentar devido à síndrome de Bardet-Biedl e fazem uma breve revisão sobre as manifestações da síndrome com especial atenção à retinopatia pigmentar.

  16. Maternidade e hanseníase: as vivências de separação devido ao isolamento compulsório Being a mother with leprosy: the experiences of separation due to compulsory isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Santos Lima de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As mulheres portadoras de hanseníase, durante grande parte do século XX, não puderam exercer a maternidade devido à política de isolamento compulsório dos doentes adotada para controlar a doença. Os filhos ao nascerem eram levados para os preventórios e o contato com estes era realizado pelo olhar. Visando compreender a experiência da maternidade no hospital colônia foi realizada pesquisa narrativa com três mães que viveram o período de internação compulsória. Os discursos revelam dois momentos distintos da vivência de maternidade: a separação dos filhos com sua posterior volta para casa e a adoção de crianças para realizar a maternidade. Considera-se que a adoção promoveu o encontro com o sentido da existência que havia sido rompido e possibilitou a experiência de ser-mãe.In the twentieth century, women with leprosy could not carry on their maternity because of the statement of compulsory isolation of patients, adopted to control the disease. Their children were taken at birth to prevention centers and the contact of mothers with their babies was only visual. In order to understand the experience of maternity in the leprosaria it was carried out an investigated narrative research with three mothers who lived through the period of compulsory internment. The speeches reveal two distinct moments in the experience of motherhood: the separation of the children with their subsequent return to home and the adoption of other children to achieve motherhood. It is considered that the adoption has promoted the meeting with the meaning of existence that had been broken and allowed the experience of being a parent.

  17. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  18. Traffic effects on the soil preconsolidation pressure due to eucalyptus harvest operations Efeito do tráfego nas pressões de preconsolidação do solo devido as operações de colheita do eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir de Souza Dias Junior

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the limitations for reaching sustainable forest development is related to the traffic of machines and vehicles during harvest operations and wood transport, which may cause soil structure degradation. Seeking a way to analyze this problem, the objective of this study was to determine the traffic effects due to harvest operations and wood transport, on the preconsolidation pressure (sigmap in a Typic Acrustox cultivated with eucalyptus. This study was conducted using undisturbed soil samples collected at the 0.1-0.125 m depth. Undisturbed soil samples were used in the uniaxial compression tests. Soil sampling consisted of two stages, before and after the mechanized harvest operations. The traffic effects on the sigmap in the dry season indicated that the soil compaction process was neither evident nor important. However, in the rainy season the traffic effects on the sigmap indicated that the operations performed with Harvester and Forwarder caused greater soil compaction than those with Motorized Saw and Manual, which caused less soil compaction.Uma das limitações para alcançar o desenvolvimento florestal sustentável está relacionado ao tráfico de máquinas e veículos durante as operações de colheita e transporte de madeira que podem causar degradação da estrutura do solo. Buscando uma maneira para analisar este problema, o objetivo deste estudo foi determinar o efeito do tráfego devido a operações de colheita e transporte de madeira, nas pressões de preconsolidação (sigmap de um Latosol Vermelho-Amarelo, cultivado com Eucalyptus. Este estudo foi realizado usando amostras de solo indeformadas coletadas a 0,10-0,125 m de profundidade. As amostras indeformadas foram usadas nos ensaios de compressão de uniaxial. A amostragem consistiu de duas fases, antes e depois das operações de colheita mecanizada. As alterações causadas pelo tráfego nas sigmap na estação seca indicaram que o processo de compactação não foi

  19. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  20. Recuperação de gotejadores obstruídos devido à utilização de águas ferruginosas Recovery of drippers clogged by use of water high in iron content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. S. Vieira

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se este trabalho com o objetivo de se avaliar a eficiência da utilização de ácido fosfórico, de hipoclorito de sódio e de um produto comercial, além do impacto mecânico na desobstrução de gotejadores entupidos, devido à utilização de águas com elevado teor de ferro. O trabalho foi realizado na Fazenda Vista Alegre, localizada em Jaboticatubas, MG. Um sistema de irrigação por gotejamento foi adaptado para realização dos testes com oito tratamentos, sendo sete com aplicação de produtos químicos e um com impacto mecânico. Para os tratamentos químicos, utilizaram-se: o ácido fosfórico com pH 2 e pH 3; o hipoclorito de sódio com as dosagens de 100, 50 e 25 mg L-1 de cloro; e Reciclean com as dosagens de 50 e 25 mg L-1. Diante dos resultados obtidos, conclui-se: o tratamento com ácido fosfórico em pH 2 forneceu o melhor resultado quanto ao aumento da uniformidade de aplicação de água pelo sistema, apresentando o maior aumento nos valores de coeficiente de uniformidade de distribuição (CUD e coeficiente de uniformidade de Christiansen (CUC; entretanto, com custo elevado. O tratamento com 25 mg L-1 de cloro apresentou a melhor relação benefício/custo, sendo o mais econômico e o segundo melhor quanto à melhoria da uniformidade de irrigação do sistema. O impacto mecânico é uma alternativa para recuperação de sistemas de irrigação por gotejamento em geral, com destaque para sistemas de cultivos orgânicos.A study was carried out (Reciclean to evaluate the efficiency of using the phosphoric acid, sodium hypochlorite, a commercial product and mechanical impact for cleaning the drippers in which the clogging was due to the presence of high iron content in water. The experiment was set up in the Vista Alegre Farm, located in Jaboticatubas County - Minas Gerais State. A drip irrigation system was adopted for the accomplishment of the tests. Eight treatments were tested, of which, seven with application

  1. Peroneal nerve palsy due to compartment syndrome after facial plastic surgery Paralisia de nervo fibular devido a síndrome compartimental após cirurgia plástica da face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clécio O. Godeiro-Júnior

    2007-09-01

    índrome compartimental crônica. Ele fazia uso de anabolizantes e venlafaxina, não relatado no início do quadro, e a agitação poderia ser explicada por uma síndrome serotoninérgia desencadeada pela interação deste último medicamento e haloperidol. A rabdomiólise secundária a estes eventos causou edema e isquemia nos compartimentos anteriores de ambos os membros inferiores, levando a uma compressão secundária do nervo fibular. O caso em questão ilustra a importância do diagnóstico precoce da síndrome compartimental pois, caso contrário, mesmo com fasciotomia, uma complicação permanente devido à compressão de nervos periféricos pode se estabelecer.

  2. A produção científica sobre riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos os trabalhadores de enfermagem La producción científica sobre riesgos ocupacionales a que están expuestos los trabajadores de enfermería The scientific production about occupational risks to which the nursing workers are exposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Ribeiro de Castro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo realizado no Curso de Mestrado na Escola de Enfermagem Anna Nery, inserido no Núcleo de Pesquisa em Enfermagem e Saúde do Trabalhador da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Objeto: a produção científica sobre riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos os trabalhadores de enfermagem. Objetivos: levantar a produção científica dos estudos stricto sensu acerca dos riscos ocupacionais nos trabalhadores de enfermagem; identificar a abordagem (objetiva ou subjetiva acerca desses riscos e analisar os riscos retratados. Estudo bibliográfico e quantitativo dos 42 resumos publicados no Centro de Estudos e Pesquisas em Enfermagem entre 1979 e 2004. Riscos mais expressivos: biológicos, seguidos dos químicos, dos psicossociais e, em menor escala, dos físicos, de acidentes e ergonômicos. Percebeu-se reduzida ênfase dispensada à subjetividade do trabalhador de enfermagem associada à temática estudada, sugerindo lacuna nesta área de conhecimento. Faz-se necessária a reflexão desses riscos na enfermagem, atentando para sua identificação, detecção e controle.Estudio realizado en el Curso de Maestría de la Escuela de Enfermería Anna Nery, inserto en el Núcleo de Investigación en Enfermería y Salud del Trabajador de la Universidad Federal de Río de Janeiro. Objeto: la producción científica sobre riesgos ocupacionales a que están expuestos los trabajadores de enfermería. Objetivos: hacer un búsqueda de la producción científica de los estudios stricto sensu acerca de los riesgos ocupacionales en los trabajadores de enfermería; identificar el abordaje (objetivo o subjetivo acerca de los riesgos y analizar los riesgos retratados. Estudio bibliográfico y cuantitativo de 42 resúmenes publicados en el Centro de Estudios e Investigación en Enfermería entre 1979 a 2004. Riesgos mas expresivos: biológicos, seguido de químicos, psicosociales y en menor escala, los físicos, accidentes y riesgos ergonómicos. Se percibi

  3. Orofacial clefts in the newborn and environmental and occupational parental exposures: a case-control study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Fendas orofaciais no recém-nascido e exposições ambientais e ocupacionais dos pais: um estudo caso-controle no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina G Leite

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate risk factors involving environmental and occupational parental exposures associated with occurrence of orofacial clefts in a group of Brazilian children. METHODS: a secondary base case-control study was conducted with 274 cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P and cleft palate only, with 548 controls (1:2. The authors analyzed residential proximity to industrial areas, exposure to commercial insecticides, agricultural pesticides, and vector control spraying, as well as various occupational exposures. The results were obtained by conditional regression analysis. RESULTS: proximity to industrial installations as a risk factor (OR = 3,32; 95%CI: 2,18-5,05 for all orofacial clefts, as well as the combined use of household insecticides and urban vector control pesticide spraying (OR = 5,73; 95%CI: 2,51-11,28. A group of maternal occupations heavily associated with orofacial clefts was domestic services (OR = 2,89; 95%CI: 1,76-4,86. CONCLUSIONS: solvents are frequently associated with CL ± P and that they are contained in numerous industrial products and household cleaning products, the results pertaining to occupational exposure become plausible. Other associations such as the routine use of domestic insecticides require further specific research for confirmation of the hypothesis.OBJETIVOS: avaliar fatores de risco envolvendo exposições ambientais e ocupacionais dos pais associadas com a ocorrência de fendas orofaciais em um grupo de crianças brasileiras. MÉTODOS: estudo caso-controle de base secundária reuniu 274 casos de portadores de fendas lábio-palatinas (FL±Pe fendas palatinas isoladas e 548 controles (1:2. Foram analisadas as variáveis proximidade residencial a área industriais, exposição a inseticidas comerciais, pesticidas agrícolas, e usados no controle de vetores, bem como várias exposições ocupacionais. Os resultados foram obtidos através de análise de regressão condicional

  4. Dose rate constants for new dose quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.; Daverda, G.; Leitner, A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual changes and new quantities made is necessary to reassess dose rate quantities. Calculations of the dose rate constant were done for air kerma, ambient dose equivalent and directional dose equivalent. The number of radionuclides is more than 200. The threshold energy is selected as 20 keV for the dose equivalent constants. The dose rate constant for the photon equivalent dose as used mainly in German speaking countries as a temporary quantity is also included. (Author)

  5. Riscos ocupacionais de uma indústria calçadista sob a ótica dos trabalhadores Riesgos laborales de una industria de calzado en la visión de los trabajadores Occupational risks of a shoe industry from the workers' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Reinher da Luz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo identificar os riscos ocupacionais de uma indústria calçadista sob a ótica dos trabalhadores, bem como as medidas preventivas adotadas por eles contra os riscos. Realizou-se um estudo qualitativo, descritivo. A amostra foi composta por quinze trabalhadores. Os dados foram coletados por entrevista semiestruturada e analisados à luz da análise de conteúdo. Foram respeitados os aspectos éticos e a pesquisa foi aprovada pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Universidade Regional do Noroeste do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os resultados apontam que os trabalhadores são conhecedores dos riscos do seu processo de trabalho, faziam uso de medidas de proteção individual e a empresa disponibilizava dispositivos de segurança, informando e realizando, periodicamente, visitas aos setores, na perspectiva de desenvolver ações educativas.Estudio cualitativo descriptivo, que tuve como objetivo identificar los riesgos laborales de una industria de calzado, así como las medidas preventivas adoptadas frente a los riesgos, en la visión de los trabajadores. La muestra fue compuesta por quince trabajadores y los datos fueran obtenidos por entrevista semi-estructurada y analizados a luz de la analísis de contenido. Los aspectos éticos fueran respetados y la investigación fue aprobada por el Comité de Ética en Pesquisa de la Universidad Regional del Estado de Rio Grande do Sul. Los resultados apuntaran que los trabajadores conocen los riesgos de su proceso de trabajo, hacen uso de medidas de protección personal, y que la empresa proporciona dispositivos de seguridad, informando y realizando visitas periódicas a los sectores con el fin de desarrollar actividades educativas.This is a qualitative and descriptive study, which aimed to identify the occupational risks of a shoe industry, as well as the preventive measures taken against those risks, from the workers' perspective. The sample consisted of fifteen workers. Data

  6. Change of the natural radiation exposure due to agriculture and industrial activities in a high natural radioactivity area from Brazil; Modificacao da exposicao a radiacao natural devido a atividades agricolas e industriais numa area de radioatividade natural elevada no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Amaral, E.C. da

    1993-12-31

    The Pocos de Caldas Plateau, Minas Gerais State one of the biggest alkaline intrusions in the world. This study has shown the expected value for the mean annual radiation exposure due to the agricultural activities ranges from 6 up to 14 mSv/a depending on the age and living habits of the population group. The inhalation exposure of radon, thoron and their progenies represents the largest radiological health hazard (70-90%); this is followed by the external gamma irradiation from soil (10-25%). Ingestion of natural radionuclides with local food is only of minor radiological consequence. It was found that the lethal cancer risk might increase by 4% for a person born at the plateau, living and working there for the rest of her life. For the remote population the consumption the consumption of food products exported from the plateau leads to an expected value for the collective dose of 19 man Sv/a. This corresponding nominally to the small calculated number of 1 additional case of cancer per year. Therefore the main radiation impact of the agricultural activities are not the increased concentrations of natural radionuclides in food products but the fact that they are produced there with human labor and thus increasing the radiation exposure to a large number of farm workers and their families that move for occupational reasons to that region. The radiation exposure due to the mining and milling activities is, in spite of the significant increase of radionuclide activity concentrations in river waters, only of the order of 0.3 mSv/a. However as a recognized industrial source the ICRP dose limitation system has to be applied. Under this aspect the exposure calculated here, 0.3 mSv/a, should be considered as acceptable. (author). 93 refs, 16 figs, 58 tabs.

  7. Change of the natural radiation exposure due to agriculture and industrial activities in a high natural radioactivity area from Brazil; Modificacao da exposicao a radiacao natural devido a atividades agricolas e industriais numa area de radioatividade natural elevada no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Amaral, E.C. da

    1992-12-31

    The Pocos de Caldas Plateau, Minas Gerais State one of the biggest alkaline intrusions in the world. This study has shown the expected value for the mean annual radiation exposure due to the agricultural activities ranges from 6 up to 14 mSv/a depending on the age and living habits of the population group. The inhalation exposure of radon, thoron and their progenies represents the largest radiological health hazard (70-90%); this is followed by the external gamma irradiation from soil (10-25%). Ingestion of natural radionuclides with local food is only of minor radiological consequence. It was found that the lethal cancer risk might increase by 4% for a person born at the plateau, living and working there for the rest of her life. For the remote population the consumption the consumption of food products exported from the plateau leads to an expected value for the collective dose of 19 man Sv/a. This corresponding nominally to the small calculated number of 1 additional case of cancer per year. Therefore the main radiation impact of the agricultural activities are not the increased concentrations of natural radionuclides in food products but the fact that they are produced there with human labor and thus increasing the radiation exposure to a large number of farm workers and their families that move for occupational reasons to that region. The radiation exposure due to the mining and milling activities is, in spite of the significant increase of radionuclide activity concentrations in river waters, only of the order of 0.3 mSv/a. However as a recognized industrial source the ICRP dose limitation system has to be applied. Under this aspect the exposure calculated here, 0.3 mSv/a, should be considered as acceptable. (author). 93 refs, 16 figs, 58 tabs.

  8. From personnel dose to personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Raffnsoe, R.C.; Tuyn, J.W.N.; Wittekind, D.

    1985-01-01

    From following the development of personnel doses at CERN over the past six years it has become evident that work in areas of induced radioactivity is the principal cause of exposure. The results of photon dose measurements free-in-air and around a phantom are presented and discussed in the light of new quantities in individual monitoring. The importance of these results, with respect to the practical situation, is discussed and the problem of phantom size is mentioned. Finally, the results of dose measurements in the phantom are presented, since such information is important in cases where it becomes necessary to transform personnel doses into personal doses. (author)

  9. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}FDG; Desenvolvimento de metodologias para avaliacao da exposicao ocupational interna devido ao radiofarmaco {sup 18}FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-07-01

    The production of {sup 18}F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of {sup 18}F- fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide {sup 18}F as {sup 18}FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of {sup 18}FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of {sup 22}Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of {sup 22}Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since

  10. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  11. Afastamento do trabalho por transtornos mentais e estressores psicossociais ocupacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Silvestre Silva-Junior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Introdução: Os transtornos mentais são a terceira principal causa de concessão de benefício previdenciário por incapacidade no Brasil. A exposição ocupacional a estressores psicossociais pode comprometer a saúde mental dos trabalhadores. Cabe ao perito médico previdenciário caracterizar se o adoecimento incapacitante está relacionado com as condições de trabalho. Objetivo: Avaliar os fatores associados ao afastamento do trabalho por transtornos mentais relacionados ao trabalho, em especial a percepção dos trabalhadores sobre fatores psicossociais no trabalho. Métodos: Estudo analítico realizado em São Paulo com 131 requerentes de auxílio-doença por transtornos mentais. Foram preenchidos questionários sociodemográfico, de hábitos/estilo de vida e fatores psicossociais no trabalho. Resultados: Os quadros mais frequentes foram transtornos depressivos (40,4%. Entre todos os requerimentos, 23,7% foram considerados relacionados ao trabalho. O perfil da maioria dos participantes era: sexo feminino (68,7%, até 40 anos de idade (73,3%, casado/união estável (51,1%, escolaridade igual ou superior a 11 anos (80,2%, não tabagista (80,9%, não ingeria bebida alcoólica (84%, fazia atividade física (77,9%. Sobre os fatores psicossociais, prevaleceu trabalho de alta exigência (56,5%, baixo apoio social (52,7%, desequilíbrio esforço-recompensa (55,7% e comprometimento excessivo (87,0%. Não houve associação estatística entre casos de transtornos mentais relacionados ao trabalho e as variáveis independentes. Conclusão: A concessão do benefício auxílio-doença acidentário não foi associada a variáveis sóciodemográficas, hábitos/estilo de vida ou fatores psicossociais no trabalho. A exposição ocupacional a estressores psicossociais esteve presente no relato da maioria dos trabalhadores afastados do trabalho por transtornos mentais. Entretanto, diversos casos não foram reconhecidos pela perícia médica previdenciária como relacionados ao trabalho, o que pode ter influenciado nos resultados das associações.

  12. Riscos ocupacionais e mecanismos de autocuidado do trabalhador de um centro de material e esterilização Riesgos laborales y mecanismos para autocuidado en trabajadores de un centro de materiales y esterilización Occupational risks and self-care mechanisms used by the sterilization and materials processing department workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Guimarães Espindola

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi investigar riscos ocupacionais e mecanismos de autocuidado utilizados pelos auxiliares e técnicos de enfermagem que trabalham em um Centro de Material e Esterilização. Estudo descritivo, de abordagem qualitativa, realizado junto a 13 trabalhadores de um hospital regional de médio porte, localizado no interior do estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os dados foram coletados no primeiro semestre de 2010, mediante entrevistas, e analisados pelo método da análise temática. O risco ocupacional mais referido pelos trabalhadores foi o físico, caracterizado pelo calor. Uso de equipamentos de proteção individual, hidratação e imunizações são alguns dos mecanismos utilizados pelos sujeitos para a prevenção de agravos e a promoção de sua saúde. A cogestão entre os sujeitos que vivenciam o trabalho e os gestores na discussão e elaboração de ações de melhoria das condições laborais, pode construir ambiências seguras aos usuários do serviço e aos produtores de saúde.El objetivo del estudio fue investigar los riesgos laborales y los mecanismos de auto-cuidado utilizados por los auxiliares y técnicos de enfermería que trabajan en un Centro de Material y Esterilización. Estudio cualitativo, descriptivo, realizado entre 13 trabajadores de un hospital regional mediano, situado en el Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Los datos fueron recolectados en el primer semestre de 2010, a través de entrevistas y se analizaron mediante análisis temático. El riesgo laboral más frecuente de los trabajadores es el físico, caracterizado por el calor. Uso de equipo de protección personal, la hidratación y vacunas son mecanismos utilizados por los individuos para la prevención de enfermedades y promoción de su salud. El co-manejo entre los trabajadores y la gestión en la discusión y preparación de acciones para mejorar las condiciones de trabajo pueden crear un ambiente seguro a los usuarios y a los productores de la salud

  13. Triagem de hemoglobinopatias e avaliação da degeneração oxidativa da hemoglobina em trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme (HbAS, expostos a riscos ocupacionais Screening of abnormal hemoglobin and the evaluation of oxidative degeneration of hemoglobin among workers with the sickle cell trait (HbAS, exposed to occupational hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac L. Silva Filho

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde os anos 40, quando foram realizados os primeiros trabalhos de triagem para hemoglobinas anormais na população brasileira, tem sido descrita uma elevada prevalência destas em nosso meio, especialmente a hemoglobina S que, a despeito da heterogeneidade de sua distribuição geográfica, quase sempre é a mais freqüente nas diversas regiões estudadas. Aliado a este fato, estudos recentes têm demonstrado uma maior susceptibilidade desta a oxidação, tornando-a mais sensível ao estresse oxidativo que a hemoglobina normal (HbAA, mesmo em se tratando de portadores heterozigotos (HbAS. Tendo em vista que algumas substâncias químicas são comprovadamente meta-hemoglobinizantes, que alguns fatores ambientais podem influenciar na morbidade da anemia falciforme e também o pouco e controverso conhecimento de que se dispõe a respeito de portadores do traço falciforme, este estudo, além da pesquisa de hemo-globinas anormais, avaliou também a degeneração oxidativa da hemoglobina, através da pesquisa de corpos de Heinz e dosagem de meta-hemoglobina em uma população de trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme, expostos a riscos ocupacionais. Foram triadas 2.190 amostras sangüíneas entre Outubro de 1999 e Dezembro de 2001. A população estudada foi constituída de trabalhadores de ambos os sexos com idades variando entre 18 e 76 anos. Os resultados evidenciaram 4,7% portadores de hemoglobinas anormais na população analisada, sendo que a hemoglobina S foi a mais freqüente - 3,2% (71. Trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme apresentaram uma chance 14 vezes maior de possuírem valores aumentados de meta-hemoglobina em relação aos trabalhadores com genótipo AA, porém, esta diferença não foi estatisticamente significativa.Hemoglobinopathies are frequent hereditary diseases in Brazilian population and have been a public health problem. This study reports the screening of abnormal hemoglobin among Fiocruz`s employees, as

  14. Pocket total dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and dose equivalent using a single tissue equivalent proportional counter. Small, pocket sized instruments are being developed to determine dose equivalent as the worker is exposed to mixed field radiation. This paper describes the electronic circuitry and computer algorithms used to determine dose equivalent in these devices

  15. On dose distribution comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  16. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There is confusion over radiation dose limits between the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), reports a Friends of the Earth's radiation campaigner. MAFF is suggesting the inadequate ICRP public dose limit does not apply to public exposures which arise from environmental contamination from past radioactive discharges. (author)

  17. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  18. Comportamento dos acadêmicos, docentes e técnicos-administrativos da clínica odontológica da Unioeste: riscos ocupacionais e atividades desenvolvidas - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i1.587 Behavior of university students, faculty and administrative technicians at the Unioeste dental clinic: occupational risks and performed activities - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i1.587

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cristina Ignácio Alves

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Os profissionais, usuários e demais envolvidos no atendimento odontológico estão expostos a diversos riscos ocupacionais. A pesquisa teve como objetivos identificar os riscos ocupacionais existentes, os procedimentos realizados, os equipamentos de proteção individual utilizados, os treinamentos recebidos e os acidentes sofridos. A amostra do tipo não probabilística foi composta por 61 acadêmicos, 27 docentes e 12 técnicos-administrativos. Os dados foram coletados através da observação dos atendimentos realizados e um questionário semi-estruturado. Das vinte e oito observações realizadas, a maioria foi na Clinica Integrada do Adulto (53,6%, seguida pela Clínica Integrada Infantil (35,7% e na Dentística (10,7%. Para a totalidade dos docentes e técnicos existem riscos, sendo referidos o biológico e de acidente. A maioria (98,4% dos acadêmicos considera a existência de riscos, contudo 1,6% a negam e 8,2% deles sofreram acidentes. Quanto ao uso de Equipamentos de Proteção Individual (EPI, 25% dos técnicos-administrativos não têm o hábito de usá-los. Embora os acadêmicos e docentes tenham relatado seu uso como forma de proteção, nem todos citaram a paramentação completa. Assim, o registro de acidentes e a baixa adesão aos EPI´s evidenciou a necessidade de treinamento e conscientização dos envolvidos.Professionals, users and other people involved in the dental treatment services are exposed to several kinds of risks occupational. A research was carried out aiming at identifying the existence of risks occupational, the proceedings performed, the protection equipment used in the treatments, the training received and the accidents suffered. The sample of the type not probabilística was composed of 61 university students, 27 professors and 12 administrative technicians. The data collecting was carried out in two stages: the observation of the treatments done and a semi-structured questionnaire. Most of the twenty

  19. Insignificant levels of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McLean, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for making decisions concerning controllable sources of radiation exposure of the public include 'justification' and 'optimisation'. The tool recommended by the ICRP for reaching these decisions is collective dose or dose commitment supplemented by consideration of doses to individuals. In both these considerations the practical problem arises of whether very small doses to large numbers of people should contribute to the final decision-making process. It may be that at levels of dose which are small increments on natural background, the relationship between dose and effect is linear even though the slope may be close to zero. If so, collective dose is a meaningful concept and the calculation of total detriment for the purpose of justification could legitimately include all doses. In the calculation of collective doses for the purpose of optimisation, which involves decisions on how much money or resource should be allocated to dose reduction, it is necessary to appraise radiation detriment realistically. At low levels of dose to the individual such as those small by comparison with variations in natural background within the UK, the risk to the individual is such that his well-being will not be significantly changed by the presence or absence of the radiation dose. These small doses, which are well below the point at which an individual attaches significance, should not carry a societal significance. Societal acceptance of risk is analysed with a view to assessing a level of possible risk, and hence dose, below which resources should not in general be diverted to secure further reduction. A formulation for collective dose commitment is proposed incorporating a cut-off to exclude insignificant doses. The implications of this formulation in practical situations are discussed

  20. Total dose meter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes an alarming ''pocket'' monitor/dosimeter, based on a tissue-equivalent proportional counter, that measure both neutron and gamma dose and determines dose equivalent for the mixed radiation field. This report details the operation of the device and provides information on: the necessity for a device to measure dose equivalent in mixed radiation fields; the mathematical theory required to determine dose equivalent from tissue equivalent proportional; the detailed electronic circuits required; the algorithms required in the microprocessor used to calculate dose equivalent; the features of the instrument; program accomplishments and future plans

  1. Dose reader CD-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakowiuk, A.; Kaluska, I.; Machaj, B.

    2005-01-01

    Dose Reader CD-02 is designed for measurement of dose from a long narrow band of dosimetric foil used for check up and control of electron beam dose during sterilization of materials and products on conveyor belt. Irradiated foil after processing (heating) is inserted into foil driving (moving) system and when the foil is moved across focused light beam the absorbed dose is measured and displayed at the same time at computer monitor (in form of a diagram). The absorbed dose is measured on the principle of light attenuation at selected light wavelength (foil absorbance is measured). (author)

  2. Dose conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The following is discussed in this report: concepts and quantities used in calculating radiation dose from internal and external exposure. Tabulations of dose conversion factor for internal and external exposure to radionuclides. Dose conversion factors give dose per unit intake (internal) or dose per unit concentration in environment (external). Intakes of radionuclides for internal exposure and concentrations of radionuclides in environment for external exposure are assumed to be known. Intakes and concentrations are obtained, e.g., from analyses of environmental transport and exposure pathways. differences between dosimetry methods for radionuclides and hazardous chemicals are highlighted

  3. Acidentes ocupacionais por exposição a material biológico entre a equipe multiprofissional do atendimento pré-hospitalar Accidentes ocupacionales por exposición a material biológico entre el equipo multiprofesional de atención pre hospitalaria Occupational accidents due to exposure to biological material in the multidisciplinary team of the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal, tipo survey, realizado com a equipe multiprofissional de Atendimento Pré-hospitalar (APh de Belo Horizonte, entre junho e dezembro de 2006. Objetivou-se determinar a incidência dos acidentes ocupacionais por exposição a material biológico, condutas pós-acidente, e fatores demográficos determinantes. Utilizou-se questionário estruturado, análise descritiva, cálculo de incidências e regressão logística. A incidência de acidentes com material biológico foi de 20,6%: 40,8% por pérfuro-cortantes e 49,0% por fluidos corporais; 35,3% entre médicos e 24,0% entre enfermeiros. Condutas pós-acidente: sem avaliação médica, 63,3%; subnotificação, 81,6%; nenhuma conduta, 55,0%; e, sem acompanhamento sorológico, 61,2%. Estiveram associados ao acidente: tempo na instituição (Odds ratio-OR 2,84; Intervalo de confiança-IC 95% 1,22-6,62, lotação na Unidade de Suporte Avançado (OR 4,18; IC 95% 1,64-10,64; interação: tempo na instituição e lotação na Unidade de Suporte Básico (OR 0,27; IC 95% 0,07-1,00. Sugere-se a implantação de protocolos pós-acidentes, visando a sua redução; a subnotificação e o aumento do acompanhamento pós-acidente.Estudio transversal, tipo survey, realizado con el equipo multiprofesional de Atención Pre Hospitalaria (APh de Belo Horizonte entre junio y diciembre de 2006. Se objetivó determinar la incidencia de los accidentes ocupacionales por exposición a material biológico, las conductas después del accidente y los factores demográficos determinantes. Se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado, el análisis descriptivo, el cálculo de incidencias y la regresión logística. La incidencia de accidentes con material biológico fue de 20,6%: 40,8% por punzo cortantes y 49,0% fluidos corporales; 35,3% entre médicos y 24,0% entre enfermeros. Conductas después del accidente: sin evaluación médica, 63,3%; subnotificación, 81,6%; ninguna conducta, 55,0%; y, sin acompa

  4. Trabalhador portuário: perfil de doenças ocupacionais diagnosticadas em serviço de saúde ocupacional Trabajador portuario: perfil de enfermedades ocupacionales diagnosticadas en un servicio de salud ocupacional Dock worker: profile of occupational diseases diagnosed in an occupational health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise Capa Verde de Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as doenças diagnosticadas em trabalhadores portuários avulsos, atendidos em um ambulatório de medicina do trabalho portuário. MÉTODOS: Estudo quantitativo descritivo com análise retrospectiva, que apresentou como fonte de dados as fichas de atendimento médico dos trabalhadores portuários avulsos entre 2000 e 2009. A coleta de dados desenvolveu-se mediante aplicação de um formulário predeterminado e procedeu-se à análise quantitativa descritiva em 953 fichas médicas dos trabalhadores. RESULTADOS: totalizou-se 953 fichas médicas (94,7%, das quais 90,47% pertenciam a trabalhadores do sexo masculino, 52% na faixa etária acima de 50 anos e 51,7% com mais de 19 anos de atuação. Identificaram-se 527 diagnósticos, sendo os principais relacionados ao trabalho: hipertensão (8,3%, lombalgia (6,2%, outras doenças pulmonares (1,7% e episódios depressivos (1,2%. CONCLUSÃO: constatou-se o acometimento do trabalhador por patologias ocupacionais de ordem mental, circulatória, respiratória e osteomuscular, evidenciando morbidades que o afetam e interferem em sua qualidade de vida e na produtividade das atividades laborais.OBJETIVO: Identificar las enfermedades diagnosticadas en trabajadores portuarios independientes, atendidos en un consultorio externo de medicina del trabajo portuario. MÉTODOS: Estudio cuantitativo descriptivo con análisis retrospectivo, que presentó como fuente de datos las fichas de atención médica de los trabajadores portuarios independientes entre 2000 y 2009. La recolección de los datos se desarrolló mediante la aplicación de un formulario estructurado y se procedió a realizar el análisis cuantitativo descritivo de 953 fichas médicas de los trabajadores. RESULTADOS: De un total de 953 fichas médicas (94,7%, el 90,47% pertenecían a trabajadores del sexo masculino, el 52% se encontraba en el grupo etáreo arriba de los 50 años y el 51,7% con más de 19 años de actuación. Se

  5. Tentativa de infanticídio por um macho dominante de Alouatta caraya (Humboldt (Primates, Atelidae em um infante extra-grupo devido a influência do observador Infanticide attempt by a dominant male of Alouatta caraya (Humboldt (Primates, Atelidae against an extra-group infant due to the influence of the observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas M. Aguiar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho relata um caso de tentativa de infanticídio por um macho residente e dominante de um grupo de Alouatta caraya (Humboldt, 1812 em um infante extra-grupo, em ilha do rio Paraná, Paraná, Brasil. O encontro do par fêmea-infante com o macho residente foi propiciado pela interferência humana. Devido às circunstâncias em que ocorreu o fato e a posição hierárquica do agressor, a hipótese de patologia social pareceu plausível na explicação do comportamento.This work reports on an infanticide attempt by a dominant resident male in a group of Alouatta caraya (Humboldt, 1812 on an extra-group infant in an Island in the Paraná river, Paraná, Brazil. The encounter of an infant-female pair with a resident male was brought about by human interference. Give the circumstances in which the event ocurred and the hierarchical position of the agressor, the social pathology hypothesis seems the most plausible explanation for such behavior.

  6. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137 Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  7. Dose measurements in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  8. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  9. Paediatric dose display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.W.; Derges, S.; Hesslewood, S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact, inexpensive unit, based on an 8085 microprocessor, has been designed for calculating doses of intravenous radioactive injections for children. It has been used successfully for over a year. The dose is calculated from the body surface area and the result displayed in MBq. The operator can obtain the required dose on a twelve character alphanumeric display by entering the age of the patient and the adult dose using a hexadecimal keyboard. Circuit description, memory map and input/output, and firmware are dealt with. (U.K.)

  10. An environmental dose experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained.

  11. An environmental dose experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained. (paper)

  12. Doses from portable gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linauskas, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Field studies to measure actual radiation exposures of operators of commercial moisture-density gauges were undertaken in several regions of Canada. Newly developed bubble detector dosimeter technology and conventional dosimetry such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), integrating electronic dosimeters (DRDs), and CR-39 neutron track-etch detectors were used to estimate the doses received by 23 moisture-density gauge operators and maintenance staff. These radiation dose estimates were supported by mapping radiation fields and accounting for the time an operator was near a gauge. Major findings indicate that gauge maintenance and servicing workers were more likely than gauge operators to receive exposures above the level of 5 mSv, and that neutron doses were roughly the same as gamma doses. Gauge operators receive approximately 75% of their dose when transporting and carrying the gauge. Dose to their hands is similar to the dose to their trunks, but the dose to their feet area is 6 to 30 times higher. Gamma radiation is the primary source of radiation contributing to operator dose

  13. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  14. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  15. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  16. Gonad dose in cineurethrocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Dixon-Brown, A.; Fursdon, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    The technical factors used for cineurethrocystography for the true lateral projection in females are given. The mid-line radiation dose has been measured with LiF TLD inserted into the vagina in 19 examinations. The average dose recorded was 148 mrad, the range being 50 to 306 mrad, the average number of cine frames exposed was 96. Data obtained using a Rando phantom indicated that the average ovary dose would be 30% greater than the mid-line dose since the near ovary receives a higher dose than the more distant one. The technique used for men is also given, the average gonad dose in six men being 123 mrad, range 56 to 243 mrad when simple lead foil gonad protection was used; the average number of cine frames was 107. The dose in one man without gonad protection was 1575 mrad for 112 cine frames. The results for both sexes compare favourably with those of others reported in the literature and with gonad doses recorded in typical IVP examinations. (author)

  17. Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Internal doses, the procedures for making them and their significance has been reviewed. Effects of uranium, radium, lead-210, polonium-210, thorium in man are analysed based on data from tables and plots. Dosimetry of some ingested nuclides and inhalation dose due to radon-222, radon-220 and their daugther products are discussed [pt

  18. Occupational dose constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The revision process of the international radiological protection regulations has resulted in the adoption of new concepts, such as practice, intervention, avoidable and restriction of dose (dose constraint). The latter deserving of special mention since it may involve reducing a priori of the dose limits established both for the public and to individuals occupationally exposed, values that can be further reduced, depending on the application of the principle of optimization. This article aims to present, with clarity, from the criteria adopted to define dose constraint values to the public, a methodology to establish the dose constraint values for occupationally exposed individuals, as well as an example of the application of this methodology to the practice of industrial radiography

  19. Um estudo comparativo sobre a identificação dos riscos ocupacionais por trabalhadores de enfermagem de duas Unidades Básicas de Saúde do município de São Paulo Un estudio comparativo sobre la identificación de los riesgos ocupacionales por trabajadores de enfermería de duas Unidades Basicas de Salud del municipio de São Paulo A comparative study about identification of occupational risks by nursing workers of two Basic Health Units of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Os riscos ocupacionais do trabalho de enfermagem em Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS não têm sido frequentemente abordados, o que nos estimulou a realizar este estudo com os objetivos de comparar a percepção dos trabalhadores deenfermagem de duas UBS sobre esses riscos e estabelecer um paralelo sobre os problemas de saúde relacionados com a suaexposição. Os dados foram coletados através da entrevista e analisados segundo suas frequências relativa e absoluta ecoeficientes de risco. Os maiores coeficientes de risco estão relacionados a exposição aos riscos biológicos. Conclui-se que os trabalhadores têm dificuldade em apreender a gênese dos riscos ocupacionais.Los riesgos ocupacionales del trabajo de enfermeria en Unidades Básicas de Salud (UBS no han sido frecuentemente abordados, lo que nos estimuló en realizar este estudio con el objetivo de comparar la percepción de los trabajadores de enfermería de dos UBS sobre estos riesgos y establecer un paralelo sobre los problemas de salud relacionados con suexposición. Los datos fueron recolectados a través de una entrevista y analizados según sus frecuencias relativa, absolutay coeficientes de riesgo. Los mayores coeficientes de riesgo estan relacionados a la exposición de riesgos biológicos. Seconcluye que los trabaj adores tienen dificultades en aprender la génesis de los riesgos ocupacionales.Occupational risks of nursing work in Basic Health Units have not been study frequently, so it stimulate us to develop this paper, whose objective are: to compare the perception of nursing workers of two Basic Health Units about these risks and toestablish a parallel between the health problems with their exposition to occupational risks- Data were collected by aninterview and were analyzed according to their frequencies. Biological risks were observed more frequently. The conclusionsshow that nursing workers have difficult to understand the genesis of occupational risks.

  20. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  1. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined

  2. Use of MCNP to compare the response of dose deposited in the TLD 100, TLD 600 and TLD 700 in radiation fields due to {sup 60}Co and {sup 241}AmBe source; Uso do MCNP para comparacao das respostas de dose depositada nos TLD 100, TLD 600 e TLD 700 em campos de irradiacao devido a fontes de {sup 60}Co e {sup 241}AmBe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, Tassio A.; Castro, Vinicius A.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D., E-mail: tassio.cavalieri@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    The successes of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) depend on the ability to deliver an adequate irradiation field to the target cells. Neutron beams used in BNCT are mostly driven from reactors and therefore, not only have a neutron energy range which far exceeds the thermal region but also do have a great gamma component. Beam characterization and dosimetry are consequently one of the essential procedures to be overcome to properly apply this technique. One of the methods currently used in mixed field (field containing both neutron and gamma) characterization, lies on the use of a pair of detectors with distinct responses to each beam component. But this technique needs to be better understood of how each thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) behaves in a mixed field or in a pure field. This work presents the results of a set of simulations performed in order to analyze the response of three ordinary types of TLDs - TLD 100, TLD 600 and TLD 700 - submitted to different irradiation fields from a Cobalt source and an Americium-Beryllium source inside a paraffin disk. And is also a possible method for performing the selection and calibration of theses TLDs. (author)

  3. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  4. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  5. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J T; Anaya M, R A [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  6. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child, call your provider. Proper Dosing of Suppositories If your child is vomiting or will not take oral medicine, you can use suppositories. Suppositories are placed in the anus to deliver ...

  7. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  8. Dose in conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna D, E.; Padilla R, Z. P.; Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    It has been pointed out that medical exposures are the most significant sources of exposure to ionizing radiation for the general population. Inside the medical exposures the most important is the X-ray use for diagnosis, which is by far the largest contribution to the average dose received by the population. From all studies performed in radiology the chest radiography is the most abundant. In an X-ray machine, voltage and current are combined to obtain a good image and a reduce dose, however due to the workload in a radiology service individual dose is not monitored. In order to evaluate the dose due to chest radiography in this work a plate phantom was built according to the ISO recommendations using methylmethacrylate walls and water. The phantom was used in the Imaging department of the Zacatecas General Hospital as a radiology patient asking for a chest study; using thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD 100 the kerma at the surface entrance was determined. (Author)

  9. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  10. Irradiation dose of cosmonauts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makra, Zs.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained by determining the irradiation dose during the spaceflights of Apollo as well as the Sojouz-3 and Sojouz-9 spacecrafts have been compared in the form of tables. In case of Apollo astronauts the irradiation dose was determined by two methods and its sources were also pointed out, in tables. During Sojouz spacetravels the cosmonauts were exposed to a negligible dose. In spite of this fact the radiation danger is considerable. The small irradiation doses noticed so far are due to the fact that during the spaceflights there was no big proturberance. However, during the future long-range spacetravels a better radiation shielding than the one used up to now will be necessary. (P.J.)

  11. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  12. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  13. Gonadal doses from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The method of calculation of gonadal doses arising from different radiotherapeutic procedures is described. The measurement of scatter factors to the gonads from superficial and deep therapy is detailed and the analytic fits to the experimental data, as a function of field position, field size and beam energy are given. The data used to calculate the gonadal doses from treatments using linear accelerators, teletherapy and sealed sources are described and the analytic fits to the data given

  14. As possíveis alterações microclimáticas devido a formação do lago artificial da hidrelétrica de Tucuruí -PA The possible impacts on the microclimate due to the artificial lake from Tucuruí's dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Sanches

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Existem muitas preocupações ecológicas do impacto que a construção de grandes lagos na Amazônia podem provocar, principalmente relacionadas ao microclima. Este estudo visa aumentar o conhecimento científico sobre a distribuição de chuvas antes e depois da formação do lago artificial da UHE Tucuruí-PA. Foram utilizados dados diários de precipitação dos períodos de 1972 a 1983 (pré-enchimento e de 1984 a 1996 (pós-enchimento para as cidades de Tucuruí e Marabá-PA. Comparando-se os totais mensais (pré e pós-enchimento, não se observam diferenças estatisticamente significantes (foram aplicados os testes de Fisher e Man-Whitney. Analisando-se a ocorrência de dias com precipitação superior a 5 e 25 mm.dia-1, também não se observam diferenças estatisticamente significativas. Há um leve aumento do número de dias com chuvas leves no final período sêco após a formação do lago, talvez devido a alta evaporação do lago artificial. Também não se observou modificações do início ou final da estação chuvosa.There are a lot of ecological concern about the ecological impacts due to an artificial lake in Amazonia, especially related with the microclimate. This study aims to increase the scientific knowledge of the rainfall distribution prior and post flooding of the UHE Tucuruí-PA. Daily rainfall from 1972 until 1983 (prior inundation and from 1984 until 1996 (post inundation for Tucuruí and Marabá-PA. Comparing the monthly totals (prior and post, there is no statistical differences between the averages (using the statistical tests from Fisher and Man-Whitney. Analyzing the number of days with rainfall higher than 5 and 25 mm.day-1, there are also no statistical differences. It was observed a small increase of light rain during the end of the dry season. Also, the are no signal related to the modification of the onset or end from the rainy season.

  15. Posição socioeconômica e duração do benefício por incapacidade devido a doenças musculoesqueléticas relacionadas ao trabalho Socioeconomic position and duration of disability benefit due to work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Suely Souto Souza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, estima-se o efeito da posição socioeconômica sobre a duração dos benefícios por incapacidade devido a doenças musculoesqueléticas. Dados de um inquérito conduzido pela Auditoria Regional do Instituto Nacional do Seguro Social, com todos os segurados que receberam benefício por incapacidade temporária por doenças musculoesqueléticas da região cervical e membros superiores, em 2008, juntamente com os registros administrativos, foram utilizados para formar uma coorte de 563 trabalhadores. Todos eram residentes em Salvador, Bahia. Entre os trabalhadores sindicalizados e com alta demanda psicossocial no trabalho, a posição socioeconômica se associava positivamente com a duração do benefício (RR = 1,89; IC95%: 1,25-2,87. Esses resultados correspondem ou a uma situação de iniquidade ou ao uso desnecessário do seguro pelos trabalhadores com posição socioeconômica alta. Investigações futuras que visem a elucidar as diferenças na utilização dos benefícios são necessárias para subsidiar a abordagem apropriada dessa questão pelos gestores do seguro social.This study estimated the effect of socioeconomic position on the duration of disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs. A cohort study including 563 insured workers from the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, registered inthe General Social Security System and who received temporary disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs, , was performedin 2008 using data from the National Social Security Institute. The results show that among union member workers with high psychosocial demands at work, those with low socioeconomic status are almost twice as likely to receive benefit for a shorter period of time compared to those with a higher socioeconomic position (RR = 1.89; 95%CI: 1.25-2.87. These results reveal aninequitable situation or unnecessary use of insurance for

  16. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  17. Mean inactivation dose (D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Ng, T.C.; Raudkivi, U.; Meaney, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    By predicting treatment outcome to radiotherapy from in vitro radiobiological parameters, not only individual patient treatments can be tailored, but also new promising treatment protocols can be tried in patients in whom unfavorable outcome is predicted. In this respect, choosing the right parameter can be very important. Unlike D 0 and N which provide information of the distal part of the survival curve, mean inactivation dose (D) estimates overall radiosensitivity. However, the parameters reflecting the response at the clinically relevant low-dose region are neglected in the literature. In a literature survey of 98 papers in which survival curves or D 0 /N were used, only in 2 D was used. In 21 papers the D 0 /n values were important in drawing conclusions. By calculating D in 3 of these 21 papers, we show that the conclusion drawn may be altered with the use of D. The importance of ''low-dose-region-parameters'' is reviewed. (orig.)

  18. Dose Reduction Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program

  19. CT dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasheva, Ts.; Georgiev, E.; Kirova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In recent decades Computed Tomography established itself as one of the most common study with a very wide range of applications and techniques of scanning. Best diagnostic value of the method resist to the risks of ionizing radiation, as statistics show that CT is one of the main sources of continuously increasing dose to the population. What you will learn: The physical parameters of the X-ray tube and the principles of image reconstruction; The relationship between variables parameters and the received dose; The ratio between the force and voltage of the current to the image quality, Influence of the used contrast medium to the physical properties of the image, The ratio of patient BMI to image processing, Effective use of knowledge for the optimal CT protocol. Discussions: The goal to reduce the dose received by the patient during a CT scan while keeping the diagnostic quality of the image puts to the test as handset X-ray producers and technicians who need to master the technique of study protocol forming as well as to balance the harm - benefit ratio. Among the most popular techniques are these of dose modulation, low-dose computed tomography at the expense of a reduction of the current or voltage intensity, and control of the number of post-processing algorithms for the image reconstruction. Conclusion: The training of radiologists and X-ray technicians plays a major role in optimizing of technical parameters in view of the reduction of the dose for the patient, while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the image

  20. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  1. Aplicação de programa educativo multidisciplinar em gestações de alto risco devido a doenças endócrinas Application of multidisciplinary educational program in high-risk pregnancies due to endocrine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Coutinho Rodrigues Feitosa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a aplicação de um programa de intervenção multidisciplinar educativo em mulheres com gestação de alto risco devido a doenças endócrinas. MÉTODOS: avaliamos retrospectivamente a aplicação de um programa educativo multidisciplinar em 185 gestantes com doenças endócrinas referenciadas para uma maternidade especializada em gestação de alto risco. As gestantes receberam atenção pré-natal multidisciplinar por times compostos por endocrinologistas, obstetras, ultrassonografistas, enfermeiras e nutricionistas. Informações orais e escritas sobre hábitos saudáveis, cuidados com diabetes, uso de adoçantes artificiais e exercícios na gestação foram passadas na primeira consulta endocrinológica. Plano nutricional individualizado foi feito em primeira visita à nutricionista. Nas reavaliações mensais com nutricionista e quinzenais com endocrinologista, as informações sobre mudanças saudáveis no estilo de vida eram reforçadas e o peso registrado. O grau de aderência à dieta e atividade física foi autorreferido. Comparou-se o peso semanal antes e após a intervenção multidisciplinar, peso fetal ao nascimento, taxa de macrossomia e baixo peso, e a frequência de parto cesário nas quatro categorias de índice de massa corpórea (IMC pré-gestacional (30 kg/m². RESULTADOS: a principal patologia de encaminhamento foi o diabetes (84,9%. Um terço das gestantes (31,2% era composto por portadoras de sobrepeso e 42,5% tinham obesidade pré-gestacional. A maior parte das gestantes foi vista pela primeira vez pela equipe multidisciplinar no terceiro trimestre (64,1%, e 50,5% delas excederam o ganho de peso recomendado para toda a gestação à primeira avaliação. Gestantes obesas excederam o ganho de peso recomendado em 62,5% dos casos. Após a intervenção multidisciplinar, o percentual de gestantes que excedeu o ganho de peso semanal recomendado reduziu em todas as categorias de IMC pré-gestacional (IMCPG

  2. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  3. Fertilizer micro-dosing

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Localized application of small quantities of fertilizer (micro-dosing), combined with improved planting pits for rainwater harvesting, has generated greater profits and food security for women farmers in the Sahel. • Women are 25% more likely to use combined applications, and have expanded areas of food crops (cowpea,.

  4. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Hill, G.S.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-09-01

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  5. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  6. Radiation doses to Finns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantalainen, L.

    1996-01-01

    The estimated annual radiation doses to Finns have been reduced in the recent years without any change in the actual radiation environment. This is because the radiation types have been changed. The risk factors will probably be changed again in the future, because recent studies show discrepancies in the neutron dosimetry concerning the city of Hiroshima. Neutron dosimetry discrepancy has been found between the predicted and estimated neutron radiation. The prediction of neutron radiation is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, which have also been used when designing recommendations for the limits of radiation doses (ICRP60). Estimation of the neutron radiation is made on the basis of measured neutron activation of materials in the city. The estimated neutron dose beyond 1 km is two to ten, or more, times as high as the predicted dose. This discrepancy is important, because the most relevant distances with respect to radiation risk evaluation are between 1 and 2 km. Because of this discrepancy, the present radiation risk factors for gamma and neutron radiation, which rely on the Monte Carlo calculations, are false, too. The recommendations of ICRP60 have been adopted in a few countries, including Finland, and they affect the planned common limits of the EU. It is questionable whether happiness is increased by adopting false limits, even if they are common. (orig.) (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  7. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  8. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although an enormous amount of progress has been made in the fields of radiation protection and risk assessment, a number of significant problems remain. The one problem which transcends all the rest, and which has been subject to considerable misunderstanding, involves what has come to be known as the 'linear non-threshold hypothesis', or 'linear hypothesis'. Particularly troublesome has been the interpretation that any amount of radiation can cause an increase in the excess incidence of cancer. The linear hypothesis has dominated radiation protection philosophy for more than three decades, with enormous financial, societal and political impacts and has engendered an almost morbid fear of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation in large segments of the population. This document presents a different interpretation of the linear hypothesis. The basis for this view lies in the evolution of dose-response functions, particularly with respect to their use initially in the context of early acute effects, and then for the late effects, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. 11 refs., 4 figs

  10. Dose specification for radiation therapy: dose to water or dose to medium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C-M; Li Jinsheng

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method enables accurate dose calculation for radiation therapy treatment planning and has been implemented in some commercial treatment planning systems. Unlike conventional dose calculation algorithms that provide patient dose information in terms of dose to water with variable electron density, the Monte Carlo method calculates the energy deposition in different media and expresses dose to a medium. This paper discusses the differences in dose calculated using water with different electron densities and that calculated for different biological media and the clinical issues on dose specification including dose prescription and plan evaluation using dose to water and dose to medium. We will demonstrate that conventional photon dose calculation algorithms compute doses similar to those simulated by Monte Carlo using water with different electron densities, which are close (<4% differences) to doses to media but significantly different (up to 11%) from doses to water converted from doses to media following American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 105 recommendations. Our results suggest that for consistency with previous radiation therapy experience Monte Carlo photon algorithms report dose to medium for radiotherapy dose prescription, treatment plan evaluation and treatment outcome analysis.

  11. Tumor significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Nagalaxmi, K.V.; Meenakshi, L.

    1983-01-01

    In the practice of radiotherapy, various concepts like NSD, CRE, TDF, and BIR are being used to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the treatment schedules on the normal tissues. This has been accepted as the tolerance of the normal tissue is the limiting factor in the treatment of cancers. At present when various schedules are tried, attention is therefore paid to the biological damage of the normal tissues only and it is expected that the damage to the cancerous tissues would be extensive enough to control the cancer. Attempt is made in the present work to evaluate the concent of tumor significant dose (TSD) which will represent the damage to the cancerous tissue. Strandquist in the analysis of a large number of cases of squamous cell carcinoma found that for the 5 fraction/week treatment, the total dose required to bring about the same damage for the cancerous tissue is proportional to T/sup -0.22/, where T is the overall time over which the dose is delivered. Using this finding the TSD was defined as DxN/sup -p/xT/sup -q/, where D is the total dose, N the number of fractions, T the overall time p and q are the exponents to be suitably chosen. The values of p and q are adjusted such that p+q< or =0.24, and p varies from 0.0 to 0.24 and q varies from 0.0 to 0.22. Cases of cancer of cervix uteri treated between 1978 and 1980 in the V. N. Cancer Centre, Kuppuswamy Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India were analyzed on the basis of these formulations. These data, coupled with the clinical experience, were used for choice of a formula for the TSD. Further, the dose schedules used in the British Institute of Radiology fraction- ation studies were also used to propose that the tumor significant dose is represented by DxN/sup -0.18/xT/sup -0.06/

  12. [Evaluation of Organ Dose Estimation from Indices of CT Dose Using Dose Index Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Akio

    Direct measurement of each patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) is not possible. Most methods to estimate patient organ dose is using Monte Carlo simulation with dedicated software. However, dedicated software is too expensive for small scale hospitals. Not every hospital can estimate organ dose with dedicated software. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simple method of organ dose estimation using some common indices of CT dose. The Monte Carlo simulation software Radimetrics (Bayer) was used for calculating organ dose and analysis relationship between indices of CT dose and organ dose. Multidetector CT scanners were compared with those from two manufactures (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Using stored patient data from Radimetrics, the relationships between indices of CT dose and organ dose were indicated as each formula for estimating organ dose. The accuracy of estimation method of organ dose was compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulation using the Bland-Altman plots. In the results, SSDE was the feasible index for estimation organ dose in almost organs because it reflected each patient size. The differences of organ dose between estimation and simulation were within 23%. In conclusion, our estimation method of organ dose using indices of CT dose is convenient for clinical with accuracy.

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  15. Reduced medical and occupational exposures by optimizing working procedures in fluoroscopy equipment in the University Hospital of Santa Maria (RS); Reducao de exposicao medicas e ocupacionais pela otimizacao de procedimentos de trabalho em equipamento de fluoroscopia no Hospital Universitario de Santa Maria (RS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Guilherme L.; Claus, Thiago V.; Baumhardt, Tadeu, E-mail: glweis@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Shuch, Luiz A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2013-08-15

    This work seeks to reduce medical (patient) and occupational (workers) exposure by standardizing resources available in fluoroscopy equipment used in interventional procedures. Such procedures use transportable surgical arch type fluoroscopy equipment, with applications in orthopedics, angiography and pacemaker implantation. Improper use of these devices generates excessive radiation doses in both patients and the medical staff. It is observed that the equipment after being connected to the grid, is pre-selected to work in continuous fluoroscopy and no additional filtration, producing higher doses of radiation. For specific applications, changes in protocols should be undertaken according to medical indication. This work used a fluoroscopy equipment Shimadzu Active Opescope two radiation monitoring equipment, brand Radcal, models 9010 and 9015, two ionization chambers, of 60 cc and 180 cc and a low contrast phantom and a catheter, information that simulate the human body. Incidences were performed by changing the conditions of exposure as frame rates (fps - frames per second) and additional filtration. For each composition parameters was generated and filed an image, with the extent of their respective doses. These images were evaluated by radiologists. In more extreme cases we obtained a reduction of a factor 25 in occupational exposure (medical personnel) using the pulsed with the greatest 2 fps additional filter (0.3 mm Cu) compared to continuous system without any additional filtration. In medical exposure (of patients), decreased by a factor 39, the same conditions described above. With these arguments it is justified the optimization and standardization of the equipment used in fluoroscopy, which besides providing a dose reduction the patient and the medical personnel, increases the life of the X-ray tube while maintaining the quality of medical diagnosis. (author)

  16. Occupational dose assessment and national dose registry system in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Hosseini-Pooya, S. M.; Taheri, M.; Gheshlaghi, F.; Kardan, M. R.; Babakhani, A.; Rastkhah, N.; Yousefi-Nejad, F.; Darabi, M.; Oruji, T.; Gholamali-Zadeh, Z.; Karimi-Diba, J.; Kazemi-Movahed, A. A.; Dashti-Pour, M. R.; Enferadi, A.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Sadegh-Khani, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents status of external and internal dose assessment of workers and introducing the structure of National Dose Registry System of Iran (NDRSI). As well as types of individual dosemeters in use, techniques for internal dose assessment are presented. Results obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison programme on measurement of personal dose equivalent H p (10) and consistency of the measured doses with the delivered doses are shown. Also, implementation of dosimetry standards, establishment of quality management system, authorisation and approval procedure of dosimetry service providers are discussed. (authors)

  17. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  18. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  19. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  20. Radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    About 200 scientists from 28 countries and 5 international organizations met at a symposium on radiation dosimetry held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in June 1960. The aim of the symposium was not so much the description of a large number of measuring instruments as a discussion of the methods used, with special emphasis on those problems which had become important in the context of recent developments, such as the measurement of mixed or very large doses

  1. Low dose epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Hubert, P.

    1992-01-01

    Actually, epidemiological studies have to establish if the assessment of cancer risk can be verified at low chronic radiation doses. The population surveillance must be very long, the side effects and cancers of such radiation appearing much later. In France, this epidemiological study on nuclear workers have been decided recently. Before describing the experiment and french projects in epidemiology of nuclear workers, the authors present the main english and american studies

  2. Time-dose modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kian Ang, K.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in fractionation schedule can be made by various approaches. However, from the first principle, it is anticipated that strategies of hyperfractionation and/or accelerated fractionation offer the most promised in improving the therapeutic ratio. Hyperfractionation is defined as a treatment schedule in which a large number of significantly reduced dose fractions (--1.2 Gy/fraction) is used to give a greater total dose in a conventional overall time period. The results of the pilot studies testing the efficacy of hyperfractionation have been encouraging. The most valid clinical trial of pure hyperfractionation, however, is that conducted by the EORTC. This study compared 70 Gy in 35 fractions or 80.5 Gy in 70 fractions over 7 weeks in the treatment of patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas. The local tumor control was significantly improved in the hyperfractionated arm without increasing the morbidity. Accelerated fractionation is defined as a schedule in which the overall time of treatment is reduced without significant changes in the total dose and fraction size. The strategy has been used to treat patients with malignant gliomas, melanomas and Head and Neck cancers. The data in Head and Neck Cancers seem to be promising

  3. Dose calculation for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    The joint working group of ICRP/ICRU is advancing the works of reviewing the ICRP publication 51 by investigating the data related to radiation protection. In order to introduce the 1990 recommendation, it has been demanded to carry out calculation for neutrons, photons and electrons. As for electrons, EURADOS WG4 (Numerical Dosimetry) rearranged the data to be calculated at the meeting held in PTB Braunschweig in June, 1992, and the question and request were presented by Dr. J.L. Chartier, the responsible person, to the researchers who are likely to undertake electron transport Monte Carlo calculation. The author also has carried out the requested calculation as it was the good chance to do the mutual comparison among various computation codes regarding electron transport calculation. The content that the WG requested to calculate was the absorbed dose at depth d mm when parallel electron beam enters at angle α into flat plate phantoms of PMMA, water and ICRU4-element tissue, which were placed in vacuum. The calculation was carried out by the versatile electron-photon shower computation Monte Carlo code, EGS4. As the results, depth dose curves and the dependence of absorbed dose on electron energy, incident angle and material are reported. The subjects to be investigated are pointed out. (K.I.)

  4. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm 2 ) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm 2 ) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  5. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  6. Dose gradient curve: A new tool for evaluating dose gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, KiHoon; Choi, Young Eun

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy, which delivers an ablative high radiation dose to a target volume for maximum local tumor control, requires a rapid dose fall-off outside the target volume to prevent extensive damage to nearby normal tissue. Currently, there is no tool to comprehensively evaluate the dose gradient near the target volume. We propose the dose gradient curve (DGC) as a new tool to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan with respect to the dose fall-off characteristics. The average distance between two isodose surfaces was represented by the dose gradient index (DGI) estimated by a simple equation using the volume and surface area of isodose levels. The surface area was calculated by mesh generation and surface triangulation. The DGC was defined as a plot of the DGI of each dose interval as a function of the dose. Two types of DGCs, differential and cumulative, were generated. The performance of the DGC was evaluated using stereotactic radiosurgery plans for virtual targets. Over the range of dose distributions, the dose gradient of each dose interval was well-characterized by the DGC in an easily understandable graph format. Significant changes in the DGC were observed reflecting the differences in planning situations and various prescription doses. The DGC is a rational method for visualizing the dose gradient as the average distance between two isodose surfaces; the shorter the distance, the steeper the dose gradient. By combining the DGC with the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in a single plot, the DGC can be utilized to evaluate not only the dose gradient but also the target coverage in routine clinical practice.

  7. Determination of organ doses and effective doses in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Martinez, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With an increasing chance of success in radiooncology, it is necessary to estimate the risk from radiation scatter to areas outside the target volume. The cancer risk from a radiation treatment can be estimated from the organ doses, allowing a somewhat limited effective dose to be estimated and compared. Material and Methods: The doses of the radiation-sensitive organs outside the target volume can be estimated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE developed by van der Giessen. The effective doses are determined according to the concept of ICRP, whereby the target volume and the associated organs related to it are not taken into consideration. Results: Organ doses outside the target volume are generally < 1% of the dose in the target volume. In some cases, however, they can be as high as 3%. The effective doses during radiotherapy are between 60 and 900 mSv, depending upon the specific target volume, the applied treatment technique, and the given dose in the ICRU point. Conclusion: For the estimation of the radiation risk, organ doses in radiooncology can be calculated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE. While evaluating the radiation risk after ICRP, for the calculation of the effective dose, the advanced age of many patients has to be considered to prevent that, e.g., the high gonad doses do not overestimate the effective dose. (orig.)

  8. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent

  9. Dose-to-man studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Dose-to-Man Studies focused on developing computer data handling and computer modules which permit easy, rapid assessment of the dose to southeastern United States populations from routine or accidental releases of radionuclides to atmospheric and stream systems

  10. Dose monitoring in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan Hongjie; Yang Zhongping; Lei Xin

    2012-01-01

    In order to protect people from irradiation sickness and rebuild the radiation filed in nuclear emergency, personal and environmental dose need to be monitored. The application of TLD in dose monitoring is discussed in this paper. (authors)

  11. A review of radiology staff doses and dose monitoring requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of radiation doses received during X-ray procedures by radiology, cardiology and other clinical staff have been reviewed. Data for effective dose (E), and doses to the eyes, thyroid, hands and legs have been analysed. These data have been supplemented with local measurements to determine the most exposed part of the hand for monitoring purposes. There are ranges of 60-100 in doses to individual tissues reported in the literature for similar procedures at different centres. While ranges in the doses per unit dose-area product (DAP) are between 10 and 25, large variations in dose result from differences in the sensitivity of the X-ray equipment, the type of procedure and the operator technique, but protection factors are important in maintaining dose levels as low as possible. The influence of shielding devices is significant for determining the dose to the eyes and thyroid, and the position of the operator, which depends on the procedure, is the most significant factor determining doses to the hands. A second body dosemeter worn at the level of the collar is recommended for operators with high workloads for use in assessment of effective dose and the dose to the eye. It is proposed that the third quartile values from the distributions of dose per unit DAP identified in the review might be employed in predicting the orders of magnitude of doses to the eye, thyroid and hands, based on interventional operator workloads. Such dose estimates could be employed in risk assessments when reviewing protection and monitoring requirements. A dosemeter worn on the little finger of the hand nearest to the X-ray tube is recommended for monitoring the hand. (authors)

  12. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.

    2015-01-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  13. Radon dose and aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planinic, J.; Radolic, V.; Faj, Z.; Vukovic, B.

    2000-01-01

    The equilibrium factor value (F) was measured in the NRPB radon chamber and the corresponding track density ratio (r = D/D 0 ) of bare (D) and diffusion (D 0 ) LR-115 nuclear track detectors was determined, as well as the regression equation F(r). Experiments with LR-115 nuclear track detectors and aerosol sources (burning candle and cigarette) were carried out in the Osijek University radon chamber and afterwards an empirical relationship between the equilibrium factor and aerosol concentration was derived. For the purpose of radon dose equivalent assessment, procedures for determining the unattached fraction of radon progeny were introduced using two nuclear track detectors. (author)

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates

  15. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, J.

    1998-01-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  16. Dose planning and dose delivery in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeoes, T.

    1991-01-01

    A method has been developed for calibration of CT-numbers to volumetric electron density distributions using tissue substitutes of known elemental composition and experimentally determined electron density. This information have been used in a dose calculation method based on photon and electron interaction processes. The method utilizes a convolution integral between the photon fluence matrix and dose distribution kernels. Inhomogeneous media are accounted for using the theorems of Fano and O'Connor for scaling dose distribution kernels in proportion to electron density. For clinical application of a calculated dose plan, a method for prediction of accelerator output have been developed. The methods gives the number of monitor units that has to be given to obtain a certain absorbed dose to a point inside an irregular, inhomogeneous object. The method for verification of dose distributions outlined in this study makes it possible to exclude the treatment related variance contributions, making an objective evaluation of dose calculations with experiments feasible. The methods for electron density determination, dose calculation and prediction of accelerator output discussed in this study will all contribute to an increased accuracy in the mean absorbed dose to the target volume. However, a substantial gain in the accuracy for the spatial absorbed dose distribution will also follow, especially using CT for mapping of electron density together with the dose calculation algorithm. (au)

  17. Normal tissue dose-effect models in biological dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated radiotherapy techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons and protons rely on numerical dose optimisation. The evaluation of normal tissue dose distributions that deviate significantly from the common clinical routine and also the mathematical expression of desirable properties of a dose distribution is difficult. In essence, a dose evaluation model for normal tissues has to express the tissue specific volume effect. A formalism of local dose effect measures is presented, which can be applied to serial and parallel responding tissues as well as target volumes and physical dose penalties. These models allow a transparent description of the volume effect and an efficient control over the optimum dose distribution. They can be linked to normal tissue complication probability models and the equivalent uniform dose concept. In clinical applications, they provide a means to standardize normal tissue doses in the face of inevitable anatomical differences between patients and a vastly increased freedom to shape the dose, without being overly limiting like sets of dose-volume constraints. (orig.)

  18. Absorbed dose in CT. Comparison by CT dose index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Andou, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Few reports have discussed the absorbed dose on CT units with increased scanning capacity even with the current widespread adoption of multi-slice CT units. To compare and investigate the dose indexes among CT units, we measured the absorbed dose on CT units operating in Nagano Prefecture Japan. The measurements showed proportionality between phantom absorbed dose and the exposured mAs values in conventional scanning operation. Further, the measurements showed that the absorbed dose in the center of the phantom differed by about 2.1-fold between the highest and lowest levels on individual CT units. Within a single company, multi-slice CT units of the same company gave absorbed doses of about 1.3 to 1.5 times those of conventional single-slice CT units under the same exposured conditions of conventional scanning. When the scanning pitch was reduced in helical scanning, the absorbed dose at the center of the phantom increased. (author)

  19. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  20. Integral dose conservation in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, Adam S.; Das, Shiva K.; Curle, Charles; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment planners frequently modify beam arrangements and use IMRT to improve target dose coverage while satisfying dose constraints on normal tissues. The authors herein analyze the limitations of these strategies and quantitatively assess the extent to which dose can be redistributed within the patient volume. Specifically, the authors hypothesize that (1) the normalized integral dose is constant across concentric shells of normal tissue surrounding the target (normalized to the average integral shell dose), (2) the normalized integral shell dose is constant across plans with different numbers and orientations of beams, and (3) the normalized integral shell dose is constant across plans when reducing the dose to a critical structure. Using the images of seven patients previously irradiated for cancer of brain or prostate cancer and one idealized scenario, competing three-dimensional conformal and IMRT plans were generated using different beam configurations. Within a given plan and for competing plans with a constant mean target dose, the normalized integral doses within concentric ''shells'' of surrounding normal tissue were quantitatively compared. Within each patient, the normalized integral dose to shells of normal tissue surrounding the target was relatively constant (1). Similarly, for each clinical scenario, the normalized integral dose for a given shell was also relatively constant regardless of the number and orientation of beams (2) or degree of sparing of a critical structure (3). 3D and IMRT planning tools can redistribute, rather than eliminate dose to the surrounding normal tissues (intuitively known by planners). More specifically, dose cannot be moved between shells surrounding the target but only within a shell. This implies that there are limitations in the extent to which a critical structure can be spared based on the location and geometry of the critical structure relative to the target.

  1. Patient dose measurement and dose reduction in East Anglia (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, J.P.; Goldstone, K.E.; Dendy, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    At the end of 1990 a programme of patient dose measurements was introduced as part of the quality assurance service already provided for X ray departments throughout the East Anglian Health Region (UK). Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were used to measure over 1200 skin entrance surface doses for four common radiographic views in 33 hospitals in both the NHS and private sector. The four views were chosen to cover a wide range of equipment and techniques. The data collected have enabled Regional reference doses to be set which, for all views considered, fall below the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) Reference levels. In departments which exceeded reference levels, techniques were reviewed, improvements suggested and doses re-measured, in accordance with the recommended procedure for patient dose audit. A significant finding was that, given appropriate controls, X ray departments in the private sector could achieve the same acceptably low doses as NHS departments. (Author)

  2. In defence of collective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, I.; Sumner, D.

    2000-01-01

    Recent proposals for a new scheme of radiation protection leave little room for collective dose estimations. This article discusses the history and present use of collective doses for occupational, ALARA, EIS and other purposes with reference to practical industry papers and government reports. The linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis suggests that collective doses which consist of very small doses added together should be used. Moral and ethical questions are discussed, particularly the emphasis on individual doses to the exclusion of societal risks, uncertainty over effects into the distant future and hesitation over calculating collective detriments. It is concluded that for moral, practical and legal reasons, collective dose is a valid parameter which should continue to be used. (author)

  3. Fast in vivo volume dose reconstruction via reference dose perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli; Mo, Xiaohu; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate on-line reconstruction of in-vivo volume dose that accounts for both machine and patient discrepancy is not clinically available. We present a simple reference-dose-perturbation algorithm that reconstructs in-vivo volume dose fast and accurately. Methods: We modelled the volume dose as a function of the fluence map and density image. Machine (output variation, jaw/leaf position errors, etc.) and patient (setup error, weight loss, etc.) discrepancies between the plan and delivery were modelled as perturbation of the fluence map and density image, respectively. Delivered dose is modelled as perturbation of the reference dose due to change of the fluence map and density image. We used both simulated and clinical data to validate the algorithm. The planned dose was used as the reference. The reconstruction was perturbed from the reference and accounted for output-variations and the registered daily image. The reconstruction was compared with the ground truth via isodose lines and the Gamma Index. Results: For various plans and geometries, the volume doses were reconstructed in few seconds. The reconstruction generally matched well with the ground truth. For the 3%/3mm criteria, the Gamma pass rates were 98% for simulations and 95% for clinical data. The differences mainly appeared on the surface of the phantom/patient. Conclusions: A novel reference-dose-perturbation dose reconstruction model is presented. The model accounts for machine and patient discrepancy from planning. The algorithm is simple, fast, yet accurate, which makes online in-vivo 3D dose reconstruction clinically feasible.

  4. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  5. Angular dependence of shallow dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical response of a detector is discussed and compared to measurements of shallow dose with tissue and phantom response detectors. A definite energy dependent angular response of dose and measurement was observed which could not be explained by simple trigonometric arguments. The response is back scatter dependent and must be considered in detector design and dose measurements. It is not possible for standard detectors to follow this response

  6. Full dose CHOP chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shinichi; Kondo, Makoto; Ando, Yutaka; Yamashita, Shoji; Uematsu, Minoru; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishiguchi, Iku; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, we have performed 125 courses of CHOP chemotherapy for 27 patients of malignancy, adhering to the original regimen as strictly as possible. CHOP chemotherapy consisted of Cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Vincristine 1.4 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1 (maximum single dose 2.0 mg) and Prednisolone 50 mg/m 2 , po, day 1 through 5. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. As side effects, myelosuppression, hair loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, stomatitis, neuropathy, herpes zoster, arrhythmia and hemorrhagic cystitis were seen. Due to myelosuppression, twenty patients experienced febrile episodes at each nadir of WBC counts on 40 courses. However, any febrile patient did not have life threatening infection. Other side effects were also reversible. The radiotherapy of most patients was carried out as initially scheduled, except for 3 patients in whom irradiation was interrupted due to severe stomatitis or herpes zoster. We consider that CHOP chemotherapy is excellent in feasibility even when combined with radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from released to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and, environmental pathways and dose estimates

  9. Occupational dose trends in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhogora, W.E.; Nyanda, A.M.; Ngaile, J.E.; Lema, U.S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of occupational radiation exposure of monitored workers in Tanzania from 1986 to 1997. The analysis of dose records observes over this period, a fluctuating trend both in the individual and collective doses. The trend is more related to the fluctuations of the number of radiation workers than to the possible radiation safety changes of the working conditions. It has been found that, the maximum annual dose for the worker in all work categories was about 18 mSv y -1 . This suggests that the occupational radiation exposure in all practices satisfies the current dose limitation system. The national exposure summary shows that, the highest collective dose of 12.8 man-Sv which is 90% of the total collective dose, was due to medical applications. The applications in industry and research had a contribution of nearly 0.8 and 0.7 man-Sv respectively. From the professional point of view, the medical diagnostic radiographers received the highest collective dose of 11.2 man-Sv. Although the medical physicists recorded the minimum collective dose of nearly 0.07 man-Sv, the data shows that this profession received the highest mean dose of about 33 mSv in 12 years. Some achievements of the personnel monitoring services and suggestions for future improvement are pointed out. (author)

  10. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Di Trano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) [es

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates

  12. Radiation doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Butler, P.; Horrocks, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Patient radiation doses during interventional radiology (IR) procedures may reach the thresholds for radiation-induced skin and eye lens injuries. This study investigates the radiation doses received by patients undergoing cerebral embolization. Measurements were conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Radiotherapy verification films were used in order to visualise the radiation field. For each procedure the fluoroscopic and digital dose-area product, the fluoroscopic time, the total number of acquired images and entrance-skin dose calculated by the angiographic unit were recorded. In this paper, the skin, eye and thyroid glands doses on a sample of patients are presented. From a preliminary study of 13 patients having undergone cerebral embolization, it was deduced that six of them have received a dose above 1 Gy. Detailed dose data from patients undergoing IR procedures will be collected in the future with the aim of developing a model to allow estimation of the dose prior to the procedure as well as to look at techniques of dose reduction. (author)

  13. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, T.; Galvan G, A.; Canizal, G.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  14. Spiral CT and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Czerny, C.; Hojreh, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Kudler, H.; Noebauer, I.; Nowotny, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies in the USA and Europe state that computed tomography (CT) scans compromise only 3-5% of all radiological exams, but they contribute 35-45% of total radiation dose to the patient population. These studies lead to concern by several public authorities. Basis of CT-dose measurements is the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), which was established 1981. Nowadays there are several modifications of the CTDI values, which may lead to confusion. It is suggested to use the standardized CTDI-100 w. value together with the dose length product in all CT-examinations. These values should be printed on all CT-images and allows an evaluation of the individualized patient dose. Nowadays, radiologist's aim must be to work at the lowest maximal diagnostic acceptable signal to noise ratio. To decrease radiation dose radiologist should use low kV and mA, but high pitches. Newly developed CT-dose-reduction soft-wares and filters should be installed in all CT-machines. We should critically compare the average dose used for a specific examination with the reference dose used in this country and/or Europe. Greater differences should caution the radiologist. Finally, we as radiologists must check very carefully all indications and recommend alternative imaging methods. But we have also to teach our customers--patients and medical doctors who are non-radiologists--that a 'good' image is not that which show all possible information, but that which visualize 'only' the diagnostic necessary information

  15. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  16. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Abstract. This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from ...

  17. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional ...

  18. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  19. The patient dose survey and dose reduction in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thanh Luong; Duong Van Vinh; Ha Ngoc Thach

    2000-01-01

    This paper presented the results of the patient dose survey in some hospitals in Hanoi from 1995 to 1997. The main investigated types of the X-ray examination were: Chest PA, LAT; Skull PA/AP, LAT; Lumbar spine AP, LAT; and Pelvis AP. The fluctuation of the entrance surface doses (ESD) was too large, even in the same type of X-ray examination and X-ray facility. It was found that the ratio of maximum and minimum ESD were ranged from 1.5 to 18. The mean values of ESD for chest and skull were higher than CEC recommended values, while the mean values of lumbar spine and pelvis were smaller than that of CEC recommended values. The result of dose intercomparison was also reported. Some methods of dose reduction were applied for improving the patient dose in X-ray departments such as a high kV technique, high sensitive screen-film combination. (author)

  20. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography applied to the assessment of calcium deposition due to the presence of microcalcifications associated with breast cancer; Tomografia computadorizada de emissao estimulada por neutrons aplicada para avaliar a deposicao de calcio devido a presenca de microcalcificacoes associadas ao cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Yoriyaz, Helio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, (SP) (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we presented an application of the Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT), which uses a thin beam of fast neutrons to stimulate stable nuclei in a sample, emitting characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and it is used to identify the emitting nuclei. This technique was applied for evaluating the calcium isotopic composition changing due to the development of breast microcalcifications. A particular situation was simulated in which clustered microcalcifications were modeled with diameters less than 1.40 mm. In this case, neutron beam breast spectroscopy was successful in detecting the counting changes in the photon emission spectra for energies, which are characteristics of 4{sup 0C}a isotope in a low deposited dose rate. (author)

  1. Time and dose in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayneord, W.V.; Clarke, R.H.

    1978-05-01

    Previous work on the implications of different forms of dose response relationships is extended to include time as a variable, not only in time of irradiation but also in the time of appearance of effects following irradiation. The forms of relationships for time distribution of tumours revealed experimentally for both radiation and chemical carcinogens are first considered. It appears that much data may be correlated in terms of a log-normal distribution of tumour yield following the insult. Further, it is noted, that there is evidence that the median time of tumour appearance may be a function of total dose received or even of dose rate for protracted exposure. Using numerical values of these parameters derived from the biological literature speculative studies have been made of the effects on dose response relationships of using a time distribution of tumour yield, considering both uniform irradiation and point sources. In addition the effects of using dose rate rather than dose to define the log-normal distribution to tumour appearance have been investigated. It is assumed that biological response is directly proportional to dose but that effect is distributed in time. From this linear assumption the appearance of non-linear dose response relationships and apparent thresholds are continually seen. Finally, both the importance of attempting analyses of biological data in terms of stochastic concepts and the need for biological data to test our hypotheses is emphasised. (author)

  2. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  3. Microbeams, microdosimetry and specific dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randers-Pehrson, H.

    2002-01-01

    Dose and its usefulness as a single parameter to describe the amount of radiation absorbed are well established for most situations. The conditions where the concept of dose starts to break down are well known, mostly from the study of microdosimetry. For low doses of high LET radiation it is noted that the process of taking the limiting value of the energy absorbed within a test volume divided by the mass within that volume yields either zero or a relatively large value. The problem is further exacerbated with microbeam irradiations where the uniformity of the energy deposition is experimentally manipulated on the spatial scale of cells being irradiated. Booz introduced a quantity to deal with these problems: the unfortunately named 'mean specific energy in affected volumes'. This quantity multiplied by the probability that a test volume has received an energy deposit is equal to dose (in situations where dose can be defined). I propose that Booz's quantity be renamed 'specific dose', that is the mean energy deposited divided by the mass within a specified volume. If we believe for instance that the nucleus of a cell is the critical volume for biological effects, we can refer to the nuclear specific dose. A microbeam experiment wherein 10 per cent of the cell nuclei were targeted with 10 alpha particles would be described as delivering a nuclear specific dose of 1.6 Gy to 10 per cent of the population. (author)

  4. Radiation absorbed doses in cephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.; Stenstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses to different organs in the head and neck region in lateral (LAT) and postero-anterior (PA) cephalography were investigated. The doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on a tissue equivalent phantom head. Lanthanide screens in speed group 4 were used at 90 and 85 k Vp. A near-focus aluminium dodger was used and the radiation beam was collimated strictly to the face. The maximum entrance dose from LAT was 0.25 mGy and 0.42 mGy from a PA exposure. The doses to the salivary glands ranged between 0.2 and 0.02 mGy at LAT and between 0.15 and 0.04 mGy at PA exposures. The average thyroid gland dose without any shielding was 0.11 mGy (LAT) and 0.06 mGy (PA). When a dodger was used the dose was reduced to 0.07 mGy (LAT). If the thyroid gland was sheilded off, the dose was further reduced to 0.01 mGy and if the thyroid region was collimated out of the primary radiation field the dose was reduced to only 0.005 mGy. (authors)

  5. Central index of dose information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) is a national database of occupational exposure to radiation operated by the NRPB as agent for the Health and Safety Executive. It receives summarised information on the radiation doses to classified persons in Great Britain annually from Approved Dosimetry Services. This document is the first annual CIDI summary of the data, giving statistics for 1986. (UK)

  6. Dose optimisation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2005-01-01

    After the installation of computed radiography (CR) systems in three hospitals in Luxembourg a patient dose survey was carried out for three radiographic examinations, thorax, pelvis and lumbar spine. It was found that the patient doses had changed in comparison with the patient doses measured for conventional radiography in the same three hospitals. A close collaboration between the manufacturers of the X-ray installations, the CR imaging systems and the medical physicists led to the discovery that the speed class with which each radiographic examination was to be performed, had been ignored, during installation of the digital imaging systems. A number of procedures were carried out in order to calibrate and program the X-ray installations in conjunction with the CR systems. Following this optimisation procedure, a new patient dose survey was carried out for the three radiographic examinations. It was found that patient doses for the three hospitals were reduced. (authors)

  7. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  8. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  9. Radiation dose during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, Ch.; Rasuli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The use of angiographic procedures is becoming more prevalent as new techniques and equipment are developed. There have been concerns in the scientific community about the level of radiation doses received by patients, and indirectly by staff, during some of these radiological procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of radiation dose from angiographic procedures to patient at the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus. Radiation dose measurements, using Thermo-Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), were performed on more than 100 patients on various procedures. The results show that while the patient dose from the great majority of angiographic procedures is less than 2 Gy, a significant number of procedures, especially interventional procedures may have doses greater than 2 Gy and may lead to deterministic effects. (author)

  10. Labour cost of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.; Lockett, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to optimise capital expenditure on measures to protect workers against radiation it would be useful to have a means to measure radiation dose in money terms. Because labour has to be employed to perform radiation work there must be some relationship between the wages paid and the doses received. Where the next increment of radiation dose requires additional labour to be recruited the cost will at least equal the cost of the extra labour employed. This paper examines some of the factors which affect the variability of the labour cost of radiation dose and notes that for 'in-plant' exposures the current cost per rem appears to be significantly higher than values quoted in ICRP Publication 22. An example is given showing how this concept may be used to determine the capital it is worth spending on installed plant to prevent regular increments of radiation dose to workers. (author)

  11. Patient dose measurement and dose reduction in chest radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milatović Aleksandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations presented in this paper represent the first estimation of patient doses in chest radiography in Montenegro. In the initial stage of our study, we measured the entrance surface air kerma and kerma area product for chest radiography in five major health institutions in the country. A total of 214 patients were observed. We reported the mean value, minimum and third quartile values, as well as maximum values of surface air kerma and kerma area product of patient doses. In the second stage, the possibilities for dose reduction were investigated. Mean kerma area product values were 0.8 ± 0.5 Gycm2 for the posterior-anterior projection and 1.6 ± 0.9 Gycm2 for the lateral projection. The max/min ratio for the entrance surface air kerma was found to be 53 for the posterior-anterior projection and 88 for the lateral projection. Comparing the results obtained in Montenegro with results from other countries, we concluded that patient doses in our medical centres are significantly higher. Changes in exposure parameters and increased filtration contributed to a dose reduction of up to 36% for posterior-anterior chest examinations. The variability of the estimated dose values points to a significant space for dose reduction throughout the process of radiological practice optimisation.

  12. Establishment Of Dose Correlation During Dose Mapping On Medical Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzalina Baharin; Hasan Sham; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab

    2014-01-01

    This paper explains the work done during product dose mapping in order to get the correlation between doses at MINTec-Sinagama plant. Product used was medical devices in aluminium tubes packaged in cardboard kegs packaging with average weight of 12 kg per carton. 12 cartons were loaded in every one tote to give 0.2 g/ cm 3 of density. Ceric cerous dosimeters were placed at specific locations as indicated in SP14: Product Dose Mapping, QMS of MINTec-Sinagama around three planes. Three processes were made at different days as a three replicates to show the reproducibility of measurements. (author)

  13. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  14. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  15. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms

  16. Effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G.

    1986-01-01

    The term 'small radiation dosis' means doses of about (1 rem), fractions of one rem as well as doses of a few rem. Doses like these are encountered in various practical fields, e.g. in X-ray diagnosis, in the environment and in radiation protection rules. The knowledge about small doses is derived from the same two forces, on which the radiobiology of human beings nearly is based: interpretation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data, as well as the experience from radiotherapy. Careful interpretation of Hiroshima dates do not provide any evidence that small doses can induce cancer, fetal malformations or genetic damage. Yet in radiotherapy of various diseases, e.g. inflammations, doses of about 1 Gy (100 rad) do no harm to the patients. According to a widespread hypothesis even very small doses may induce some types of radiation damage ('no threshold'). Nevertheless an alternative view is justified. At present no decision can be made between these two alternatives, but the usefullness of radiology is definitely better established than any damage calculated by theories or extrapolations. Based on experience any exaggerated fear of radiations can be met. (author)

  17. Patient dose in neonatal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, K.; Struelens, L.; Smet, M.; Bosmans, H.; Vanhavere, F.

    2008-01-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is therefore the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Hence, knowledge of the patient dose is necessary to justify the exposures. A study to assess the patient doses was started at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Univ. Hospital in Leuven. Between September 2004 and September 2005, prematurely born babies underwent on average 10 X-ray examinations in the NICU. In this sample, the maximum was 78 X-ray examinations. For chest radiographs, the median entrance skin dose was 34 μGy and the median dose area product was 7.1 mGy.cm 2 . By means of conversion coefficients, the measured values were converted to organ doses. Organ doses were calculated for three different weight classes: extremely low birth weight infants ( 2500 g). The doses to the lungs for a single chest radiograph for infants with extremely low birth weights, low birth weights and normal birth weights were 24, 25 and 32 μGy, respectively. (authors)

  18. CT dose reduction in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vock, Peter

    2005-01-01

    World wide, the number of CT studies in children and the radiation exposure by CT increases. The same energy dose has a greater biological impact in children than in adults, and scan parameters have to be adapted to the smaller diameter of the juvenile body. Based on seven rules, a practical approach to paediatric CT is shown: Justification and patient preparation are important steps before scanning, and they differ from the preparation of adult patients. The subsequent choice of scan parameters aims at obtaining the minimal signal-to-noise ratio and volume coverage needed in a specific medical situation; exposure can be divided in two aspects: the CT dose index determining energy deposition per rotation and the dose-length product (DLP) determining the volume dose. DLP closely parallels the effective dose, the best parameter of the biological impact. Modern scanners offer dose modulation to locally minimise exposure while maintaining image quality. Beyond the selection of the physical parameters, the dose can be kept low by scanning the minimal length of the body and by avoiding any non-qualified repeated scanning of parts of the body. Following these rules, paediatric CT examinations of good quality can be obtained at a reasonable cost of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  19. Plutonium dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Osamu

    1976-01-01

    Dose in internal exposure to Pu was investigated, and dose-effect relationship was discussed. Dose-effect relationship in internal exposure was investigated by means of two methods, which were relationship between dose and its effect (relationship between μ Ci/Kg and its effect), and exposure dose and its effects (rad-effect), and merits and demerits of two methods were mentioned. Problems in a indication method such as mean dose were discussed with respect to the dose in skeleton, the liver and the lung. Pu-induced osteosarcoma in mice rats, and beagles was described, and differences in its induction between animals were discussed. Pulmonary neoplasma induced by 239 PuO 2 inhalation in beagles was reported, and description was made as to differences in induction of lung cancer between animals when Pu was inhaled and was taken into the lung. A theoretical and experimental study of a extrapolation of the results of the animal experiment using Pu to human cases is necessary. (Serizawa, K.)

  20. Dose concentration and dose verification for radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    The number of cancer treatments using radiation therapy is increasing. The background of this increase is the accumulated fact that the number of successful cases is comparative to or even better than surgery for some types of cancer due to the improvement in irradiation technology and radiation planning technology. This review describes the principles and technology of radiation therapy, its characteristics, particle therapy that improves the dose concentration, its historical background, the importance of dose concentration, present situation and future possibilities. There are serious problems that hinder the superior dose concentration of particle therapy. Recent programs and our efforts to solve these problems are described. A new concept is required to satisfy the notion of evidence based medicine, i.e., one has to develop a method of dose verification, which is not yet available. This review is for researchers, medical doctors and radiation technologists who are developing this field. (author)

  1. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  2. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  3. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  4. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  5. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  6. Savannah River Site dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits

  7. Are low radiation doses Dangerous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Lima, O.; Cornejo, N.

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years the answers to this questions has been affirmative as well as negative from a radiation protection point of view low doses of ionizing radiation potentially constitute an agent causing stochasting effects. A lineal relation without threshold is assumed between dose and probability of occurrence of these effects . Arguments against the danger of probability of occurrence of these effects. Arguments again the danger of low dose radiation are reflected in concepts such as Hormesis and adaptive response, which are phenomena that being studied at present

  8. What is correct: equivalent dose or dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In Croatian language some physical quantities in radiation protection dosimetry have not precise names. Consequently, in practice either terms in English or mathematical formulas are used. The situation is even worse since the Croatian language only a limited number of textbooks, reference books and other papers are available. This paper compares the concept of ''dose equivalent'' as outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations No. 26 and newest, conceptually different concept of ''equivalent dose'' which is introduced in ICRP 60. It was found out that Croatian terminology is both not uniform and unprecise. For the term ''dose equivalent'' was, under influence of Russian and Serbian languages, often used as term ''equivalent dose'' even from the point of view of ICRP 26 recommendations, which was not justified. Unfortunately, even now, in Croatia the legal unit still ''dose equivalent'' defined as in ICRP 26, but the term used for it is ''equivalent dose''. Therefore, in Croatian legislation a modified set of quantities introduced in ICRP 60, should be incorporated as soon as possible

  9. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  10. Dose determination in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Germanier, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the last years the methodologies to determine the dose in computed tomography have been revised. In this work was realized a dosimetric study about the exploration protocols used for simulation of radiotherapy treatments. The methodology described in the Report No. 111 of the American Association of Medical Physiques on a computed tomograph of two cuts was applied. A cylindrical phantom of water was used with dimensions: 30 cm of diameter and 50 cm of longitude that simulates the absorption and dispersion conditions of a mature body of size average. The doses were determined with ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry. The results indicate that the dose information that provides the tomograph underestimates the dose between 32 and 35%.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed

  12. Dose from drinking water Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Salonen, Laina; Huikuri, Pia; Arvela, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The dose from drinking water originates almost totally from naturally occurring radionuclides in the uranium-238 series, the most important nuclide being radon-222. Second comes lead-210, and third polonium-210. The mean age-group-weighted dose received by ingestion of drinking water is 0.14 mSv per year. More than half of the total cumulative dose of 750 manSv is received by the users of private wells, forming 13% of the population. The most exposed group comprises the users of wells drilled in bedrock, who receive 320 manSv while comprising only 4% of the population. The calculated number of annual cancer incidences due to drinking water is very sensitive to the dose-conversion factors of ingested radon used, as well as to the estimated lung cancer incidences caused by radon released from water into indoor air. (au)

  13. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Radiation Sources Michael G. Stabin, PhD, CHP Introduction Radiation exposures from diagnostic medical examinations are generally ... of exposure annually to natural background radiation. Plain Film X Rays Single Radiographs Effective Dose, mSv Skull ( ...

  14. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222 Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings

  15. Extremity doses to interventional radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wihtby, M.; Martin, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiologists performing interventional procedures are often required to stand close to the patient's side when carrying out manipulations under fluoroscopic control. This can result in their extremities receiving a high radiation dose, due to scattered radiation. These doses are sometimes high enough to warrant that the radiologist in question be designated a classified radiation worker. Classification in the UK is a result of any worker receiving or likely to receive in the course of their duties in excess of 3/10ths of any annual dose limit (500mSv to extremities, skin). The doses to the legs of radiologists have received less attention than those to the hands, however the doses may be high, due to the proximity of the legs and feet to scattered radiation. The legs can be exposed to a relatively high level of scattered radiation as the radiation in produced from scatter of the un attenuated beam from the bottom of the patient couch. The routine monitoring of extremity doses in interventional radiology is difficult due to several factors. Firstly a wide range of interventional procedures in undertaken in every radiology department, and these procedures require many different techniques, equipment and skills. This means that the position the radiologist adopts in relation to scattering medium and therefore their exposure, depends heavily on the type of procedure. As the hands which manipulate the catheters within the patient are often located close to the patients side and to the area under irradiation, the distribution of dose across the hands can be variable, with very high localised doses, making routine monitoring difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and distribution of dose to the hands and legs of interventional radiologists carrying out a wide range of both diagnostic and therapeutic interventional procedures. To ascertain the most effective method of monitoring the highest dose in accordance with the Basic safety standards

  16. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  17. Calculating radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods and procedures used to calculate the radiation exposures and radiation doses to designated employees of the Olympic Dam Project. Each of the three major exposure pathways are examined. These are: gamma irradiation, radon daughter inhalation and radioactive dust inhalation. A further section presents ICRP methodology for combining individual pathway exposures to give a total dose figure. Computer programs used for calculations and data storage are also presented briefly

  18. Dose assessment at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Phillips, W.A.; Colsher, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Bikini Atoll is one of two sites in the northern Marshall Islands that was used by the United States as testing grounds for the nuclear weapons program from 1946 to 1958. In 1969 a general cleanup began at Bikini Atoll. Subsistence crops, coconut and Pandanus fruit, were planted on Bikini and Eneu Islands, and housing was constructed on Bikini Island. A second phase of housing was planned for the interior of Bikini Island. Preliminary data indicated that external gamma doses in the interior of the island might be higher than in other parts of the island. Therefore, to select a second site for housing on the island with minimum external exposure, a survey of Bikini Atoll was conducted in June 1975. External gamma measurements were made on Bikini and Eneu Islands, and soil and vegetations samples collected to evaluate the potential doses via terrestrial food chains and inhalation. Estimates of potential dose via the marine food chain were based upon data collected on previous trips to the atoll. The terrestrial pathway contributes the greater percentage, external gamma exposure contributes the next highest, and inhalation and marine pathways contribute minor fractions of the total whole body and bone marrow doses. The radionuclides contributing the major fraction of the dose are 90 Sr and 137 Cs. All living patterns involving Bikini Island exceed federal guidelines for 30-yr population doses. The Eneu Island living pattern leads to doses that are slightly less than federal guidelines. All patterns evaluated for Bikini Atoll lead to higher doses than those on the southern islands at Enewetak Atoll

  19. Personnel external dose monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hengyuan

    1989-01-01

    The status and trend of personnel external dose monitoring system are introduced briefly. Their characteristics, functions and TLD bedges of some commercially available automatic TLD system, including UD-710A (Matsushita, Japan), Harshaw-2271, 2276 (Harshaw, USA), Harshaw-8000 (Harshaw/Filtrol), Studsvik-1313 (Sweden) and Pitman-800 (UK) were depicted in detail. Finally, personnel dose management and record keeping system were presented and two examples were given

  20. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr

  1. Technical basis for dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider two general topics: Technical considerations of why dose-reconstruction studies should or should not be performed and methods of dose reconstruction. The first topic is of general and growing interest as the number of dose-reconstruction studies increases, and one asks the question whether it is necessary to perform a dose reconstruction for virtually every site at which, for example, the Department of Energy (DOE) has operated a nuclear-related facility. And there is the broader question of how one might logically draw the line at performing or not performing dose-reconstruction (radiological and chemical) studies for virtually every industrial complex in the entire country. The second question is also of general interest. There is no single correct way to perform a dose-reconstruction study, and it is important not to follow blindly a single method to the point that cheaper, faster, more accurate, and more transparent methods might not be developed and applied. 90 refs., 4 tabs

  2. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  3. Technical basis for dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider two general topics: technical considerations of why dose-reconstruction studies should or should not be performed and methods of dose reconstruction. The first topic is of general and growing interest as the number of dose-reconstruction studies increases, and one asks the question whether it is necessary to perform a dose reconstruction for virtually every site at which, for example, the Department of Energy (DOE) has operated a nuclear-related facility. And there is the broader question of how one might logically draw the line at performing or not performing dose-reconstruction (radiological and chemical) studies for virtually every industrial complex in the entire country. The second question is also of general interest. There is no single correct way to perform a dose-reconstruction study, and it is important not to follow blindly a single method to the point that cheaper, faster, more accurate, and more transparent methods might not be developed and applied

  4. Yield in cultivars of the West Indian gherkin for different doses of biofertiliser = Produtividade de cultivares de maxixeiro em função de doses de biofertilizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pereira Gomes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fruit of the West Indian gherkin is greatly appreciated in Brazilian cuisine, especially in the north and northeast of Brazil. However, it is still considered a secondary crop, and is cultivated using non-technical management. As it is a crop produced mainly by small farmers, any research should be directed towards its cultivation using inputs produced on the farm itself, such as bio-fertilisers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on the yield of two West Indian gherkin cultivars, of different doses of bio-fertiliser consisting of cattle manure and commercial products containing bacteria and enzymes that degrade organic molecules. A completely randomised design was used in a 2 x 4 factorial scheme with four replications. The factors included two cultivars (Do Norte and Liso Gibão and four doses of bio-fertiliser (0, 8, 16 and 24 m3 ha-1 applied through fertigation. The experiment lasted for 100 days, with six collections being made, for which the following variables were evaluated: number of fruits, fruit weight, production and yield. All the variables were affected by the interaction between the factors under study. The cultivars did not differ as to yield, however the De North cultivar gave the highest number of fruits, while the Liso Gibão cultivar produced fruit of a greater weight. From the results obtained, a dose of 14 m3 ha-1 is recommended for the Liso Gibão cultivar. For the De Norte cultivar, further studies with higher doses of bio-fertiliser are recommended. = Os frutos de maxixeiro são de grande apreciação na culinária brasileira, principalmente nas regiões Norte e Nordeste do Brasil. No entanto, é considerada uma cultura secundária e seu cultivo é realizado sem adoção de manejo tecnificado. Devido o seu cultivo ser realizado, principalmente, por pequenos produtores, as pesquisas empregando insumos produzidos na própria propriedade, como o biofertilizante, na adubação do maxixe são relevantes

  5. Recomendações para se evitar grandes erros de dose em tratamentos radioterapêuticos Recommendations to avoid gross errors of dose in radiotherapeutic treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Nogueira de Souza

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Erros humanos são uma importante fonte de falhas em todos os passos do planejamento e do tratamento radioterapêutico. Com o objetivo de reduzir este grau de incerteza, várias organizações especializadas recomendam minuciosos programas de garantia da qualidade. No Brasil, programas deste tipo vêm tendo sua exigência intensificada, e a maioria dos serviços de radioterapia vem se orientando neste sentido, tanto em relação aos equipamentos de radiação e dosimetria, quanto em relação à verificação dos cálculos de dose em pacientes e das revisões das fichas de planejamento. Como uma contribuição a este esforço de qualidade, apresentam-se algumas recomendações para se evitar falhas de tratamento devidas a erros na dose de radiação recebida pelo paciente, como redundância nas verificações dos cálculos feitos manualmente ou por computador, e, também, a verificação da dose acumulada para cada paciente sob tratamento, semanalmente, além de se evitar a possibilidade de acesso a qualquer sistema de segurança do equipamento ao pessoal técnico treinado para apenas o operar. Além disso, deve-se considerar a possibilidade de se empregar um sistema computadorizado de verificação e registro do tratamento, dessa maneira prevenindo-se erros durante a aplicação diária devidos à seleção indevida dos diferentes parâmetros do tratamento. Reportam-se quatro incidentes radioativos recentes ocorridos no mundo, com injúrias em pacientes, e algumas ocorrências de erros grandes de dose.Human mistakes are an important source of errors in radiotherapy and may occur at every step of the radiotherapeutic planning and treatment. To reduce this level of uncertainties, several specialized organizations have recommended a comprehensive quality assurance program. In Brazil, the requirement for these programs has been strongly stressed, and most radiotherapy services have pursued this goal regarding radiation units and dosimetry equipment

  6. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la

    2008-05-01

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  7. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  8. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  9. Low-dose dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustemeyer, P.; Eich, H.T.; John-Mikolajewski, V.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The intention of this study was to reduce patient dose during dental CT in the planning for osseointegrated implants. Methods and Materials: Dental CTs were performed with a spiral CT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens) and a dental software package. Use of the usual dental CT technique (120 kVp; 165 mA, 1 s rotation time, 165 mAs; pitch factor 1) was compared with a new protocol (120 kVp; 50 mA; 0.7 s rotation time; 35 mAs; pitch factor 2) which delivered the best image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose, as tested in a preceding study. Image quality was analysed using a human anatomic head preparation. Four radiologists analysed the images independently. A Wilcoxon rank pair-test was used for statistic evaluation. The doses to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the salivary glands, and the eye lens were determined in a tissue-equivalent phantom (Alderson-Rando Phantom) with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters at the appropriate locations. Results: By mAs reduction from 165 to 35 and using a pitch factor of 2, the radiation dose could be reduced by a factor of nine (max.) (e.g., the bone marrow dose could be reduced from 23.6 mSv to 2.9 mSv, eye lens from 0.5 mSv to 0.3 mSv, thyroid gland from 2.5 mSv to 0.5 mSv, parotid glands from 2.3 mSv to 0.4 mSv). The dose reduction did not lead to an actual loss of image quality or diagnostic information. Conclusion: A considerable dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information is achievable in dental CT. Dosereducing examination protocols like the one presented may further expand the use of preoperative dental CT. (orig.) [de

  10. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  11. Repair and dose-response at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totter, J.R.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-04-01

    The DNA of each individual is subject to formation of some 2-4 x 10 14 ion pairs during the first 30 years of life from background radiation. If a single hit is sufficient to cause cancer, as is implicit in the linear, no-threshold theories, it is unclear why all individuals do not succumb to cancer, unless repair mechanisms operate to remove the damage. We describe a simple model in which the exposed population displays a distribution of repair thresholds. The dose-response at low dose is shown to depend on the shape of the threshold distribution at low thresholds. If the probability of zero threshold is zero, the response at low dose is quadratic. The model is used to resolve a longstanding discrepancy between observed incidence of leukemia at Nagasaki and the predictions of the usual linear hypothesis

  12. Notes on the effect of dose uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent dose-response relationship between amount of exposure to acute radiation and level of mortality in humans is affected by uncertainties in the dose values. It is apparent that one of the greatest concerns regarding the human data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki is the unexpectedly shallow slope of the dose response curve. This may be partially explained by uncertainty in the dose estimates. Some potential effects of dose uncertainty on the apparent dose-response relationship are demonstrated

  13. Trends in population dose and examples of occupational dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; McDonough, L.; Gelder, R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent review by NRPB of the exposure of the UK population shows the average annual dose to the population from all sources of radiation to be 2.5 mSv(1). Natural radiation gives rise to 87% of this with radon daughters accounting for the largest single contribution of 1.2 mSv. Medical irradiation remains the most significant contributor to the dose from man-made sources: the current estimate for all diagnostic uses is 0.3 mSv per annum. (author)

  14. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields (≥10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10 -10 scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged from

  15. Tissue dose in thorotrast patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.; Noffz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Absorbed doses to the liver, spleen, red marrow, lungs, kidneys, and to various parts of bone tissue were calculated for long-term burdens of intravascularly injected Thorotrast. The estimates were performed for typical injection levels of 10, 30, 50 and 100 ml, based upon best estimates of 232 Th tissue distribution, and steady state activity ratios between the subsequent daughters. Correcting for the α-particle self absorption within Thorotrast aggregates, the mean α-dose to a standard 70-kg man at 30 yr after the injection 0f 25 ml of Thorotrast is 750 rad to the liver, 2100 rad to the spleen, 270 rad to the red marrow, 60-620 rad in various parts of the lung, and 13 rad to the kidneys. Dose rates to various parts of bone tissue (bone surface, compact, and cancellous bone) were estimated by applying the ICRP model on alkaline earth metabolism to the continuous translocation of thorium daughters to bone and to the formation of thorium daughters by decay within bone tissue. The average dose to calcified bone from translocated 224 Ra with its daughters is 18 rad at 30 yr after the injection of 25 ml of Thorotrast. Considering the Spiess-Mays risk coefficient of 0.9-1.7% bone sarcoma/ 100 rad of average skeletal dose from 224 Ra and its daughters, the induction of 1.6-3.1 bone sarcomas per 1000 Thorotrast patients is predicted. (author)

  16. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering

  17. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  18. Dose reconstruction using mobile phones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerten, K.; Reekmans, F.; Schroeyers, W.; Lievens, L.; Vanhavere, F.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic components inside mobile phones are regarded as useful tools for accident and retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence. Components inside the devices with suitable properties for luminescence dosimetry include, amongst others, ceramic substrates in resistors, capacitors, transistors and antenna switches. Checking the performance of such devices in dosimetric experiments is a crucial step towards developing a reliable dosimetry system for emergency situations using personal belongings. Here, the results of dose assessment experiments using irradiated mobile phones are reported. It will be shown that simple regenerative dose estimates, derived from various types of components removed from different mobile phone models, are consistent with the given dose, after applying an average fading correction factor. (authors)

  19. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP)

  20. Consultative exercise on dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, B A; Parker, T; Simmonds, J R; Sumner, D

    2001-06-01

    A summary is given of a meeting held at Sussex University, UK, in October 2000, which allowed the exchange of ideas on methods of assessment of dose to the public arising from potential authorised radioactive discharges from nuclear sites in the UK. Representatives of groups with an interest in dose assessments were invited, and hence the meeting was called the Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments (CEDA). Although initiated and funded by the Food Standards Agency, its organisation, and the writing of the report, were overseen by an independent Chairman and Steering Group. The report contains recommendations for improvement in co-ordination between different agencies involved in assessments, on method development and on the presentation of data on assessments. These have been prepared by the Steering Group, and will be taken forward by the Food Standards Agency and other agencies in the UK. The recommendations are included in this memorandum.

  1. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average dosage of diclofenac suppository and mean time for taking the first dosage of opioids have not statistical difference too (respectively; P = 0.76, P = 0.87). Average dose of pethidine was lesser than placebo statistically. It means, the case group did not take pethidine but this amount was 6 (20%) in the control one (P ...

  2. Carcinogenesis in mice after low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The results from the experimental systems reported here indicate that the dose-response curves for tumor induction in various tissues cannot be described by a single model. Furthermore, although the understanding of the mechanisms involved in different systems is incomplete, it is clear that very different mechanisms for induction are involved. For some tumors the mechanism of carcinogenesis may be mainly a result of direct effects on the target cell, perhaps involving one or more mutations. While induction may occur, in many instances, through such direct effects, the eventual expression of the tumor can be influenced by a variety of host factors including endocrine status, competence of the immune system, and kinetics of target and interacting cell populations. In other tumors, indirect effects may play a major role in the initiation or expression of tumors. Some of the hormone-modulated tumors would fall into this class. Despite the complexities of the experimental systems and the lack of understanding of the types of mechanisms involved, in nearly every example the tumorigenic effectiveness per rad of low-LET radiation tends to decrease with decreasing dose rate. For some tumor types the differences may be small or may appear only with very low dose rates, while for others the dose-rate effects may be large

  3. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  4. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  5. Dose budget for exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Dose budget is an important management tool to effectively control the collective dose incurred in a nuclear facility. The budget represents a set of yardsticks or guidelines for use in controlling the internal activities, involving radiation exposure in the organisation. The management, through budget can evaluate the radiation protection performance at every level of the organisation where a number of independent functional groups work on routine and non-routine jobs. The discrepancy between the plan and the actual performance is high lighted through the budgets. The organisation may have to change the course of its operation in a particular area or revise its plan with due focus on appropriate protective measures. (author)

  6. Natural radiation dose to Gammarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbud, M.

    1975-01-01

    The natural radiation dose rate to whole body and components of the Gammarus species (i.e., G. Tigrinus, G. Fasciatus and G. Daiberi) that occurs in the Hudson River is evaluated and the results compared with the upper limits of dose rates from man made sources to the whole body of the organisms. Methods were developed to study the distribution of alpha emitters from 226 Ra plus daughter products in Gammarus using autoradiographic techniques, taking into account the amount of radon that escapes from the organisms. This methodology may be adapted to study the distribution of alpha emitters in contaminated tissues of plants and animals

  7. Confectionery-based dose forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangso, Kristian J; Ho, Quy Phuong; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional dosage forms such as tablets, capsules and syrups are prescribed in the normal course of practice. However, concerns about patient preferences and market demands have given rise to the exploration of novel unconventional dosage forms. Among these, confectionery-based dose forms have strong potential to overcome compliance problems. This report will review the availability of these unconventional dose forms used in treating the oral cavity and for systemic drug delivery, with a focus on medicated chewing gums, medicated lollipops, and oral bioadhesive devices. The aim is to stimulate increased interest in the opportunities for innovative new products that are available to formulators in this field, particularly for atypical patient populations.

  8. Statistical and low dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The low dose response and the lower limit of detection of the Hanford dosimeter depend upon may factors, including the energy of the radiation, whether the exposure is to be a single radiation or mixed fields, annealing cycles, environmental factors, and how well various batches of TLD materials are matched in the system. A careful statistical study and sensitivity analysis were performed to determine how these factors influence the response of the dosimeter system. Estimates have been included in this study of the standard deviation of calculated dose for various mixed field exposures from 0 to 1000 mrem

  9. RISCOS OCUPACIONAIS QUÍMICOS NO CONHECIMENTO DE CIRURGIÕES DENTISTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martins Arpone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The consequences for the health of the work are the result of the interaction of the body with agents/factors existing in the working environment, characterizing the occupational exposure. The dentists are exposed to various occupational hazards, whether chemical, physical, mechanical, ergonomic or accidents. The aim of this study was identify whether dentists and dental students know the risks that they are exposed to chemicals during their practical work. A questionnaire was given to 33 dentists and 33 students of final year of Dentistry, about his knowledge of the chemical agents which dental professionals are exposed and what the risks posed by exposure to each of these agents. With the exception of ether and formaldehyde, most students are exposed to all the chemicals studied, while dentists are less exposed to ether, formaldehyde and surgical cement. The majority of students do 16 chemicals associated with health problems, including alcohol, antibacterial liquid soap, latex, powder, glutaraldehyde, sodium alginate and glass ionomer. Most dentists not associated products with 11 health problems, like a list of the students. None dentist and only 6.1% of the students associated the risk of cancer with exposure to cement/plaster. Only 24.2% of dentists and 21.1% of students associated methyl methacrylate exposure with lung disorders. Dentists and dental students don’t have an adequate knowledge of the risks involved with exposure to the chemicals they use every day, and it may result in not using appropriate protective equipment and occupational diseases.

  10. Vulnerabilidades ocupacionais e percepção de saúde em trabalhadores do SUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Ávila Assunção

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo desenvolve uma tipologia de precariedade nos vínculos de trabalho, considerando outras dimensões além daquelas tradicionais, como tipo de vínculo, jornada e rendimento de trabalho. Outros aspectos do local de trabalho e da alocação de tempo em atividades e tarefas fora do ambiente laboral afetam a inserção dos indivíduos no mercado de trabalho. Assim, a partir da flexibilidade do método e da relativamente grande disponibilidade de informações sobre o indivíduo e seu desempenho socioeconômico, a presente investigação recorreu à aplicação do Método Grade of Membership (GoM aos dados de 1.808 trabalhadores da rede municipal de saúde de Belo Horizonte que participaram de um inquérito epidemiológico em 2009. Foram considerados elegíveis todos os profissionais vinculados ao serviço público municipal de saúde, independente do vínculo empregatício (permanente, temporário, estágio. O estudo foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (parecer nº 542/07. Os resultados apresentados convergem para as reflexões acerca da crescente constatação da vulnerabilidade dos trabalhadores de saúde em função das condições de trabalho precárias, além de indicaram a relevância da abordagem da atividade de trabalho, no sentido de identificar agentes estressores e outros fatores do ambiente relacionados às situações nocivas e de adoecimento. Algumas características dos indivíduos (idade, sexo, tempo de serviço, etc. que conformam a população-alvo não são passíveis de ações externas, no entanto, as políticas podem modificar os fatores localizados em torno do núcleo individual.

  11. Hemoglobinopatias em trabalhadores expostos à riscos ocupacionais Hemoglobinopathies in workers exposed to occupational hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac L. Silva Filho

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies have been considered the most frequent hereditary disease in Brazilian population, constituting a Public Health problem. This paper reports on screening in workers at FIOCRUZ-RJ., exposed to some hazards factors such as, chemical substances, radiation, excessive cold and heat etc., with the objective of evaluating the impact of these factors in carriers of hemoglobinopathies, mainly in sickle cell trait (AS.

  12. Comparison of Nordic dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1978-04-01

    A comparison is made between the models used in the four Nordic countries, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, for calculation of concentrations and doses from releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere. The comparison is limited to the near-zone models, i.e. the models for calculation of concentrations and doses within 50 km from the release point, and it comprises the following types of calculation: a. Concentrations of airborne material, b. External gamma doses from a plume, c. External gamma doses from radioactive material deposited on the ground. All models are based on the gaussian dispersion model (the gaussian plume model). Unit releases of specific isotopes under specific meteorological conditions are assumed. On the basis of the calculation results from the models, it is concluded that there are no essential differences. The difference between the calculation results only exceeds a factor of 3 in special cases. It thus lies within the known limits of uncertainty for the gaussian plume model. (author)

  13. The cost of occupational dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, A.B.; Clark, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The optimization of radiological protection will routinely involve the balancing of public and occupational exposure, particularly within the nuclear fuel cycle. For example the reduction of public exposure from an effluent stream could lead to increases in occupational exposure from treatment, storage and disposal operations. A methodology is propased for the estimation of the cost of occupational exposure in the UK (Pound man-Sv -1 ) based on valuations of changes in risk. A variable value for the cost of the occupational man-Sv is obtained depending on per caput dose levels. The values at particular per caput dose levels are different for occupational workers and the general public, because of different demography and assumptions on risk perception and aversion. They are however approximately the same when the per caput doses are expressed as percentages of the dose limits for workers and the general public respectively. An example of the application of the derived cost of the occupational man-Sv to an optimisation problem is given. (author)

  14. Dose response relationship and Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.

    1986-09-01

    In this paper, it will be shown how dose-response relationships allow to give quantitative figures for the detriment of irradiation. At this stage, the detriment is expressed directly as a certain number of health effects, whose valuation is not dealt with here. The present tools for quantifying, their weaknesses and their strenghts, and their scientific basis will be developed

  15. Model of organ dose combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valley, J.-F.; Lerch, P.

    1977-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations are based on the limitation of the dose to each organ. In the application and for a unique source the critical organ concept allows to limit the calculation and represents the irradiation status of an individuum. When several sources of radiation are involved the derivation of the dose contribution of each source to each organ is necessary. In order to represent the irradiation status a new parameter is to be defined. Propositions have been made by some authors, in particular by Jacobi introducing at this level biological parameters like the incidence rate of detriment and its severity. The new concept is certainly richer than a simple dose notion. However, in the actual situation of knowledge about radiation effects an intermediate parameter, using only physical concepts and the maximum permissible doses to the organs, seems more appropriate. The model, which is a generalization of the critical organ concept and shall be extended in the future to take the biological effects into account, will be presented [fr

  16. Dose reduction - the radiologist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the exposure to ionising radiation dominates radiological practice in only three fields, i.e. foetal radiography, mammography and computed tomography. The balance between risk and benefit are briefly examined. The types of hazard considered are carcinogenesis, genetic injury and organogenesis. Ways of achieving a reduction of the dose to the patient are also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Compliance with public dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation, in various forms, is ubiquitous in the environment. Natural background radiation leads to an average radiation exposure for the general population of about 2 mSv per year. The mining and milling of radioactive ores - uranium and mineral sands - may cause a small increase in radiation exposure for some members of the public. Because any such increment in exposure is small compared with a natural exposure that is variable and difficult to quantify accurately, it is not easy to determine what proportion of the total dose received by a member of the public can be attributed to mining and milling activities. Consequently, because public dose limits apply and to those doses caused by human activity, such as mining and milling, the task of demonstrating compliance can be hampered by uncertainty. Some strategies for handling this situation are discussed. While the discussion concentrates on public dose limits, much of it may also be applicable, or adaptable, to occupational exposure. 4 refs., 2 figs

  18. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  19. The dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents calculations that illustrate two conclusions; for any particular cell type there will be a critical radius at which tumor control breaks down, and the radius at which this occurs is strongly dependent upon the low-dose-rate radiosensitivity of the cells

  20. Dose limits for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, D.

    1989-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure to ionising radiation are assessed to see if they give sufficient protection both for the occupationally exposed and for the general public. It is concluded that current limits give a level of safety that satisfies the necessary criteria in the light of present knowledge and further reductions would be unlikely to improve standards of safety. (author)

  1. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. - Highlights: • Elemental composition and density of nails were determined. • MIRD-type mathematical human phantom with arms and hands was created. • Organ doses and doses to nails were calculated for external photon exposure in air. • Effective dose and nail doses values are close for rotational and soil surface exposures.

  2. Dose due to 40K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    The dose due to 40 K has been estimated. Potassium is one of the most abundant elements in nature, being approximately 2% of the Earth's crust. Potassium has three isotopes 39 K, 40 K and 41 K, two are stable while 40 K is radioactive with a half life of 1.2x10 9 years; there is 0.0117% 40 K-to-K ratio. Potassium plays an important role in plants, animals and humans growth and reproduction. Due to the fact that K is an essential element for humans, 40 K is the most abundant radioisotope in human body. In order to keep good health conditions K must be intake at daily basis trough food and beverages, however when K in ingested above the requirements produce adverse health effects in persons with renal, cardiac and hypertension problems or suffering diabetes. In 89.3% 40 K decays to 40 C through β-decay, in 10.3% decays through electronic capture and emitting 1.46 MeV γ-ray. K is abundant in soil, construction materials, sand thus γ-rays produced during 40 K decay contribute to external dose. For K in the body practically all 40 K decaying energy is absorbed by the body; thus 40 K contributes to total dose in humans and it is important to evaluate its contribution. In this work a set of 40 K sources were prepared using different amounts of KCl salt, a γ-ray spectrometer with a NaI(Tl) was characterized to standardized the sources in order to evaluate the dose due to 40 K. Using thermoluminescent dosemeters the dose due to 40 K was measured and related to the amount of 40 K γ-ray activity. (Author)

  3. Collective dose, conceptual basis and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the ICRP Publications no. 22(1973) and no. 26(1977), the ICRP recommends that the maximum permissible whole-body dose by kept below the dose limits corresponding to the sum of all effective dose equivalents of the persons concerned, i.e. the collective dose. The effective dose equivalent is recommended by the ICRP for use as a new quantity for evaluating the stochastic radiation dose for individual persons. Examples are given by the author explaining cost-benefit analyses according to ICRP recommendations, especially discussing the definition of optimum local dose limits with regard to shielding design in nuclear installations. (DG) [de

  4. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses

  5. Mixed field dose equivalent measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Quam, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, separate instruments have been used to monitor dose equivalent from neutrons and gamma rays. It has been demonstrated that it is now possible to measure simultaneously neutron and gamma dose with a single instrument, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). With appropriate algorithms dose equivalent can also be determined from the TEPC. A simple ''pocket rem meter'' for measuring neutron dose equivalent has already been developed. Improved algorithms for determining dose equivalent for mixed fields are presented. (author)

  6. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  7. Update on pediatric resuscitation drugs: high dose, low dose, or no dose at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Annalise

    2005-04-01

    Pediatric resuscitation has been a topic of discussion for years. It is difficult to keep abreast of changing recommendations, especially for busy pediatricians who do not regularly use these skills. This review will focus on the most recent guidelines for resuscitation drugs. Three specific questions will be discussed: standard dose versus high-dose epinephrine, amiodarone use, and the future of vasopressin in pediatric resuscitation. The issue of using high-dose epinephrine for cardiopulmonary resuscitation refractory to standard dose epinephrine has been a topic of debate for many years. Recently, a prospective, double-blinded study was performed to help settle the debate. These results will be reviewed and compared with previous studies. Amiodarone is a medication that was added to the pediatric resuscitation algorithms with the most recent recommendations from the American Heart Association in 2000. Its use and safety will also be discussed. Another topic that is resurfacing in resuscitation is the use of vasopressin. Its mechanism and comparisons to other agents will be highlighted, although its use in the pediatric patient has not been thoroughly studied. Pediatric resuscitation is a constantly evolving subject that is on the mind of anyone taking care of sick children. Clinicians are continually searching for the most effective methods to resuscitate children in terms of short- and long-term outcomes. It is important to be familiar with not only the agents being used but also the optimal way to use them.

  8. Evaluation of the dose uniformity for double-plane high dose rate interstitial breast implants with the use of dose reference points and dose non-uniformity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAjor, T.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Nemeth, G.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dwell time optimizations on dose uniformity characterized by dose values in dose points and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) and analyzed which implant parameters have influence on the DNR. Double-plane breast implants with catheters arranged in triangular pattern were used for the calculations. At a typical breast implant, dose values in dose reference points inside the target volume and volumes enclosed by given isodose surfaces were calculated and compared for non-optimized and optimized implants. The same 6-cm treatment length was used for the comparisons. Using different optimizations plots of dose non-uniformity ratio as a function of catheter separation, source step size, number of catheters, length of active sections were drawn and the minimum DNR values were determined. Optimization resulted in less variation in dose values over dose points through the whole volume and in the central plane only compared to the non-optimized case. At implant configurations consisting of seven catheters with 15-mm separation, 5-mm source step size and various active lengths adapted according to the type of optimization, the no optimization, geometrical (volume mode) and dose point (on dose points and geometry) optimization resulted in similar treatment volumes, but an increased high dose volume was observed due to the optimization. The dose non-uniformity ratio always had the minimum at average dose over dose normalization points, defined in the midpoints between the catheters through the implant volume. The minimum value of DNR depended on catheter separation, source step size, active length and number of catheters. The optimization had only a small influence on DNR. In addition to the reference points in the central plane only, dose points positioned in the whole implant volume can be used for evaluating the dose uniformity of interstitial implants. The dose optimization increases not only the dose uniformity within the implant but

  9. Dose apportionment for BARC facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preetha, J.; Sundar, D.; Munshi, S.K.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the important responsibilities of BARC Safety Council (BSC) is to ensure that appropriate measures are in place to protect the members of the public and the environment from the undue effects of radioactive releases from the facilities regulated by BSC. It is with this aim in mind that a Standing Committee for Dose Apportionment (DAC) was constituted by BSC in 2005, to ensure that the limits are set by the regulatory body for release of low-level gaseous and liquid effluents into the environment from BARC facilities. There are three Committees for dose apportionment constituted by the Chairman, BSC, viz, DAC-TK for Tarapur and Kalpakkam facilities, DAC-TV for Trombay and DACSF for specific faculties

  10. Dose assessment in radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donkor, S.

    2013-04-01

    The applications of ionizing radiation bring many benefits to humankind, ranging from power generation to uses in medicine, industry and agriculture. Facilities that use radiation source require special care in the design and operation of equipment to prevent radiation injury to workers or to the public. Despite considerable development of radiation safety, radiation accidents do happen. The purpose of this study is therefore to discuss how to assess doses to people who will be exposed to a range of internal and external radiation sources in the event of radiological accidents. This will go a long way to complement their medical assessment thereby helping to plan their treatment. Three radiological accidents were reviewed to learn about the causes of those accidents and the recommendations that were put in place to prevent recurrence of such accidents. Various types of dose assessment methods were discussed.(au)

  11. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  12. Dose to patient in tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minambres Moro, A.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Rui-Zorrilla, J.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.

    2013-01-01

    They are beginning to implement digital mammography with the possibility of acquiring in tomosynthesis, whose biggest advantage is to distinguish structures without overlapping through of pseudotridimensionals images. With these modified mammograms can acquire a planar mammography, with fixed x-ray tube, or a tomosynthesis with tube by turning. For acquire tomosynthesis is necessary a detector of high efficiency together with tungsten white tubes. The objective of this study is to know the dose received by the patient with this new imaging. (Author)

  13. Radiation dose from cigarette tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, Constantin

    2008-01-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as 226 Ra and 210 Pb of the uranium series and 228 Ra of the thorium series and or man-made produced radionuclides, such as 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226 Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv y -1 (average 79.7 μSv y -1 ), while for 228 Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv y -1 (average 67.1 μSv y -1 ) and for 210 Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv y -1 (average 104.7 μSv y -1 ), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv y -1 (average 251.5 μSv y -1 ). The annual effective dose from 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 μSv y -1 (average 199.3 μSv y -1 ). (author)

  14. Urban contamination and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, E.; Barry, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear power reactors and other nuclear facilities are being built near or even within urban centres. Accidental releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere in built-up areas result in radiological exposure pathways that differ from those caused by releases in rural environments. Other than inhalation, exposure pathways involve external radiation from the plume while it passes and from radioactivity deposited onto the many and varied surfaces after it has passed. Radiation fields inside buildings are attenuated but many people are potentially exposed so while individual doses may be relatively low, population integrated doses may be high enough to cause concern. It is important, therefore, to assess the potential exposures and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dose reduction measures in urban environments. This report describes a model developed to carry out such assessments. The model draws heavily on experience gained in European cities after their contamination fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Input is time integrated concentrations of specific radionuclides in urban air, obtained either by direct measurement or by prediction using an atmospheric dispersion model. The code includes default values for site specific variables and transfer parameters but the user is invited if desired to enter other values from the keyboard. Output is the time integrated dose rates for individuals selected because of the characteristic living, working and recreational habits. An accompanying manual documents the technical background on which the model is based and leads a first-time suer through various steps and operations encountered while the model is running. (author). 60 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P.; Roeser, A.

    2015-01-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  16. Dose assessment models. Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The models presented in this chapter have been separated into 2 general categories: environmental transport models which describe the movement of radioactive materials through all sectors of the environment after their release, and dosimetric models to calculate the absorbed dose following an intake of radioactive materials or exposure to external irradiation. Various sections of this chapter also deal with atmospheric transport models, terrestrial models, and aquatic models.

  17. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs

  18. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  19. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A wide variety of portable survey instruments employing GM, ionization chamber and scintillation detectors exist for the measurement of gamma exposure rates. Often these same survey instruments are used for monitoring beta fields. This is done by making measurements with and without a removable shield which is intended to shield out the non-penetrating component (beta) of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. In many instances correction factors have been derived, that if properly applied, can reduce these errors substantially. However, this requires some knowledge of the beta spectra, calibration techniques and source geometry. This paper discusses some aspects of the proper use of instruments for beta measurements including the application of appropriate correction factors. Ionization type instruments are commonly used to measure beta dose rates. Through design and calibration these instruments will give an accurate reading only for uniform irradiation of the detection volume. Often in the field it is not feasible to meet these conditions. Large area uniform distributions of activity are not generally encountered and it is not possible to use large source-to-detector distances due to beta particle absorption in air. An example of correction factors required for various point sources is presented when a cutie pie ionization chamber is employed. The instrument reading is multiplied by the appropriate correction factor to obtain the dose rate at the window. When a different detector is used or for other geometries, a different set of correction factors must be used

  1. Editorial: New operational dose equivalent quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRU Report 39 entitled ''Determination of Dose Equivalents Resulting from External Radiation Sources'' is briefly discussed. Four new operational dose equivalent quantities have been recommended in ICRU 39. The 'ambient dose equivalent' and the 'directional dose equivalent' are applicable to environmental monitoring and the 'individual dose equivalent, penetrating' and the 'individual dose equivalent, superficial' are applicable to individual monitoring. The quantities should meet the needs of day-to-day operational practice, while being acceptable to those concerned with metrological precision, and at the same time be used to give effective control consistent with current perceptions of the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiations. (U.K.)

  2. The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

  3. Collective dose commitments from nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The concepts of collective dose and collective dose commitment are discussed, particularly regarding their use to compare the relative importance of the exposure from several radiation sources and to predict future annual doses from a continuing practice. The collective dose commitment contributions from occupational exposure and population exposure due to the different components of the nuclear power fuel cycle are evaluated. A special discussion is devoted to exposures delivered over a very long time by released radionuclides of long half-lives and to the use of the incomplete collective dose commitment. The maximum future annual ''per caput'' doses from present and projected nuclear power programmes are estimated

  4. Radiation doses from residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Fujita, Shoichiro; Harley, John H.

    1987-01-01

    requires knowing the location of the person to within about 200 m from the time of the explosion to a few weeks afterwards. This is an effort that might be comparable to the present shielding study for survivors. The sizes of the four exposed groups are relatively small; however, the number has been estimated only for those exposed to fallout in the Nishiyama district of Nagasaki. Okajima listed the population of Nishiyama as about 600 at the time of the bomb. No figures are available for the other three groups. The individual exposures from residual radiation may not be significant compared with the direct radiation at the time of the bomb. On the other hand, individuals with potential exposure from these sources are dubious candidates for inclusion in a cohort that was presumably not exposed. For comparison with organ doses estimated in other parts of this program, the exposure estimates are converted to absorbed dose in tissue. The first conversion of exposure to absorbed dose in air uses the factor rad in air 0.87 x exposure in R. UNSCEAR uses an average combined factor of 0.7 to convert absorbed dose in air to absorbed dose in tissue for the whole body. This factor accounts for the change in material (air to tissue) and for backscatter and the shielding afforded by other tissues of the body. No allowance for shielding by buildings has been included here. The cumulative fallout exposures given above become absorbed doses in tissue of 12 to 24 rad for Nagasaki and 0.6 to 2 rad for Hiroshima. The cumulative exposures from induced radioactivity become absorbed doses in tissue of 18 to 24 rad for Nagasaki and about 50 rad for Hiroshima. (author)

  5. PROCESSO CONSTITUCIONAL: o processo como locus devido para o exercício da democracia

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fernando Laércio Alves da; Universidade Federal de Viçosa

    2015-01-01

    Em 1984, José Alfredo de Oliveira Baracho publicou, no Brasil, a obra intitulada Processo Constitucional, por meio da qual pioneiramente apresentou os elementos de conexão entre Constituição e Processo, levando a uma radical mudança na perspectiva pela qual se concebe o Direito Processual e sua importância para a construção do Estado Democrático de Direito. Mais de trinta anos depois, intensas tem sido as pesquisas jurídicas a partir da teoria do processo constitucional não apenas nos tradici...

  6. Insucessos em empreendimentos nucleares devido a falhas em processos de Comunicação Pública

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,Vinícius V. M.; Soares,Wellington A.

    2012-01-01

    A energia nuclear é um tema amplamente discutido em todo o mundo. O acidente nuclear de Chernobyl e o acidente radiológico de Goiânia contribuíram decisivamente para que a sociedade brasileira tivesse uma imagem negativa sobre o tema. A operação da usina de Angra 3, atualmente em obras, está vinculada à construção de um repositório para armazenar os rejeitos radioativos, o que provavelmente será explorado pelos opositores do setor nuclear. Um dos grandes desafios dos profissionais envolvidos ...

  7. Falhas de estruturas de aço soldadas devido a reduzida ductilidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Guerra Machado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available O principal propósito deste artigo é demonstrar para os (as engenheiros(as projetistas e de soldagem, que numa estrutura de aço estrutural soldada a ductilidade possui importância equivalente ou ainda maior do que a resistência e a rigidez. Porém, o elevado nível requerido para a ductilidade não pode ser somente dos metais base e de solda. A análise tem que ser abrangente, envolvendo todos os componentes e também a estrutura completa.

  8. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  9. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  10. Dose indices: everybody wants a number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the merits and weaknesses of the standard terms that have been developed to quantify CT dose: CT dose indices (CTDI), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose. The difference between the measured CTDI vol and the CTDI vol displayed on the CT scanner illustrates a clinical dilemma. Displayed CTDI vol represents the radiation dose delivered to a plastic phantom, which is significantly different from the dose delivered to the patient, depending on the size of the patient. Although effective dose is simple to calculate for an individual patient, it was never intended for this purpose. The need for a simple, appropriate method to estimate pediatric patient doses led to the development of the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE), the newest CT dose index. Here I compare SSDE and its merits to the use of effective dose to estimate patient dose. The discussion concludes with a few sample calculations and basic clinical applications of SSDE to better quantify pediatric patient dose from CT scans. (orig.)

  11. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    CERN Document Server

    Jamal, M H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear.

  12. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, M. H.; Khamis, I.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear. (author)

  13. Simplified dose calculation method for mantle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaff, L.A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified dose calculation method for mantle technique is described. In the routine treatment of lymphom as using this technique, the daily doses at the midpoints at five anatomical regions are different because the thicknesses are not equal. (Author) [pt

  14. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  15. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs

  16. Calibration of dose meters used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This manual is a practical guide, not a comprehensive textbook, to the instrumentation and procedures necessary to calibrate a radiation dose meter used in clinical practice against a secondary standard dose meter

  17. Bayesian estimation of dose rate effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Groer, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical method was used to quantify the effectiveness of high dose rate 137 Cs gamma radiation at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice. The Bayesian approach considers both the temporal and dose dependence of radiation carcinogenesis and total mortality. This paper provides the first direct estimation of dose rate effectiveness using Bayesian statistics. This statistical approach provides a quantitative description of the uncertainty of the factor characterising the dose rate in terms of a probability density function. The results show that a fixed dose from 137 Cs gamma radiation delivered at a high dose rate is more effective at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice than the same dose delivered at a low dose rate. (author)

  18. Dose-rate dependence of thermoluminescence response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Chen, R.; Groom, P.J.; Durrani, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The previously observed dose-rate effect of thermoluminescence in quartz at high dose-rates is given at theoretical formulation. Computer calculations simulating the experimental conditions yield similar results to the experimental ones. (orig.)

  19. Dose estimation by biological methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; David C, L.; Serment G, J.; Brena V, M.

    1997-01-01

    The human being is exposed to strong artificial radiation sources, mainly of two forms: the first is referred to the occupationally exposed personnel (POE) and the second, to the persons that require radiological treatment. A third form less common is by accidents. In all these conditions it is very important to estimate the absorbed dose. The classical biological dosimetry is based in the dicentric analysis. The present work is part of researches to the process to validate the In situ Fluorescent hybridation (FISH) technique which allows to analyse the aberrations on the chromosomes. (Author)

  20. Internal radiation dose of Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Nagaratnam, A.; Sharma, U.C.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of γ-rays from 40 K by whole-body counting provides a sensitive technique to estimate the body 40 K radioactivity. In India, right from the whole body counter (WBC) of Trombay in the early 1960s to the INMAS WBC of 1970s, some limited information has been available about the internal 40 K of Indians. However, information on 40 K dose with age and sex of Indians is scanty. Therefore, a systematic study was taken up to generate this information

  1. The philosophy of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, P.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of concepts and terms appearing in the European Rules of 15 July 1980 is briefly described. After a period where ''tolerance doses'' represent definite limits which should be respected, appears the concept of a ''as low as possible'' and ''as low as practicable'' level. The hypothesis that any exposure represents a risk which should be avoided is taken into account in the later evolution. As a consequence one has to examine the advantages and disadvantages in other words to make a cost-benefit analysis. This evolution leads to the concepts of justification and optimization used at the present time. (author)

  2. Dose dispenser for radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, N.H.; Gutkowski, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    An activity metering apparatus for metering predetermined activities of radioactive gas from a supply ampul to dose vials is described. The apparatus includes a shielded ampul housing, a fine metering valve communicating with the ampul housing chamber, a shielded vial housing and a hypodermic needle communicating with the metering valve and received through an opening in the vial housing. A Geiger-Muller tube is adjustably supported opposite an opening in the vial housing, whereby the activity of the radioactive gas dispensed to a partially evacuated vial within the vial chamber may be read directly by a standard laboratory rate meter

  3. Dose limits cause unacceptable risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Sylvia.

    1985-01-01

    This paper on radiation dose limits for workers and the public discusses the following: Medical Research Council report; safety standards; risk assessment; deaths from cancers; biological radiation effects; UK legislation; low-level radiation; public concern; UKAEA staff survey; Ionising Radiations Regulations; United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation; US studies on work force in nuclear establishments; problems of extrapolation; Japanese data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations; studies on uranium miners; UK Health and Safety Executive; UK National Radiological Protection Board. (U.K.)

  4. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    in which we developed an algorithm based on a 2-compartment distribution without elimination. The GFR estimate led to plasma concentrations 3-4 times lower than those anticipated. In contrast, the estimates based on V(d) and the algorithm derived from pharmacokinetic modeling led to comparable loading dose...... in this patient with no residual kidney function. We did not observe adverse effects related to this regimen, which was monitored from 18 days to 8 months of therapy, and the patient experienced relief from her severe depressive disorder. In conclusion, dialysis patients may be treated with lithium administrated...

  5. Fiber optics in high dose radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of state-of-the-art optical fiber waveguides in high dose (greater than or equal to 10 5 rad), steady state radiation fields is presented. The influence on radiation-induced transmission loss due to experimental parameters such as dose rate, total dose, irradiation history, temperature, wavelength, and light intensity, for future work in high dose environments are given

  6. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, W. Tyler; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated

  7. Dose-response relationship in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehan, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship of dose (and dose rate) to response and toxicity in clinical oncology is reviewed. The concepts expressed by some authors in dose-response studies in animal and human systems are reviewed briefly. Dose rate and tactics of conducting clinical studies are reviewed for both radiotherapy and various types of chemotherapeutic treatment. Examples are given from clinical studies in Hodgkin's disease, acute leukemia, and breast cancer that may prove useful in planning future clinical studies

  8. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, W. Tyler, E-mail: watkinswt@virginia.edu; Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Moore, Joseph A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Gordon, James [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  9. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, W Tyler; Moore, Joseph A; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  10. Concepts of collective dose in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1985-01-01

    The collective dose (S) is the product of the number of individuals exposed and their average radiation dose. ''Radiation dose'' is usually taken to be the effective dose equivalent (Hsub(E)) as defined by the ICRP. The unit of the collective dose is then the man.sievert (man.Sv). The following four applications of the collective dose are the most common: (a) in the assessment of the highest per caput dose rate in the future from a continued practice which exposes some critical group or the population as a whole to radiation; (b) in the limitation of present radiation sources, if it is believed that additional sources in the future may add to the per caput dose in a population so that it might reach unacceptable levels unless all sources are controlled at an early stage; (c) as an input to justification assessments, indicating the total detriment from a certain practice; and (d) as an input to optimization assessments as the basis for costing detriment in differential cost-benefit analyses of protection arrangements. It is sometimes said that the collective dose is a useful quantity only if the assumption of a non-threshold, linear dose-response relation is valid. This assumption is not always necessary. Applications (a) and (b) are possible without any assumption on the dose-response relationship at very low doses. Only applications (c) and (d) require the assumption of a non-threshold, linear dose-response relation. Some hesitation in using the collective dose originates in distrust in the biological assumptions implied by uses (c) and (d), but also in lack of confidence in the meaningfulness of collective doses that have been derived by adding dose contributions over very long time periods. However, none of the four applications (a) - (d) is by necessity related to extreme time scales. That problem mainly arises in the assessment of radioactive waste repositories

  11. Background dose subtraction in personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picazo, T.; Llorca, N.; Alabau, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to consider the mode of the frequency distribution of the low dose dosemeters from each clinic that uses X rays as the background environmental dose that should be subtracted from the personnel dosimetry to evaluate the doses due to practice. The problems and advantages of this indirect method to estimate the environmental background dose are discussed. The results for 60 towns are presented. (author)

  12. Cervical cancer: intracavitary dose specification and prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.; Gerbi, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Dose and volume specifications for reporting intracavitary therapy were analyzed according to criteria recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Ninety Fletcher-Suit radium applications were studied to examine the validity of the assumptions of the ICRU and the merit of their routine reporting. It was demonstrated that the reporting recommendations were inconsistent with clinical prescription systems and added little to dose specification. The distinction between dose specification and dose prescription was stressed

  13. Maternal methadone dosing schedule and fetal neurobehavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Lauren M.; DiPietro, Janet A.; Velez, Martha; Elko, Andrea; Knauer, Heather; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Daily methadone maintenance is the standard of care for opiate dependency during pregnancy. Previous research has indicated that single-dose maternal methadone administration significantly suppresses fetal neurobehaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine if split-dosing would have less impact on fetal neurobehavior than single-dose administration. Methods Forty methadone-maintained women were evaluated at peak and trough maternal methadone levels on single- and split-dosing schedules. Monitoring sessions occurred at 36 and 37 weeks gestation in a counterbalanced study design. Fetal measures included heart rate, variability, accelerations, motor activity and fetal movement-heart rate coupling (FM-FHR). Maternal measures included heart period, variability, skin conductance, respiration and vagal tone. Repeated measure analysis of variance was used to evaluate within-subject changes between split- and single-dosing regimens. Results All fetal neurobehavioral parameters were suppressed by maternal methadone administration, regardless of dosing regimen. Fetal parameters at peak were significantly lower during single vs. split methadone administration. FM-FHR coupling was less suppressed from trough to peak during split-dosing vs. single-dosing. Maternal physiologic parameters were generally unaffected by dosing condition. Conclusion Split- dosed fetuses displayed less neurobehavioral suppression from trough to peak maternal methadone levels as compared to single-dosed fetuses. Split-dosing may be beneficial for methadone-maintained pregnant women. PMID:19085624

  14. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study...

  15. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic); Lee, Woo Jin [Dept. of Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Sciences Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Heon Young [School of Computer Science Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose.

  16. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo Jin; Yeom, Heon Young

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose

  17. The definition of the individual dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, Margarete

    1986-01-01

    A brief note examines the choice of the present definition of the individual dose equivalent, the new operational dosimetry quantity for external exposure. The consequences of the use of the individual dose equivalent and the danger facing the individual dose equivalent, as currently defined, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  18. Practical experience of monitoring patient dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonnell, C.; Shrimpton, P. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)); O' Mahoney, M. (National Radiological Protection Board, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Foster, J. (Nuffield Hospitals, Surbiton (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    NRPB recommends the use of reference dose levels for diagnostic medical exposures as an aid to patient dose reduction, but is this approach effective This article describes the broadly encouraging experiences of one large group of hospitals in carrying out measurements of entrance surface dose on patients undergoing some common types of x-ray examination. (author).

  19. Gonadal dose in routine diagnostic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Koen, J.A.; Akkermans, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Gonadal doses caused by stray radiation produced during radiodiagnostic investigations were measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters in various hospitals in the Netherlands. Significantly different gonadal doses were measured depending upon the hospital where the investigations were carried out. The mean dose of an examination type in one country can only be determined with any accuracy if measurements in a large number of hospitals are performed

  20. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  1. Dose mapping role in gamma irradiation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; John Konsoh Sangau; Mazni Abd Latif

    2002-01-01

    In this studies, the role of dosimetry activity in gamma irradiator was discussed. Dose distribution in the irradiator, which is a main needs in irradiator or chamber commissioning. This distribution data were used to confirm the dosimetry parameters i.e. exposure time, maximum and minimum dose map/points, and dose distribution - in which were used as guidelines for optimum product irradiation. (Author)

  2. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damkaer, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm -2 sub([DNA]) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm -2 sub([DNA]). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation. (orig.)

  3. Estimation of exposed dose, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive atomic fallouts in Nishiyama district of Nagasaki Prefecture are reported on the basis of the survey since 1969. In 1969, the amount of 137 Cs in the body of 50 inhabitants in Nishiyama district was measured using human counter, and was compared with that of non-exposured group. The average value of 137 Cs (pCi/kg) was higher in inhabitants in Nishiyama district (38.5 in men and 24.9 in females) than in the controls (25.5 in men and 14.9 in females). The resurvey in 1971 showed that the amount of 137 Cs was decreased to 76% in men and 60% in females. When the amount of 137 Cs in the body was calculated from the chemical analysis of urine, it was 29.0 +- 8.2 in men and 29.4 +- 26.2 in females in Nishiyama district, and 29.9 +- 8.2 in men and 29.4 +- 11.7 in females in the controls. The content of 137 Cs in soils and crops (potato etc.) was higher in Nishiyama district than in the controls. When the internal exposure dose per year was calculated from the amount of 137 Cs in the body in 1969, it was 0.29 mrad/year in men and 0.19 mrad/year in females. Finally, the internal exposure dose immediately after the explosion was estimated. (Serizawa, K.)

  4. Patient doses in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Francisco Diaz, J.; Sanchez, A.; Tort, I.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first cause of death in Spain. The most usual procedures in interventional cardiology are coronariography and PTCA. The first is a diagnostic technique, and the second one is interventional. Our goal has been to study procedures made during the first six months in the Interventional Cardiology Unit of the Juan Ramon Jimenez Hospital (Huelva-Spain), taking into account radiation protection issues. We have studied 178 patients; 145 of them underwent coronariography, and 33 of the patients had PTCA too. Every case was analyzed taking into account technical and dosimetric parameters. We show parameters values gathered: Diagnostic techniques (valvular and non-valvular patients), and interventional techniques (coronariography and PTCA in different or in the same intervention). Higher doses were obtained with valvular patients, although the number of frames was similar. Attending to therapeutic procedures, the highest values were gotten with the 'double' interventions. Interventional procedures exceed in 60% doses gotten in diagnostic studies: this is because of the number of series and number of frames per series. Similar values obtained by other authors have been gotten. (author)

  5. Doses in mammography. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez P, F.; Acosta R, N.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Benavente, T.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Poma, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mammography is the most important method to detect lesions in the breast with this technique one can detect small tumours before clear clinical symptoms appear. Mammographic image of require high quality standards due that the extremely low contrast between the normal and pathological areas in the breast, eg.g., they have similar attenuation and absorption coefficient. The x-ray mammographic systems, used in this study are Senographe 500t and Senographe DMR, a detector with a RadCal ionization chambers calibrated to the qualities of mammographic x-ray beams, and a breast simulator that is a phantoms of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of several thicknesses with the equivalence of 50% of the glandular tissue. The results obtained indicate that the values of doses at the entrance surface of a breast (DES) are greater the reference value 20 mGy to 5,0 cm of PMMA and the values of the mean glandular dose (MGD) exceed the reference value of 2,1 mGy for 5,1 cm of compressed thick breast. We consider that the values high of the EDS and MGD are due that the x-ray systems no meeting in good condition or for used of x-ray spectra no suitable, so is recommendable be carried out test of quality control to the x-ray systems and also realize studies, or characterize the of x-ray mammographic spectra

  6. Patient dose in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Margarita; Moran, Pilar; Ten, Jose I.; Fernandez Soto, Jose M.; Cepeda, T.; Vano, Eliseo

    2004-01-01

    In the present investigation, we analyze the dose of 5034 patients (20 137 images) who underwent mammographic examinations with a full-field digital mammography system. Also, we evaluate the system calibration by analyzing the exposure factors as a function of breast thickness. The information relevant to this study has been extracted from the image DICOM header and stored in a database during a 3-year period (March 2001-October 2003). Patient data included age, breast thickness, kVp, mAs, target/filter combination, and nominal dose values. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) without backscatter was calculated from the tube output as measured for each voltage used under clinical conditions and from the tube loading (mAs) included in the DICOM header. Mean values for the patient age and compressed breast thickness were 56 years (SD: 11) and 52 mm (SD: 13), respectively. The majority of the images was acquired using the STD (for standard) automatic mode (98%). The most frequent target/filter combination automatically selected for breast smaller than 35 mm was Mo/Mo (75%); for intermediate thicknesses between 35 and 65 mm, the combinations were Mo/Rh (54%) and Rh/Rh (38.5%); Rh/Rh was the combination selected for 91% of the cases for breasts thicker than 65 mm. A wide kVp range was observed for each target/filter combination. The most frequent values were 28 kVp for Mo/Mo, 29 kVp for Mo/Rh, and 29 and 30 kV for Rh/Rh. Exposure times ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 s with a mean value of 1.1 s. Average glandular doses (AGD) per exposure were calculated by multiplying the ESAK values by the conversion factors tabulated by Dance for women in the age groups 50 to 64 and 40 to 49. This approach is based on the dependence of breast glandularity on breast thickness and age. The total mean average glandular dose (AGD T ) was calculated by summing the values associated with the pre-exposure and with the main exposure. Mean AGD T per exposure was 1.88 mGy (CI 0.01) and the mean AGD T per

  7. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A large number of portable survey instruments employing G.M., ionization chamber, and scintillation detectors used for gamma measurements are also used for monitoring in beta fields by using removable shields to separate the beta and gamma components of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. Appropriate calibrations and correction factors can be used to reduce the errors in beta measurements to a tolerable level

  8. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  9. Dose rate visualization of radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Kessler, S.F.; Tomaszewski, T.A.

    1995-09-01

    Advanced visualization techniques can be used to investigate gamma ray and neutron dose rates around complex dose rate intensive operations. A method has been developed where thousands of dose points are calculated using the MCNP(Monte Carlo N-Particle) computer code and then displayed to create color contour plots of the dose rate for complex geometries. Once these contour plots are created, they are sequenced together creating an animation to dynamically show how the dose rate changes with changes in the geometry or source over time

  10. Discuss on luminescence dose data analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinhua; Xiao Wuyun; Ai Xianyun; Shi Zhilan; Liu Ying

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology. General design planning of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology is put forward with the diverse demands. The emphasis is focused on dose data processing method, luminescence curve analysis method, using of network, mechanics of communication among computers, data base management system of individual dose in this paper. The main methods and skills used in this technology as well as their advantages are also discussed. And it offers general design references for development luminescence dose data processing software. (authors)

  11. Patient radiation doses from enteroclysis examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.; Wall, B.F.; Haggett, P.J.; Boardman, P.; Nolan, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Data relating to patient dose have been acquired for enteroclysis examinations (small bowel enemas) performed at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, on 23 adult patients. Dose-area products, fluoroscopy times and the number of radiographs taken are used to compare the examination procedure at the Hospital with enteroclysis and barium follow-throughs performed elsewhere. The mean dose-area product for the 23 examinations was 6.8 Gy cm 2 and the mean effective dose was estimated to be 1.5 mSv. These doses are intermediate between those arising from barium meals and barium enemas performed in the same room. (author)

  12. Dose rate visualization of radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Kessler, S.F.; Tomaszewski, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced visualization techniques can be used to investigate gamma ray and neutron dose rates around complex dose rate intensive operations. A method has been developed where thousands of dose points are calculated using the MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) computer code (Briesmeister 1993) and then displayed to create color contour plots of the dose rate for complex geometries. Once these contour plots are created, they are sequenced together creating an animation to dynamically show how the dose rate changes with changes in the geometry or source over time. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  14. Entrance and peripheral dose measurements during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Kappas, K.; Theodorou, K.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry of entrance dose was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in order to evaluate the clinical application of the build up caps in patient dose measurements and for different treatment techniques. Peripheral dose (thyroid and skin) was measured for patients during breast radiotherapy to evaluate the probability of secondary cancer induction. TLD-100 chips were used with different Copper build up caps (for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams from two linear accelerators. Entrance doses were measured for patients during radiotherapy course for breast, head and neck, abdomen and pelvis malignancies. The measured entrance dose for the different patients for 6 MV beams is found to be within the ±2.6% compared to the dose derived from theoretical estimation (normalized dose at D max ). The same measurements for 15 MV beams are found to be ±3 %. The perturbation value can reach up to 20% of the D max , which acts as a limitation for entrance dose measurements. An average thyroid skin dose of 3.7% of the prescribed dose was measured per treatment session while the mean skin dose breast treatment session is estimated to be 42% of D max , for both internal and external fields. These results are comparable in those of the in vivo of reported in literature. The risk of fatality due to thyroid cancer per treatment course is 3x10 -3

  15. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  16. Guidance levels, achievable doses and expectation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lianbo; Meng, Bing

    2002-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) published their guidance levels and reference doses for typical X-ray examination and nuclear medicine in their documents in 1993, 1994 and 1996 respectively. From then on, the concept of guidance levels or reference doses have been applied to different examinations in the field of radiology and proved to be effective for reduction of patient doses. But the guidance levels or reference doses are likely to have some shortcomings and can do little to make further reduction of patient dose in the radiology departments where patient dose are already below them. For this reason, the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) proposed a concept named achievable doses which are based on the mean dose observed for a selected sample of radiology departments. This paper will review and discuss the concept of guidance levels and achievable doses, and propose a new concept referred to as Expectation Levels that will encourage the radiology departments where patient dose are already below the guidance levels to keep patient dose as low as reasonably achievable. Some examples of the expectation levels based on the data published by a few countries are also illustrated in this paper

  17. Considering job-related doses in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    As part of its role of safeguarding nuclear workers the Commission of the European Community has created a European data bank on job-related doses. The data bank is intended to correlate jobs and workers doses and is a useful instrument to observe the collected doses of workers in nuclear power plants. Set up in 1980, the database covers doses in PWRs and BWRs. To create it a questionnaire is distributed to plant operators. The database responses provide information on (i) Trends in total collective doses, including those for some ancillary jobs. It is possible to see trends by calendar year and by fuel cycle number. (ii) Other trends such as dose in terms of installed power or dose in terms of power station design. (iii) Dose differences between power stations, normalized against the differences in dose rates. This is only possible for PWRs that monitor dose rates using the EPRI standard monitoring programme. (vi) The relative dose rate in each plant for a defined job. The questionnaire is not perfectly adapted to all the working criteria in nuclear power stations but it is an effective tool for implementing radiation protection. (author)

  18. Peripheral dose outside applicators in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, James C L; Grigorov, Grigor N

    2006-01-01

    The peripheral dose outside the applicators in electron beams was studied using a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator. To measure the peripheral dose profiles and point doses for the applicator, a solid water phantom was used with calibrated Kodak TL films. Peak dose spot was observed in the 4 MeV beam outside the applicator. The peripheral dose peak was very small in the 6 MeV beam and was ignorable at higher energies. Using the 10 x 10 cm 2 cutout and applicator, the dose peak for the 4 MeV beam was about 12 cm away from the field central beam axis (CAX) and the peripheral dose profiles did not change with depths measured at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 cm. The peripheral doses and profiles were further measured by varying the angle of obliquity, cutout and applicator size for the 4 MeV beam. The local peak dose was increased with about 3% per degree angle of obliquity, and was about 1% of the prescribed dose (angle of obliquity equals zero) at 1 cm depth in the phantom using the 10 x 10 cm 2 cutout and applicator. The peak dose position was also shifted 7 mm towards the CAX when the angle of obliquity was increased from 0 to 15 deg. (note)

  19. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  20. Dose evaluation in diagnostic for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, W.; Borges, J.C.; Mota, H.

    1998-01-01

    The patients which are subjected to computerized tomography tests are exposed to relatively high doses given as result doses on organs that are not matter to test. It was realized a dose levels raising in patients subjected to tests by T C, utilizing to measure this magnitude, TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters which were put directly on the patient, in eye regions, thyroid, breast and navel; founding doses fluctuating between 29.10-49.39 mGy in organs examined and dose values between 0.21-29.10 mGy for organs that no matter to test. The applications of ionizing radiations in medicine do not have dose limits, but paying attention to the radiological protection optimization principle, it is recommended the use of clothes to anti-rays protection for zones not examined, getting with this to reduce the level doses as low as possible, without this to diminish the test quality. (Author)

  1. The concept of the effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of the human body by external or internal sources leads mostly to a simultaneous exposure of several organs. However, so far no clear and consistent recommendations for the combination of organ doses and the assessment of an exposure limit under such irradiation conditions are available. Following a proposal described in ICRP-publication 14 one possible concept for the combination of organ doses is discussed in this paper. This concept is based on the assumption that at low doses the total radiation detriment to the exposed person is given by the sum of radiation detriments to the single organs. Taking into account a linear dose-risk relationship, the sum of weighted organ doses leads to the definition of an 'Effective Dose'. The applicability and consequences of this 'Effective Dose Concept' are discussed especially with regard to the assessment of the maximum permissible intake of radionuclides into the human body and the combination of external and internal exposure. (orig.) [de

  2. Salivary gland doses from dental radiographic exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Kato, Kazuo; Wada, Takuro; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Salivary gland doses incurred during dental radiography were measured by phantom dosimetry, and these dose data and data obtained during a two-week survey of Hiroshima and Nagasaki dental hospitals and clinics were used to estimate the respective doses to members of the populations of the two cities. The results obtained were used to supplement previously determined doses to the thyroid gland, lens, and pituitary gland from dental radiography. No significant differences in doses were observed by age, sex or city. Doses to the salivary glands during dental radiography are probably not sufficiently large to cause bias in assessments of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects. However, the steadily increasing use of dental radiography underscores the need for continued monitoring of dental radiography doses in the interests of these assessments. (author)

  3. Routine monitoring of eye dose; and reply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, K; Jeans, S P; Faulkner, K; Bardsley, R A; Love, H G

    1985-12-01

    This letter briefly reports the assessment at Papworth Hospital of the feasibility of monitoring eye doses of staff using a film badge worn on the shoulder in addition to the badge worn under the lead apron. For three consecutive months hand and eye (forehead) dose were monitored using TLDs, while shoulder and body dose, recorded under the lead apron, were measured with film badges. For the four doctors monitored, (two radiologists and two cardiologists) the shoulder badge somewhat overestimated the eye dose. In the case of nurses, the dose recorded by the shoulder badge was of a similar order to the TLD-recorded eye dose. The reply from the Christie Hospital at Manchester comments on the use of the shoulder badge and contends that the use of forehead dosemeters to measure eye dose is to be preferred whenever possible.

  4. Hand Dose in Nuclear Medicine Staff Members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Shahein, A.Y.; Hassan, R.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the hand dose during preparation and injection of radiopharmaceuticals is useful in the assessment of the extremity doses received by nuclear medicine personnel. Hand radiation doses to the occupational workers that handling 99m Tc-labeled compounds, 131 I for diagnostic in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. A convenient method is to use a TLD ring dosimeter for measuring doses of the diagnostic units of different nuclear medicine facilities . Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 4 weeks. The radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine staff at the hospitals under study were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y) because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year

  5. Maintaining occupational dose ALARA through work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Canadian philosophy in keeping occupational dose ALARA has been to train staff in radiation safety so that they can be fully responsible for participating in minimizing the risks associated with the hazardous work. Senior managers actively promote high standards of performance in dose reduction techniques as a means for integrating ALARA into the operation and maintenance of the station by all personnel. Minimizing radiation dose is accomplished by applying cost effective work management techniques such as Job Safety Analysis, pre-job briefings and establishing and achieving radiation dose goals. Radiation dose goals are used as a management tool for involving all work groups in reducing doses as well as providing a means of assessing the effectiveness of dose reduction actions. ALARA, along with conventional safety, is used as a lever to raise the standard of quality of work and to overall build a safety culture. (author). 4 figs

  6. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  7. Experimental data and dose-response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response relationships for radiation carcinogenesis have been of interest to biologists, modelers, and statisticians for many years. Despite his interest there are few instances in which there are sufficient experimental data to allow the fitting of various dose-response models. In those experimental systems for which data are available the dose-response curves for tumor induction for the various systems cannot be described by a single model. Dose-response models which have been observed following acute exposures to gamma rays include threshold, quadratic, and linear models. Data on sex, age, and environmental influences of dose suggest a strong role of host factors on the dose response. With decreasing dose rate the effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation tends to decrease in essentially every instance. In those cases in which the high dose rate dose response could be described by a quadratic model, the effect of dose rate is consistent with predictions based on radiation effects on the induction of initial events. Whether the underlying reasons for the observed dose-rate effect is a result of effects on the induction of initial events or is due to effects on the subsequent steps in the carcinogenic process is unknown. Information on the dose response for tumor induction for high LET (linear energy transfer) radiations such as neutrons is even more limited. The observed dose and dose rate data for tumor induction following neutron exposure are complex and do not appear to be consistent with predictions based on models for the induction of initial events

  8. Patient Dose From Megavoltage Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Langen, Katja M.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Cox, Andrea; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) can be used daily for imaging with a helical tomotherapy unit for patient alignment before treatment delivery. The purpose of this investigation was to show that the MVCT dose can be computed in phantoms, and further, that the dose can be reported for actual patients from MVCT on a helical tomotherapy unit. Methods and Materials: An MVCT beam model was commissioned and verified through a series of absorbed dose measurements in phantoms. This model was then used to retrospectively calculate the imaging doses to the patients. The MVCT dose was computed for five clinical cases: prostate, breast, head/neck, lung, and craniospinal axis. Results: Validation measurements in phantoms verified that the computed dose can be reported to within 5% of the measured dose delivered at the helical tomotherapy unit. The imaging dose scaled inversely with changes to the CT pitch. Relative to a normal pitch of 2.0, the organ dose can be scaled by 0.67 and 2.0 for scans done with a pitch of 3.0 and 1.0, respectively. Typical doses were in the range of 1.0-2.0 cGy, if imaged with a normal pitch. The maximal organ dose calculated was 3.6 cGy in the neck region of the craniospinal patient, if imaged with a pitch of 1.0. Conclusion: Calculation of the MVCT dose has shown that the typical imaging dose is approximately 1.5 cGy per image. The uniform MVCT dose delivered using helical tomotherapy is greatest when the anatomic thickness is the smallest and the pitch is set to the lowest value

  9. Conventional radiology and genetic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Vila, V.; Fernandez, A.; Rivera, F.; Martinez, M.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A research project was established in 1984 to evaluate the expected genetic abnormalities due to radiation received by the population attending the Outpatient Radiological Service due to medical radiological practices. The study was conducted in 1985 (12 weeks chosen by random). The equivalent gonadal dose was the chosen parameter, representing the social cost of the radiology. Samples of 2945 men and 2929 women were considered in the study. The number of genetic abnormalities, in relation to the mean age of reproduction (a generation every 30 years), was 2.13 cases per million in the first generation and 15.97 cases per million at equilibrium. The authors interpretation is that both the method and the expected genetic detriment are suitable procedures for the characterisation of the Radiological Service as a radiation source. (author)

  10. Quality control for dose calibrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.C.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear medicine laboratories are required to assay samples of radioactivity to be administered to patients. Almost universally, these assays are accomplished by use of a well ionization chamber isotope calibrator. The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Institute for Radiological Protection and Dosimetry) of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (National Commission for Nuclear Energy) is carrying out a National Quality Control Programme in Nuclear Medicine, supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The assessment of the current needs and practices of quality control in the entire country of Brazil includes Dose Calibrators and Scintillation Cameras, but this manual is restricted to the former. Quality Control Procedures for these Instruments are described in this document together with specific recommendations and assessment of its accuracy. (author)

  11. Method of preparing radionuclide doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of preparing aliquot dosea of a tracer material useful in diagnostic nuclear medicine comprising: storing discrete quantities of a lyophilized radionuclide carrier in separate tubular containers from which air and moisture is excluded, selecting from the tubular containers a container in which is stored a carrier appropriate for a nuclear diagnostic test to be performed, interposing the selected container between the needle and the barrel of a hypodermic syringe, and drawing a predetermined amount of a liquid containing a radionuclide tracer in known concentration into the hypodermic syringe barrel through the hypodermic needle and through the selected container to dissolve the discrete quantity of lyophilized carrier therein to combine the carrier with the radionuclide tracer to form an aliquot dose of nuclear diagnostic tracer material, as needed

  12. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  13. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 62-year-old female hemodialysis patient during initiation and maintenance of lithium carbonate therapy. Three different methods were applied to estimate the regimen: a scenario based on volume of distribution (V(d)), a scenario based on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a scenario...... estimates. Furthermore, the maintenance dose estimated from the central compartment (V1) led to plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. Thus, a regimen where 12.2 mmol lithium was given after each hemodialysis session resulted in stable between-dialysis plasma lithium concentrations...... in this patient with no residual kidney function. We did not observe adverse effects related to this regimen, which was monitored from 18 days to 8 months of therapy, and the patient experienced relief from her severe depressive disorder. In conclusion, dialysis patients may be treated with lithium administrated...

  14. Determination of Entrance Skin Doses and Organ Doses for Medical X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, C.J.; Cheng, C.Y.; Chao, T.C.; Tsai, H.Y.

    1999-01-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic X ray radiographs is planned in Taiwan. Entrance skin doses and organ doses for all installed X ray machines will be investigated. A pilot study has been carried out for the national survey to develop a protocol for the dose assessment. Entrance skin doses and organ doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several X ray examinations. The conversion factor from free air entrance absorbed dose to entrance skin dose was derived. A formula for the computation of entrance skin doses from inputs of kV p , mA.s, source to skin distance, aluminium filtration, and generator rectifying was constructed. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom. All data will be passed to the Atomic Energy Council for developing a programme of national survey and regulatory controls for diagnostic X ray examinations. (author)

  15. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  16. Prediction of midline dose from entrance ad exit dose using OSLD measurements for total irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Chun, Min Soo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study aims to predict the midline dose based on the entrance and exit doses from optically stimulated luminescence detector (OSLD) measurements for total body irradiation (TBI). For TBI treatment, beam data sets were measured for 6 MV and 15 MV beams. To evaluate the tissue lateral effect of various thicknesses, the midline dose and peak dose were measured using a solid water phantom (SWP) and ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were measured using OSLDs. OSLDs were attached onto the central beam axis at the entrance and exit surfaces of the phantom. The predicted midline dose was evaluated as the sum of the entrance and exit doses by OSLD measurement. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was evaluated at various thicknesses. The ratio of the peak dose to the midline dose was 1.12 for a 30 cm thick SWP at both energies. When the patient thickness is greater than 30 cm, the 15 MV should be used to ensure dose homogeneity. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was less than 1.0 for thicknesses of less than 30 cm and 40 cm at 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. Therefore, the predicted midline dose can be underestimated for thinner body. At 15 MV, the ratios were approximately 1.06 for a thickness of 50 cm. In cases where adult patients are treated with the 15 MV photon beam, it is possible for the predicted midline dose to be overestimated for parts of the body with a thickness of 50 cm or greater. The predicted midline dose and OSLD-measured midline dose depend on the phantom thickness. For in-vivo dosimetry of TBI, the measurement dose should be corrected in order to accurately predict the midline dose.

  17. Skin dose variation: influence of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This research aimed to quantitatively evaluate the differences in percentage dose of maximum for 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams within the first lcm of interactions. Thus provide quantitative information regarding the basal, dermal and subcutaneous dose differences achievable with these two types of high-energy x-ray beams. Percentage dose of maximum build up curves are measured for most clinical field sizes using 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams. Calculations are performed to produce quantitative results highlighting the percentage dose of maximum differences delivered to various depths within the skin and subcutaneous tissue region by these two beams Results have shown that basal cell layer doses are not significantly different for 6MV and 18Mv x-ray beams At depths beyond the surface and basal cell layer there is a measurable and significant difference in delivered dose. This variation increases to 20% of maximum and 22% of maximum at Imm and 1cm depths respectively. The percentage variations are larger for smaller field sizes where the photon in phantom component of the delivered dose is the most significant contributor to dose By producing graphs or tables of % dose differences in the build up region we can provide quantitative information to the oncologist for consideration (if skin and subcutaneous tissue doses are of importance) during the beam energy selection process for treatment. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed.Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy.Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%.Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity

  19. ''Low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' in radiation protection: A need to setting criteria for dose classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ''low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' of ionizing radiation are common terms widely used in radiation applications, radiation protection and radiobiology, and natural radiation environment. Reading the title, the papers of this interesting and highly important conference and the related literature, one can simply raise the question; ''What are the levels and/or criteria for defining a low dose or a high dose of ionizing radiation?''. This is due to the fact that the criteria for these terms and for dose levels between these two extreme quantities have not yet been set, so that the terms relatively lower doses or higher doses are usually applied. Therefore, setting criteria for classification of radiation doses in the above mentioned areas seems a vital need. The author while realizing the existing problems to achieve this important task, has made efforts in this paper to justify this need and has proposed some criteria, in particular for the classification of natural radiation areas, based on a system of dose limitation. (author)

  20. A graphical review of radiogenic animal cancer data using the 'dose and dose-rate map'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Hoshi, Yuko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    We have been investigating the effects of low dose or low dose rate irradiation on mice, using our low dose-rate irradiation facilities. In these studies, we found that the effects were highly dependent on both total dose and dose rate. To show this visually, we proposed the 'dose/dose rate map', and plotted the results of our laboratory and our co-workers. The map demonstrated that dose/dose rate plane could be divided into three areas; 1) An area where harmful effects are observed, 2) An area where no harmful effects are observed, and 3) Another area, between previous two areas, where certain protective functions are enhanced. As this map would be a powerful tool to find some trend among the vast numbers of data relating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, we have developed a computer program which plots the collected data on the dose/dose rate map sorting by experimental conditions. In this study, we graphically reviewed and analyzed the data relating to the lifespan studies of animals with a view to determining the relationships between doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation and cancer incidence. The data contains about 800 sets of experiments, which concerns 187,000 animals exposed to gamma ray or X-ray and their 112,000 controls, and total of about 30,000 cancers in exposed animals and 14,000 cancers in controls. About 800 points of data were plotted on the dose/dose rate map. The plot showed that 1) The divided three areas in the dose/dose rate map were generally confirmed by these 800 points of data, and 2) In some particular conditions, e.g. sarcoma by X-rays, the biologically effective area is extended to relatively high dose/dose rate area. (author)

  1. Simulation of dose reduction in tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Methods for simulating dose reduction are valuable tools in the work of optimizing radiographic examinations. Using such methods, clinical images can be simulated to have been collected at other, lower, dose levels without the need of additional patient exposure. A recent technology introduced to healthcare that needs optimization is tomosynthesis, where a number of low-dose projection images collected at different angles is used to reconstruct section images of an imaged object. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems, suitable for tomosynthesis. Methods: The developed method uses information about the noise power spectrum (NPS) at the original dose level and the simulated dose level to create a noise image that is added to the original image to produce an image that has the same noise properties as an image actually collected at the simulated dose level. As the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital detectors operating at the low dose levels used for tomosynthesis may show a strong dependency on the dose level, it is important that a method for simulating dose reduction for tomosynthesis takes this dependency into account. By applying an experimentally determined relationship between pixel mean and pixel variance, variations in both dose and DQE in relevant dose ranges are taken into account. Results: The developed method was tested on a chest tomosynthesis system and was shown to produce NPS of simulated dose-reduced projection images that agreed well with the NPS of images actually collected at the simulated dose level. The simulated dose reduction method was also applied to tomosynthesis examinations of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the obtained noise in the reconstructed section images was very similar to that of an examination actually performed at the simulated dose level. Conclusions: In conclusion, the present article describes a method for simulating dose

  2. Practical applications of internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1994-06-01

    Accurate estimates of intake magnitude and internal dose are the goal for any assessment of an actual intake of radioactivity. When only one datum is available on which to base estimates, the choices for internal dose assessment become straight-forward: apply the appropriate retention or excretion function, calculate the intake, and calculate the dose. The difficulty comes when multiple data and different types of data become available. Then practical decisions must be made on how to interpret conflicting data, or how to adjust the assumptions and techniques underlying internal dose assessments to give results consistent with the data. This article describes nine types of adjustments which can be incorporated into calculations of intake and internal dose, and then offers several practical insights to dealing with some real-world internal dose puzzles

  3. Radiation doses in buildings containing coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somlai, J.; Kanyar, B.; Nenyei, A.; Nemeth, Z.; Nemeth, Cs.

    2001-01-01

    Using coal-slag with high concentration of 226 Ra as building material could result excess dose of people living in these dwellings. The gamma dose rate, the radon concentration and the radionuclide concentration of built-in slags were measured in kindergartens, schools and homes of three towns (Ajka, Tatabanya, Varpalota). The absorbed dose rates exceeded significantly the world average (80 nGy/h) and the annual dose reached 3-4 mSv in some cases. The dose coming from radon is significant in the case of slags, which did not originate from power plants but from smaller stoves and furnaces because in these cases the burning temperature is lower, so the radon emanation is higher. The dose in the latter cases could reach 10-20 mSv/year. (author)

  4. The dose-area product in DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfirtner, H.

    1995-01-01

    In DSA, the dose-area product shows a very good correlation with the maximum incidence dose. It may therefore serve as a reliable basis for the assessment of radiation doses to patients. The dose-area product is also a useful tool for the detection pf peak shifts in the radiation curves for certain investigations. In view of the considerable scatter of the values for the dose-area product these must, however, be subjected to an additional statistical analysis. Provided that this rule is observed, the dose-area product will considerably gain in importance for the monitoring of radiation exposures of patients. A very noteworthy learning effect could be achieved, if it would be made mandatory for those statistical analyses to be carried out not only on an investigation-specific but also an investigator-specific basis. The latter is particularly true of teaching hospitals. (orig./VHE) [de

  5. Patient and staff dose during hysterosalpinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buls, N.; Osteaux, M.

    2001-01-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a useful and widely employed technique which uses X-ray fluoroscopy to investigate the female genital tract. Fluoroscopy is assessed by a gynaecologist, a physician who is not always trained to work with ionising radiation. Dose-area product measurements in a group of 34 patients allowed an estimation of the median effective dose (0,83 mSv) and the median dose to the ovaries (1,63 mGy) of the patient per procedure. The dose to the staff was estimated using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The following median entrance surface doses were estimated per procedure: 0,22 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0,15 mGy to the neck at thyroid level and 0,19 mGy to the back of the hand. The annual eye dose limit could be exceeded if the gynaecologist is a member of the public. (author)

  6. Progress in high-dose radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Nam, J.W.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a deluge of new high-dose dosimetry techniques and expanded applications of methods developed earlier. Many of the principal systems are calibrated by means of calorimetry, although production of heat is not always the final radiation effect of interest. Reference systems also include a number of chemical dose meters: ferrous sulphate, ferrous-cupric sulphate, and ceric sulphate acidic aqueous solutions. Requirements for stable and reliable transfer dose meters have led to further developments of several important high-dose systems: amino acids and saccharides analysed by ESR or lyoluminescence, thermoluminescent materials, radiochromic dyes and plastics, ceric-cerous solutions analysed by potentiometry, and ethanol-chlorobenzene solutions analysed by high-frequency oscillometry. A number of other prospective dose meters are also treated in this review. In addition, an IAEA programme of high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing is described. (author)

  7. Use of dose constraints in public exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tageldein, Amged

    2015-02-01

    An overview of the dose constraints in public exposures has been carried out in this project. The establishment, development and the application of the concept of dose constraints are reviewed with regards to public exposure. The role of dose constraints in the process of optimization of radiation protection was described and has been showed that the concept of the dose constraints along with many other concept of radiation protection is widely applied in the optimization of exposure to radiation. From the beginning of the establishment of dose constraints as a concept in radiation protection, the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published a number of documents that provides detailed application related to radiation protection and safety of public exposure from ionizing radiation. This work provides an overview of such publications and related documents with special emphasis on optimization of public exposure using dose constraints. (au)

  8. Crescimento de meloeiro sob estresse salino e doses de potássio Growth of melon cultivated under saline stress and potassium doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T. Gurgel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, em destaque a região da Chapada do Apodi, se destaca na produção e exportação de melão no País, em regime de irrigação, devido à distribuição pluvial baixa e irregular. A Chapada do Apodi possui dois aqüíferos subterrâneos; a do lençol menos profundo de alta salinidade, porém com menor custo de bombeamento, ocorrendo o contrário com o de maior profundidade. Objetivou-se, ante o exposto, avaliar o efeito de duas águas de salinidades diferentes (0,52 e 2,41 dS m-1, combinadas com cinco doses de K2O (218, 273, 328, 383 e 438 kg ha-1 sobre o crescimento do meloeiro (Cucumis melo L., cultivar Goldex, utilizando-se do delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com parcelas subdivididas; amostras de planta foram coletadas aos 21, 28, 35, 49 e 63 dias após a semeadura, determinando-se a fitomassa seca das plantas, estas separadas em ramos (caule + folhas, flores e frutos; avaliou-se, também, a taxa de crescimento absoluto e relativo e a produção de frutos. Em geral, o crescimento do melão foi favorecido com o uso de água mais salina; a taxa de crescimento absoluto foi máxima entre 35 e 49 dias após a semeadura. Obteve-se maior produção de fitomassa total com 438 kg ha-1 de K2O e uso de água mais salina, ao final do ciclo.The region of 'Chapada do Apodi', in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, stands out in Brazilian production and exportation of melon. This region possesses two aquiffers, one of lower exploration cost, though of high salinity, another of low salinity, with higher cost and limited use. This work was carried out with the objective to evaluate the effect of waters of different salinities combined with five doses of K in the dry matter accumulation and productivity of the melon (Cucumis melo L. cultivar Goldex. The experimental design adopted was split plot in completely randomized blocks. The melon crop was irrigated with low (0.52 dS m-1 and high (2.41 dS m-1 salinity water combined with

  9. Dependence of total dose response of bipolar linear microcircuits on applied dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, S.; Will, W.; Perry, G.; Pease, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on the total dose radiation hardness of three commercial bipolar linear microcircuits is investigated. Total dose tests of linear bipolar microcircuits show larger degradation at 0.167 rad/s than at 90 rad/s even after the high dose rate test is followed by a room temperature plus a 100 C anneal. No systematic correlation could be found for degradation at low dose rate versus high dose rate and anneal. Comparison of the low dose rate with the high dose rate anneal data indicates that MIL-STD-883, method 1019.4 is not a worst-case test method when applied to bipolar microcircuits for low dose rate space applications

  10. Analysis of workers' dose records from the Greek Dose Registry Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Dimitriou, P.; Proukakis, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this work is the study of the individual film badge annual dose information of classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System. The statistical analysis refers to the years 1989-93 and deals with the distribution of individuals in the occupational groups, the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialties and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose limits. Results concerning the annual dose summaries, demonstrate a year-by-year reduction in the mean individual dose to workers in the health sector. Conversely, exposures in the industrial sector did not show any decreasing tendency during the period under consideration. (Author)

  11. Equivalent dose determination in foraminifera: analytical description of the CO2--signal dose-response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Woda, C.; Mangini, A.

    2003-01-01

    The dose-response of the CO 2 - signal (g=2.0006) in foraminifera with ages between 19 and 300 ka is investigated. The sum of two exponential saturation functions is an adequate function to describe the dose-response curve up to an additional dose of 8000 Gy. It yields excellent dating results but requires an artificial doses of at least 5000 Gy. For small additional doses of about 500 Gy the single exponential saturation function can be used to calculate a reliable equivalent dose D E , although it does not describ the dose-response for higher doses. The CO 2 - -signal dose-response indicates that the signal has two components of which one is less stable than the other

  12. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a “pulsed beam”; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a “continuous beam.” A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose

  13. Switching From Age-Based Stimulus Dosing to Dose Titration Protocols in Electroconvulsive Therapy: Empirical Evidence for Better Patient Outcomes With Lower Peak and Cumulative Energy Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill-Kerr, Alex; Yassin, Anhar; Rogers, Stephen; Cornish, Janie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the proposition that adoption of a dose titration protocol may be associated with better patient outcomes, at lower treatment dose, and with comparable cumulative dose to that in patients treated using an age-based stimulus dosing protocol. This was an analysis of data assembled from archived records and based on cohorts of patients treated respectively on an age-based stimulus dosing protocol and on a dose titration protocol in the National Health Service in England. We demonstrated a significantly better response in the patient cohort treated with dose titration than with age-based stimulus dosing. Peak doses were less and the total cumulative dose was less in the dose titration group than in the age-based stimulus dosing group. Our findings are consistent with superior outcomes in patients treated using a dose titration protocol when compared with age-based stimulus dosing in a similar cohort of patients.

  14. Application of biological dose concept in dose optimization for conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunhai; Liao Yuan; Zhou Lijun; Pan Ziqiang; Feng Yan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: On basis of physical dose optimization, LQ model was used to investigate the difference between the curves of biological effective dose and physical isodose. The influence of applying the biological dose concept on three dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma was discussed. Methods: Four treatment plannings were designed for physical dose optimization: three fields, four-box fields, five fields and six fields. Target dose uniformity and protection of the critical tissue-rectum were used as the principal standard for designing the treatment planning. Biological effective dose (BED) was calculated by LQ model. The difference between the BED curve drawn in the central layer and the physical isodose curve was studied. The difference between the adjusted physical dose (APD) and the physical dose was also studied. Results: Five field planning was the best in target dose uniformity and protection of the critical tissue-rectum. The physical dose was uniform in the target, but the biological effective doses revealed great discrepancy in the biological model. Adjusted physical dose distribution also displayed larger discrepancy than the physical dose unadjusted. Conclusions: Intensified Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) technique with inversion planning using biological dose concept may be much more advantageous to reach a high tumor control probability and low normal tissue complication probability

  15. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Paredes G, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  16. Monitoring and dose recording for the individual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document specifies the conditions under which monitoring of individuals is required. For workers identified as Atomic Radiation Workers, determination of dose or exposure must be made. In circumstances where personal monitoring techniques are impractical, doses and exposures may be estimated by non-personal monitoring techniques. For workers not identified as Atomic Radiation Workers, licensees must be able to demonstrate that there is no reasonable potential for accumulating radiation doses or exposures in excess of regulatory limits. (L.L.)

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doeses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates

  18. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  19. Low-dose Dental-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Imhof, H.; Homolka, P.; Fuerhauser, R.; Freudenthaler, J.; Watzek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Dental-CT is a relatively new, increasingly used investigation technique in dental radiology. Several authors have stated that the indication for Dental-CT has to be chosen on a strict basis, due to high dose values. This article describes the technique of performing dental-CT and calculates the effective dose based on published data and own measurements as well as the dose reduction potential to achieve an optimized protocol for Dental-CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  20. The reconstruction of thyroid dose following Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.; Kondrashov, A.; Yaskova, E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Parshkov, E.; Gavrilin, Yu.; Khrousch, V.; Shinkarev, S.; Makarenkova, I.; Volkov, V.; Zvonova, I.; Bratilova, A.; Kaidanovsky, J.; Minenko, V.; Drozdovich, V.; Ulanovsky, A.; Korneev, S.; Heinemann, K.; Pomplun, E.; Hille, R.; Bailiff, A.

    1996-01-01

    The report presents the overview of several approaches in working out the methods of thyroid internal dose reconstruction following Chernobyl. One of these approaches was developed (IBPh, Moscow; MRRC, Obninsk; IRM, Minsk) using the correlations between the mean dose calculation based on I 131 thyroid content measurements and Cs 137 contamination of territories. The available data on I 131 soil contamination were taken into account. The lack of data on I 131 soil contamination was supposed to be compensated by I 129 measurements in soil samples from contaminated territories. The semiempiric model was developed for dose reconstruction. The comparison of the results obtained by semiempiric model and empirical values are presented. The estimated values of average dose according semiempiric model were used for individual dose reconstruction. The IRH (St.-Petersburg) has developed the following method for individual dose reconstruction: correlation between the total I 131 radioiodine incorporation in thyroid and whole body Cs 137 content during first months after accident. The individual dose reconstruction is also mentioned to be performed using the data on individual milk consumption during first weeks after accident. For evaluation of average doses it is suggested to use the linear correlation: thyroid dose values based on radioiodine thyroid measurements vs Cs 137 contamination, air kerma rate, mean I 131 concentration in the milk. The method for retrospective reconstruction of thyroid dose caused by short-living iodine nuclides released after the Chernobyl accident has been developed by Research Centre, Juelich, Germany. It is based on the constant ratio that these nuclides have with the long-living I 129 . The contamination of soil samples by this nuclide can be used to assess thyroid doses. First results of I 129 contamination values and derived thyroid doses are to be presented

  1. Characteristics of repair following very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Metting, N.F.; Nelson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems being with the physical processes of energy deposition and develop through many stages of chemical reaction and biological response. The modeling effort attempts to organize the available data and theories of all of these stages into self-consistent models that can be compared and tested. In some cases, important differences among models result in only small differences in cell survival within the ranges of dose and dose rate that are normally investigated. To overcome this limitation, new ways of irradiating cells at extremes of dose rate, or ways of evaluating the effects of very small doses, are developed. Mathematical modeling and cellular studies complement each other. It has recently been found that some mechanisms are not adequate to account for the interaction of dose and repair time as they affect the reproductive survival of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Repair of radiation-induced cellular damage plays a central role in the survival of cells exposed to doses of 1 Gy or more. This repair is responsible for the dose rate, split-dose and delayed plating effect and can be evaluated. Because split-dose and dose-rate experiments involve repair during irradiation and delayed plating experiments involve repair after irradiation is completed, it was originally thought that different repair processes were involved. It is now clear that this is not necessarily the case. Appropriately designed models can account for observed effects at conventional doses (1 Gy or more) whether they assume all damage is lethal unless repaired or some damage is innocuous unless it interacts with additional damage. The fact that the survival following a plating delay is always less than the survival following immediate plating at low doses indicates that the damage produced is probably not potentially lethal

  2. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.E.; Hill, E.P.; Harpen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between image noise and radiation dose was investigated in computed tomography (CT) images of a pediatric abdomen phantom. A protocol which provided a minimum absorbed dose consistent with acceptable image noise criteria was determined for a fourth generation CT scanner. It was found that pediatric abdominal CT scans could maintain diagnostic quality with at least a 50% reduction in dose from the manufacturers' suggested protocol. (orig.)

  3. Patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose to patient resulting from interventional procedures to assess the risk of deterministic effect. To this end, various dose indicators like dose area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used in clinical practice. The study aims at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribe to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). For the study the local MSD and related to their areas are investigated and compared for coronary angiography CA and intervention (PCI). Two methods implying radiographic films Kodak EDR2 and matrixes of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are applied for direct measurements of dose distribution for selected procedures. Both methods are compared. Additionally, for patient dosimetry the following data: MSD, CD, EFD, fluoroscopy time (FT), number of acquired images, total DAP, fluoro-DAP and record-DAP were collected for randomly selected procedure. The statistical quantities like: median, 3 rd quartile, mean and standard deviation for all dosimetric parameters are determined. Preliminary study showed that the values of data collected for coronary procedures are in the ranges 0,7 - 27,3 min for fluoroscopy time, 50 - 350 Gy cm 2 for total DAP, 300 - 2000 mGy for CD, 140 - 2000 mGy for EFD and 100 - 1500 mGy for local maximal skin dose. For interventions the ranges are, accordingly 3,0 - 43,6 min , 25 - 450 Gy cm 2 , 270 - 6600 mGy, 80 - 2600 mGy and 80 - 1500 mGy. As a result of the study the correlations between dose indicators and local MSD are analyzed. The concentration of dose on irradiated films are going to be investigated in some detail as well. (author)

  4. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...... mapping. The paper further gives recommendations for effective dose mapping including traceable dosimetry, documented procedures for placement of dosimeters, and evaluation of measurement uncertainties. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Cosmic radiation dose in the aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Varga, M.; Planinic, J.; Vekic, B.

    2006-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A 320 and ATR 42 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb - Paris - Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the total dose of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to the Japan (24 hours-flight: Zagreb - Frankfurt - Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude the neutron component curried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data. (author)

  6. Individual dose control of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keverling Buisman, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    This publication has the character of a set of recommendations towards in practice working radiation protection specialists who are involved within their company or institute with the organization and performance of measurements in order to control the individual radiation burden caused by external exposition and internal contamination in applying radioactive materials and radiation apparatus. This publication gives information about the practical performance of personnel dosimetry at external exposure with a personnel dosimeter, which is carried on the body. The individual control of internal contamination is a much more complicated task. This publication assumes, with regard to this part, that people who are involved with it have been schooled as a radiation specialist level-3. For this part this publication contains numerical information needed for assessing of the individual effective follow-dose equivalence in occurring cases. A list with data of much used radionuclides is included. Also dosimetric data are presented which may be useful in case of contamination of skin and wounds. (author). 14 refs.; 2 figs.; 17 tabs

  7. Control instrument for dose ratemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutzki, B.

    1974-01-01

    The testing apparatus for the dose ratemeter has safety locking mechanisms for protection of the operating personnel allowing the apparatus to be opened only if the nuclear radiation source is shielded. For this purpose, the apparatus consists of a casing with an opening to be locked. The lock may be in the shape of a hollow cylinder matching with the likewise cylindrical wall of the casing through a ball bearing. The hollow-cylindrical part has an internal flange with a recess in which a shielding body in the shape of a roller is supported. The shielding body has a flattening on the jacket surface and penetrations for the nuclear radiation filled with absorbing material. Because of the eccentric bearing of the rotating shielding body with respect to the flange resp. the recess, the door connot be opened. Only after removal of the shielding block from the recess whereby the movement is caused from outside the casing by means of a knurling wheel, can the door be opened. Now, however, the shielding block is in the way of the beam from the nuclear radiation source and is shielding the door completely from it. (DG) [de

  8. Concentration - dose - risk computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frujinoiu, C.; Preda, M.

    1997-01-01

    Generally, the society is less willing in promoting remedial actions in case of low level chronic exposure situations. Radon in dwellings and workplaces is a case connected to chronic exposure. Apart from radon, the solely source on which the international community agreed for setting action levels, there are other numerous sources technically modified by man that can generate chronic exposure. Even if the nuclear installations are the most relevant, we are surrounded by 'man-made radioactivity' such as: mining industry, coal-fired power plants and fertilizer industry. The operating of an installation even within 'normal limits' could generate chronic exposure due to accumulation of the pollutants after a definite time. This asymptotic proclivity to a constant level define a steady-state concentration that represents a characteristic of the source's presence in the environment. The paper presents a methodology and a code package that derives sequentially the steady-state concentration, doses, detriments, as well as the costs of the effects of installation operation in a given environment. (authors)

  9. A dose of HLW reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, J.

    1993-01-01

    What many people were sure they knew, and some others were fairly confident they knew, was acknowledged by the US Department of Energy in December: A monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility will not be ready to accept spent fuel by January 31, 1998. A dose of reality has thus been added to the US high-level radioactive waste scene. Perhaps as important as the new reality is the practical, businesslike nature of the DOE's plan. The Department's proposal has the quality of a plan aimed at genuinely solving a problem rather just going through the motions. (In contrast, some readers are familiar with New York State's procedures for siting and licensing a low-level waste facility - procedures so labyrinthine that they are much more likely to protect political careers in that state than they are to achieve an LLW site). The DOE has received a lot of criticism - some justified, some not - about its handling of the HLW program. In this instance, it is proposing what many in the industry might have recommended: Make available storage capacity for spent nuclear fuel at existing federal government sites

  10. Neutrons in active proton therapy. Parameterization of dose and dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe; Haelg, Roger A. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential elements of an epidemiological study to decide if proton therapy may be associated with increased or decreased subsequent malignancies compared to photon therapy is an ability to estimate all doses to non-target tissues, including neutron dose. This work therefore aims to predict for patients using proton pencil beam scanning the spatially localized neutron doses and dose equivalents. The proton pencil beam of Gantry 1 at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron dose and neutron spectra an analytical mechanistic dose model was developed. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed model in order to calculate the neutron component of the delivered dose distribution for each treated patient. The neutron dose was estimated for two patient example cases. The analytical neutron dose model represents the three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulated dose distribution up to 85 cm from the proton pencil beam with a satisfying precision. The root mean square error between Monte Carlo simulation and model is largest for 138 MeV protons and is 19% and 20% for dose and dose equivalent, respectively. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. In average the neutron dose is increased by 10% or 65% when using 160 MeV or 177 MeV instead of 138 MeV. For the neutron dose equivalent the increase is 8% and 57%. The presented neutron dose calculations allow for estimates of dose that can be used in subsequent epidemiological studies or, should the need arise, to estimate the neutron dose at any point where a subsequent secondary tumour may occur. It was found that the neutron dose to the patient is heavily increased with proton energy.

  11. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  12. Electron and bremsstrahlung penetration and dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Burrell, M. O.

    1972-01-01

    Various techniques for the calculation of electron and bremsstrahlung dose deposition are described. Energy deposition, transmission, and reflection coefficients for electrons incident on plane slabs are presented, and methods for their use in electron dose calculations were developed. A method using the straight-ahead approximation was also developed, and the various methods were compared and found to be in good agreement. Both accurate and approximate methods of calculating bremsstrahlung dose were derived and compared. Approximation is found to give a good estimate of dose where the electron spectrum falls off exponentially with energy.

  13. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jarvinen, H.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested ( d ouble dosimetry ) . The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  14. Nuclear Electric's central dose record service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.P.; Mullarkey, D.T.; McWhan, A.W.; Risk, G.; Vaughan, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the conception, development and operation of the Nuclear Electric Central Dose Record Service, including the initial philosophy considered necessary for a database for a large multi-site organisation, the setting up of the data and current routine operation. Lessons learned are briefly described. CDRS holds 35,000 records in a high security environment. The database includes records of radiation doses received by contractor's employees working at Nuclear Electric sites as well as dose records and dose histories for classified and non classified Nuclear Electric employees. (Author)

  15. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  16. Skin dose measurement with MICROSPEC-2 trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    For many years, the Eberline HP-260 trademark beta detectors were used for skin dose measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This detector does not measure the beta spectrum and the skin dose can only be determined if the contaminating radioactive isotope is known. A new product MICROSPEC-2 trademark, has been developed which consists of a small portable computer with a multichannel analyzer and a beta probe consisting of a phoswich detector. The system measures the beta spectrum and automatically folds in the beta fluence-to-dose conversion function to yield the skin dose

  17. In search of the relevant lung dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    Researchers have traditionally been inconsistent in their methods of determining and reporting dose to the lung from inhaled radionuclides - a situation which has led to difficulties in later comparing results and deriving dose-response relationships. The dose quantities which at present are most generally assumed to be related to risk of stochastic radiation effects (such as lung cancer) are (1) mean dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium basal cell layer for radon daughters, and (2) mean dose equivalent to the whole lung (including tracheobronchial lymph nodes) for all other radionuclides. The average radiation dose is calculated by assuming that the energy is homogeneously impared to the entire tissue mass. However, the actual dose received by a cell which becomes transformed or tumorigenic is likely to be very much different than the smear dose to the entire organ. This realization has led to further study of stochastic energy deposition processes in single cells or cell nuclei from internal emitters. The end product of the stochastic approach to dosimetry, sometimes called microdosimetry, is a probability density in specific energy. For alpha-emitting radionuclides in the lung, a concept that may be more important than dose is the probability that a cell is hit by an alpha particle

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  19. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Martin, L.J.; Young, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO 4 :Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  20. Balancing patient dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.J.; Sutton, D.G.; Sharp, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of images in diagnostic radiology involves a complex interdependence of many factors. The ideal balance is to obtain an image which is adequate for the clinical purpose with the minimum radiation dose. Factors which affect radiation dose and image quality can be grouped under three headings; radiation quality, photon fluence and removal of scattered radiation. If optimal performance is to be achieved, it is necessary to understand how these factors influence image formation and affect radiation dose, and apply methodology for image quality and dose analysis at each stage in the development and use of X-ray equipment

  1. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have been have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Doses from food 1986/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.; Holmberg, M.; Nyholm, K.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents calculation of doses from cesium 134 and cesium 137. The doses are calculated on basis from the assumption that food containing more than 300 Bq/kg of cesium 137 has not been consumed. The average radiation dose from food products for the first year is evaluated to about 0.1 mSv for the whole country and about 0.3 mSv for exposed areas. The collective dose is calculated to about 800 manSv. (O.S)

  4. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  5. SPE dose prediction using locally weighted regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Nichols, T. F.

    2005-01-01

    When astronauts are outside earth's protective magnetosphere, they are subject to large radiation doses resulting from solar particle events (SPEs). The total dose received from a major SPE in deep space could cause severe radiation poisoning. The dose is usually received over a 20-40 h time interval but the event's effects may be mitigated with an early warning system. This paper presents a method to predict the total dose early in the event. It uses a locally weighted regression model, which is easier to train and provides predictions as accurate as neural network models previously used. (authors)

  6. Fetal absorbed doses by radiopharmaceutical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M; Gomez Parada, Ines M.; Di Trano, Jose L.

    2000-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  7. Use of dose constraints for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaijage, Tunu

    2015-02-01

    The use of dose constraints for occupational exposure was reviewed in this project. The role of dose constraints as used in optimization of protection of workers was described. Different issues to be considered in application of the concept and challenges associated with their implementation were also discussed. The situation where dose constraints could be misinterpreted to dose limits is also explained as the two are clearly differentiated by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. Moreover, recommendations to all parties responsible for protection and safety of workers were discussed. (au)

  8. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huhou

    1988-01-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned

  9. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhou, Li [Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Archaeology

    1988-11-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned.

  10. SPE dose prediction using locally weighted regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Nichols, T. F.

    2005-01-01

    When astronauts are outside Earth's protective magnetosphere, they are subject to large radiation doses resulting from solar particle events. The total dose received from a major solar particle event in deep space could cause severe radiation poisoning. The dose is usually received over a 20-40 h time interval but the event's effects may be reduced with an early warning system. This paper presents a method to predict the total dose early in the event. It uses a locally weighted regression model, which is easier to train, and provides predictions as accurate as the neural network models that were used previously. (authors)

  11. Specification of volume and dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levernes, S.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of a questionnaire about dose and volume specifications in radiotherapy in the Nordic countries, a group has been set up to propose common recommendations for these countries. The proposal is partly based on ICRU 50, but with major extensions. These extensions fall into three areas: patient geometry, treatment geometry, and dose specifications. For patient geometry and set-up one need alignment markings and anatomical reference points, the latter can be divided into internal and external reference points. These points are necessary to get relationships between coordinate systems related to patient and to treatment unit. For treatment geometry the main volume will be an anatomical target volume which just encompass the clinical target volume with all its variations and movements. This anatomical volume are the most suitable volume for prescription, optimization and reporting dose. A set-up margin should be added to the beam periphery in beams-eye-view to get the minimum size and shape of the beam. For dose specification the most important parameter for homogeneous dose distributions is the arithmetic mean of dose to the anatomical target volume together with its standard deviation. In addition the dose to the ICRU reference point should be reported for intercomparison, together with minimum and maximum doses or dose volume histograms for the anatomical target volume. (author)

  12. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  13. Doses of Chernobyl liquidators: Ukrainian prospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, Vadim V.; Bakhanova, Elena V.; Sholom, Sergey V.; Bouville, Andre; Luckyanov, Nickolas K.; Skaletsky, Yuri N.; Kryuchkov, Viktor P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The issue of doses received by Chernobyl clean-up workers (liquidators) remains controversial both in terms of dose values (individual and collective) and reliability of available data. This deficiency became particularly evident during preparation of the Ukrainian contribution to the UNSCEAR report. Analysis showed that available official dose records (ODR) are neither representative nor unbiased and, therefore, cannot be used to indicate the impact of Chernobyl exposure on this cohort (∼230,000 individuals). Recent developments in the area of dosimetry for liquidators contributed to better understanding of this problem and added information regarding individual, group averaged, and collective doses to Ukrainian liquidators. It was established that majority (∼95%) of existing ODR are related to one particular category of clean-up workers military liquidators. All other categories of Ukrainian liquidators either do not have recorded doses or their doses are not presented in the Chernobyl State Registry of Ukraine (SRU). The main sets of new doses were derived from reassessment of about 8,600 ODRs performed within Ukrainian-American Chernobyl Ocular Study (UACOS) and results of independent dose reconstructions using a time-and-motion method called Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation (RADRUE) for about 1,000 subjects in the Ukrainian-American study of leukemia and related disorders among cleanup workers from Ukraine. A third source of independent dose assessments is the set of individual doses obtained using EPR spectroscopy of tooth enamel; such estimates have been performed for about 800 Ukrainian liquidators. Analysis of dosimetric information related to military liquidators, who comprise about the 48% of Ukrainian liquidators, showed that as a rule ODRs for persons in this category systematically overestimate actual doses. Quantification of this overestimation gives a clue to retrospective adjustment of doses, at

  14. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  15. Case Example of Dose Optimization Using Data From Bortezomib Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M; Backenroth, Daniel; Cheung, Ying Kuen Ken; Hershman, Dawn L; Vulih, Diana; Anderson, Barry; Ivy, Percy; Minasian, Lori

    2016-04-20

    The current dose-finding methodology for estimating the maximum tolerated dose of investigational anticancer agents is based on the cytotoxic chemotherapy paradigm. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) have different toxicity profiles, which may lead to more long-lasting mild or moderate toxicities as well as to late-onset and cumulative toxicities. Several approved MTAs have been poorly tolerated during long-term administration, leading to postmarketing dose optimization studies to re-evaluate the optimal treatment dose. Using data from completed bortezomib dose-finding trials, we explore its toxicity profile, optimize its dose, and examine the appropriateness of current designs for identifying an optimal dose. We classified the toxicities captured from 481 patients in 14 bortezomib dose-finding studies conducted through the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, computed the incidence of late-onset toxicities, and compared the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) among groups of patients receiving different doses of bortezomib. A total of 13,008 toxicities were captured: 46% of patients' first DLTs and 88% of dose reductions or discontinuations of treatment because of toxicity were observed after the first cycle. Moreover, for the approved dose of 1.3 mg/m(2), the estimated cumulative incidence of DLT was > 50%, and the estimated cumulative incidence of dose reduction or treatment discontinuation because of toxicity was nearly 40%. When considering the entire course of treatment, the approved bortezomib dose exceeds the conventional ceiling DLT rate of 20% to 33%. Retrospective analysis of trial data provides an opportunity for dose optimization of MTAs. Future dose-finding studies of MTAs should take into account late-onset toxicities to ensure that a tolerable dose is identified for future efficacy and comparative trials. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient.

  17. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  18. Decomposition analysis of differential dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, Frank van den

    2006-01-01

    Dose volume histograms are a common tool to assess the value of a treatment plan for various forms of radiation therapy treatment. The purpose of this work is to introduce, validate, and apply a set of tools to analyze differential dose volume histograms by decomposing them into physically and clinically meaningful normal distributions. A weighted sum of the decomposed normal distributions (e.g., weighted dose) is proposed as a new measure of target dose, rather than the more unstable point dose. The method and its theory are presented and validated using simulated distributions. Additional validation is performed by analyzing simple four field box techniques encompassing a predefined target, using different treatment energies inside a water phantom. Furthermore, two clinical situations are analyzed using this methodology to illustrate practical usefulness. A comparison of a treatment plan for a breast patient using a tangential field setup with wedges is compared to a comparable geometry using dose compensators. Finally, a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculation is refined using this decomposition. The NTCP calculation is performed on a liver as organ at risk in a treatment of a mesothelioma patient with involvement of the right lung. The comparison of the wedged breast treatment versus the compensator technique yields comparable classical dose parameters (e.g., conformity index ≅1 and equal dose at the ICRU dose point). The methodology proposed here shows a 4% difference in weighted dose outlining the difference in treatment using a single parameter instead of at least two in a classical analysis (e.g., mean dose, and maximal dose, or total dose variance). NTCP-calculations for the mesothelioma case are generated automatically and show a 3% decrease with respect to the classical calculation. The decrease is slightly dependant on the fractionation and on the α/β-value utilized. In conclusion, this method is able to distinguish clinically

  19. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  20. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  1. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  2. Radiation absorbed dose from medically administered radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.; Kaul, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for medical examinations is increasing. Surveys carried out in West Berlin show a 20% average yearly increase in such examinations. This implies an increased genetic and somatic radiation exposure of the population in general. Determination of radiation exposure of the population as well as of individual patients examined requires a knowledge of the radiation dose absorbed by each organ affected by each examination. An extensive survey of the literature revealed that different authors reported widely different dose values for the same defined examination methods and radiopharmaceuticals. The reason for this can be found in the uncertainty of the available biokinetic data for dose calculations and in the application of various mathematical models to describe the kinetics and calculation of organ doses. Therefore, the authors recalculated some of the dose values published for radiopharmaceuticals used in patients by applying biokinetic data obtained from exponential models of usable metabolism data reported in the literature. The calculation of organ dose values was done according to the concept of absorbed fractions in its extended form. For all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine the energy dose values for the most important organs (ovaries, testicles, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys, skeleton, total body or residual body) were recalculated and tabulated for the gonads, skeleton and critical or examined organs respectively. These dose values are compared with those reported in the literature and the reasons for the observed deviations are discussed. On the basis of recalculated dose values for the gonads and bone-marrow as well as on the basis of results of statistical surveys in West Berlin, the genetically significant dose and the somatically (leukemia) significant dose were calculated for 1970 and estimated for 1975. For 1970 the GSD was 0.2 mrad and the LSD was 0.7 mrad. For 1975 the GSD is estimated at < 0.5 mrad and the

  3. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution

  4. Exposure dose assessment using bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Shinichi

    1994-01-01

    Bioassay involves following steps: sampling, pre-treatment, chemical separation and counting of radioactivity. As bioassay samples, urines are usually used, although faecal analysis may be required in some occasions for example to assess intake of non-transferable radioactive materials. Nasal smear is a useful indicator of an inhalation case. Exhalation air is used to estimate the intake of tritiated water. Sample pre-treatment includes evaporation for concentration, wet ashing, dry ashing and co-precipitation. After adding small amount of nitric acid, the sample can be concentrated by 1/10 of initial volume, which may be used to identify γ-emitters. As the pre-treatment of urine, wet ashing is used for example for analysis of Pu, and co-precipitation is used for example for analysis of Sr. Dry ashing by electric furnace is usually adopted for faecal samples. Methods of chemical separation depend on the radionuclide(s) to be analysed. The detection limit depends also on radionuclide, and for example typical detection limits are 0.4Bq / l (volume of urine sample) for 89 Sr or 90 Sr, and 0.01 Bq / l with urine and 0.01 Bq per sample with faeces for 238 Pu, 239 Pu or 241 Am. Simpler methods can be used for some radionuclides: For example, radioactivity concentration of tritium can be determined by liquid scintillation counting of urine or condensed water from exhaled air, and natural uranium in urine can be quantified by using fluorometric method. In some circumstances, gross-α or gross-β analyses are useful for quick estimation. To estimate intakes by inhalation or by ingestion from bioassay results and to assess the committed dose equivalent, commonly available bases are the relevant publications by the ICRP and domestic guides and manuals that conform to the radiation protection regulations. (author)

  5. Validation of radiation dose estimations in VRdose: comparing estimated radiation doses with observed radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystad, Espen; Sebok, Angelia; Meyer, Geir

    2004-04-01

    The Halden Virtual Reality Centre has developed work-planning software that predicts the radiation exposure of workers in contaminated areas. To validate the accuracy of the predicted radiation dosages, it is necessary to compare predicted doses to actual dosages. During an experimental study conducted at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) hall, the radiation exposure was measured for all participants throughout the test session, ref. HWR-681 [3]. Data from this experimental study have also been used to model tasks in the work-planning software and gather data for predicted radiation exposure. Two different methods were used to predict radiation dosages; one method used all radiation data from all the floor levels in the HBWR (all-data method). The other used only data from the floor level where the task was conducted (isolated data method). The study showed that the all-data method gave predictions that were on average 2.3 times higher than the actual radiation dosages. The isolated-data method gave predictions on average 0.9 times the actual dosages. (Author)

  6. Recommendations on dose buildup factors used in models for calculating gamma doses for a plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-09-01

    Calculations of external γ-doses from radioactivity released to the atmosphere have been made using different dose buildup factor formulas. Some of the dose buildup factor formulas are used by the Nordic countries in their respective γ-dose models. A comparison of calculated γ-doses using these dose buildup factors shows that the γ-doses can be significantly dependent on the buildup factor formula used in the calculation. Increasing differences occur for increasing plume height, crosswind distance, and atmospheric stability and also for decreasing downwind distance. It is concluded that the most accurate γ-dose can be calculated by use of Capo's polynomial buildup factor formula. Capo-coefficients have been calculated and shown in this report for γ-energies below the original lower limit given by Capo. (author)

  7. Trends in doses to radiation workers recorded on the Central Index of Dose Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenslade, E.; Kendall, G.M.; Fillary, K.; Bines, W.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the doses stored on the Central Index of Dose Information for the calendar years 1986, 1987 and 1988. Mean doses are low, and both mean doses and the proportion of workers exceeding 15 mSv in a year are decreasing with time. Underground miners are the occupational group receiving the highest doses, though in this and other relatively high dose groups the exposures are falling with time. Only 6% of workers are female and their average individual dose is about half that of men. Patterns of employment are different for women and men but there is a tendency for women to receive lower doses than men even within the same occupation. (author)

  8. Comparative study of eye dose and chest dose received during radiopharmaceutical production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chindarkar, A.S.; Chavan, S.V.; Sawant, D.K.; Sahoo, L.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Sneha, C.; Sachdev, S.S.; Dey, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical laboratory, BRIT, Vashi produces different radiopharmaceuticals of 131 I, 153 Sm, 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and 177 Lu. Principle gamma energies of these isotopes vary from 103 to 740 KeV and their maximum beta energies vary from 384 to 1214 KeV. In the light of the revised eye lens dose limit recommended in IAEA Basic Safety Standard Interim Edition No. GSR Part 3 (IAEA-2011), the study of radiation dose for eye lens was carried out using CaSO 4 : Dy based Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). This TLD was worn at center of the forehead to measure eye lens dose. This TLD dose was then compared with chest TLD dose to deduce any correlation between these TLD doses. These TLD doses were assessed on quarterly basis. Eight quarter data of these TLD doses were compared

  9. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  10. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  11. Environmental impact statement analysis: dose methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    Standardized sections and methodologies are being developed for use in environmental impact statements (EIS) for activities to be conducted on the Hanford Reservation. Five areas for standardization have been identified: routine operations dose methodologies, accident dose methodology, Hanford Site description, health effects methodology, and socioeconomic environment for Hanford waste management activities

  12. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, M J; Abreu-Luis, J; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada-Martinez, E [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm{sup 2} in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  13. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  14. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation

  15. Update on electroconvulsive therapy dosing strategies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    In order to make an “evidence based” decision on the stimulus dose question .... based model would more accurately have dosed the older pa- .... ECT “dosing” to be established regardless of the induction agent .... the arguments over seizure threshold are a waste of energy and .... Examples here include lack of funding for.

  16. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  17. Howard Hughes Medical Institute dose assessment survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.L.; McDougall, M.M.; Barkley, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Biomedical science researchers often express frustration that health physics practices vary widely between individual institutions. A survey examining both internal and external dose assessment practices was devised and mailed to fifty institutions supporting biomedical science research. The results indicate that health physics dose assessment practices and policies are highly variable. Factors which may contribute to the degree of variation are discussed. 2 tabs

  18. Dose coefficients for individual occupationally exposed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', aiming its application to the dose calculation, with purposes of conformity verification with limits and restrictions of doses and level of reference for individual occupationally exposed, according to the express in its section 5

  19. Image quality and dose in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurik, A.G.; Jessen, K.A.; Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the patient during CT is relatively high, and it is therefore important to optimize the dose so that it is as low as possible but still consistent with required diagnostic image quality. There is no established method for measuring diagnostic image quality; therefore, a set of image quality criteria which must be fulfilled for optimal image quality was defined for the retroperitoneal space and the mediastinum. The use of these criteria for assessment of image quality was tested based on 113 retroperitoneal and 68 mediastinal examinations performed in seven different CT units. All the criteria, except one, were found to be usable for measuring diagnostic image quality. The fulfilment of criteria was related to the radiation dose given in the different departments. By examination of the retroperitoneal space the effective dose varied between 5.1 and 20.0 mSv (milli Sievert), and there was a slight correlation between dose and high percent of ''yes'' score for the image quality criteria. For examination of the mediastinum the dose range was 4.4-26.5 mSv, and there was no significant increment of image quality at high doses. The great variation of dose at different CT units was due partly to differences regarding the examination procedure, especially the number of slices and the mAs (milli ampere second), but inherent dose variation between different scanners also played a part. (orig.). With 6 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  1. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  2. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  3. External dose distributions of exposure to natural uranium slab for calibration of beta absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lishu

    1987-01-01

    The depth dose distributions and uniformity of beta radiation fields from a natural uranium slab in equilibration were measured using a tissue equivalent extrapolation chamber and film dosimeter. The advantages for calibration of enviromental dose instument or survey meter and personal dosimeter, for routine monitoring in terms of directional dose equivalent and superficial individual dose equivalent were summarized. Finally, the values measured agree well with that of theoretical calculation

  4. External dose distributions of exposure to natural uranium slab for calibration of beta absorbed dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishu, Chen

    1987-05-01

    The depth dose distributions and uniformity of beta radiation fields from a natural uranium slab in equilibration were measured using a tissue equivalent extrapolation chamber and film dosimeter. The advantages for calibration of enviromental dose instument or survey meter and personal dosimeter, for routine monitoring in terms of directional dose equivalent and superficial individual dose equivalent were summarized. Finally, the values measured agree well with that of theoretical calculation.

  5. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  6. Fetal dose evaluation during breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antypas, Christos; Sandilos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Balafouta, Ersi; Karinou, Eleftheria; Kollaros, Nikos; Vlahos, Lambros

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to estimate the radiation dose delivered to the fetus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A 45-year woman was treated for left breast cancer using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposing tangential unwedged fields. Daily dose was 2.3 Gy at 95% isodose line given by two fields/day, 5 days/week. A total dose of 46 Gy was given in 20 fractions over a 4-week period. Pregnancy confirmed during the second therapeutic week. Treatment lasted between the second and sixth gestation week. Radiation dose to fetus was estimated from in vivo and phantom measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters and an ionization chamber. In vivo measurements were performed by inserting either a catheter with TL dosimeters or ionization chamber into the patient's rectum. Phantom measurements were performed by simulating the treatment conditions on an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: TLD measurements (in vivo and phantom) revealed fetal dose to be 0.085% of the tumor dose, corresponding to a cumulative fetal dose of 3.9 cGy for the entire treatment of 46 Gy. Chamber measurements (in vivo and phantom) revealed a fetal dose less than the TLD result: 0.079 and 0.083% of the tumor dose corresponding to cumulative fetal dose of 3.6 cGy and 3.8 cGy for in vivo and phantom measurement, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that the cumulative dose delivered to the unshielded fetus was 3.9 cGy for a 46 Gy total tumor dose. The estimated fetal dose is low compared to the total tumor dose given due to the early stage of pregnancy, the large distance between fundus-radiation field, and the fact that no wedges and/or lead blocks were used. No deterministic biological effects of radiation on the live-born embryo are expected. The lifetime risk for radiation-induced fatal cancer is higher than the normal incidence, but is considered as inconsequential

  7. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B; Catalan-Acosta, A; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Perez-Martin, C [Servicio de Ingenieria Biomedica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Armas-Trujillo, D de [Servicio de Cardiologia, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  8. Dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.M.; Einsiedel, P.; Langenberg, F.; Lui, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in CT technology have produced brighter X-ray sources. gantries capable of increased rotation speeds, faster scintil lation materials arranged into multiple rows of detectors, and associated advances in 3D reconstruction methods. These innovations have allowed multi-detector CT to be turned to the diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities and compliment traditional imaging techniques such as coronary angiography. This study examines the cardiac imaging solution offered by the Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source 64 slice CT scanner. Our dose reduction strategies involve optimising the data acquisition protocols according to diagnostic task, patient size and heart rate. The relationship between scan parameters, image quality and patient dose is examined and verified against measurements with phantoms representing the standard size patient. The dose reduction strategies are reviewed with reference to survey results of patient dose. Some cases allow the insertion of shielding to protect radiosensitive organs, and results are presented to quantify the dose saving.

  9. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook

  10. Methods of bone marrow dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboaco, R.C.

    1982-02-01

    Several methods of bone marrow dose calculation for photon irradiation were analised. After a critical analysis, the author proposes the adoption, by the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/CNEN, of Rosenstein's method for dose calculations in Radiodiagnostic examinations and Kramer's method in case of occupational irradiation. It was verified by Eckerman and Simpson that for monoenergetic gamma emitters uniformly distributed within the bone mineral of the skeleton the dose in the bone surface can be several times higher than dose in skeleton. In this way, is also proposed the Calculation of tissue-air ratios for bone surfaces in some irradiation geometries and photon energies to be included in the Rosenstein's method for organ dose calculation in Radiodiagnostic examinations. (Author) [pt

  11. Dose constraints, what are they now?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a source-related dose constraint was first introduced in ICPR publication 60. The idea was to provide a number that individual exposures from a single, specific source should not exceed, and below which optimisation of protection should take place. Dose constraints were applied to occupational and public exposures from practices. In order to simplify and clarify the ICRP's recommendations, the latest draft, RPO5, presents dose constraints again, and with the same meaning as in publication 60. However, the dose constraints are now applied in all situations, not just practices. This new approach does provide simplification, in that a single concept is applied to all types of exposures (normal situations, accident situations, and existing situations). However, the approach and numerical values that are selected by regulatory authorities for the application of the concept, particularly in normal situations which are also subject to dose limits, will be crucial to the implementation of the system of radiological protection. (author)

  12. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  13. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraeni, N; Hiswara, E; Kartikasari, D; Waris, A; Haryanto, F

    2016-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits. (paper)

  14. Occupational dose at Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, F.; Taguchi, R.; Kano, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is going to start the operation in service as the first large-scale commercial reprocessing plant of spent fuels that has annual reprocessing quantity of 800tU pr in maximum. The occupational external exposure is controlled for the purpose of keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable, and it is monitored by the personal dosimeter. On the other hand, the occupational internal exposure is controlled for the purpose of preventing, and it is monitored by the periodical evaluation of internal dose from the radioactive concentration in air of workplace. The individual doses of radiation workers are less than the dose limits in the statute and our lower management values enough. Dose data will be stored continuously and the rational management method will be examined. (author)

  15. Dose calculations for severe LWR accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, T.S.; Martin, J.A. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents a set of precalculated doses based on a set of postulated accident releases and intended for use in emergency planning and emergency response. Doses were calculated for the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident categories of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) using the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) code. Whole body and thyroid doses are presented for a selected set of weather cases. For each weather case these calculations were performed for various times and distances including three different dose pathways - cloud (plume) shine, ground shine and inhalation. During an emergency this information can be useful since it is immediately available for projecting offsite radiological doses based on reactor accident sequence information in the absence of plant measurements of emission rates (source terms). It can be used for emergency drill scenario development as well

  16. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B.; Catalan-Acosta, A.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Martin, C.; Armas-Trujillo, D. de

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  17. Population dose assessment from radiodiagnosis in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serro, R.; Carreiro, J.V.; Galvao, J.P.; Reis, R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of radiodiagnostic installations was carried out in Portugal covering 75 premises including public hospitals, local and regional public health centres. A total of 175 X ray tubes was surveyed using the new NEXT methodology covering data on premises, tube and operator, and projection. Average value of voltage, current-time product, HVL, ratio of beam area to film area and source to film distance for the eleven most frequent projections are reported as well as the skin entrance exposure and the doses to some organs. The weighted average dose values per projection and for the different organs allowed an estimate of the whole-body dose per caput. From the gonadal doses the genetic significant dose was also estimated

  18. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  19. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    In any application involving the use of ionizing radiation in humans, risks and benefits must be properly evaluated and balanced. Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine, particularly in the treatment of hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies. This has heightened interest in the need for radiation dose calculations and challenged the scientific community to develop more patient-specific and relevant dose models. Consideration of radiation dose in such studies is central to efforts to maximize dose to tumor while sparing normal tissues. In many applications, a significant absorbed dose may be received by some radiosensitive organs, particularly the active marrow. This talk will review the methods and models used in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, and discuss some current trends and challenges in this field

  20. Manual of dose evaluation from atmospheric releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvaikar, V V; Abrol, V [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1978-07-01

    The problem of dose evaluation from atmospheric releases is reduced to simple arithmetic by giving tables of concentrations and time integrated concentrations for instantaneous plumes and long time (1 year), sector averaged plumes for distances upto 10 km, effective release heights of upto 200 m and the six Pasquill stability classes. Correction factors for decay, depletion due to deposition and rainout are also given. Inhalation doses, immersion doses and contamination levels can be obtained from these by using multiplicative factors tabulated for various isotopes of significance. Tables of external gamma doses from plume are given separately for various gamma energies. Tables are also given to evaluate external beta and gamma dose rates from contaminated surfaces. The manual also discusses the basic diffusion model relevant to the problem. (author)

  1. High-dose irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies performed on behalf of the International Project on Food Irradiation in the period from 1971 until 1980 resulted in the concluding statement that ''.the irradiation of any food commodity up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy presents no toxicological hazard; hence, toxicological testing of foods so treated is no longer required.'' Since then, licenses for food irradiation have been restricted to this maximum dose in any country applying this technology. Further testing programmes have been carried out investigating the wholesomeness or hazards of high-dose irradiation, but there has been little demand so far by the food industry for licensing of high-dose irradiation, as there is only a small range of products whose irradiation at higher doses offers advantages for given, intended use. These include eg. spices, dried herbs, meat products in flexible pouch packagings for astronauts, or patients with immune deficiencies. (orig./CB) [de

  2. Paediatric doses from diagnostic radiology in Victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, T.J.; Cardillo, I.; Einsiedel, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study examines doses to paediatric patients from diagnostic radiology. Measurements were made at 29 hospitals and private radiology practices in the state of Victoria. Entrance skin doses in air were measured for the exposure factors used by hospital radiology departments and private radiology practices for a standard size 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old child, for the following procedures: chest AP/PA, lat; abdomen AP; pelvis AP; lumbar spine AP, lat; and skull AP, lat. There was a large range of doses for each particular procedure and age group. Factors contributing to the range of doses were identified. Guidance levels for paediatric radiology based on the third quartile value of the skin entrance doses have been recommended and are compared with guidance levels. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  3. Reduced oxygen enhancement ratio at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen depletion rate in cell suspensions was measured using a Clark electrode. It was found that under experimental conditions used in this laboratory for hypoxic irradiations, the oxygen levels before the start of irradiation are always below 0.1μm, the levels which could give any significant enhancement to radiation inactivation by x-rays. The measured O/sub 2/ depletion rates were comparable to those reported in the literature. Chinese hamster cells (CHO) were made hypoxic by gas exchange, combined with metabolic consumption of oxygen by cells at 37 0 C. Full survival curves were determined in the dose range 0 to 3Gy using the low dose survival assay. The results confirmed the authors' earlier finding that the OER decreases at low doses. The authors therefore believe that the dose-dependent OER is a true radiobiological phenomenon and not an artifact of the experimental method used in the low dose survival assay

  4. Panoramic irradiator dose mapping with pin photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Bueno, Carmen Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the possibility of using commercial silicon PIN photodiodes (Siemens, SFH 00206) for dose mapping in the Panoramic Irradiator facility at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The chosen photodiode, that is encased in 1.2 mm thickness polymer layer, displays promising dosimetric characteristics such as small size (sensitive area of 7.00 mm 2 ), high sensitivity and low dark current (≅ 300 pA, at 0 V) together with low-cost and wide availability. The Panoramic facility is an irradiator Type II with absorbed dose certificated by International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) offered by the International Agency Energy Atomic (IAEA). The charge registered by the diode as a function of the absorbed dose was in excellent agreement with that one calibrated by IDAS. Besides this, the easy handling and fast response of the SFH00206 diode compared to Fricke chemical dosimeters encouraged us to perform dose mapping around the source. (author)

  5. Drug dosing in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Abramson, Stuart

    2005-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions. Drug dosing in these patients often proves to be a difficult task. Renal dysfunction-induced changes in human pathophysiology regularly results may alter medication pharmacodynamics and handling. Several pharmacokinetic parameters are adversely affected by CKD, secondary to a reduced oral absorption and glomerular filtration; altered tubular secretion; and reabsorption and changes in intestinal, hepatic, and renal metabolism. In general, drug dosing can be accomplished by multiple methods; however, the most common recommendations are often to reduce the dose or expand the dosing interval, or use both methods simultaneously. Some medications need to be avoided all together in CKD either because of lack of efficacy or increased risk of toxicity. Nevertheless, specific recommendations are available for dosing of certain medications and are an important resource, because most are based on clinical or pharmacokinetic trials.

  6. Dose limits to the eye lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sion, N.

    2016-01-01

    Protecting the human body from the effects of ionizing radiation is essential to forestall stochastic effects and require placing limits on the effective dose. Dose limits on specific organs are also necessary to reduce the deterministic effects and tissue reactions. The standard for radiation protection was ISO 15382 (2002) which mainly dealt with beta radiation for nuclear power plant workers. Clearly an update is required to allow for new technology and the proliferative use of radiation in medical practices. There is a need for more explicit radiation monitoring to operators and staff. ICRP118 (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Ref. 1, evolved their recommendations to include eye lens doses as a follow on to their publication 103 and to focus on radiation exposures. It provides updated estimates of 'practical' threshold doses for tissue injury at the level of 1% incidence. This paper discusses the current status and the recommendation for a drastic reduction of the dose limit to the eye lens. (author)

  7. Potential gonadal dose from leakage radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author draws attention to the potential dangers of leakage radiation from mobile image intensifier units, and points out that during interventional urological procedures, radiation from below the urologist's knees may irradiate male gonads without being intercepted by protective aprons. Results are presented for a Shimatzu WHA mobile II, phantom doses being measured with an ionization chamber. Dose rates measured in the male gonad position were compared with rates at waist level behind a 0.35 mm lead equivalent shielding and dose rates at collar level outside the lead apron. Results are also presented of a study on the effect on gonad dose of a) adding 0.7 mm lead shielding to the tube housing and b) adding 0.7 mm lead and removing the spacer cone to reduce scatter. Results show that it is possible for gonad doses to be comparable with those assumed for the eyes, rather than the body. (Author)

  8. The national dose registry of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, when the National Dosimetry Service was established by the Department of National Health and Welfare, a system of centralized records was created as an integral part of the new service. Over the last few years the dose record system has expanded in size and content, and improvements have been made in the physical methods of record storage. In addition to the 250 000 individual dose records from the National Dosimetry Service, the National Dose Registry now includes internal tritium and external doses from nuclear generating stations, and radon daughter exposures submitted by uranium mining companies. With the increase in the use of radiation in the medical, industrial and research fields, it is becoming more important to have a comprehensive and readily accessible centralized record system. The Canadian National Dose Registry is particularly suited for continuing health risk studies of radiation workers and provides a base for future epidemiological studies

  9. Effect of nitrogen doses on disease severity and watermelon yield Influência de doses de nitrogênio na severidade de doenças e na produtividade da melancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil R dos Santos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is an important step for watermelon (Citrullus lanatus production due to its influence over yield, fruit quality, and disease severity. Currently, the gummy stem blight (Didymella bryoniae and the downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis can be taken as the most important watermelon diseases, since they impose severe impairment to the crop. Furthermore, studies focusing on plant responses to nitrogen fertilization regarding fruit yield and quality, and disease resistance are rare. Hence, the present study aimed at evaluating the effect of nitrogen doses on fruit yield and quality, and on disease prevalence in watermelon. Two experiments were carried out at the Universidade Federal de Tocantins, employing sprinkler irrigation, in an area previously used to grow watermelon. The experimental design was blocks at random, with five treatments (N doses, applied twice as side-dressing, in kg ha-1, as follows: T1= control treatment without N, T2= 20, T3= 40, T4= 80, and T5= 120, and four replications. Urea (45% N was used as the N source. In the first assay, the highest fruit yield and average weight were observed when 40 kg ha-1 of N were applied. The highest severity of the gummy stem blight was observed when the highest nitrogen doses were applied (80 and 120 kg ha-1. In the second assay, the highest severity levels of the gummy stem blight, as well as of mildew, were observed again when N doses were the highest (80 and 120 kg ha-1. The lowest severity levels for both diseases were observed in the control treatment.A adubação nitrogenada é importante para a cultura da melancia (Citrullus lanatus por afetar diretamente a produtividade, a qualidade dos frutos e a severidade de doenças. Atualmente, o crestamento gomoso (Didymella bryoniae e o míldio (Pseudoperonospora cubensis podem ser consideradas as doenças mais importantes da melancia devido aos prejuízos que podem causar na lavoura. Estudos envolvendo a aplicação de

  10. Dose banding as an alternative to body surface area-based dosing of chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chatelut (Etienne); M.L. White-Koning (M.); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); F. Puisset (F.); S.D. Baker (Sharyn); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Dose banding is a recently suggested dosing method that uses predefined ranges (bands) of body surface area (BSA) to calculate each patients dose by using a single BSA-value per band. Thus, drugs with sufficient long-term stability can be prepared in advance. The main

  11. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  12. Assessment of a new p-Mosfet usable as a dose rate insensitive gamma dose sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettese, F.; Donichak, C.; Bourgeault, P.

    1995-01-01

    Dosimetric response of unbiased MOS devices has been assessed at dose rates greater than 2000 cGy/h. Application have been made to a personal dosemeter / dose rate meter to measure the absorbed tissue dose received in the case of acute external irradiation. (D.L.)

  13. Estimation of dose from chromosome aberration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deping

    1990-01-01

    The methods and skills of evaluating dose from correctly scored shromsome aberration rate are presented, and supplemented with corresponding BASIC computer code. The possibility and preventive measures of excessive probability of missing score of the aberrations in some of the current routine score methods are discussed. The use of dose-effect relationship with exposure time correction factor G in evaluating doses and their confidence intervals, dose estimation in mixed n-γ exposure, and identification of high by nonuniform acute exposure to low LET radiation and its dose estimation are discussed in more detail. The difference of estimated dose due to whether the interaction between subleisoms produced by n and γ have been taken into account is examined. In fitting the standard dose-aberration rate curve, proper weighing of experiment points and comparison with commonly accepted values are emphasised, and the coefficient of variation σ y √y of the aberration rate y as a function of dose and exposure time is given. In appendix I and II, the dose-aberration rate formula is derived from dual action theory, and the time variation of subleisom is illustrated and in appendix III, the estimation of dose from scores of two different types of aberrations (of other related score) is illustrated. Two computer codes are given in appendix IV, one is a simple code, the other a complete code, including the fitting of standard curve. the skills of using compressed data storage, and the production of simulated 'data ' for testing the curve fitting procedure are also given

  14. Local dose assessment for a contaminated wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, J.; Chaptinel, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Contaminated wounds present a great variability concerning the type of lesion. Assessment of the local dose is one amongst other factors for a decision as to the surgical operation. A simple model has been used to calculate the doses in a representative volume, that of a phalanx for instance. The dose rates are given for current radionuclides. The method of calculation is enough simple in order to allow the practitioners to use it in situations involving other radionuclides. Committed dose depends on the biological half-life which can be estimated from the local measurements. Some examples of calculation of committed dose are given considering half-lives characteristic of the compound. Transposition of the dose to the local risk is easy for the non-stochastic risk. Conversely, this is not the case for the risk of chronic inflammation or cancer. The latter question could only be solved by a feedback based on the analysis of real till now observed cases, nevertheless taking into account the fact that the available data are generally not so easy to make use for establishing an unquestionable dose - effect relation. A critical issue remains open as to the use of these doses for their comparison to the regulatory limits and for the subsequent decisions in case of exceeding the limits. The actual impact of an irradiation, especially by alpha particles, is not linked to the calculated dose in a simple and direct way. This question needs further consideration and perhaps a practical guide concerning this topic would be useful. The anatomical (surgical side effects), psychological and professional consequences should have a large weight relatively to the doses, obviously except for the cases, involving actually large contamination. (authors)

  15. Comparison of proton and photon dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable work, as yet largely theoretical, in developing ways to improve the dose distributions which can be achieved with x-rays. Foremost among these developments are the use of non-coplanar beam directions, the use of intensity-modulated beams, and the implementation of computer-controlled delivery of complex plans using new beam modifiers such as multi-leaf collimators and beam scanners. One way of improving the dose distributions which have been achieved with conventional radiations is to use protons, with their quite different physical characteristics but very similar radiobiological properties as compared with supervoltage x-rays. Some substantial experience has been gained in the use of protons which has confirmed clinically that better results have been obtained as a result of their better dose distributions. Indeed, it is fair to say that the advantages which protons have demonstrated are, in large part, responsible for the renewed interest in improving the dose distributions from all radiation modalities. So much better are the dose distributions which the new techniques, mentioned above, offer that there is the impression that, with their use, photons can deliver dose distributions as good as can be obtained with protons. In this paper, the extent of the possible improvement will be discussed. It will be suggested that the integral dose is relatively little affected by the treatment technique - so that the lower normal tissue doses which the new approaches offer is almost always at the price of delivering dose to a larger volume. Protons can be matched pencil beam for pencil beam with photons - and then almost always deliver substantially less dose outside the target volume. Ultimately, the clinical importance of the differences will have to decided by clinical trial

  16. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  17. A novel dose uncertainty model and its application for dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Chung Heetaek; Liu Chihray; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2005-01-01

    Based on statistical approach, a novel dose uncertainty model was introduced considering both nonspatial and spatial dose deviations. Non-space-oriented uncertainty is mainly caused by dosimetric uncertainties, and space-oriented dose uncertainty is the uncertainty caused by all spatial displacements. Assuming these two parts are independent, dose difference between measurement and calculation is a linear combination of nonspatial and spatial dose uncertainties. Two assumptions were made: (1) the relative standard deviation of nonspatial dose uncertainty is inversely proportional to the dose standard deviation σ, and (2) the spatial dose uncertainty is proportional to the gradient of dose. The total dose uncertainty is a quadratic sum of the nonspatial and spatial uncertainties. The uncertainty model provides the tolerance dose bound for comparison between calculation and measurement. In the statistical uncertainty model based on a Gaussian distribution, a confidence level of 3σ theoretically confines 99.74% of measurements within the bound. By setting the confidence limit, the tolerance bound for dose comparison can be made analogous to that of existing dose comparison methods (e.g., a composite distribution analysis, a γ test, a χ evaluation, and a normalized agreement test method). However, the model considers the inherent dose uncertainty characteristics of the test points by taking into account the space-specific history of dose accumulation, while the previous methods apply a single tolerance criterion to the points, although dose uncertainty at each point is significantly different from others. Three types of one-dimensional test dose distributions (a single large field, a composite flat field made by two identical beams, and three-beam intensity-modulated fields) were made to verify the robustness of the model. For each test distribution, the dose bound predicted by the uncertainty model was compared with simulated measurements. The simulated

  18. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Biase, Steven J.; Wallner, Kent; Tralins, Kevin; Sutlief, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence. Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy) with 46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Axial CT images were acquired 2 to 4 hours postoperatively for postimplant dosimetry. Because the NVBs cannot be visualized on CT, NVB calculation points were determined according to previously published anatomic descriptions. Bilateral NVB points were considered to lie posterior-laterally, approximately 2 mm from the prostatic capsule. NVB doses were recorded bilaterally, at 0.5-cm intervals from the prostatic base. Results: For Pd-103, the average NVB doses ranged from 150 Gy to 260 Gy, or 130% to 226% of the prescription dose. For I-125, the average NVB dose ranged from 200 Gy to 325 Gy, or 140% to 225% of the prescription dose. These was no consistent relationship between the NVB dose and the distance from the prostatic base. To examine the possible effect of minor deviations of our calculation points from the true NVB location, we performed NVB calculations at points 2 mm medial or lateral from the NVB calculation point in 8 patients. Doses at these alternate calculation points were comparable, although there was greater variability with small changes in the calculation point if sources were located outside the capsule, near the NVB calculation point. Three patients who developed early postimplant impotence had maximal NVB doses that far exceeded the average values. Conclusions: In the next few years, we hope to clarify the role of high NVB radiation doses on potency, by correlating NVB dose calculations with a large number of patients enrolled in an ongoing I-125 versus Pd-103 trial for early-stage patients

  19. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60 Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm 3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60 Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma

  20. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  1. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  2. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  3. Patient doses in digital cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Ogden, K.M.; Roskopf, M.L.; Phadke, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this pilot study, we obtained estimates of entrance skin doses and the corresponding effective doses to patients undergoing digital cardiac imaging procedures on a GE Advantx LC/LP Plus system. Data were obtained for six patients undergoing diagnostic examinations and six patients who had interventional procedures. For each patient examination, radiographic techniques for fluoroscopic and digital cine imaging were recorded, together with the irradiation geometry. The projection with the highest exposure resulted in an average skin dose of 0.64 ± 0.41 Gy (maximum of 1.6 Gy). The average patient skin doses taking into account overlapping projections was 1.1 ± 0.8 Gy (maximum of 3.0 Gy). The exposure area product (EAP) incident on the patient was converted into the energy imparted to the patient and the corresponding effective dose. The average patient effective dose was 28 ± 14 mSv (maximum 62 mSv), with the resultant average fatal cancer risk estimated to be of the order of 8x10 -3 . Average doses for interventional procedures in cardiac imaging are higher than those associated with diagnostic examinations by approximately 50%. (author)

  4. Dose profile of a dental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Borges, D. da; Lava, D.D.; Moreira, M. de L.; Ferreira Guimaraes, A.C.; Silva, L. Fernandes da

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the dose profile is important to classify the level of danger which the individuals are exposed (considering their positioning) in dental facilities. From this, this paper aims to present a methodology capable of mapping the dose within dental rooms in three dimensions. The methodology used for dose mapping in conjunction with techniques for calculating shielding for dental facilities, provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), form a complete system able to generate meaningful data on the safety of occupationally Exposed Individuals (IOEs) and of the public. As the dose is strongly dependent on the distance, the estimated value of the initial dose was made in the isocenter of the source. This value was adopted because the model of dose calculus tends to infinity when it is desired to analyze points very close of the source. The model of room to be presented, as a case of illustration of the methodology, was arbitrarily constructed to generate better understanding of the problem. Its inclusion in the calculus was made through discretizations performed with the aid of high-performance computers. This discretizations allowed the obtain of dose values for an infinitesimal distance after the start point. (authors)

  5. Low dose irradiation and biological defense mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Tsutomu; Sagan, L.A.; Aoyama, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    It has been generally accepted in the context of radiation protection that ionizing radiation has some adverse effect even at low doses. However, epidemiological studies of human populations cannot definitively show its existence or absence. Furthermore, recent studies of populations living in areas of different background radiation levels reported some decrease in adverse health effects at high background levels. Genetic studies of atomic bomb survivors failed to produce statistically significant findings on the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. A British study however, suggests that a father's exposure to low dose radiation on the job may increase his children's risk of leukemia. On the other hand, many experimental studies have raised the possibility that low doses of ionizing radiation may not be harmful or may even produce stimulating or adaptive responses. The term 'hormesis' has come to be used to describe these phenomena produced by low doses of ionizing radiation when they were beneficial for the organisms studied. At the end of the International Conference on Low Dose Irradiation one conclusion appeared to be justified: radiation produces an adaptive response, though it is not universally detected yet. The conference failed to obtain any consensus on risk assessment at low doses, but raised many problems to be dealt with by future studies. The editors therefore believe that the Proceedings will be useful for all scientists and people concerned with radiation protection and the biological effects of low-dose irradiation

  6. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C.

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  7. Continuing education: online monitoring of haemodialysis dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartia, Aarne

    2018-01-25

    Kt/V urea reflects the efficacy of haemodialysis scaled to patient size (urea distribution volume). The guidelines recommend monthly Kt/V measurements based on blood samples. Modern haemodialysis machines are equipped with accessories monitoring the dose online at every session without extra costs, blood samples and computers. To describe the principles, devices, benefits and shortcomings of online monitoring of haemodialysis dose. A critical literature overview and discussion. UV absorbance methods measure Kt/V, ionic dialysance Kt (product of clearance and treatment time; cleared volume without scaling). Both are easy and useful methods, but comparison is difficult due to problems in scaling of the dialysis dose to the patient's size. The best dose estimation method is the one which predicts the quality of life and survival most accurately. There is some evidence on the predictive value of ionic dialysance Kt, but more documentation is required on the UV method. Online monitoring is a useful tool in everyday quality assurance, but blood samples are still required for more accurate kinetic modelling. After reading this article the reader should be able to: Understand the elements of the Kt/V equation for dialysis dose. Compare and contrast different methods of measurement of dialysis dose. Reflect on the importance of adequate dialysis dose for patient survival and life quality. © 2018 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  8. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  9. Comparison of computed tomography dose reporting software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, A.; Sun, Z.; Pongnapang, N.; Ng, K. H.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dose reporting software facilitates the estimation of doses to patients undergoing CT examinations. In this study, comparison of three software packages, i.e. CT-Expo (version 1.5, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany)), ImPACT CT Patients Dosimetry Calculator (version 0.99x, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org) and WinDose (version 2.1a, Wellhofer Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck (Germany)), has been made in terms of their calculation algorithm and the results of calculated doses. Estimations were performed for head, chest, abdominal and pelvic examinations based on the protocols recommended by European guidelines using single-slice CT (SSCT) (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Erlangen (Germany)) and multi-slice CT (MSCT) (Siemens Sensation 16, Erlangen (Germany)) for software-based female and male phantoms. The results showed that there are some differences in final dose reporting provided by these software packages. There are deviations of effective doses produced by these software packages. Percentages of coefficient of variance range from 3.3 to 23.4 % in SSCT and from 10.6 to 43.8 % in MSCT. It is important that researchers state the name of the software that is used to estimate the various CT dose quantities. Users must also understand the equivalent terminologies between the information obtained from the CT console and the software packages in order to use the software correctly. (authors)

  10. Occupational doses and impact on fusion economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustoe, J.; Currie, I.D.; Frias, M. Pascual

    2001-01-01

    As part of the SEAFP-99 programme, water cooled and helium cooled fusion power plant design concepts were assessed with regard to occupational doses and related availability and operating costs. Different design and management measures to reduce occupational doses were considered. This task assessed the existing designs and proposed extensions or changes, where required. For each significant contributor, possible methods were specified which could reduce the operator dose and outage time. Where this was the case expected; costs or savings incurred by the improvement were estimated. Overall, the use of a system to remove particulate corrosion product activity from the primary coolant was considered essential for the water-cooled variant. In addition, application of the most up-to-date ALARA techniques could make the estimated dose for the water-cooled conceptual design appreciably lower than earlier estimated. It was concluded that the water cooled conceptual design could meet the project design target for occupational dose of 0.7 p-Sv per GW(e). A survey of occupational doses from the UK AGR plants was also carried out. From this, it is judged that the helium cooled fusion plant conceptual design could meet the project design target for occupational dose of 0.7 p-Sv per GW(e) without the need for additional plant to reduce primary coolant activity levels

  11. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  12. Fetus dose estimate of a pregnant worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, P.; Espana, M.L.; Sevillano, D.; Minguez, C.; Ferrer, C.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    A female employee working in diagnostic radiology should take additional controls to protect the unborn child from ionizing radiations. The fetus is particularly sensitive to the effects of x-rays and, so, the determination of the equivalent dose to the unborn child is of interest for risk estimates from occupational exposures of the pregnant workers. The ian of this study is to develop a method for fetus dose estimate of a pregnant worker who participates in interventional radiology procedures. Factors for converting dosemeter readings to equivalent dose to the fetus have been measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry. Equivalent dose to the uterus is used to simulate the equivalent dose to the fetus during the first two months of pregnancy. Measurements at different depths are made to consider the variations in the position of the uterus between pregnant women. The normalized doses obtained are dependent on the beam quality. Accurate estimation of fetus doses due to occupational exposures can be made using the data provided in the current study. (Author)

  13. Dose evaluation and protection of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Takagi, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    This paper explained the effects of cosmic radiation on aircraft crews and astronauts, as well as related regulations. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the practice of radiation exposure management for the handling/storage of radon and materials containing natural radioactive substances, as well as for boarding jet aircraft and space flight. Common aircraft crew members are not subject to radiation exposure management in the USA and Japan. In the EU, the limit value is 6 mSv per year, and for the crew group exceeding this value, it is recommended to keep records containing appropriate medical examination results. Pregnant female crewmembers are required to keep an abdominal surface dose within 1 mSv. For astronauts, ICRP is in the stage of thinking about exposure management. In the USA, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement has set dose limits for 30 days, 1 year, and lifetime, and recommends lifetime effective dose limits against carcinogenic risk for each gender and age group. This is the setting of the dose limits so that the risk of carcinogenesis, to which space radiation exposure is considered to contribute, will reach 3%. For cosmic radiation environments at spacecraft inside and aircraft altitude, radiation doses can be calculated for astronauts and crew members, using the calculation methods for effective dose and dose equivalent for tissue. (A.O.)

  14. Radiologist and angiographic procedures. Absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryhus, M.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Kelsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation dose absorbed by the angiographer during angiographic procedures is of vital importance to the radiologist. Nevertheless, most articles on the subject are incomplete, and few measure gonadal dose. In this study, three TLDs were used for each of the following sites: radiologist's eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding apron, and hands. The average dose during carotid angiograms was 2.6, 4.1, 0.4, 4.7, and 7.1 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without .5 mm of lead shielding, and hands, respectively. Average dose during abdominal and peripheral vascular angiographic procedures was 5.2, 7.5, 1.2, 8.5, and 39.9 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding, and hands, respectively. A literature review demonstrates a significant reduction in radiation dose to the angiographer after the advent of automated injectors. Our measured doses for carotid angiography are compatible with contemporary reported values. There was poor correlation with fluoroscopy time and measured dose to the angiographer

  15. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr

  16. Dose assessment for brachytherapy with Henschke applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wu, Ching-Jung; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator is a major concern for the brachytherapy planning system (BPS) in recent years. To investigate dose impact owing to neglect of the metal shielding effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, BPS calculation, and film measurement have been performed for dose assessment in a water phantom. Additionally, a cylindrical air cavity representing the rectum was added into the MC simulation to study its effect on dose distribution. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) was used in this study to simulate the dose distribution using a mesh tally. This Monte Carlo simulation has been validated using the TG-43 data in a previous report. For the measurement, the Henschke applicator was placed in a specially-designed phantom, and Gafchromic films were inserted in the center plane for 2D dose assessment. Isodose distributions with and without the Henschke applicator by the MC simulation show significant deviation from those by the BPS. For MC simulation, the isodose curves shrank more significantly when the metal applicator was applied. For the impact of the added air cavity, the results indicate that it is hard to distinguish between with and without the cavity. Thus, the rectum cavity has little impact on the dose distribution around the Henschke applicator.

  17. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  18. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  19. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed

  20. On the definition of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before. - Highlights: • A stringent definition of absorbed dose is given. • This requires the definition of an irradiation and a suitable probability space. • A stringent definition is important for an understanding of the concept absorbed dose